Volume 126 Issue 94 kansan.

com Monday, March 24, 2014
UDK
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 13
CROSSWORD 5
CRYPTOQUIPS 5
OPINION 4
SPORTS 14
SUDOKU 5
Partly to mostly cloudy.
Some clouds early will
give way to clear skies.
Make an advising
appointment.
Index Don’t
Forget
Today’s
Weather
You know nothing, Jon Cloud.
HI: 50
LO: 26
ST. LOUIS BLUES
PAGE 14
Jayhawks fall to Cardinal in Round of 32
GEORGE MULLINIX AND MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
STUDENT SENATE
Jayhawkers candidates prepare for election
STUDYING: FINANCE
Student Senate University Affairs committee chair
Memorial Union Corporation voting member
Peer Leadership Consultant co-director of development at Student Involvement &
Leadership Center
Into the Streets Week coordinator at Center for Community Outreach
Sigma Kappa sorority member
STUDYING: MARKETING AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
Student Senate Multicultural Affairs chair
Hawks Helping Hawks marketing director
Queers and Allies social media coordinator
Commission on the Status of Women legislative affairs director
Multicultural Business Scholars Program tutor
JAYHAWKERS PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: MACKENZIE OATMAN JAYHAWKERS VICE PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE: MITCHELL COTA
EMILY DONOVAN
news@kansan.com
TURN TO PAGE 8 FOR A BIOGRAPHY ABOUT BOTH CANDIDATES
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor – production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor – digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT
Advertising director
Sean Powers
Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORS
News editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
Duncan McHenry
Sports editor
Blake Schuster
Associate sports editor
Ben Felderstein
Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
Special sections editor
Dani Brady
Head copy chief
Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
Casey Hutchins
Hayley Jozwiak
Paige Lytle
Design chiefs
Cole Anneberg
Trey Conrad
Designers
Ali Self
Clayton Rohlman
Hayden Parks
Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Associate photo editor
Michael Strickland
ADVISERS
Media director and
content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
Jon Schlitt
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 PAGE 2
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2000 Dole Human Development Center
1000 Sunnyside Avenue
Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather,
Jay?
What’s the
— weather.com
WEDNESDAY
HI: 63
LO: 44
Partly cloudy and
windy.
Wind-erfell.
TUESDAY
HI: 45
LO: 26
Generally sunny.
Winds NNW at 10 to
20 mph.
Spring is coming.
THURSDAY
HI: 66
LO: 35
Winds with showers
at times.
Spring’s Landing.
Calendar
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
What: Bold Aspirations Visitor and
Lecture Series: D. Kimbrough Oller
When: 4 p.m.
Where: Bruckmiller Room, Adams
Alumni Center
About: The topic is “emergence of
foundations for language.” The event
is free.
What: Amandla! A Revolution in Four
Part Harmony.
When: 6:30 p.m.
Where: Lied Center
About: A film about music’s role in
the African anti-apartheid move-
ment. A discussion moderated by
the Kansas African Studies Center,
Elizabeth MacGonagle, will follow.
What: An Evening with Cindy McCain
When: 7:30 p.m.
Where: Dole Institute of Politics
About: Cindy McCain will speak about
her experiences in philanthropy and
campaigning.
What: The Joy of Singing — The
James Ralston Memorial Concert
When: 7:30 p.m.
Where: Lied Center
About: Tickets are $6 for students,
children and seniors, $8 for adults.
What: In Our Time: Performance Art
Event
When: 10:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m.
Where: Art and Design Building
Gallery
About: Eli Gould’s work represents
the human relationship to time,
with each performance lasting the
duration of 10,000 heartbeats of
the performer. The event is free
to the public and will continue
throughout the week.
What: An Evening with Chancellor
Bernadette Gray-Little
When: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Where: Woodruff Auditorium,
Kansas Union
About: The Chancellor will speak
and be interviewed about her
career as a woman in leadership. A
reception will follow.
Monday, March 24 Tuesday, March 25 Wednesday, March 26 Thursday, March 27
What: Remembering Mandela:
Legacies and Liberation Struggles
When: 3 to 4 p.m.
Where: Sabatini Multicultural
Resource Center
About: A panel discussion with
South African Scholars Hannah
Britton, Surendra Bhana, Lorraine
Haricombe and Elene Cloete.
What: Employment Topic Workshop:
Job Search Strategies for Interna-
tional Students
When: 3:30 to 4:30 p.m.
Where: 149 Burge Union
About: Tips and strategies for
international students looking for a
job in the United States.
Don “Red Dog” Gardner
has spent his life working
with others creating a com-
munity to call his own, and
at 75, he’s not done yet.
Red Dog currently works
for the University of Kansas
as a senior ambassador, or
“class checker” as he calls it.
He and 15 other retired cit-
izens stand outside of class-
rooms to make sure that ath-
letes attend class.
Aside from being a class
checker, he and his wife are
in charge of Red Dog’s Dog
Days, a free year-round ft-
ness program open to the
Lawrence community.
Red Dog’s Dog Days start-
ed in June 1984 as a way to
prepare high school football
players for their fall season.
Eventually, it grew to include
the rest of the schools’ ath-
letes, and even their siblings
and parents. Today, nearly
30 years later, Red Dog’s Dog
Days is a chance for those in
Lawrence to participate in a
community workout.
Gardner says he enjoys see-
ing the progress people make
through the program.
“So far it’s still fun,” Gardner
said. “It’s just like athletes
and playing pro ball or sing-
ing or whatever. When it’s no
fun anymore you better get
out.”
Gardner’s nickname, “Red
Dog,” was given to him by
his seventh grade coach and
gym teacher, coach Duver.
Gardner said coach Duver
gave nicknames to everyone
and called all of the redheads
“red dog.”
“It never really bothered
me,” he said. “I mean, does
anybody like a nickname? It
just followed me. I couldn’t
shake it.”
As a child, Gardner lived in
three diferent foster homes
throughout Lawrence until
he was 10 years old.
“For my mother to keep me,
she divorced, which was a
real rarity back then, and put
me in a home,” Gardner said.
“One time she lived across
the street, one time across
the alley and another time
she was just about a block
away.”
Gardner was able to see his
mother every two weeks. He
said it was important to his
mom that he live and go to
school in Lawrence so they
could still see each other.
When he saw his mom they
would usually see a movie
and get ice cream.
“I still love ice cream,” he
said.
He said that not living with
his mother was just a part of
life.
“My line has always been
[that] I wasn’t abused or mis-
treated ever, but there wasn’t
any love either,” Gardner
said. “I feel that way because
it’s not like today. I wasn’t
knocked around or any-
thing.”
Once his mother remarried,
he was able to move in with
her and her new husband.
“It was great because I don’t
remember living with her
when I was two,” he said. “It
was great to just to be with
her.”
Gardner describes his mom
as a “strong-willed, auburn
lady.” He said she always had
the house in order and he
knew better than to talk back
to her. He was thankful to
be living with her again and
never wanted to make her
mad.
From being a class checker
to running Dog Days, Gard-
ner creates a community ev-
erywhere he goes.
When Gardner was asked
to be a class checker 11 years
ago, it meant that he would
get to be involved in sports
again, at least in some way.
He was a sports trainer at
Lawrence High School for
many years and even did
volunteer traveling with the
University football team on
and of for about 15 years.
“Retired people need a part-
time job or their spouses
will throw them out of the
house,” Gardner said.
Libby Brown, a sophomore
from Wichita, has known
Gardner for two years. She
met him afer waiting on him
at Alvamar Country Club
where she worked.
“He’s genuinely interested in
the lives of others and actu-
ally cares about you,” Brown
said. “He asks questions, gets
upset if you don’t say hi and
enjoys making new friends.
He’s a really outgoing guy.”
— Edited by Sarah Kramer
LAWRENCE
Local creates city-wide exercise community
CASSIDY RITTER
news@kansan.com
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Don “Red Dog” Gardner started Red Dog’s Dog Days nearly 30 years ago. Since its founding, Red Dog’s Dog Days
has exploded into a community fitness program open to anyone in Lawrence.
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 PAGE 3 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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Ample scholarships are available, but the
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To learn more about opportunities
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TAKE THE NEXT STEP...
It was night in Te Gambia,
a small country in West Afri-
ca, and Kansas graduate Lacy
Szuwalski was walking home
when she noticed a strange
man walking in front of her.
He kept looking back to make
sure she was following him,
and when she stopped walking
he did, too. She had seen him
in town before and he seemed
to pop up unexpectedly during
her time as a Peace Corps vol-
unteer. Worried, she called
ahead to let the guards know
about the man.
Te man went away, but it’s
the potential for experiences
like this, or worse, that can
scare of prospective volun-
teers.
“Safety is one the biggest
concerns people have when
looking at the Peace Corps,”
Szuwalski said.
Te program, which sends
Americans abroad to help
communities in felds ranging
from agriculture to education,
has seen a steady decline na-
tionally over the last few years.
Participation dropped from
9,095 volunteers in 2011 to
7,209 in 2013. At the Univer-
sity, numbers have declined
from 47 volunteers in 2010 to
23 in 2013.
Some reasons for this de-
cline include safety concerns,
improving job markets, a lack
of awareness and increased
opportunities to volunteer
abroad according to Peace
Corps experts.
Szuwalski recently became
the University’s Peace Corps
Representative and is working
to recruit students for the pro-
gram by leading informational
events about the organization,
like an upcoming Peace Corps
Information Session – Ad-
dressing Your Fears. Tis will
be held on Tuesday, March 25
from noon to 1 p.m. in the In-
ternational Room of the Kan-
sas Union.
Kate Newman, a political sci-
ence major from Kansas City,
Mo., considered the program
but ultimately decided it wasn’t
for her.
“I felt that there was a lot of
risk in volunteering in some
of the countries, especially for
women, where the respect and
University’s Peace Corps participation decreases
BRENDAN O’FARRELL
news@kansan.com

“I felt that there was a lot of
risk in volunteering in some
of the countries...”
KATE NEWMAN
Student
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
University graduate Lacy Szuwalski poses with her host sister Bintu in
The Gambia. Szuwalski is the University’s Peace Corps Representative
and she is currently working on recruiting for the organization.
Addison Schiele, a sopho-
more from Topeka, is a mem-
ber of the Kansas debate team,
the second team in the country
so far that’s qualifed to head
to the national debate compe-
tition. Tis year’s competition
will take place at the Universi-
ty of Indiana. Te Kansan sat
down with Schiele and asked
him some questions about his
experience with debate.

The University Daily Kan-
san: Take me through the pro-
cess of preparing for a debate.

Addison Schiele: Gener-
ally, either a week or two in
advance, you scope out the
competition and fgure out
what the other teams are read-
ing and prepare arguments
against those teams, both on
the afrmative and negative.
Online there is a case list that
everybody puts all the research
that they do on it, so they have
all their afrmative and neg-
ative arguments. I do a lot of
the afrmative research for my
partner and I; I do research
and update the afrmative, see
if there are any new articles or
new advantages. Te week of
[the competition], a few days
before, you have to do your
prep-sheet, you sort the judges
based on how you prefer them
to judge you. Te judges that
you want the most go at the
top of the list and the judges
you want the least go at the
bottom and that determines
who will judge you in the com-
petition.

UDK: What do you receive if
you win the debate?

AS: Tere’s a traveling trophy
that goes around to the schools
that you get your name put on.
I think there are individual
trophies; you get a watch that
is pretty cool too.
UDK: What helped you make
it to the national champion-
ship?

AS: I think one of the things
that have really helped has
been having a solid coaching
staf. Dr. Harris, who is the di-
rector of the debate program,
is an argumentative genius in
my opinion and he’s able to
think about arguments in a
unique manner that makes a
lot of debate strategic sense.
Dr. Bret Bricker is extreme-
ly helpful for teaching debate
style and techniques.

UDK: When did you start de-
bating and why?

AS: I started debating fresh-
man year in high school to
get a speech credit to graduate
and I stuck with it and I liked
it. It was unexpected to say the
least.

UDK: What has prompted
you to continue debate?

AS: Tere’s something about
being in a debate round that
is incomparable to any other
life experiences that I’ve had.
It’s just a rush of adrenalin and
it’s equivalent to why someone
wants to play a sport for the
rest of their life. It’s a diferent
style of competitiveness that is
interesting to me, at least.

UDK: What will you do afer
college debate ends to get that
rush?

AS: Unfortunately there is no
professional debate so it does
have to come to an end. My
last debate round will proba-
bly be very emotional for me
and will end in some tears. Te
way that I will try to fulfll that
kind of rush is to keep up with
debate, follow the KU debate
program. Right now I coach
debate at my old high school,
and coaching is it’s own kind
of rush, it is just more before
the round than anything. [I
will probably be] getting an
assistant coaching position or
something like that while I’m
in grad school.

UDK: What do you plan to do
afer college?

AS: Something to do with
chemical engineering; it’s sort
of unrelated to debate.

UDK: How do you think your
debate skills will help you in
this career?

AS: Debate teaches you how
to process information and
make decisions incredibly
quickly. It also exposes you
to diferent kinds of literature
bases that you have to re-
search. It helps with school in
two ways: one, it forces you to
get better at reading and read-
ing comprehension, and then
to be able to synthesize the re-
search that you do and analyti-
cally think about it and process
that information very quickly.
— Edited by Callan Reilly
Kansas debate team qualifies for nationals
Q&A
CAMPUS
TERRI HARVEY
news@kansan.com
SEE CORPS PAGE 8
I
miss the thunderstorms.
Spending a year in
China I knew I would
have a strong sense of
missing out during football
and basketball season, and
family and friends were a
given. Tese were things
I could prepare for, but
six months away from
my home during a light
Nanjing drizzle of rain, it
dawned on me that I had
not seen a single proper
fash of lighting or heard
a proper boom of thunder
since I had lef. Tis was a
feeling I had not prepared
for. It caught me of guard.
When I frst came to
China, I was in a state
of complete sensory
overload. Te buildings
are seemingly endless in
every direction, people are
everywhere and trafc is a
frantic free-for-all. I didn’t
know how to accomplish
basic tasks. I was reliant
on the help of new
friends. We went in large
groups of recently arrived
and culturally shocked
international students to
apply for our residency
permits together. Te
process was disorganized
and in the wrong language.
We all relied on each
others’ tips to navigate
our way through the
bureaucracy. Te frst
month was a mess, but it
was fun in a weird sort of
way as everything was new
and challenging.
Afer half a year, I, like
most of the people I went
to get residency permits
with, have fgured out most
aspects of how to get along
in Nanjing. I’ve developed
a rich mental map of
nearby places to eat, and
my barber and I have some
semblance of a relationship.
I know for a fact that while
the rickshaws seem like a
fun idea in concept they
typically will end with me
getting ripped of. I am able
to get in a rhythm of life
here, but occasionally some
little hiccup in it reminds
me how far away I am from
home. Te sof patter of a
recent typical rainstorm in
Nanjing did just that.
I miss the thunderstorms
in Kansas. I miss lazily
sipping on cofee while
listening to sheets of rain
crash upon the roof. I miss
standing outside, below an
awning, and hearing the
full roar of the downpour
— the way my father
checks the sump-pump
every 30 minutes fearing
the basement will food.
It sounds cliché to say it’s
the little things you will
miss, and while I won’t
speak for everyone, for me
this is defnitely true. Te
unexpected minor aspects
of life in my home are what
made it mine, and these are
the things I miss the most.
I went to China to learn
about Chinese culture,
but I have also learned a
little bit about my own.
Tere are many things we
take for granted in life,
and most are not obvious.
Being away has caused me
to appreciate them more.
I knew I would miss the
way of life in my home, but
who would have guessed
I would miss the way it
rained?
Scott Rainen is a senior from
Kansas City, Mo., studying East
Asian languages and culture
and geography.
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 PAGE 4
“The Bells oooof Campooonileee”
Listen! So many sounds so many
wonders, but you know...they dont
ring all by themselves!
My boyfriend didn’t propose after it
was in his horoscope. I’m not sure
if that means he doesn’t want to
go there or he doesn’t believe in
horoscopes...
To the anime girl, there’s not many
of us, but we exist.
It’s not the hill, Wescoe stairs
are like the ones in Harry Potter
libraries.
That moment you’ve walked
halfway home before remembering
you actually drove to class today.
Damn it.
Doooooooweeeeeeeeooooooooooo
ooooo!!!!! Oooooooooooooooooo!
Doooodoooodoooo weeeeeee
ooooooo! - Doctor Who theme song
Only at KU will the TA postpone the
class discussion for 30 minutes to
watch overtime! Rock Chalk!
Re: song requests for The Campa-
nile. I’m new to playing the carillon
(instrument that plays the bells)
but I can try!
Editor’s Note: Eye of the Tiger?
Nice guys finish last. No more
Mr. Nice Guy.
Where does one find a
rebound in Lawrence?
I submit a change to the bellring-
ing schedule. Whenever its tipoff
time for KU in the tournament,
campanille should play the rock
chalk chant.
All of my friends went to amazing,
faraway places during break. My
proudest accomplishment was
watching 3 seasons of a TV show...
I’m the kind of guy who will adopt
a highway and then sit in a lawn
chair to watch the cars drive down
my highway.
And so it begins...
I hate Stanford.
Editor’s Note: Ditto.
There are two types of people
in this world: Those who admit
to peeing in the shower, and
f*@?!ng liars.
Plot twist: Her roommate doesn’t
exist she is just talking to herself.
This new editor is super
sassy and I love it.
My heart breaks a little every time
someone mentions March
Madness now...
No more basketball and another
Monday of classes. Clearly we
should go back to break.
Text your FFA
submissions to
(785) 289–8351 or
at kansan.com
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TER TO THE EDITOR in the email subject line.
Length: 300 words
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Katie Kutsko, editor-in-chief
kkutsko@kansan.com
Allison Kohn, managing editor
akohn@kansan.com
Lauren Armendariz, managing editor
larmendariz@kansan.com
Anna Wenner, opinion editor
awenner@kansan.com
Sean Powers, business manager
spowers@kansan.com
Kolby Botts, sales manager
kbotts@kansan.com
Brett Akagi, media director and content
strategist
bakagi@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board
are Katie Kutsko, Allison Kohn, Lauren
Armendariz, Anna Wenner, Sean Powers
and Kolby Botts.
@NickBAwesome
@KansanOpinion Yes. I think the
current relationship model is out-
dated. Exclusiveness is developed
by culture, it goes against nature.
@YaBoiHans
@KansanOpinion Personally I find
it utterly reprehensible, but it is
based on the opinions of those in
the relationship and not me.
@SieARose
@KansanOpinion Nobody likes
sideline girls. Stay on the bench
until you get in the game.
#CheatersNeverWin
Is it okay to be
romantically involved
with a person who
is already in a
relationship?
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
Follow us on Twitter
@KansanOpinion. Tweet
us your opinions, and we
just might publish them.
NATIONAL
From Nanjing on longing:
Missing the way it rains
I
’ve seen it all too ofen.
“Te other girl.”
Eric Anderson, an
American sociologist at the
University of Winchester, did
a study on undergraduate
college men that revealed 78
percent of them had cheated
at least once on their partner.
Tis number is huge. Tis is a
sad, embarrassing statistic for
the male population, but I also
can’t help but think — who are
these girls?
I mean who is really satisfed
with being second place? I’ve
heard women say, “I’m not
the one in a commitment, he
is,” as if this justifes sleeping
with a man who they know is
taken.
Being “the other girl” is like
driving the getaway car in a
bank robbery; you might not
have been the one robbing the
bank, but you still played a
major role in something that
isn’t right. And according to
federal law, the accomplice
is just as guilty as the person
who committed the crime.
Relationship law is the same.
We ofen tell each other that
it’s the guy we should be mad
at, which is true. He’s the one
making the mistake. However,
it takes two to tango. Instead
of feeling fattered, you
should tell the girlfriend her
boyfriend’s a snake and let her
deal with him.
Take a second to think about
our own standards. A guy
who’s willingly cheating on his
girlfriend doesn’t deserve your
attention. If he’s unfaithful in
his current commitment, you
better believe he’d do the same
to you.
If he isn’t promising a
relationship afer hooking
up with you on the side, and
you’re just doing it for fun,
you’re doing a terrible thing.
Pretend for a minute that his
girlfriend is your sister or best
friend. Is it as fun now?
I write this column
extremely fed up with the girls
who are continuously okay
with being “the other woman.”
Find some self-respect and
maybe you’ll fnd a man who
wants you for more than what
you have to ofer in bed while
his girlfriend is at work.
Kayla Soper is a senior from
Junction City studying journalism
and political science.
RELATIONSHIPS
Both parties guilty
when cheating
A
s of writing this,
I just got a push
notifcation that
said that Fred Phelps, the
founder of Westboro Baptist
Church, passed away. I was
a little surprised to fnd that
I had mixed emotions about
it. On one hand, most of
the things that Westboro
Baptist Church stands for
are absolutely reprehensible,
but on the other hand, I
feel a little bit uneasy about
Phelps’ death. I don’t want
to see people cheering in
the streets because an eye
for an eye makes the whole
world blind. I always thought
that when he died I would
have a joyful feeling. I admit
that part of me rejoices at
his downfall, but it is more
about my hope for the future
destruction of his ideals as
opposed to the death of the
man himself.
Phelps was wretched. He
was a callous, out of touch,
old man who deserves
all of the bad things that
came upon him, but for
some reason all I can do is
feel sorry for him. He was
misguided and I wonder
what it was that brought him
there. I just see no way that
someone could be so hateful
for no reason.
On the bright side, I
suspect that he may have
had a change of heart toward
the end because according
to his estranged son’s
Facebook post, Phelps was
excommunicated in the fnal
days of his life. All kinds of
conclusions might be drawn
from this, but, whatever the
reason may be, I like to think
that he realized the error of
his ways at the end.
Trough his death we can
grow as people. Hopefully
people see that if we sit and
cheer the death of Phelps,
then we aren’t any diferent
from him. Should we go
picket his funeral with
signs that say, “God hates
Fred”? I think not. Tis is
an opportunity to show
that hate doesn’t have to
course through the veins of
those who have wronged
others and those who’ve
been wronged alike. We can
forgive and love. Tat love
is what brings about true
change. Hating a man and
letting that hate seethe and
boil inside us can bring to
the surface ugly behavior.
Let the man die alone,
forgotten and lost. He has no
power anymore. It is not the
man we fght, but that which
he stood for. Together we
can take all of the disgusting
ideas and dig them a grave,
too. Tat will be the real
victory. Let’s do it the right
way.
Nick Jackson is a senior
from Lawrence studying
chemical engineering.
By Kayla Soper
opinion@kansan.com
By Nick Jackson
opinion@kansan.com
LIVING ABROAD
Fred Phelps’ death should lead to positive change
By Scott Rainen
opinion@kansan.com


Pay Heed all who enter,
Beware of the Tablers.
FFA OF THE DAY


That awkward moment when you realize
your favorite nursery rhymes are actually
depictions of terrible historical events.
FFA OF THE DAY: HONORABLE MENTION
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014
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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
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Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 7
A group decision provides an
opportunity. Consider it, without
taking action yet. Look at all
options. A rise in status or pay is
possible. Clarify your dream, map
out a plan, and prepare
your move.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Plan your next trip, but don’t go
yet. Handle responsibilities, make
preparations, pay bills and repair
equipment. Delegate or complete
obligations. Verify reservations.
Dream about the upcoming
adventure. Determine intended
outcomes and priorities. Get your
gear together.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 6
Resist the temptation to deplete
shared resources. Follow an
expert’s plans. Work closely with
your partner. Ride the wave, with-
out testing physical limitations.
Anticipate controversy and head
it off with clarification. Don’t
react without thinking. Send
someone ahead.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 7
Aim high and rely on partners,
especially to navigate break-
downs smoothly. Delegate more
this week. Streamline a work
routine. Postpone relaxing in
luxury. The more energy you put
in, the more benefits appear. Your
credit rating’s rising.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is an 8
You don’t have to pay for
everything. Streamline a routine.
You’re a lucky winner. Wait to
see what develops. Don’t make
outrageous promises. No fair
cheating. In other words, don’t
take big actions. Sit quietly and
appreciate.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 7
The tide shifts in an unexpected
direction today. Get family to help.
Give everyone a chance to voice
their opinion. Have what you need
delivered. Increase efficiency, and
consider all possibilities. Look for
the fun side.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 7
Don’t show unfinished work to a
critic. Irritations and breakdowns
at home could throw you off your
stride. Schedule carefully. Remain
gracious, especially around those
lacking manners. Nip disagree-
ments in the bud. Map out a
dream privately.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 6
Adapt to changes with flexibility
and optimism. Reassure a loved
one with your wry sense of humor.
Opportunities and new ideas hide
in the chaos of fears about the
future. Recognize lurking shad-
ows and banish them with light.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is an 8
Give yourself permission to dream
about money. How much would
you like to make? Check out an
interesting suggestion. Expand
your heart. Clean up messes.
Finish up old business. Test your
hypothesis. Don’t take anything
for granted.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is an 8
Determine priorities to fulfill
a personal dream. Use more
imagination than money. Act
from wisdom, not impulse. Sell
stuff or get it appraised. Clean up
messes. Test ideas in
private before going public.
Let the family help.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7
Get your team moving. Schedule
carefully to fit it all in. Stop wor-
rying... meditate or go for a walk
for some peace. Others ask your
advice. There may be institutions
or health issues involved. Friends
are with you.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 6
Keep increasing your under-
standing, or you can just rely on
faith to pull you through. Avoid
a disagreement about priorities
by clarifying them early on. Invite
participation. Friends and associ-
ates get behind your dream.
‘Divergent’ follows same
YA adaptation formula
MOVIE REVIEW
“Divergent” is essentially just
a lesser “Hunger Games.” It’s
a franchise blockbuster led
by a strong female character,
which Hollywood needs more
of, but it builds a future world
that hits many similar story
beats. And alas, it can’t over-
come the biggest challenge of
young adult adaptations: a
highly formulaic narrative.
In a dystopian future, society
is divided into fve factions
based on personality types:
the intelligent, the selfess,
the peaceful, the honest and
the brave. Tris Prior (Shailene
Woodley) has grown up in
Abnegation (the selfess),
but discovers she’s divergent,
a rare personality type who
doesn’t ft into just one cat-
egory, so the faction leaders
fear and hunt them.
As citizens reach adulthood,
they have the choice to stay
in the faction they grew up
in or join a diferent one.
Tris decides to leave her
family to become Dauntless
(the brave). At this point,
“Divergent” transitions from
a thought-provoking set-up
then slips into a familiar mold
as Tris undergoes the Daunt-
less training program, gains
several friends and develops
romantic tension with her
instructor Four (Teo James).
Of course, there’s also a politi-
cal play at hand as the Erudite
(the intelligent) prepare to
forcefully take control of the
government from Abnega-
tion.
You’ve probably seen all of
this before, and while watch-
ing “Divergent” you might
start to feel burnt out from
so many recent young adult
dystopian future adaptations.
Te fatigue has defnitely hit
me. Te Dauntless training
takes the majority of the run-
time and ofen just feels like a
big-kid, less spacey version of
“Ender’s Game.”
However, there are just
enough engrossing and
entertaining elements for this
to stand on its own, although
not at full height. Woodley
has been one of my favorite
rising young stars since her
impressive turn in “Te De-
scendants” and she exhibits an
involving vulnerability while
also growing stronger and
more confdent. Her doe-eyed
beauty garners wonderful em-
pathy. And James surprises in
bringing depth to Four, with a
touch of kindness beneath his
hardened exterior.
It’s worth mentioning
that Kate Winslet plays the
scheming head of the Erudite,
with some sinister plans up
her sleeve, but she’s a little
too restrained and not cold
enough to feel particularly
threatening.
Director Neil Burger
(“Limitless”) brings a vibrant
visual style to more efectively
characterize the scenes. From
clean production designs that
resemble a forward-thinking
society to moody colored
lighting, most of it hews
toward brighter tones, which
gives more personality to
diferent sectors.
But there’s nothing special
about the action sequences. A
few fghts, a nighttime capture
the fag game, a skirmish for
survival — they get the job
done — but the visualizations
of fears as part of training
ofer the cooler moments,
lacking rules of reality and
delving into the mind.
Tere are some intriguing
concepts flling the sci-f story
of “Divergent,” but unless
you’re chomping at the bit
waiting for the next “Hunger
Games,” take a break from
this overcrowded genre.
— Edited by Amber Kasselman
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entertain@kansan.com
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6
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Jayhawks ACT.
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T: Take charge to return home together.

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Cat behaviorist heading to Oregon after attack
TELEVISION
CELEBRITY
LOS ANGELES — Te large
cat that attacked a baby and
trapped an Oregon family
in a bedroom touched of an
Internet uproar that worries
Jackson Galaxy, star of Animal
Planet's "My Cat from Hell."
Cats don't become ferocious
felines that turn on their fam-
ilies for no reason, says the cat
behavior expert, who is head-
ing to Portland soon to work
with the 4-year-old part-Hi-
malayan pet named Lux. Gal-
axy will flm the visit for his
show's ffh season, which
kicks of April 26.
"Every parental site on the
Internet blames the cat for
this confrontation. Every pet
site blames the family," he
said, adding that something is
wrong if the cat is acting out.
"We need to step away from
the hysteria. Tere is a story
behind all this. Don't assume
anything."
Lux became a worldwide
phenomenon afer owner Lee
Palmer called 911 and said
the cat had cornered him, his
girlfriend, their baby and the
family dog inside a room.
Palmer says his 7-month-old
pulled Lux's tail, and he kicked
the animal afer it scratched
the child. Ten, the cat "just
went of over the edge," Palm-
er told an emergency dispatch-
er afer the family barricaded
themselves. "He's charging
us," Palmer said, as the cat was
heard screeching in the back-
ground. Ofcers arrived and
caught Lux with a dog snare.
Palmer said the cat had a
history of violence, but the
family kept Lux until Monday,
when they turned him over to
a Portland-area shelter. But the
family assured Animal Planet
they were going to keep the
cat and agreed to therapy with
Galaxy.
Palmer didn't return a call
from Te Associated Press
seeking comment Tuesday.
Tere are many reasons a cat
can turn aggressive, and there
is no universal way to deal
with it, Galaxy said. But the
star feline behaviorist provid-
ed fve ways to tame out-of-
control cats:
— Never leave a young child
unsupervised with a cat.
— Take it to a vet at least
once a year. If a cat is acting
suspiciously, the owner needs
to pay attention. "Know what
suspicious looks like," Galaxy
said. "If they're not feeling
well, cats will socially with-
draw themselves, or they will
lose weight, or they will gain
weight, or they'll be howling in
the middle of the night when
they never did before.
"I've known cats who acted
out similarly to Lux because
of an abscessed tooth, a brain
tumor, hyperthyroidism or di-
abetes."
— Make sure cats can liter-
ally climb out of a situation.
Having a space up high, like
a cat condo, to get away from
children and other pets is cru-
cial, Galaxy said. "Make sure
the cat can make the choice to
get away from the kid," he said.
— Timeouts are good things.
"We associate timeouts with
punishment, but in the world
of cats, timeout is not a pun-
ishment." Tey can go to a
designated place where they
can settle down, come back to
a peaceful moment or ground
themselves, he said.
— Stop fghts between felines
with "timeout drills." With
simple pieces of cardboard, lef
strategically around the house,
you can stop a fght between
two cats. Put the cardboard be-
tween them, blocking their vi-
sion and providing a moment
of disorientation when you
can lead them to their timeout
spot. It's especially important
to have the drills with aggres-
sive cats.
Galaxy said he was going to
Portland to act as Lux's advo-
cate and fnd out what's wrong.
"I have no idea what made
Lux aggressive," he said. It
could be a chemical imbal-
ance, a history of stressful en-
vironments or because he was
kicked.
"If you want a blanket state-
ment on how to deal with ag-
gression, how about, 'Don't set
the cat up for failure,'" he said.
Te behaviorist, who has
worked with tens of thou-
sands of cats, said the thing
that bothered him most about
Lux was his continued aggres-
sion the day Palmer called 911,
including the animal's ongo-
ing assault on the door even
though the threat was gone.
But the word "attack" doesn't
sit well with Galaxy because 75
percent of the time, it's tied to
a grouchy mood or a warning,
he said.
"If I have a headache, I won't
be the nicest guy in the world.
I may snap at you," he said.
"Tis may have been Lux's way
of snapping.”
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lux, a 22-pound Himalayan cat that attacked a seven-month old baby, rests at home. Cats don’t become ferocious felines that turn on their families
for no reason, says the cat behavior expert Jackson Galaxy, star of Animal Planet’s “My Cat from Hell,” who is heading to Portland soon to work with the
cat. Galaxy will film the visit for his show’s fifth season, which kicks off April 26.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
VATICAN CITY — Actor
Russell Crowe and the makers
of the big-budget flm "Noah"
attended Pope Francis' gen-
eral audience Wednesday
but didn't get what they most
wanted: a papal meeting and
photo-op.
Crowe had lobbied hard for
a papal thumbs up for his flm
and the ensuing publicity a
Francis blessing would bring.
Te flm has been banned in
much of the Muslim world
because of its depiction of the
prophet, while U.S. conserva-
tives have complained it took
liberties with the Biblical ac-
count of the food.
Te Vatican spokesman, the
Rev. Federico Lombardi, said
the request from Noah's pro-
ducers for a private audience
was immediately turned down.
In an email Wednesday to
Te Associated Press, Lombar-
di said there was similarly no
scheduled "meet and greet" af-
ter Wednesday's general audi-
ence, when VIPs can ofen get
a quick word with the pope.
"Tey could have been at the
audience like anyone else,"
Lombardi said. Wednesday's
audience drew an estimated
crowd of 80,000.
Francis is loath to lend such
blessings for publicity. Given
his sensitivities to the Muslim
world — and his upcoming
trip to Jordan, Israel and the
Palestinian territories — it
would seem natural that he
would decline any public en-
dorsement of a flm that might
ofend Muslim viewers.
Variety reported that the
Noah delegation, includ-
ing Crowe, director Darren
Aronofsky, producer Scott
Franklin, and the vice chair-
man of Paramount Pictures,
Rob Moore, had met with the
pope. Variety cited a spokes-
woman for Universal, which
is distributing the flm in Italy.
But in an email to AP, Para-
mount merely said the dele-
gation "went to hear" Francis'
address at the audience.
Crowe was spotted in the VIP
section of St. Peter's Square,
but was too far back to reach
the pope.
Afer the audience, Crowe
tweeted: "Tank you holy fa-
ther @Pontifex for the bless-
ing," and "What a privilege,
attended the Udienza with the
holy father @Pontifex."
No pope meeting for Russell Crowe
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Actor Russell Crowe, right, attends Pope Francis’ general audience in St.
Peter’s Square at the Vatican on Wednesday, March 19.
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7
DATA & DEMOCRACY
A PANEL DISCUSSION
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WASHINGTON — People
can pray. Corporations cannot.
But now the Supreme Court
must decide whether imper-
sonal, for-proft companies
do enjoy religious rights that
exempt them from provid-
ing contraceptives under
the Obama administration's
health care law.
"Tat's a big question," said
Laurie Sobel, a senior policy
analyst with the Kaiser Fami-
ly Foundation, a private, non-
proft health research group,
"and it's a big door to open."
On Tuesday morning, the
court's nine justices will con-
front the corporate religious
objections to the Patient Pro-
tection and Afordable Care
Act. Te oral argument marks
the court's frst reconsider-
ation of the law since a land-
mark 2012 decision.
Tis time, in an unusually
long 90-minute argument,
the closely divided court will
hear challenges from a chain
of craf stores and a Pennsyl-
vania-based cabinet manufac-
turing company. Both corpo-
rations are owned by devout
individuals. Both are proft-
able.
And both seek exemption
from the health law's require-
ment to provide contraception
as part of a broader insurance
package.
"(Tey) believe that human
beings deserve protection
from the moment of concep-
tion, and that providing insur-
ance coverage for items that
risk killing an embryo makes
them complicit in abortion,"
attorneys for the Hobby Lobby
chain wrote in a legal brief.
Hobby Lobby is a multibil-
lion-dollar, Oklahoma-based
company that employs about
13,000 workers nationwide.
Conestoga Wood Specialties
is a smaller frm owned by a
Mennonite family in Penn-
sylvania's Lancaster County.
Both have invoked the First
Amendment's provision that
guarantees the right to freely
exercise religious beliefs.
Te companies also claim
protection under the 1993 Re-
ligious Freedom Restoration
Act. Te 1993 law ofers reli-
gious practitioners protection
against government intrusion.
Te big question Tuesday is
whether this protection ex-
tends to corporations as well
as living, breathing individu-
als.
It's a question that evokes
strong and conficting opin-
ions.
Attorneys general for 18
states including Georgia, Alas-
ka, Idaho, Kansas, South Car-
olina, Texas and Florida have
sided with the religiously af-
fliated companies. California
and Washington have joined
with 13 other states in sup-
porting the mandate.
"Corporations, of course,
cannot sufer. Tey are not
sentient. Tey have no soul,"
said Caroline Mala Corbin, a
professor at the University of
Miami School of Law. "Reli-
gious protection only makes
sense when it applies to actual
people."
Others disagree.
"Followers of kosher rules
run catering companies," at-
torneys for Conestoga Wood
Specialties wrote. "Families
that observe the Sabbath op-
erate fast food restaurants and
craf stores. And those who
value sacred texts publish and
distribute books. Whatever the
legal status of their organiza-
tions, owners and operators do
not check their beliefs at the
door each Monday morning."
Ironically, the Religious
Freedom Restoration Act that
conservatives might use to
strike down the contraception
mandate was a congressional
reaction to a 1990 opinion by
strictly conservative Justice
Antonin Scalia. Scalia's 1990
opinion reasoned that reli-
gious objectors are not exempt
from a "neutral law of general
applicability."
Adding even more judicial
spice, the conservative-dom-
inated court that will decide
this question is the same court
that likened corporations to
people in erasing limits on
corporate campaign spending.
"Political speech does not
lose First Amendment protec-
tion simply because its source
is a corporation," Justice An-
thony Kennedy, ofen a swing
vote, wrote in the court's 2010
Citizens United case.
Te potential consequences,
moreover, reach beyond the
80-plus federal lawsuits that
have been fled by colleges,
charities and others.
Faith and health care law
to collide at Supreme Court
NATIONAL
MCCLATCHY TRIBUNE

“Corporations, of course,
cannot suffer. They are not
sentient. They have no soul.”
CAROLINE MALA CORBIN
University of Miami professor
Recycle this paper
PERTH, Australia — Rain
was expected to hamper the
hunt Monday for the miss-
ing Malaysia Airlines jet, as
a growing number of planes
focus on an expanded area of
the south Indian Ocean where
French radar detected poten-
tial debris.
Australian Maritime Safety
Authority's rescue coordina-
tion center said the search area
was expanded from 59,000
to 68,500 square kilometers
(22,800-26,400 square miles)
on Monday, including a new
separate area covered by data
provided by France on Sunday.
Two Chinese Ilyushin IL-76
planes joined the search from
Perth on Monday, increasing
the number of aircraf from
eight on Sunday to 10, AMSA
said.
It said the weather in the
search area, about 2,500 kilo-
meters (1,550 miles) southwest
of Perth, was expected to dete-
riorate with rain likely.
Australian Transport Minis-
ter Warren Truss said "nothing
of note" was found Sunday,
which he described as a "fruit-
less day."
He said that the new search
area based was 850 kilometers
(530 miles) north of the pre-
vious search zone. He said it
was not the same area that had
been identifed as the most
likely place where the aircraf
may have entered the sea, "but
... we've got to check out all the
options."
"We're just, I guess, clutch-
ing at whatever little piece of
information comes along to
try and fnd a place where we
might be able to concentrate
the eforts," he added.
A cyclone bearing down on
the Australian northwest coast
"could stir up less favorable
weather," he said.
Flight 370 vanished March 8
with 239 people aboard while
en route from Kuala Lumpur,
Malaysia, to Beijing, setting of
a multinational search that has
turned up no confrmed piec-
es and nothing conclusive on
what happened to the jet.
Te latest French satellite
data came to light on Sunday
as Australian authorities coor-
dinating the search sent planes
and a ship to try to "re-fnd" a
wooden pallet that appeared to
be surrounded by straps of dif-
ferent lengths and colors.
Te pallet was spotted on
Saturday from a search plane,
but the spotters were unable to
take photos of it, and a PC Ori-
on military plane dispatched
to locate it could not fnd it.
"So, we've gone back to that
area again today to try and re-
fnd it," said Mike Barton, chief
of the Australian rescue coor-
dination center. "It's a possible
lead," he added.
Wooden pallets are ofen
used by ships, Barton cau-
tioned. But he said airlines
also commonly use them in
cargo holds.
An ofcial with Malaysia
Airlines said Sunday night that
the fight was, in fact, carrying
wooden pallets. Te ofcial
spoke on condition of ano-
nymity in keeping with com-
pany policy.
AMSA said it has requested a
cargo manifest from Malaysia
Airlines.
When Brazilian searchers in
2009 were looking for debris
from Air France Flight 447
afer it mysteriously plunged
into the Atlantic Ocean, they
found a wooden pallet. Te
military initially reported
the pallet came from the Air
France fight, but backtracked
hours later and said the plane
had not been carrying any
wooden pallets.
Sunday's search was frustrat-
ing because "there was cloud
down to the surface, and at
times we were completely en-
closed by cloud," Royal Aus-
tralian Air Force fight Lt. Rus-
sell Adams told reporters.
Nothing of interest was
found, he said.
In Paris, French Foreign
Ministry spokesman Romain
Nadal said in an interview
with Te Associated Press
that the satellite radar echoes
"identifed some debris that
could be from the Malaysian
Airlines plane."
Te spokesman said that
these echoes "are not images
with a defnition like a photo-
graph, but they do allow us to
identify the nature of an object
and to localize it."
"Te French government has
decided to increase its satellite
monitoring of this zone," Na-
dal said.
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8
Keeping the
Hawks Rolling
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New data expands search for missing plane
INTERNATIONAL
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rights ofen aren’t there,” said
Newman.
Tese potential risks are not
limited to the Peace Corps.
Women are four times more
likely to be victims of un-
wanted sexual conduct while
studying abroad, according
to 2012 study by Matthew
Kimble of the Department
of Psychology at Middlebury
College.
In order to help reduce safe-
ty risks, the Corps trains vol-
unteers and each volunteer
post has a country director
responsible for volunteers’
safety and creating a safety
and security program. At
least one medical ofcer at
each post is available 24/7 for
emergencies.
“Listen to your gut, it is a
two year commitment and
don’t do anything you're un-
comfortable with, but I never
felt unsafe,” said Szuwalski.
“Living in my community,
everyone knew my name
and everybody is looking
out for you. Tey know
you're helping their commu-
nity grow and they want to
keep you there.”
Volunteers can be assigned a
variety of tasks ranging from
educating to creating cleaner
water supplies or even help-
ing local businesses. Tasks
can depend on experience,
as well as which country a
volunteer is assigned. When
the program was started by
President Kennedy in 1961,
volunteers went to nine host
countries: Chile, Colombia,
Ghana, India, Nigeria, the
Philippines, St. Lucia, Tanza-
nia and Pakistan. Today there
are volunteers in 65 diferent
countries ranging from Peru
to Mongolia.
— Edited by Chelsea Mies
CORPS FROM PAGE 3
Attending her frst full-senate meeting
as a freshman, MacKenzie Oatman had a
realization: Student Senate makes a difer-
ence in students' lives.
Oatman had run for freshman senator on
a campaign of her face on a Quaker Oat-
meal box with the slogan "Vote for Oats."
She was impressed when the then-Student
Body President opened the frst meeting
of the year with a long list of accomplish-
ments from the summer.
Te school year had hardly started but
Student Senate had already changed poli-
cies to improve students' lives.
“I remember taking it all in and think-
ing, ‘Tis is what I want to do for my four
years,’ ” Oatman said.
Oatman, a junior from Overland Park,
describes herself as “your typical KU stu-
dent.” She’s a fnance major, a spreadsheet
nerd and a vegetarian.
“I feel that I can be the student voice,” she
said. “I’ve experienced campus in a lot of
diferent ways than just Greek life or just
Senate.”
As a Hawk Link guide, Oatman tutored
frst-generation and minority students.
“[Helping students who didn’t] have that
support system reminded me how import-
ant Student Senate is in connecting stu-
dents to resources,” Oatman said.
Because students pay a fee for programs,
she said it was a shame that one of the girls
she tutored wouldn’t have known about
Legal Services for Students if Oatman
hadn’t thought to give her a ride.
Oatman said students who get involved
in organizations have a support base that
naturally connects them better to these re-
sources.
Although she was one of those people
who signed up for every club and volun-
teer group’s email lists at student orienta-
tion, Oatman says she wants to create an
infrastructure for organizations to recruit
members throughout the school year.
She suggested an email list, a smartphone
app or a screen in the Kansas Union with a
schedule of meetings and events. She also
wants interest surveys at the beginning of
each semester and more tabling recruit-
ment opportunities.
— Edited by Callan Reilly
In middle school, a priest interrupted
Mitchell Cota during confession and
asked, “What are you?”
Cota, a junior from Overland Park, is
Hispanic, gay and a frst-generation col-
lege student. Ten, being so noticeably
diferent felt like a crutch. Now, he em-
braces these traits as a platform.
“People should celebrate everything
about themselves,” Cota said.
Cota wants to represent minority
groups that have been historically un-
derrepresented. He plans to encourage
students from diverse backgrounds to
get more engaged in campus groups,
wants to bring in more multicultural
senators and is concerned about reten-
tion of minority students.
He wants to bridge the gap between
the Kansas Union and the Sabatini Mul-
ticultural Resource Center.
Getting diferent opinions, especially
from minority students, leads to better
discussion and decisions that refect the
needs of everyone on campus, he said.
“I’ve been motivated by the idea of in-
clusivity,” Cota said.
As a freshman, he joined Senate to
show he could succeed regardless of his
minority status. Now, he advocates for
minorities.
Over the years, he’s changed his major
from pre-pharmacy, communications,
history, political science and Italian to
marketing and international business,
and said he therefore knows his way
around campus.
Cota said he can use his marketing
skills — fnding niche markets, asking
how to best serve them and creating
valuable experiences — to engage the
student body.
“Everything is marketing in a sense,”
Cota said.
Afer graduation, Cota wants to apply
social consciousness to marketing. He
said marketing tends to rely on heter-
onormative stereotypes, like making a
pen pink for women. He wants to either
start a more conscious marketing frm
or to be a corporate social justice coor-
dinator who teaches about diversity.
— Edited by Callan Reilly
MITCHELL COTA MACKENZIE OATMAN
CHECK BACK THIS WEEK FOR FEATURES ON GROWKU
AND CRIMSON AND TRUE CANDIDATES
Meet the Jayhawkers candidates
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 9


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ST. LOUIS — It took a pro-
gram stocked with NBA pros-
pects to fnally end Wichita
State's perfect run.
Andrew Harrison scored 20
points, twin brother Aaron
had 19 and Kentucky survived
a potential winning 3-pointer
at the buzzer by Fred VanVleet
to knock of the undefeated
Shockers with a 78-76 victory
Sunday in the NCAA tourna-
ment.
Julius Randle added 13 points
and 10 rebounds, and James
Young also had 13 points for
the No. 8 seed Wildcats (26-
10), who made a series of
clutch free throws in the clos-
ing minutes to advance to the
Sweet 16 in arguably the most
captivating game of a thrilling
frst weekend.
Now, Big Blue Nation gets
to jump right into another
high-profle matchup: Lou-
isville awaits in the Sweet 16
on Friday in Indianapolis. Te
Wildcats beat their bitter in-
state rival in December.
Cleanthony Early scored 31
points and Ron Baker had 20
for the Shockers (35-1), who
hadn't lost since last year's Fi-
nal Four while taking an entire
city — and state — on quite a
ride.
Kentucky took the lead for
good at 73-71 when Young
knocked down a 3-pointer
with less than two minutes
to go. Early answered with a
basket for Wichita State, and
Andrew Harrison made two
free throws for Kentucky. Bak-
er banked in a 3-pointer and
Randle made two more foul
shots.
Early's two free throws with
9.8 seconds lef got the Shock-
ers within 77-76, and they still
had a chance when Andrew
Harrison missed the second of
two free throws and Early got
the rebound.
VanVleet raced up court and
called timeout with 3.2 sec-
onds lef.
Wichita State coach Gregg
Marshall drew up a play that
had Tekele Cotton inbounding
the ball to VanVleet, who took
a shot from the top of the key.
But the shot was wide the en-
tire way, and it clanked of the
rim as the buzzer sounded and
Kentucky began to celebrate.
Te team full of blue-chip
prospects had fnally ended the
blue-collared team's dream.
Te Midwest Regional show-
down came afer an entertain-
ing undercard matchup that
saw Stanford knock of Kansas,
and it lived up to every expec-
tation.
Kentucky was successful
early using its superior size,
not only in the paint but
also on the perimeter, where
the 6-foot-6 Harrison twins
dwarfed the 5-11 VanVleet.
But afer the Wildcats took a
19-15 lead midway through
the half, Wichita State ramped
up its trademark defense, forc-
ing a series of turnovers and
getting right back in the game.
VanVleet was the catalyst. On
one sequence late in the half,
he stripped Aaron Harrison
and hit Early in transition, and
he was fouled slamming over
7-foot Willie Cauley-Stein.
Early converted the free throw
as the shockers built a 37-31
lead at the half.
Early hit a 3-pointer right
out of the locker room, too,
to match the Shockers' big-
gest lead at 40-31. But VanV-
leet picked up his third foul
moments later, and Kentucky
took advantage of the Shockers
missing their foor general by
gradually pulling ahead.
Kentucky ends Wichita State’s perfect run
NCAA BASKETBALL
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Wichita State forward Chadrack Lufile (0) is defended by Kentucky guard/forward James Young (1) during the first half of a third-round game of the
NCAA college basketball tournament on Sunday in St. Louis.
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 10
@ bigeventku.com
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ON APRIL 12, 2014
-
FUNDED BY STUDENT SENATE
KANSAS
KANSAS STAT LEADERS
STANFORD
KANSAS 24 33 57
22 38 60 STANFORD
PLAYER PTS FG-FGA REBS A T0’s
Tarik Black 18 6-8 6 0 0
Conner Frankamp 12 4-8 2 0 0
Perry Ellis 9 3-10 8 0 3
Naadir Tharpe 5 2-8 2 2 2
Andrew Wiggins 4 1-6 4 1 4
Jamari Traylor 3 1-8 5 0 3
Wayne Selden Jr 2 1-5 1 2 1
Frank Mason 2 0-4 2 2 1
Other Players 2 1-1 5 0 0
TOTAL 57 19-58 35 7 14
PLAYER PTS FG-FGA REBS A T0’s
Dwight Powell 15 5-10 7 1 5
Chasson Randle 13 6-12 4 1 7
Sefan Nastic 10 4-5 4 0 1
Anthony Brown 10 2-5 5 1 2
Josh Huestis 6 2-8 8 2 1
John Gage 4 1-6 3 1 0
Grant Verhoeven 2 1-1 0 0 0
Robbie Lemons 0 0-0 1 0 0
Other Players 0 0-0 5 0 0
TOTAL 60 21-47 37 6 16
Ellis Tharpe Black
REBOUNDS ASSISTS POINTS
UNSUNG HERO
GAME TO FORGET
GAME TO REMEMBER
Frankamp
Wiggins
Black
Conner Frankamp, guard
Andrew Wiggins, guard
Tarik Black, forward
The Jayhawk nation saw a glimpse of what Frankamp can bring to Kansas’
offense next season. He hit four 3-pointers, one coming in the final seconds of
the first half to give Kansas a halftime lead and two in the final minute to bring
Kansas within a possession. Frankamp finished the game 4-7 from beyond the
arc for 12 points.
This loss to Stanford will likely be Wiggins’ last in a Kansas uniform and he
failed to produce on the offensive end. The 1-3-1 zone Stanford play caused
problems for Wiggins the whole game. He committed four turnovers and scored
four points on 1-6 from the field. For Wiggins’ last game, he left a sour taste in
Kansas fans’ mouths.
Being the only starting senior, Black will remember this game for the rest of
his life because it might be his last. Black came out and played like it was his
last game, shooting 6-8 from the field and 6-8 from the free-throw line to score
a team-high 18 points. Black fouled out with five minutes left and Kansas’
offense truly missed his presence.
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BASKETBALL
Kansas 57
Wiggins leaves mark on Kansas in one season
Andrew Wiggins sat in the
locker room with a blood stain
on his jersey, leaning back with
his arms behind his head, de-
fecting questions about his
future.
In what would be Kansas’ last
game of the season, the fresh-
man guard scored four points
on 1-6 shooting in a 60-57 loss
to the Stanford Cardinal in
the Round of 32 of the NCAA
Tournament. Although he re-
fused to confrm it himself,
Wiggins likely played his last
game in a Kansas uniform on
Sunday, ending his career in a
way contrary to his high-oc-
tane play throughout the sea-
son.
“Te kid’s had a remarkable
season,” coach Bill Self said. “I
don’t think today should ofset
what he’s done for 34 games,
34 other games in which he
has been terrifc.”
And he played those 35
games with a backpack stufed
full with expectations on his
shoulders.
Before the season, a Sports Il-
lustrated cover compared him
to Wilt Chamberlain and Dan-
ny Manning, two of the best
players in Kansas basketball’s
storied history. Many dubbed
him the next LeBron James.
Others named him a lock for
the number one pick in the
upcoming NBA Draf.
But despite these other-
worldly distractions, Wiggins
stayed grounded, never letting
the outside world afect his ego
or attitude.
“He’s a great kid, a humble
kid,” sophomore forward Per-
ry Ellis said of Wiggins. “Even
though he doesn’t show emo-
tion, he really cares and we all
know that.”
Averaging 17.4 points and 5.9
rebounds per game for the Big
12 regular season champions,
Wiggins played at such a high
level all season, one where he
received many accolades. He
earned the Big 12 Freshman of
the Year honor, was named the
Big 12 newcomer of the week
three times and broke the Kan-
sas freshman record for points
in a season (597), passing the
mark set by Ben McLemore
last year. Two weeks ago, he
was named to the All-Ameri-
ca Second Team by the United
States Basketball Writers Asso-
ciation.
He shifed into an even high-
er gear near the end of the sea-
son, averaging 28 points in his
last four games before Sunday.
But against Stanford, Wig-
gins never looked at ease
against a zone defense that was
designed to shut him down.
Te Cardinal planted eyes on
him every second he was on
the foor, making sure the ball
was never in his hands.
“We always had an awareness
of him because he is a great
player and he has the ability
to get hot quick,” Stanford for-
ward Dwight Powell said. “We
stayed locked in.”
It could have been the de-
fense that never allowed him
to get hot.
Or maybe it was just one of
those days. Wiggins said there
were a lot of things he would
take back if he could. He
missed shots he usually makes,
made decisions he wished he
hadn’t.
“He put himself in position
to make some plays and didn’t
make them like he normally
made them the majority of the
year,” Self said.
Afer the game, Wiggins
shouldered a lot of the weight
of Kansas’ second Round of 32
loss in the last four years.
“My team played well and
fought to the end,” Wiggins
said. “I just wasn’t there for
them when they needed me.”
In reality, the team played one
of its worst ofensive games of
the season. Other than senior
forward Tarik Black, the rest
of the Jayhawk starters scored
just 20 points, making seven of
29 feld goals.
In the four games Wiggins
failed to reach double fgures
in scoring this season (the
team went 3-1), his teammates
were usually there to pick up
the slack. Just not on Sunday.
Barring a major surprise,
Wiggins is headed to the NBA,
where he will continue to work
on his already polished game
against the world’s elite.
“I learned a lot,” Wiggins said
when asked to refect on the
season. “I got a lot better. But
today I just laid an egg.”
— Edited by Callan Reilly
BRIAN HILLIX
sports@kansan.com

“The kid’s had a remarkable season. I don’t think today should
offset what he’s done for 34 games, 34 other games in which he
has been terrific.”
COACH BILL SELF
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Frank Mason and Jamari Traylor quietly sit in the locker room after their 60-57 loss to Stanford on Sunday in the 3rd round of the NCAA Tournament.
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 11
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SCHEDULE
BASKETBALL REWIND
Stanford 60
KEY STATS
KEY PLAYS
Kansas’ field goal percentage. It’s the second-worst shooting
performance of the season.
Number of Kansas assists, the team’s second-lowest total in a
game this season.
Points for Conner Frankamp, a career-high.
Conner Frankamp forces a steal, pulls up and hits a 3-pointer at the buzzer.
Kansas takes the lead 24-22 at halftime.

Frank Mason drives into the lane and tosses up a lob to Tarik Black who
throws it down and cuts the Stanford lead to five. Kansas trails 42-37 with
9:06 remaining in the second half.

Conner Frankamp connects on back-to-back 3-pointers, bringing the
Jayhawks back within one possession of the lead. Kansas trails 59-57 with
16 seconds remaining.
32.8
7
12
Wiggins leaves mark on Kansas in one season
GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Freshman guard Andrew Wiggins drives to the basket and loses the ball with three minutes left in the game.
Wiggins ended the game with four points and four rebounds, statistics much lower than his season averages of
17.9 PPG and 5.9 RPG.
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
Freshman guard Conner Frankamp smiles after hitting one of the four 3-point shots he made in the game. Frankamp played 18 minutes in the game against Stanford.
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 12
ONE TEAM. ONE GOAL.
LET THE MADNESS BEGIN!
ONE TEAM. ONE GOAL.
LET THE MADNESS BEGIN!
Available at:
FRONT BACK
innings allowing two runs on
nine hits as well. He had the
strikeout pitch working as
he struck out seven and only
walked one.
“I was able to make pitches
when I had to,” Duncan said. “
Later in the game I was able to
make some big pitches and get
some strikeouts.”
Senior closer Jordan Piché
was given the loss. In his 2.1
innings of work, he let up the
game winning run on one hit.
For Piché, this was his frst loss
of the season and fell to 3-1.
A bright spot for Kansas was
that Justin Protacio reached
base twice on Sunday and ex-
tended his on base streak to 34
games.
Kansas will travel to Omaha,
Neb., Wednesday to take on
the Creighton Bluejays.
“We have to give them a little
payback,” Protacio said. “We
need to be ready for a big game
on Wednesday.”
— Edited by Callan Reilly
of incompleteness Duke’s
star freshman Jabari Parker
alluded to afer his team was
eliminated on Friday.
Senior forward Tarik Black
was hoping for an oppor-
tunity to play in front of his
hometown. A win for Kansas
would’ve returned him to
the Memphis arena where
he played for the last three
years.
His 18 points and six
rebounds were one of the few
reasons why Kansas even had
a shot at overtime. But he
fouled out with fve minutes
remaining and watched
from the bench as his dream
disappeared.
“Tat was my last game
of college basketball,” Black
said, fully feeling the weight
of the words.
Black may go back to Mem-
phis to train this summer.
He might stay in Lawrence
instead.
Not even the senior could
answer what comes next. He
could only think about what
could’ve been.
“I’m not sure right now,”
Black said. “I’m still right
here in the moment.”

— Edited by Chelsea Mies
made a free throw. Traylor
stole the inbounds pass and
dished it to freshman guard
Frank Mason, who missed an
uncontested 3-pointer, just as
the Jayhawks had all game.
“Te main factor of the game
was that we couldn’t fnish and
make shots,” Traylor said.
Tough there was success
within the season, Kansas
not fnishing with a run in
the NCAA tournament leaves
players who won’t be returning
with an uneasy feeling. Fresh-
men Wiggins and Joel Embiid
will likely leave for the NBA.
But it was Tarik Black, the
only starting senior, showing
the greatest disappointment
afer the game. He said the one
of the main reasons he trans-
ferred to Kansas was to win in
March and win big. Instead he
was lef with another early end
to the season.
“My mind is just a complete
blank,” Black said. “It’s over
now. Tat’s all I can say.”
— Edited by Chelsea Mies
FROM NCAA PAGE 14 FROM LOSE PAGE 14
FROM BALL PAGE 14
RALEIGH, N.C. — Tennes-
see came to Tobacco Road
and turned it into "Raleigh
Top."
Jarnell Stokes had 17 points
and a career-high-tying 18
rebounds, and the Volun-
teers denied Mercer a second
straight upset in the NCAA
tournament by routing the
Bears 83-63 on Sunday night.
Josh Richardson had a ca-
reer-high 26 points and An-
tonio Barton had 18 for the
11th-seeded Vols (24-12),
who outrebounded Mercer
41-19 and kept the Southeast-
ern Conference perfect in the
tournament.
Tey joined Florida and
Kentucky in the round of 16
— the frst time three SEC
teams made it that far since
2007.
Tennessee will face sec-
ond-seeded Michigan (27-8)
in a Midwest Regional semif-
nal Friday night in Indianap-
olis.
Stokes broke his 2-day-old
school tournament record for
rebounds.
Langston Hall had 15 points
to lead the 14th-seeded Bears
(27-9). Tey knocked of
Duke in the signature upset of
the tournament but couldn't
answer Tennessee's size.
Mercer trailed by double fg-
ures for the entire second half
before the Bears threatened to
give themselves yet another
fantastic fnish.
Tey had the ball down 12
with about 2½ minutes lef
when Jakob Gollon — one of
the heroes of the Duke upset
two days earlier — threw the
ball away in the lane, then
fouled out a few seconds later.
Jordan McRae hit two free
throws, and Richardson add-
ed a fast-break layup to push
the Tennessee lead to 77-61
with 1½ minutes lef.
McRae fnished with 13
points for the Volunteers,
who have won eight of nine
with the only loss coming to
the top-ranked Gators in the
SEC tournament.
Tey are in the round of 16
for the fourth time in eight
years, and the third team to
go from the First Four to the
Sweet 16 since the introduc-
tion of the extra round in
2011.
Tey also got a bit of pay-
back: Mercer ended Tennes-
see's season last year with a
75-67 win in the frst round of
the NIT.
Ike Nwamu scored 12
points, Anthony White Jr. had
11 and Daniel Coursey added
10 for Mercer, the plucky At-
lantic Sun Conference school
trying to match Florida Gulf
Coast's run last year to the re-
gional semifnals.
Te Bears drew a perfect
matchup for their frst game
— and couldn't have had a
worse one for their second.
Tey were bigger, more ex-
perienced and more precise
than a Duke team loaded with
high school All-Americans
and a leaky defense, carving
them up down the stretch
in a 78-71 victory that ranks
among the top upsets in the
history of the tournament.
Tennessee never trailed
and held a 24-4 rebounding
advantage in the frst half.
Richardson scored 10 straight
points midway for the Vol-
unteers to turn a tight game
into a double-fgure lead. His
3 from the right wing made it
29-18 with 6½ minutes lef.
Mercer falls to Tennessee, 83-63
NCAA
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tennessee guard Antonio Barton (2) celebrates with Tennessee coach Cuonzo Martin near the the end of the
first half of an NCAA college basketball third-round tournament game against Mercer, Sunday, in Raleigh.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

“I want these kids to stay in school
longer because the NBA is worse than
it’s ever been. It’s not good basketball.
It’s frustrating for me to watch. These
kids aren’t physically or emotionally
ready to come and play against grown
men. Jabari Parker and Andrew Wig-
gins are supposed to be top-3 draft
picks. They didn’t have very good
games — and it’s just one game —
but if they’re going to struggle against
Mercer and Stanford, they’re really
gonna struggle against grown men.”
— Charles Barkley
This week in athletics
?
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
Q: How many players have gone
directly from high school to the
NBA?
A: 42
— NBA.com
!
FACT OF THE DAY
Since 2006, 57 players who were
one year out of high school have
been drafted by NBA teams
— USA Today
One-and-dones may not be ready for the NBA
QUOTE OF THE DAY
H
otly contested at this year’s
NCAA Tournament is the
“one-and-done” trend.
According to NCAA and NBA rules,
athletes must complete one year of
college before they enlist in the NBA
Draf. Tis rule was implemented in
2006.
Before that, several NBA greats
have came directly out of high school
before the rule was instituted. LeBron
James, Kobe Bryant, Amare Stou-
demire, J.R. Smith, Dwight Howard,
Kevin Garnett, Tracy McGrady and
Tyson Chandler all declared for the
NBA right out of high school, but
that’s the cream of the crop.
But since then, the 1991-1992
Michigan team, which included the
one-and-dones, started to fall to the
experienced teams. Te 1991-1992
Michigan team consisted of Chris
Webber, Jalen Rose, Juwan Howard,
Ray Jackson and Jimmy King. Four of
the team members were McDonald’s
All-Americans out of high school.
Although the team advanced to the
national championship game, it fell to
the experienced team from Duke, led
by senior Christian Laettner, soph-
omore Grant Hill and junior Bobby
Hurley. Duke only had one freshman
on the roster that year and it delivered
a beating to Michigan with the fnal
score 71-51.
Tis season, many of the highly pros-
pected early round draf picks, such
as Jabari Parker and Andrew Wiggins,
have put on shows for college basket-
ball fans against other young teams,
but come tournament time when they
are to face more experienced teams,
they become fabbergasted.
In the Round of 64, No. 3 Duke faced
of against No. 14 Mercer. Mercer
started fve seniors while Duke started
a senior, three sophomores and a
freshman. Duke, predicted by most to
win, fell short, even though
a junior guard came of the
bench to assist the Blue
Devils.
In the Round of 32, No.
2 Kansas took on No. 10
Stanford. Freshmen Wiggins
scored four points, freshman
Wayne Selden Jr. scored two
points and freshman Frank
Mason scored two points.
Te majority of the points
came from an experienced
senior, Tarik Black.
Charles Barkley, an NBA great,
spoke out afer the Kansas-Stanford
game, saying he believed that players
to the likes of Wiggins and Parker
should stay another year in college.
Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas
Mavericks, has also spoken about the
one-and-done trend. “It’s not even so
much about lottery busts,” Cuban said.
“It’s about kids’ lives that we’re ruining.
Even if you’re a frst-round pick and
you have three years of guaranteed
money — or two years now of guar-
anteed money — then what? Because
if you’re a bust and it turns out you
just can’t
play in
the NBA,
your ‘Rocks
for Jocks’
one year of
schooling isn’t
going to get you
real far. I just
don’t think it takes
into consideration
the kids enough.
Obviously, I think
there’s signifcant
beneft for the NBA. It’s
not my decision to make, but that’s my
opinion on it.”
With all the negative press about
one-and-dones, there have been sev-
eral NBA players who have thrived in
the NBA afer just one year of college.
Kyrie Irving, Derrick Rose, Kevin
Love, Kevin Durant, Carmelo Antho-
ny, Greg Oden and DeMarcus Cousins
are some of those, just to name a few.
— Edited by Amber Kasselman
Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Friday Saturday
Softball
Wichita State
6 p.m.
Wichita, Kan.
Track
Texas Relays
All day
Austin, Texas
Track
Texas Relays
All day
Austin, Texas
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Texas Relays
All day
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Women’s Rowing
Sunflower Showdown
Final Results
Kansas City, Kan.
Women’s Tennis
Oklahoma
12 p.m.
Lawrence
Baseball
Creighton
6 p.m.
Omaha, Neb.
Women’s Tennis
Oklahoma State
3:30 p.m.
Lawrence
Baseball
Oklahoma
1 p.m.
Lawrence
Baseball
Oklahoma
6 p.m.
Lawrence
Soccer
FC Kansas City
1 p.m.
Lawrence
Women’s Golf
2014 Briar’s Creek Invitational
All Day
Johns Island, S.C.
Women’s Golf
2014 Briar’s Creek Invitational
All day
Johns Island, S.C.
Thursday
Track
Texas Relays
All Day
Austin, Texas
Softball
Oklahoma State
5 p.m.
Lawrence
Softball
Oklahoma State
2 p.m.
Lawrence
Softball
Oklahoma State
12 p.m.
Lawrence
MONDAY, MARCH 24, 2014 PAGE 13 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
By Amie Just
sports@kansan.com
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Volume 126 Issue 94 kansan.com Monday, March 24, 2014
By Blake Schuster
sports@kansan.com
COMMENTARY
Questions remain
as season ends
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
S
BASKETBALL REWIND
PAGE 10 Kansas’ run in the NCAA tournament comes to an end
S
T. LOUIS – As soon as
Conner Frankamp let go
of the shot, he knew he
missed. He knew he just threw
away Kansas’ chance at over-
time. He knew this was the end
before the ball ever sailed lef
of the goal, of the backboard
and into the arms of Stanford’s
Dwight Powell.
Tat’s not what lef him and
the Jayhawks with red eyes
minutes later.
Not knowing is the worst
part. It has to be.
It can’t be any worse than
what the Jayhawks were feeling
afer falling to Stanford 60-57
in the third round of the
NCAA Tournament.
At least on Sunday, Kansas
could explain what went
wrong. Te players could detail
how playing nervous in the
frst few minutes set the tone
for the rest of the game. Or
how Stanford’s bigs were able
to contest nearly every Kansas
layup. Or how playing against
a zone and lengthy guards
limited Andrew Wiggins to
just four points.
"If I would've done my part
we would've won the game,”
Wiggins said. “I let the team
down.”
Tere are many questions
about the Jayhawks’ season
that could be answered.
What’s worse are the ones that
couldn’t.
Maybe more than any team
in recent memory, Kansas fans
will look back at the 2013-14
team in fve or 10 years and
wonder how it didn’t get past
the frst weekend. How with
names like Wiggins, Joel Embi-
id, Perry Ellis, Brannen Greene
and Jamari Traylor they weren’t
able to achieve more.
Te way the tournament was
shaping up, even the players
could feel a run coming.
Tey watched as Syracuse
fell to Dayton on Saturday and
imagined themselves ground-
ing the Flyers a week later in
the Sweet Sixteen.
“It was setting up nice for us,”
Frankamp said. “What if we
would’ve advanced?”
Injured center Joel Embiid
said he would “defnitely” have
played if that had been the
case. Despite the fact Kansas
was able to manage for a few
games without him, it’s irrefut-
able what his presence adds on
the foor.
“I think I could’ve done
something,” Embiid said of the
Jayhawks’ loss.
Te same is true for Wiggins,
who set the Kansas freshman
scoring record in the same
weekend he couldn’t hit a shot.
His season ended much
like the way it started: leaving
everyone wanting more.
“Te kid had a great year,”
coach Bill Self said afer his
frst 10-loss season at Kansas.
“I hate that the last game he
labored like this.”
But even Wiggins was
learning something new. Of
all the games he’d played in,
Wiggins had never felt this
sort of devastation — a feeling
MEN’S BASKETBALL
Jayhawks fall out of NCAA tournament
MICHAEL STRICKLAND/KANSAN
With 3.5 seconds remaining, Conner Frankamp took a shot from behind the arc in an attempt to tie the game and send the Jayhawks into overtime. The shot fell short and the Jayhawks
lost to Stanford in the final seconds, 60-57, in the 3rd round of the NCAA Tournament.
BLAIR SHEADE
sports@kansan.com
Te Jayhawks could never
grab ahold of the game Sun-
day as Kansas ended its sea-
son with a 60-57 loss to the
No. 10 seed Stanford Cardinal
in the round of 32.
“Te game was a strug-
gle from the opening tip, it
seemed like,” coach Bill Self
said.
Stanford aggravated the Jay-
hawks’ ofense, forcing Kansas
turnovers and bad shots.
Te Cardinal used the size of
their frontcourt on both ends,
dominating the paint and
taking away any chance for
the Jayhawks to do the same.
Stanford’s senior forwards
Dwight Powell and Stefan
Nastic, both 6-foot-11-inch
guys, disrupted seemingly ev-
ery Kansas shot inside.
Te Cardinal outscored Kan-
sas in the paint 30-20, with 12
of those coming from senior
forward Tarik Black, who
fouled out with fve minutes
to play.
Te Cardinal’s starting bigs
totaled for 22 points and 11
rebounds.
Te zone defense that Stan-
ford played stalled the Jay-
hawks’ ofense. Every time a
Kansas player drove the lane
a Stanford big swarmed him.
Kansas freshman guard An-
drew Wiggins felt it the most,
unable to get his game going
and totaling just four points.
"Wherever I went, I’d see like
three people,” Wiggins said. “I
couldn’t really get anywhere."
Te 1-3-1 zone the Cardinal
played hurt both the perim-
eter and the inside game for
Kansas.
“You throw it inside, you have
to score over 6’10”, 6’11”,” Self
said.
Te zone wasn’t anything new
to Kansas, teams had pulled it
out against the Jayhawks all
season. It didn’t surprise Self
either, but Kansas looked as
it didn’t know how to play
through it.
“We were a little frustrated
by it,” sophomore forward
Perry Ellis said. “We really
didn’t start attacking it until
late in the game.”
Stanford’s defense held Kan-
sas to a season-low 57 points
on a season-low 32 percent
shooting. Te easy, close-
range shots the Jayhawks’ usu-
ally manage with ease weren’t
falling.
“It just happens sometimes,”
Ellis said.
Even when the Jayhawks
started pressuring the Cardi-
nal and forcing turnovers late,
the ofense couldn’t turn them
into points.
With seven minutes lef in the
game and the Jayhawks only
down by four, Kansas pressed
Stanford afer Jamari Traylor
Kansas slips to Dartmouth in 10th inning
BASEBALL
Kansas (16-8) failed to com-
plete the sweep of Dartmouth
(3-9) on Sunday as they fell
3-2 in 10 innings. Te Jay-
hawks missed opportunities
late in the early afernoon
contest.
“We didn’t come up big
when we needed to,” coach
Ritch Price said. “We had a
man on third with one out in
the ninth and we couldn’t cap-
italize.”
Junior shortstop Justin Prot-
acio was able to reach frst on
a two-base error by the third
baseman and was prompt-
ly moved to second on a sac
bunt from his sophomore
double play partner, Colby
Wright.
Te Jayhawks seemed to be
in business with their three
and four hitters coming to
the plate. Junior lef felder
Michael Suiter drew a walk
to put runners at the corners
for junior right felder Connor
McKay.
McKay entered the contest
with a Big 12 leading 34 RBIs.
McKay’s lead atop the Big 12
is cushioned by 11 runs. McK-
ay went down swinging on a
breaking ball in the dirt. Tis
brought Saturday’s hero ju-
nior designated hitter Dakota
Smith to the plate.
Smith put the exclamation
point on Saturday’s game,
belting the go-ahead grand
slam in the home half of the
seventh inning. Sunday was a
diferent story for Smith and
the Jayhawks as he few out
the right felder and stranded
Protacio on third and Suiter
on second.
Protacio and Suiter were just
two of the 13 runners that
Kansas stranded on base.
“We missed opportunities,”
Protacio said. “We couldn’t
get it done with runners in
scoring position. Teir guy
pitched a great game out
there.”
Freshman right-hander Mi-
chael Concato got the start
for Dartmouth. He went eight
strong innings, allowing two
runs on nine hits, while strik-
ing out three and only walk-
ing two. Concato entered the
game with a 5.23 ERA and
posted his best start of the
season to date.
“Tat’s as good as a guy has
thrown against us all year,”
Price said. “I was really im-
pressed.”
Senior right-hander Frank
Duncan had another solid
start. Duncan threw seven
BEN FELDERSTEIN
sports@kansan.com
BEN LIPOWITZ/KANSAN
Connor McKay slides into homeplate for one of the Jayhawks 2 runs scored in their 3-2 loss to Dartmouth.
SEE BALL PAGE 12
SEE NCAA PAGE 12
SEE LOSE PAGE 12

“The game was a struggle from the opening tip, it seemed
like.”
BILL SELF
Coach