Sendik’s Food Markets

welcome
Open 7 a.m. – 9 p.m. daily
340 W. Brown Deer Rd. Bayside, WI 53217 (414) 352-9525 Open 6 a.m. – 10 p.m. daily 13425 W. Watertown Plank Rd. Elm Grove, WI 53122 (262) 784-9525 5200 W. Rawson Ave. Franklin, WI 53132 (414) 817-9525 N112 W15800 Mequon Rd. Germantown, WI 53022 (262) 250-9525 2195 1st Ave. Grafton, WI 53024 (262) 376-9525 7901 W. Layton Ave. Greenfield, WI 53220 (414) 329-9525 10930 N. Port Washington Rd. Mequon, WI 53092 (262) 241-9525 3600 S. Moorland Road New Berlin, WI 53151 (262) 696-9525 8616 W. North Ave. Wauwatosa, WI 53226 (414) 456-9525 280 N. 18th Avenue West Bend, WI 53095 (262) 335-9525 500 E. Silver Spring Dr. Whitefish Bay, WI 53217 (414) 962-9525

BAYSIDE

ELM GROVE

FRANKLIN

GERMANTOWN

Your Neighborhood Store W

GRAFTON

GREENFIELD

MEQUON

NEW BERLIN

WAUWATOSA

WEST BEND

WHITEFISH BAY

www.sendiksmarket.com

Penfield Children’s Center board representative Tom Smith (left) and president Christine Holmes (right) accept the summer charity campaign check from Sendik’s family co-owner Margaret Harris. A portion of the $65,000 donation was raised from sales of the Real Food summer issue.

ow! Time flies when you’re having fun. It’s hard to believe the busy holiday season is here already and 2013 is almost concluded. At Sendik’s, we were particularly busy this year. Our eleventh store—a new concept called Sendik’s Fresh2GO— opened in Bayside this August. We’ve been working hard, and having loads of fun, developing our new brand and integrating The Balistreri family: some Fresh2GO products into Nick, Margaret (Harris), Ted, and Patrick. other local Sendik’s. Part of what made the process so fun neighbor is giving back to the community. and rewarding for us was the excitement We’re very happy to again partner with the our neighbors in Bayside shared about MACC Fund on this issue. All proceeds the new store. As we remodeled over the from the sale of this magazine will go summer months, friends and future shop- directly to the charity as they continue the pers were very anxious to see what was battle against childhood cancer and blood going on behind the red brick walls. We disorders.We will also be selling the MACC fielded many phone calls and e-mails from Fund Stars again in our stores.You can see people inquiring about when the store the design of this year’s star below and read would be open for business. We even had more about the MACC to politely escort a few curious onlookers Fund on page 16. from the work site who were excited to We thank you see all the changes. for your genTheir enthusiasm served as a humble erous support reminder of how important the local cor- of our chariner store is to a neighborhood. It is often table partners the last stop on a busy day, the first stop on and wish you your weekend errands, the place you see old and your famfriends and familiar faces, and the place you ily a safe and find nourishment for your family. We take h a p py h o l i d ay the responsibility of serving our neighbors season. See you at the very seriously, and we’re honored you neighborhood store! choose Sendik’s. As our customers remind us with their Sincerely, incredible generosity, part of being a good The Balistreri Family

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Sendik’s Food Markets
food & wine

SOUP’S ON!
Tips for pairing wine with soups and stews.

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ith cooler temperatures upon us, what’s better to serve for dinner than a pot of hearty soup that’s simmered on the stove all afternoon? Soup can be comfort food at its best, a meal option that can satisfy the meat and vegetable lovers alike around your table. But when it comes time to offer wine with their favorite soups, many folks get confused about which wines to pour. “This can be a tough one,” says Tara Q. Thomas, author of The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Wine Basics. “Wine—or any drink, for that matter—is pretty hard to match with soup. You have the fact that they are both liquids, for one, and the temperature differential can be pretty weird.” That being said, here are some tips from Thomas about making soups, stews, chowders, and chilis, and selecting the right wines to enhance their flavors.

TEMPERATURE MATTERS
Don’t serve the wine too cold or the temperature contrast can be too shocking.“A good white wine can even benefit from being ser ved a little warmer than you might normally serve it,”Thomas says.“The warmer the wine, the more volatile it is, which means the more you can smell and taste.” (There are limits, however. If a wine is too warm, it may start to taste more like an alcoholic fruit soup than a wine.)

SOUP AND WINE PICKS
Take the above tips into account and you’ll be on your way to making informed wine selections as you cast off winter’s chill with steaming-hot soup. Here are a few specific wine and soup pairings to provide you with some inspiration. • Chicken Noodle: Select a light Chardonnay chilled only slightly or a very light red such as a Pinot Noir or Beaujolais (not Nouveau, but the real stuff). • Chili: Whether meaty or meat-free, chili is hearty enough to go with just about any red you throw at it. The only issue is how many chiles you add: alcohol fans the flames of a chile’s heat. So, if it’s five-alarm chili, you’re best off going with a very fruity red that’s not so high in alcohol, Thomas says, like a simple Shiraz or some of the great bargains coming out of lesser-

SPIKE IT
Spike the soup with whatever you’re drinking. “The classic example is a mushroom soup spiked with sherry,”Thomas says,“and a glass of sherry next to it. But you could even add a glass of red wine to your onion soup, for example.”

MAKE IT THICK
The less like a liquid the soup is, the easier it will be to pair with a range of wine. Chicken broth, for example, is no heavier than wine—in fact, many wines would overwhelm it (like an oaky Chardonnay, or nearly any red), Thomas says. “Chicken gumbo, on the other hand, could be delicious with a Chardonnay, even one that has lots of toasty, buttery flavors.”
10 real food winter 2013

known parts of Spain like Jumilla, Campo de Borja, and Toro. • Seafood Chowder: Because of the cream, seafood chowder can stand up to rich whites like oaked Chardonnay, or, even better, Rhône-style whites made from Marsanne and Roussanne grapes. “The Perrin family makes excellent examples both in California at Tablas Creek and at Château de Beaucastel in France’s Rhône Valley,” Thomas says. Chowder also tastes delicious with a glass of nutty, dry sherry. (Add a splash to the soup, too!) • Beef Stew: Most beef stews are hearty enough to stand a spoon up in, so they can take the same sort of reds that you’d pair with the beef if it were simply roasted.“The only requirement here is that the wine has good structure—some tannin and good acidity so that it doesn’t feel soupy itself,” Thomas says. (Soup will make a soft wine feel only soupier.) A Cabernet Sauvignonbased red would be the classic match (it could be straight Cab or a Cab-Merlot blend, like many Bordeaux), although Cabernet Franc, with its slightly lighter texture and green pepper spice—is also delicious. ■

Sendik’s Food Markets

Roll Out The

meat department

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or many celebratory meals this holiday season, turkey is a must-have on the menu. But it doesn’t always need to be a whole bird to be a centerpiece. Whether you’re looking for a different take on turkey for one of the many get-togethers throughout the season or the holiday dinner, this rolled turkey breast is sure to impress. It’s one of many recipes featured in The Good Housekeeping Christmas Cookbook by the editors of Good Housekeeping (Hearst Books, 2013, $30). “To help you spread the joy and chase away stress,” they’ve gathered tools, tips, and shortcuts for decorating and dining, such as this tempting turkey recipe.

TURKEY

Prosciutto-Wrapped Turkey Roulade
MAKES 8 MAIN-DISH SERVINGS

Rolled up with an herb blend and topped with slices of savory prosciutto, this variation on traditional roast turkey breast is stuffed with flavor.
1 lemon 1 cup packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves 6 cloves garlic, peeled 3 tablespoons fresh sage leaves 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary leaves 1 tablespoon fennel seeds ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 whole boneless turkey breast (4 to 5 pounds), skin removed (see Tip) 6 thick slices prosciutto (5 ounces; see Tip) 2 large red onions (8 to 10 ounces each), peeled and cut into ½-inch-thick rounds 1 tablespoon canola oil 1 cup lower-sodium chicken broth 1½ cups water (if needed) Rosemary and sage sprigs for garnish

1. Preheat oven to 375°F. From lemon, grate 1 teaspoon peel, transfer to food processor. Into small bowl, squeeze 1 tablespoon juice; set aside. 2. To food processor, add parsley, garlic, sage, rosemary, fennel seeds, salt, and pepper. Pulse until finely chopped. Transfer to medium bowl. 3. Place turkey on large cutting board, smooth side down. On left breast, cut along right side of tenderloin to separate from breast without cutting tenderloin off completely. Fold tenderloin back until flat but still attached to breast along left side. Repeat on right breast, cutting along left side of tenderloin and folding back. Cover surface of turkey with 2 large sheets plastic wrap. Using flat side of meat mallet or heavy rolling pin, pound turkey until about ¾ inch thick all over. Remove and discard plastic wrap. 4. Spread three-quarters of herb mixture in even layer on breast. Starting with short side, roll breast in jellyroll fashion. Place seam side down. 5. Rub outside of rolled turkey with remaining herb mixture. Cover top with prosciutto slices, overlapping slightly and tucking ends underneath turkey. Using 16-inch pieces of kitchen string, tie turkey tightly at 2-inch intervals. (Turkey can be wrapped tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerated overnight.) 6. Arrange onions in single layer on bottom of medium (14” by 10”) roasting pan. Place turkey on onions in pan. Brush turkey and onions with oil. Pour broth into pan. Roast for 1½ to 2 hours or until thermometer inserted into center registers 165°F. If pan seems dry after 45 minutes, add 1 cup water. 7. With tongs, transfer turkey to large cutting board and onions to serving platter. Cover turkey loosely with foil. Place roasting pan on burner. Heat to boiling on medium-high; whisk in reserved lemon juice. (If liquid in pan is minimal and tastes too salty, add ½ cup water along with lemon juice.) Boil 3 to 5 minutes or until reduced slightly, whisking occasionally. Slice turkey; place on platter with onions. Drizzle turkey with reduced pan juices. Garnish with rosemary and sage sprigs. TIP: For easier prep, ask your butcher to butterfly and pound the turkey breast for you so you can skip step 3. For easier wrapping, use slightly thicker (not paper-thin) slices of prosciutto. ■

PHOTO BY KATE MATHIS

PER SERVING: CALORIES About 340; FAT 5g (1g saturated fat); CHOL 155mg; CARB 8g; FIBER 2g; PROTEIN 62g

RECIPE FROM THE GOOD HOUSEKEEPING CHRISTMAS COOKBOOK, © 2013 BY HEARST BOOKS, AN IMPRINT OF STERLING PUBLISHING CO., INC.

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Sendik’s Food Markets
community

Where in the World? W

hile the intended use of our Sendik’s shopping bags is to carry groceries, we’ve heard there are many other great uses— from toting items to the office, school, or even around the world! Here are some globetrotting customers who have put their Sendik’s bags to good use.

The next time you’re in a faraway place and spot a red Sendik’s bag—or you’re traveling yourself—snap a picture and send it to us at sendiksmarket.com and click on “Where in the World.” (Please provide high resolution images and include your name and a few details, if you wish.)

Christine in Baraboo, WI

WISCONSIN

Svend in Frederikssund, Denmark

DENMARK

Chase and Jackson in Gulf Shores, AL

ALABAMA

Cave Creek, AZ

ARIZONA

Brandon, Tammy, Brandon, George, Marillyn, Jake, and Larry at Hotel Moloka’i in Kaunakakai, HI

HAWAII

RHODE ISLAND
Dennis and Rita in Jamestown, RI

Kath in Seward, AK

ALASKA

12 real food winter 2013

Sendik’s Food Markets
community

Mary, Hannah, and Emily at Milner Pass, CO

COLORADO

DID YOU KNOW?
Linda in Palmer, AK

ALASKA

Reuse your Sendik’s quality paper or plastic shopping bag and receive a 5¢ discount for every bag.

CALIFORNIA
Sue Olson at Candlestick Park in San Francisco, CA

Rod in San Elizario, TX

TEXAS

Ally, Noel, Katie, and Justin at Sabi Sands National Park in South Africa

SOUTH AFRICA

NEW MEXICO
Anne and Rod in Ruidoso, NM

Milvin, Mareta, Amanda, Jennifer, and Maricar in San Jose, Batangas, Philippines

PHILIPPINES

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Sendik’s Food Markets
baking

Gluten-Free s e i d o Go
A gluten-free diet doesn’t mean a treat-free diet when tempting cookies are on tap.

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he holidays are an especially enjoyable time with all the cookies, cakes, and decadent goodies shared in the various rounds of merry making—that is, unless you are gluten intolerant. That’s why we were happy to have a new book come across our desks just in time for the holidays that we can share with you— The Gluten-free Cookbook by The Australian Women’s Weekly (Sterling Epicure, 2013 $9.95). It features 50 recipes you can use throughout the year for breakfasts, lunches, kids’ parties, and sweets, including the following cookie recipe. While it does contain tree nuts, this recipe is gluten-free, wheat-free, and yeast-free.

Chocolate Pecan Cookies
MAKES 24 THIS RECIPE IS GLUTEN- FREE, WHEAT- FREE, AND YEAST- FREE.

STORAGE: Cookies can be stored in an airtight container for up to 1 week. ■
RECIPES REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION FROM THE GLUTEN-FREE COOKBOOK © 2013 BY STERLING EPICURE, AN IMPRINT OF STERLING PUBLISHING CO., INC.

PER SERVING: CALORIES 186; FAT 12.8g (4.7g saturated fat); CARB 15.8g; FIBER .8g; PROTEIN 1.8g

14 real food winter 2013

PHOTO BY ACP MAGAZINES LIMITED

1½ cups pecan pieces 1 stick butter, softened ½ cup superfine sugar ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 1 large egg ²⁄ 3 cup brown rice flour ½ cup cornstarch 5 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped 24 whole pecans 2 ounces bittersweet chocolate, melted

1. Preheat oven to 350°F/325°F convection. Grease baking sheets; line with parchment paper. 2. Process pecan pieces until ground finely. 3. Beat butter, sugar, vanilla, and pecan meal in small bowl with electric mixer until light and fluffy. Add egg; beat until combined. Stir in sifted flours, then chopped chocolate. 4. Roll rounded tablespoons of mixture into balls; place 3 inches apart on trays, flatten slightly. Top with whole pecans. 5. Bake cookies about 20 minutes. Cool on trays. 6. Drizzle melted chocolate over cookies.

Sendik’s Food Markets

A BETTER CHEDDAR
Deer Creek’s award-winning cheese: A good reason aged Wisconsin Cheddars are famous.

cheese

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t Sendik’s, we’re always looking for the best products, and when we met Chris Gentine, who presented Deer Creek to us, we immediately knew this was very special cheese. The Deer Creek line of award-winning cheddars are perfect examples of what aged Wisconsin Cheddars are famous for—the distinctively delicious flavor that makes you want to take another bite. A team of Wisconsin licensed cheese graders hand select the choicest vats, seeking only those that meet the standards of identity for body, flavor, texture, and finish. Not all blocks produced make the cut. In fact, some are utterly outstanding and still do not make the grade. Those that do become Deer Creek cheddars. The 3 Year Reserve highlighted here is always graded as AA, the highest grade, indicating exactly what defines a cheese in look, texture, and flavor. As the awards are piling up for these relative newbies, we think you’ll agree that they offer the best when it comes to cheddar.

3 YEAR RESERVE
The distinctively delicious taste comes directly from its main ingredient—wholesome milk from Wisconsin. Cows spend long days grazing on deep green grass and drinking clean, limestone filtered water.Their sweet, fresh milk is then blended together to produce a Cheddar cheese that is specifically crafted for aging. A team of Wisconsin licensed cheese graders hand selects only the best vats from the hundreds that are produced. As the cheese ages, they continually evaluate and inspect the cheese to ensure that the chosen vats meet the 38 specific standards of identity for flavor, texture, body, and finish indicative of a AA Grade Cheddar. We are proud that this cheese meets those standards and is the only Cheddar certified by the official Chief State Grader as Wisconsin’s Certified AA Grade Cheddar.
AWARDS:
• Third Place, American Cheese Society, 2013 • First Place, American Cheese Society, 2012 • Bronze, World Cheese Awards, 2011

VAT 17
The creation of Deer Creek Vat 17, with its deep, bold, and complex flavors, was not an accident. Rather, it was a quest to capture the best Cheddar attributes from around the world and blend them into one outstanding cheese. Multiple test vats were developed with variations in the procedure. These vats were then allowed to develop and blossom using proprietary aging techniques. During the two-year aging process, each vat was continually monitored and inspected to focus on the single combination that would produce the body, texture, and, most importantly, the flavor that would be pleasing to any Cheddar connoisseur around the world.The cheese in Vat 17 stood out above all others.
AWARDS
• Bronze, World Cheese Awards, 2012 • Second Place, American Cheese Society, 2012 • Gold, World Cheese Awards, 2011. ■

7 YEAR PROPRIETOR’S GRAND RESERVE
Deer Creek 7 Year Proprietor’s Grand Reserve Cheddar can best be described by the word “balance.” It is a balance of how the distinctively bold flavors give way to a rich, lingering finish. And it is a balance of how the texture remains firm and smooth without becoming dry and crumbly. It is this balance in taste, texture, and body that unfolds and becomes the kind of Cheddar the proprietor is proud to call his own.
AWARDS:
• First Place, American Cheese Society, 2013

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Sendik’s Food Markets
community support

The MACC Fund
Hope for Children with Cancer and Blood Disorders Through Research

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he MACC Fund (Midwest Athletes Against Childhood Cancer, Inc.), started 37 years ago when a two-year-old boy named Brett Doucette was diagnosed with leukemia. Brett is the son of Karen and Eddie Doucette, the colorful Milwaukee Bucks broadcaster who recently received the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame’s Curt Gowdy Media Award. The MACC Fund’s first success story, Brett is married and living in California. His illness served as the impetus for the MACC Fund to help children with cancer, and in the last decade, blood disorders such as sickle cell anemia and aplastic anemia. The MACC Fund began on the Milwaukee Arena floor during a Milwaukee Bucks game on December 10, 1976 during the retirement ceremony for Jon McGlocklin’s number 14 Bucks jersey. From this humble beginning, and thanks to the generosity of thousands of people, the MACC Fund has become a source of hope for children and their families. By year’s end, it will have contributed over $48 million to research, playing an important role in helping the overall cure rate for childhood cancer to rise from 20 percent to 80 percent.These are impressive statistics but, more importantly, represent the lives of children. As impressive as they are, they are far from the MACC Fund’s goal of life for all children battling cancer and blood disorders. Even children in the 80 percent success category can have “late effect” issues that require more research. The MACC Fund supports translational research in the MACC Fund Center at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin and scientific research in the Medical College of Wisconsin’s 6-story MACC Fund Research Center and the University of Wisconsin’s Carbone Cancer Center’s MACC Fund Childhood Cancer Research Wing. Research provides hope to a child, which is reflected in simple things many children take for granted. A child battling cancer or a blood disorder doesn’t take anything for granted. A day at school, a homecoming dance, prom, or graduation are all sources of celebration for these children, but none can compare to a birthday! MACC Fund supporters throughout the past 37 years have all played a role in helping these celebrations come true. It’s easy to help the MACC Fund—ride a bike, run, hit a golf ball, attend a fashion show or a concert, watch a basketball game or a televised auction, volunteer, purchase special grocery items at your favorite Balistreri Sendik’s store, buy a TODAY’S TMJ4 MACC*Star, sponsor an event, participate in an event, or simply make a donation at www.maccfund.org. All special events have provided “a good time for a good cause.”The MACC Fund affords a chance to provide a life-saving Gift of Hope to children battling cancer and blood disorders to give every child a fighting chance. ■
16 real food winter 2013

Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers smiled as he looked at a gift given to him from children featured in the Kohl’s “Aaron Rodgers 12 Days of Christmas” program in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. The kids “autographed” their pictures for Aaron to thank him for his support of the MACC Fund. The presentation took place as the 4th Annual “Evening With Aaron Rodgers” came to a close on May 14, 2013 at the Hyatt Regency Milwaukee.

Upcoming Programs and Events
NOVEMBER 5 Women for MACC’s “Couture for a Cure” Fashion Show presented by Boston Store, at the Hyatt Regency Milwaukee. MID-NOVEMBER The TODAY’S TMJ4 MACC*Star on sale at Balistreri’s Sendik’s Food Markets and Buddy Squirrel Stores. ($10) NOVEMBER 29–DECEMBER 27 Candy Cane Lane in West Allis, celebrating 28 years of “Sharing Christmas” NOVEMBER–DECEMBER 30th Annual Pepsi MACC Fund Holiday Program, “Say Pepsi Please.” Help the MACC Fund by purchasing Pepsi products. NOVEMBER–JANUARY 5th Annual Balistreri’s Sendik’s Markets MACC Fund Program. DECEMBER 1–12 Aaron Rodgers’ “12 Days of Christmas” sponsored by Kohl’s in the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel.
PHOTO BY BRIAN MALLOY FOR THE MACC FUND

DECEMBER 14 The TODAY’S TMJ4 Sports Auction 4 MACC on TODAY’S TMJ4 from 11 AM – 1 PM. DECEMBER 31 Linked Together for Hope 5K Run at State Fair Park. JANUARY 18, 2014 Laugh It Up Milwaukee’s “An Evening With Martin Short” benefiting the Jewish Community Center and the MACC Fund at the Pabst Theater. Please call 414-955-5830 or visit www.maccfund.org for more information or to make a donation. Follow the MACC Fund on Twitter and Facebook, too.

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