APRIL 2014

Bayside Church:
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PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

4 10 12

Don’t Like Church?

New Farmers Needed

Bayside Church attracts people with music, ministries, philanthropy.

Cooperative Extension trains beginning farmers.

Boston, Here She Comes

New York, New York!
Granite Bay’s Emerald Brigade performs at Carnegie Hall.

Granite Bay woman running in honor of cancer-stricken mom.

27 40

Well, I done did it! I got myself hitched! To be more accurate: By the time you read this, I will have (cross your fingers) hosted a fabulous celebration with my closet family and friends, and acquired my very own ball and chain. Growing up, and well into my 20s, I had never planned on getting married. On all the big to-do lists I made throughout my life — and there have been many — marriage was always conspicuously absent. Besides the philosophical issues I had with the idea of traditional marriage, being legally bound to another human being just didn’t coincide with my personal mantra of, “I do what I want!” How would I be able to follow my passions and harebrained ideas —

Feel The Love
Sena Christian Managing Editor

again, of which there have been many — if I had this other person hanging around all the time? But then as happens, my priorities shifted when I found someone I actually wanted to spend my life with who fully supports all my dreams and aspirations, and has given into those harebrained ideas … just the right amount. I also began to take more notice of my parents’ marriage, which has lasted 45 years: After they retired and their children had long since

moved out, it was their joy in one another that brought them true happiness. Eventually, my partner and I decided we wanted to make our own joy and love “official.” I guess I’ve come to recognize that nothing in life compares to the importance of love, and I’m grateful to have the right to have my romantic love legally recognized — a right sadly not granted to everyone. I’ve also realized that my marriage doesn’t have to fit with anyone else’s definition of the term. Instead, my partner and I will define our life-long commitment to one another for ourselves.
Sena Christian is the managing editor of the View. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaCChristian.

Finding Faith

Check out this roundup of local places to worship.

ALSO IN THIS ISSUE
Hot Property Eyes on Granite Bay Professional View Things to Do Daytripper Back and Forth 24 37 47 52 53 54

ON THE COVER:
Worship Pastor Lincoln Brewster is one of the main attractions at Bayside Church in Granite Bay.
COVER PHOTO • LANG LEW

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April 2014 Volume 24 • Number 4
Interim General Manager: Jeff Royce, (530) 852-0279, jeffr@goldcountrymedia.com General Manager, Gold Country Media: Jim Easterly, (530) 852-0224, jime@goldcountrymedia.com Managing Editor: Sena Christian, 916-774-7947, senac@goldcountrymedia.com Circulation Director, Kelly R. Leibold, 530-885-2471, kellyl@goldcountrymedia.com Advertising information: Rebecca Regrut, 916-774-7928, rebeccar@goldcountrymedia.com Production Supervisor: Sue Morin Circulation: 1-800-927-7355 or 916-774-7900

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Copyright 2014. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The publisher shall not be responsible for any liabilities arising from the publication of copy provided by any advertiser for the Granite Bay View. Further, it shall not be liable for any act of omission on the part of the advertiser pertaining to their published advertisement in the Granite Bay View. A publication of Gold Country Media.

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 3

CHRISTIANITY
For The Masses
Bayside Church believes practical, relevant teaching is catalyst for transforming lives
BY CHERISE HENRY

Bayside Church Senior Pastor Ray Johnston used to be an atheist, but exploration of the Christian faith changed his mind.
PHOTOS BY LANG LEW • GRANITE BAY VIEW

ayside Church prides itself on providing a highenergy, encouraging and welcoming place of worship for both people who love attending church and those who are hesitant to become part of a faith community. “When we started the church in 1995, we wanted to start a church specifically for the people who don’t like church,” said Senior Pastor Ray Johnston.

B

Bayside Church is based in Granite Bay with other locations in Midtown Sacramento, Folsom, Lincoln and coming soon to Rocklin. Before becoming a devout Christian himself, Johnston was an atheist. He understood the questions and concerns many people have about the Christian faith and the underlying reluctance to join a church community. Johnston eventually felt motivated to investigate Christianity, and eight months later determined that the faith appealed to him, and he hasn’t looked back. “The Christian church healed my image of God and myself. It healed my image of marriage,” Johnston said. “And I have no clue where I would be without doing life with the Christian church.” In addition to building a church that appealed to everyone, Johnston has a strong connection to youth and felt that

“The Christian church healed my image of God and myself. It healed my image of marriage. And I have no clue where I would be without doing life with the Christian church.”
Ray Johnston, senior pastor, Bayside Church

God was telling him that he “can screw up the choir (and) stained glass … but he better not drop the ball on kids and teenagers,’” Johnston said. “We speak teenager.” Bayside parishioner Cyndi Honnette praises the church for the direct impact and influence it has had on her two sons. “Our boys were super involved in youth group and serving oth- Worship Pastor Lincoln Brewster played music with Steve Perry • SEE BAYSIDE PAGE 6 of rock band Journey before joining Bayside Church.

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• APRIL

5

BAYSIDE:
Bayside Church Worship Pastor Lincoln Brewster gets parishioners inspired about their Christian faith through music.

Music Ministry

continued from 4 ers; it helped them get through those tough teenage years,” Honnette said. “I really attribute my kids growing up to how they are to being so involved in Bayside.” Worship pastor and musician Lincoln Brewster said Bayside is committed to being a church that’s comfortable for everyone. “We want to be a lighthouse, a place of refreshment, encouragement, help and hope for our entire community,” Brewster said. “All of us have issues, are broken people who are messed up. We are a bunch of misfits who love God and take Him seriously, and yet not take ourselves too seriously at the same time.” Brewster has a strong background in mainstream music, having played guitar for Steve Perry of the legendary band Journey, among other impressive accomplishments. Brewster left the musician lifestyle as a young Christian to pursue his calling into ministry, which eventually led him to

Senior Pastor Ray Johnston started Bayside Church in 1995, and the church now has several campuses throughout the greater Sacramento area.
Bayside Church. “My wife and I felt that God was calling us to Bayside to help build the church,” Brewster said. “And in my mind I had a vision of what worship could look like here, and Ray said, ‘Let’s go for it.’ The focus isn’t doing the music that I like
• SEE CHURCH PAGE 8

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continued from 6 necessarily; it’s what works for our church and our people who attend. We do music that works for them.” Brewster describes the service experience at Bayside as high-energy, exciting, encouraging and authentic. “It is a good mix of humor, head and heart,” Brewster said. “It’s not uncommon to laugh and cry in the same service.” Another leading theme within the Bayside community, according to Johnston, is “unleashing compassion,” which means fundraising efforts to serve others on local, national and global levels. “Good deeds lead to good will, which leads to openness in the good news,” he said. Efforts include collecting donations for local food banks, and once shutting down the church to encourage parishioners to serve on more than 125 community projects. Bayside Church offers a career coaching ministry for those people undergoing a job transition. The church also

CHURCH:

Humor, Head And Heart

The music of Worship Pastor Lincoln Brewster and his band inspires the crowd at Bayside Church.
raises money to rescue girls from sex trafficking in Cambodia. Each year, more than 1,000 high school students and adults travel to Mexico to build homes for people living in dangerous conditions. These are just some of Bayside’s many service projects. “Our family is very involved with the church programs, serving and volunteering,” Honnette said. “Bayside has added the completeness into our lives that I think everyone is looking for.”

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BY SENA CHRISTIAN

Granite Bay resident Laura Gordon is running in the Boston Marathon.
KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

unning 26.2 miles in the course of a morning may seem daunting to most people, as it does to Granite Bay resident Laura Gordon, but that’s what she’ll be attempting to do come April 21, the day of the Boston Marathon. Gordon said attempting this goal seems minor in comparison to her mother’s battle with cancer. Gordon, 49, will run the 118th Boston Marathon to raise money for the Dana-

R

Farber Cancer Institute. Well, she’ll run many of the miles, and walk, skip, jump the rest — doing anything it takes to cross the finish line. “I’m going to finish that damn race,” Gordon said. “Like my dad would say, ‘Come hell or high water.’” Gordon’s desire to participate in the marathon didn’t begin as a quest to raise money for the Boston-based cancer institute, instead spawning from the selfquestioning that occurred as her three sons became adults and she prepared to turn 50 years old. “It’s hard to give it up as a mom, to say, ‘OK, it’s my turn,’” Gordon said. Running started simply as something for herself, but has since morphed into something much bigger as she joins an estimated 750 runners in the Dana-Farber marathon group, aiming to reach a team goal of $5.3 million for cancer

research. Gordon hopes to raise $10,025. This money will support Dana-Farber’s Claudia Adams Barr Program in Innovative Basic Cancer Research, which is described on the organization’s website as a “new era of targeted, less-toxic therapy,” in contrast to less-effective conventional chemotherapy and its many side effects. Raised in the small farming community of Esparto, where her dad continues to organically grow almonds, Gordon attended college in Sacramento. She married and had children and relocated to Granite Bay to raise her family. “It was one of those dreams, one of the things we had to work for,” she said, of moving to Granite Bay. She and her husband, Dan, toiled for long hours running their carpet cleaning business. Gordon also worked as a social worker with pregnant

teenagers, until deciding to stay home with her children and run the family business. And for the next several years being mom was her No. 1 job. Three years ago, Gordon’s youngest son graduated from Granite Bay High School, and her mother was diagnosed with cancer. In 2011, Gordon’s younger sister, Sara Kinney, who lives in Boston, ran the city’s marathon in support of the Dana-Farber Foundation. Gordon was on the sidelines cheering her on; standing right across the street from where a bombing would occur two years later. “Every runner has likely heard of ‘Heartbreak Hill’ and what it takes to make it here, the mother of all marathons,” Kinney said via email. “I’ve trained in abysmal conditions of ice, rain, snow, sleet. Today, my sister travails that same arduous path.” Gordon felt inspired by her

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sister’s accomplishment to give running at try; at the time she weighed 210 pounds and couldn’t even keep up with her active niece and nephew — the children of her brother, who lives in Woodland. She has since dropped about 65 pounds. This new runner hated her newfound hobby. But she kept going. She signed up for Mama Bootcamp, held Saturday mornings at Maidu Park in Roseville, and began running 5Ks and 10Ks. She cried at the finish line of her first half-marathon. Gordon’s mother was cancer-free until nine months ago, and results of MRI and CT scans revealed the cancer had spread to her mouth and jaw bone, but the family

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Laura Gordon goes on a trail run through Roseville.
KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

rejoiced that it hadn’t progressed to her brain. Doctors removed 90 percent of their mother’s

palate and teeth. Rehabbing from surgery is manageable, Gordon said, except her 80-year-

old mother also has Alzheimer’s. The daughter has repeatedly tried to tell her mom why she’s travel-

ing to Boston this month, to no lasting avail. “Receiving the news of (our mom’s) recurrence was a devastating blow to our family,” Kinney said. “Laura could have easily packed it in and stopped training. Instead, she’s used the experience to become a stronger, tougher runner. I’m extremely admirable of her turning a delicate and adverse situation into a motivator.” Gordon thinks about her mother when she’s on the running trail — feet and body aching —

to keep motivated. She also thinks about the commitment of her father, who immigrated to the United States from Guadalajara as a farmworker and became a citizen in 1962 — after he had returned to Mexico to collect his wife. Gordon credits the support of family and friends with helping her hold it all together as she prepares for one of the biggest personal challenges of her life, running the Boston Marathon, and as she counts down to April 21. “The starting line can’t come fast enough,” Gordon said.
Reach Sena Christian at senac@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaCChristian.

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Granite Bay has many options for finding faith
ith the renewal of spring comes for some the desire for a renewal of the spirit. People want to do better, be better and alleviate suffering of their own and that of others. For some that means turning to their faith. Granite Bay offers many choices for those looking to join likeminded folks in the search for something higher than their everyday concerns. “As a painting reflects the nature and character of its painter, so do we as humans reflect our creator,” said Pastor Mike Harrison of Fellowship Church. “The human search for spiritual truth is nothing more

W

BY MARGARET SNIDER

than our natural desire to know our creator.” While there are differences in beliefs, doctrines, traditions, organization and practices among religions and places of worship, there is also much in common. “With our Christian friends we share a belief in Jesus Christ, the son of God,” said Dan Clift of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. “With all of our friends in Granite Bay, regardless of religious backgrounds, we share the desire to live in a community that values children, honesty, hard work and respect for law and order.” locally and around the world.
Chabad of Placer County

Where Do You Worship?
PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Pastor Mike Prater delivers a message to his congregation during Sunday service at Landmark Missionary Baptist Church in Granite Bay.

Bayside Church, with about 14,000 people attending their eight services each week at five area campuses, has a large effect on the community. “We want people to know that God has a good plan for you, your kids, your marriage, your career and your life,” said spokesman Mark Miller. “At Bayside, there is something for everyone and an opportunity for everyone

BAYSIDE CHURCH
Services: 4:15 p.m. and 6 p.m. Saturday; 8:15 a.m., 9:45 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 7 p.m. Sunday. Where: 8191 Sierra College Blvd., Granite Bay Info: (916) 791-1244, www.baysideonline.com

to get involved.” Bayside’s outreach ministries give people a chance to help those in need both

serves every Jewish person regardless of background. “We’re all about outreach and trying to bring people together, and giving people an opportunity to learn and grow in their Jewish knowledge and practice and education,” said Rabbi Yossi Korik.

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CHABAD OF PLACER COUNTY
Services: 10 a.m. Saturday Where: 4410 Douglas Blvd., Granite Bay Info: (916) 500-4522, www.jewishroseville.com

THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS
FOR GRANITE BAY RESIDENTS LIVING NORTH OF DOUGLAS BLVD.:
Services: 9 a.m. Sunday Where: 6460 Cavitt Stallman Rd., Granite Bay Info: (916) 206-4700, www.mormon.org

FOR GRANITE BAY RESIDENTS LIVING SOUTH OF DOUGLAS BLVD.:
Services: 1 p.m. Sunday Where: 7800 Santa Juanita Ave., Folsom Info: (916) 761-9322, www.mormon.org

The center’s preschool, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on weekdays, is open to the entire community, not just Jewish families. The Hebrew school on Sundays is for public or private school students who want to learn Hebrew language skills and gain knowledge of Judaism. Korik said he and his wife, Malkie, are a team. “I am the rabbi, but she’s the director of education,” Korik said. “We work together as pretty much co-directors of the Chabad Center.” There are more than 4,000 Chabad centers worldwide. “Chabad actually stands for three Hebrew words, which mean knowledge, wisdom and understanding,” Korik said. “The idea is to make the principles and concepts of Judaism

KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Rabbi Yossi Korik considers the Chabad Center in Granite Bay a place where people can grow in their Jewish knowledge, practice and education.
be understood and become internalized within a person … Another important element of Chabad is the idea of serving God with joy and optimism and a positive perspective.”
The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is geared

toward service. “It’s a totally

volunteer

church; no one is paid for their service,” said Dan Clift, twice former bishop in Granite Bay. “All of the leadership are lay ministers.” The church annually holds a community day of service, which in the past involved cleanup efforts at Granite Bay High School and the Ronald McDonald House at UC Davis

Medical Center. “The church is not a go to church on Sunday and that’s it for the week,” Clift said. “It’s a way of life, and it’s the way that we think Christ would have us live in taking care of one another, watching out for one another and providing service to our community.” Everyone is welcome to attend services. The church as a whole sends thousands of missionaries out into the world each year, and the Granite Bay congregations have close to 20 young men and women now serving for up to two years, as well as some adult couples.
East Parkway Church is affili-

EAST PARKWAY CHURCH
Services: 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Sunday When: 4700 E. Roseville Parkway, Granite Bay Info: (916) 781-2013, www.eastparkway.org

denomination. “(It) is an evangelical, Protestant denomination that traces its roots to the Great Awakening of the 1740s,” said Pastor Wayne Griswold. “As a local congregation, we are called and dedicated to the gospel of Jesus Christ.” There are Awana kids programs for children 4 years old through high school age, and
• SEE WORSHIP PAGE 14

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WORSHIP: Finding Your Faith
continued from 13 Mothers of Preschoolers — both of which are outreachrelated ministries designed to welcome new people from the community. Some parishioners participate in a prison ministry at Folsom State Prison, while others raise food and funds for the hungry. An annual toy and turkey drive and various rebuilding projects are other ways the church is involved in helping serve the community. “God does not call us to religious activity, mainly He calls us to himself,” Griswold said. “The more we seek Him who alone can ultimately satisfy the hunger of our soul — the more we seek God — the more satisfying life becomes.”
Fellowship Church partners with the Southern Baptist Convention for global missions and disaster relief, and with Willow Creek Association for leadership development. “We have some pretty simple values,” said Pastor Mike Harrison. “One is just relationships. We think that God is heavily invested in relationships, and we see as we read the Bible where he is committed to people … people matter to God, so they matter to us.” Fellowship Church works with Blood Source. Members go out with United Baptist Church to feed the homeless two days a week, and help provide all the food for the St. Vincent de Paul food pantry for the month of November. “We think that God teaches us that the primary thing in life would be, for those that follow Him, to be actually known by the way we love one another,” Harrison said. “So we try to learn how to do that — love others really well.”

KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Religious texts at the Chabad Center.

JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES
Services: Granite Bay Congregation, 1 p.m. Sunday, 7 p.m. Wednesday Where: 8370 Berg Street, Granite Bay Info: (916) 797-2040, www.jw.org

Bay Congregation of Jehovah’s Witnesses. “Every one of Jehovah’s Witnesses has a ministry that they carry out, and we all personally go out and engage in the ministry on a weekly basis, some on a daily basis.” Each year the church holds a commemoration of the Lord’s evening meal before his death. It falls on the same day as the beginning of the Jewish Passover each year and this year will be at 9 p.m. Monday, April 14 at the Kingdom Hall. “(There will be) a Biblebased talk and it goes into all the facts surrounding the death of Christ Jesus way back 2000 years ago and what it means to us today,” Nuckton said. “It would be well worth anyone’s time to attend.”

Landmark Missionary Baptist Church is an independent

FELLOWSHIP CHURCH
Services: 10 a.m. Sunday Where: 5635 Douglas Blvd., Granite Bay Info: (916) 791-4418, www.gofellowship.org

Jehovah’s Witnesses go back in history to the late 1800s. Now, there are nearly 8 million around the world. “We have extensive outreach to the community,” said Elder Henry Nuckton of the Granite

LANDMARK MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH
Services: 10:45 a.m. Sunday Where: 7150 Wildwood Place, Granite Bay Info: (916) 791-7046, www.landmarkroseville.org

Christian church dating back to its historical origins in Roseville in 1917. Now it is tucked away in a picturesque neighborhood alcove in Granite Bay, where it moved in 1980. Everyone is welcome to join or visit. “We’re very blessed to have a wide range from seniors all the way down to newborns and everything in between,” said Pastor Mike Prater. Among its efforts, the congregation reaches out into the homeless community. “We’re more traditional than a lot of churches nowadays,” Prater said. “We keep more of the traditional hymns, preaching — some of the ways that this church has always done things since the beginning. It really is something that is almost a dying breed.” The church is now beginning to offer services in Spanish. “We are in the infant stages of that,” Prater said. “We’re starting to work with it and I think it’s going to work out well.”
• SEE CHURCHES PAGE 44

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APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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ALWAYS IN HIS ARMS, LLC
What: Open house When: 1-5 p.m. Sunday, April 6 Where: 4270 Cavitt Stallman Road, Granite Bay Info: Call (916) 872-1119 or visit www.alwaysinhisarms.com

Serving Seniors
P
New assisted-living facility for seniors opens in Granite BY SENA Bay dential CHRISTIAN
living for the elderly, while following through on a plan she said God laid out before her some 14 years ago. She runs the service out of her home, which was originally a duplex before a year-and-a-halflong renovation combined the space and added wheelchair-accessible ramps and bathrooms. Residents have their

From left, Always in His Arms Founder Pres James, senior Margaret Dolce and her daughter Lori Clark visit with one another at James’s assisted-living facility in Granite Bay.
PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

res James has always possessed a fondness for the elderly and often finds herself gravitating to seniors at church to engage them in conversation and learn the details of their lives. As a registered nurse, she is also passionate about caring for the infirm. Now with her Granite Bay business, Always in His Arms, LLC, James is providing assisted resi-

privacy on one side of the house, while James and her five children, ages 7 to 15, remain onsite as well. “He said to me take care of my seniors and I’ll take care of you,” James said, in reference to God. The house can accommodate up to four residents at a time, and features a large outdoor patio and deck, laundry facilities, a vegetable and flower garden and sidewalk around the fenced

.6-acre property where residents can take walks. The home is only 2 miles from Kaiser Permanente Roseville Medical Center and 3 miles from Sutter Roseville Medical Center. Upon entering the home on Cavitt Stallman Road, a visitor will often consume the aroma of homemade whole wheat bread in the oven and chicken soup on the stove. James will prepare three nutritious meals plus snacks daily for resi-

dents, and help with feeding, bathing, grooming and medications, as needed. Always in His Arms charges a base rate of $2,500 a month, and the cost increases depending on the needs of the resident. James doesn’t yet have any residents, but is “trusting in God’s timing.” She has opened her home to 86-year-old Margaret Dolce twice on a daycare basis.

“Mom loves staying here because she loves Pres,” said Dolce’s daughter Lori Clark. “It’s just nice to be able to leave her here with peace of mind knowing she’s in good hands.” Thirteen years ago, James and her husband were raising a toddler and a baby and thought about how they might be able to operate a home for the elderly. In 2008, the couple separated and James returned to

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“He said to me take care of my seniors and I’ll take care of you.”
Pres James, founder, Always in His Arms

work as a nurse to earn an income on which to raise her five children. She sought help from God to figure out how she could stay home with her children, while financially providing for her family. “The answer was clear,” she said. James bought the Granite Bay house in 2009 and set to work transforming the space. She describes her house as Christ-centered, but open to all people regardless of faith. There are daily devotionals and the singing of traditional hymns by her children, who also play the piano. The children are homeschooled, which James said is beneficial to both the seniors and her children who will learn how

to serve the elderly. “I love that we can do this together; that’s part of the excitement of this,” James said. Always in His Arms is licensed through the state of California to provide residential care for the elderly. James said her goal is to take care of her residents as if they were a member of her own family. “I feel privileged that God would allow me this opportunity,” she said. “I still can’t believe it. I am still waiting for my first resident, and in His perfect timing, it will all come together.”
Reach Sena Christian at senac@goldcountrymedia.com. Follow her on Twitter, @SenaCChristian.

From left the James family: Joshua, 14, Noah, 12, Sarah, 15, Pres, Hannah, 7, and Abi, 10, prepare healthy snacks at Always in His Arms assisted-living facility in Granite Bay.
PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

TICKETS $35 in advance • $40 at the gate

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 17

dining view

BY TOBY LEWIS

Eat as much or as little as you like at Crossroads Café on the campus of William Jessup in Rocklin.
COURTESY PHOTOS • CROSSROADS CAFÉ

What: Farm-fresh cuisine served cafeteria style Hours: Monday - Friday: breakfast is served 7:30 to 9:30 a.m.; pizza, salad bar, soup and deli are available from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.; hot entree choices are served 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; dinner is served 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday: brunch is served 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.; dinner is served 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Location: 333 Sunset Blvd., Rocklin Info: www.williamjessup. cafebonappetit.com

here are two things I tend to avoid when it comes to eating — cafeterias and buffets. Maybe I am a bit spoiled, or maybe it’s because I have too many bad memories of school cafeteria lunches or the “slop” of the Marine Corps chow hall. Of course, when I was coming up through high school and on into my years of military service, the trendy “farm-tofork” restaurant movement was still decades away from gaining mass momentum. But as the typical American palate is evolving — growing more and more health conscious and demanding higherquality food with farm-fresh ingredients — you would think that school cafeterias and buf-

T

fet lines would follow suit. Well many are, and I recently discovered one local school cafeteria that is also jumping on the bandwagon. And it is open to the public. Crossroads Café at William Jessup University in Rocklin is doing things a little bit different from what you might expect at a typical school cafeteria, offering thoughtful, gourmet cuisine with a focus on locally sourced, fresh-from-the-farm ingredients. Several buffet stations are set up throughout the spacious, high-ceilinged dining room in an all-you-care-to-eat smorgasbord of food and drink — all for about 10 bucks. General Manager Danny Vasquez told me, not surpris-

ingly, that the majority of the café’s customers are students, teachers and faculty of William Jessup University. But, he said, thanks to a little publicity and a mounting reputation for quality, a growing portion of the café’s business is beginning to come in from outside the university. “For the past five or six months, we’ve been getting up to 18 percent of our business as walk-ins,” Vasquez said. “That is pretty extraordinary for us being so hidden.” Hidden is exactly the way I would describe Crossroads Café — in a good way. Everything at the café is made fresh daily, from scratch, and from ingredients that are sourced from within 150 miles

or less. I am told the café is managed by Palo Alto-based Bon Appetit Management Company, which also manages the acclaimed cafeteria at the Google campus in Sunnyvale. “We are very conscious of having a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options for our guests,” Vasquez said. “All of our meats are antibiotic-, hormone- and cage-free.” The way it works: Diners pay an up-front fee of $8.50 for breakfast, $9.50 for lunch and $10.50 for dinner (William Jessup students pay less) and then have free reign on all the food presented. There is a salad bar, deli bar, soup station and a hot line with burgers, fries, sliders and other

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APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

specials that change daily. There is also a pizza bar offering two varieties of pizza each day (one for carnivores and one vegetarian option), made from a secret in-house dough recipe. On my recent visit, I opted to pop in for lunch and (of course) I had to try everything. The salad bar looked quite appealing, and so I started there with a small mixed-green salad and also a sampling of the Udon noodle salad — bell peppers, sugar snap peas, edamame, water chestnuts and a house-made miso vinaigrette. There was also a grilled asparagus and smoked trout salad made up of mixed greens with hickory-smoked trout, cage-free hard boiled eggs and radish. The hot line on this day was featuring hot pastrami sliders with a choice of French fries or grilled vegetables. The fries were impressively crispy, yet seemingly devoid of grease, almost as if they were baked somehow and not fried. Also on the hotline was a

“We are very conscious of having a variety of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options for our guests.”
Crossroads Café isn’t your typical school cafeteria – in a good way.
choice of Japanese beef or Portobello mushroom curry. Both curries were served with a choice of brown or white rice, and both were delicious. The pizza bar was featuring a grilled sausage pizza, made from scratch with hand-tossed pizza dough, sausage, red onion, mushrooms, olives, traditional pizza sauce and three different kinds of cheese. There was also a creamy alfredo pizza with asparagus, arugula, alfredo sauce and cheese. Beverage options include a juice bar, lemon water, melon water, iced tea and a soda fountain. The thing I really enjoyed about this concept (aside from everything I tasted being quite delicious) is you can come in and eat as much or as little as you like. We are talking about quality, gourmet, farm-fresh cuisine for about 10 bucks. Where else in the region can you find that? There are several seating options, including the spacious
Danny Vasquez, general manager, Crossroads Café

dining room, a couple lounge areas with comfortable chairs and flat-screen TVs and a few private rooms. The place was not without some drawbacks, however (in my opinion). Trash cans are hard to find, and there are no bussers coming around to clear plates between courses. You are responsible for bussing your own table, so unless you go to the “dish pit” every time between courses, you will find the plates have a tendency to stack up at your table.

Also, the restrooms are outside of the cafeteria, so if you need to “go” at some point during your meal, you have to go outside and come back in through the front door of the cafeteria. This is a bit awkward and might present a bit of confusion, as it did for me when I explained to the host that my laptop and other gear were already laid out at the table in the corner. But, I have been told I can be a bit too critical at times. The way I see it, the value of what you get at Crossroads Café in the spacious and vibrant dining room by far outweighs any petty inconvenience you might feel by having to bus your own table. But I still don’t like having to clear my own plates. I guess I really am just spoiled.
Toby Lewis is a freelance writer and restaurant professional. Look to each month’s Dining View for his thoughts, insights and opinions about dining in and around Granite Bay. Follow him on Twitter, @TobLewis.

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• APRIL

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Recipe of the Month... Sausage Crusted Quiche
A quiche is a beautiful dish to serve for Easter brunch, dinner, or for any meal of the week. It is simple to make with just a few ingredients and tastes delicious. For the vegetables, I usually buy a pre-chopped medley in the produce section so I don’t have to buy 8 different types. If you don’t like pork, try turkey sausage. For the eggs, you can either use fresh whole eggs, a combination of eggs (4 whole and 4 whites), or an egg substitute.

INGREDIENTS:
• • • • One 12 oz package reduced fat breakfast sausage (Jimmy Dean brand) 6 whole eggs, 1 16 oz carton egg substitute, or a combo 1 cup chopped fresh vegetables (red/green peppers, onions, spinach, mushrooms, zucchini, etc 1/2 cup Reduced Fat Cheddar Cheese, Kraft brand or similar, shredded

Makes 4 servings
• • • 1 garlic clove, minced 1 tsp. olive oil Salt and Pepper to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:
In a pie plate, spread the sausage with a large spoon evenly on the bottom and up the sides. Place in pre-heated oven for 10 minutes at 400 degrees. While sausage is cooking, heat olive oil and cook the garlic for 1 minute on medium; add the chopped vegetables, stir and sauté until onions are softened, about 3 minutes. Add a dash of salt and pepper. Turn off heat and let sit. When the sausage is done, take plate out of oven and pat the sausage with a paper towel to remove any excess grease. In a separate bowl, add the eggs and whip for about a minute; mix in the shredded cheese and vegetable medley, mix quickly and immediately pour mixture over the sausage. Place the pie plate back in the oven and bake at 375 for about 15 minutes, or until the egg is set. When the quiche is done, remove from oven and cut into 4 sections. Serve warm. Nutritional Analysis: Each serving contains approximately 28 grams of protein, 3 grams of net carbohydrate, 15 grams of fat and 285 calories.

Paula Hendricks, Nutrition and Wellness Consultant

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APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

utch Bros. Coffee has opened in Granite Bay serving their uniquely named coffee mixes, including the Kicker, Annihilator, ER-911, Cocomo and several other early morning boosters. The coffee shop is run by owners Brian and Maddie Place. The couple has been with Dutch Bros. Coffee for seven years and made the move to the greater Sacramento area with the intent of opening up their own franchise, Maddie Place said. “We have plans to put one in Roseville, too,” she said. March 7 marked their grand-opening celebration, as the business gave away free 16 oz. cups of coffee to patrons. Dutch Bros. Coffee is located at the corner of Douglas Boulevard and Auburn-Folsom Road in the Granite Bay Village Shopping Center, and is only the Brian Place and his wife, Maddie, make coffee drinks for third Granite Bay coffee provider after Starbucks and customers at the Dutch Bros. Coffee stand they opened Peet’s Coffee & Tea. in Granite Bay.

D

PHOTOS BY PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Maddie and Brian Place recently opened Dutch Bros. Coffee in Granite Bay.

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Freshly Squeezed
Jamba Juice on Sierra College Boulevard in Roseville is back under the management of cousins and business partners Trevor and Jeremy Sanders, who previously owned two dozen franchises before selling them back to the parent company. Under their management, they’ve embraced Jamba Juice’s newest level of premium juices, which are freshly squeezed in front of the customer. What separates the Sanders’ outlet from other area Jamba Juices is that they said they are the only one currently offering the freshly squeezed premium juices. Those include the Great Greens!! drink, which has chia seeds, super greens, apple, cucumber and lemon, and the Veggie Harvest, which consists of beets, carrots, super greens, apple and ginger, among other newly minted fruit and vegetable drinks. “We have a lot of juice recipes,” Jeremy Sanders explained. Trevor Sanders said the choice to include premium fresh juice drinks on the menu was easy because it caters to the wants and lifestyles of their local clientele. The cousins have also remodeled the location, giving it a new look and feel.
~ Philip Wood

Zack Parham pours a freshly squeezed Orange Reviver, which includes orange, carrot, banana, apple, beet and chia seed juice mix, at Jamba Juice on Sierra College Boulevard.

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8749 Auburn Folsom Rd. Granite Bay • 916-791-1086
22 APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

LARGE QUANTITY DISCOUNTS FOR BUSINESS!

(Close to Ace Hardware. Corner of Douglas Blvd.)

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Granite Bay View Mixer
on Thursday, March 20th
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• APRIL

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hot property

The one word to describe this Granite Bay house: perfect.
COURTESY PHOTOS • KELLER WILLIAMS REALTY

Summer beckons with this swimming pool and backyard.

f it’s the ultimate in modern and spacious family living you’re looking for, look to 4215 Rolling Oaks Drive for your upcoming move. The home is perfect! Set at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac in a highly respected neighborhood, the house rests adjacent to a lush nature trail and is filled with outstanding amenities that your family will love. Start with the backyard. You can feel summer fun just around the corner, and you won’t want to be anywhere else come pool season. The nearly one acre lot has something for the swimmer, the sunbather, the outdoor barbeque enthusiast and the party maven. There’s even plenty of room in

I

BY EILEEN WILSON

the side yard for the dogs. The pool area includes sheeting waterfalls, a custom hot tub with fountain and numerous covered and uncovered patio areas that are ideal for outdoor dining. The yard even includes forested areas and flagstone walking paths. Back indoors, the best way to describe the home is fresh. Classic bones enhanced with fresh new details give this turnkey property a brand new feel. Interior designers with great style and elevated taste created a home that feels entirely livable with upscale attitude. The sprawling floor plan includes arches, columns and custom ceiling treatments, as

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APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

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well as custom ceiling fans throughout. One of the fabulous features of the home is the remote master wing. This is a master that was designed to be the ultimate retreat. The spacious area has a side view to the pool. The wing has access to the backyard, as well, and is located steps away from the large hot tub. The master is outfitted in rich custom colors in restful blues and browns, and the room includes crown molding and a specialized ceiling treatment. The room also includes a formal fireplace and a modern bath with dual marble vanities, a sunken and jetted tub and a private rain head shower that is surrounded in glass block. Views from the bathtub are of beautiful and shady redwoods. When you’re ready for family time, it’s easy to picture everyone joining it together in the warm kitchen. Honey colored cherry cabinets are paired with warm granite tiles and a wood hood and fan, creating a lovely focal

Honey colored cherry cabinets are paired with warm granite tiles in the kitchen.

HOT PROPERTY
Where: 4215 Rolling Oaks Drive,
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point in the highly functional space. The breakfast area offers semi-circular windows that take advantage of the large backyard and pool area views.

These windows are mirrored in the spacious upstairs game room, as well. Kitchen amenities include double sinks with convenient tall faucets, a dishwasher, a

five-burner cook top and dual ovens that include a microwave and oven combination. A long center island offers ample seating for friends and family. The family room includes

spectacular views to the outdoors and a granite-fronted fireplace. Guest bedrooms in the home are filled with designer paints and touches, including a room with en-suite bath, window seats and a remote downstairs guest bedroom — the perfect location for your summer guests. This home is smart. A laundry room doubles as a large mud area with an additional storage room, including coat racks and organizers. The home includes central vac, a wholehouse fan and too many custom features to list. Start the summer off right — in a beautiful pool, in a beautiful home, in a beautiful neighborhood.

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26 APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

In The Beginning
Extension aims to teach beginning farmers the ropes

farm-to-fork

Shanon Ousley, left, and Michael Whamond operate organic Hillview Farms in Auburn.
PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

hether driven by an idyllic view of working with the land or a commitment to the local food movement, farming in the Sierra foothills is attracting smart and passionate adherents. Those tasked with supporting agriculture in Placer County are making sure this community of small-scale farmers and ranchers has the tools needed to be successful. Farming is a business, after all, and a notoriously difficult one. At the turn of the 20th century, the agricultural sector boomed in the foothills. But competition from growers in the valley and technological progress in packing and shipping eventually meant a sharp decline in farming in the area in the second half of the 1900s. All these years later, agricultural trends continue to shift.

W

BY SENA CHRISTIAN

“The number of small farms in Placer/Nevada is increasing, but land in agriculture is declining,” said Cindy Fake, horticulture and small farms adviser for the University of California Cooperative Extension for Placer and Nevada counties. “Large farms are being sold for development, but small farms are proliferating. More than 80 percent of the farms in Placer are under 50 acres.” The Extension aims to support new and beginning farmers who are entering the profession at just the right time, considering agriculture is experiencing a nationwide decline and the average age of the American farmer is 58 years old. That means a lot of farmland will soon change hands. The romanticism of farming in the American
• SEE FARM PAGE 28

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FARM: continued from page 27
West is intoxicating: The soil and climate are ideal. But California is deeply immersed in a historic drought that threatens the livelihood of our booming agricultural sector. Placer County had 1,488 farms at the time of the 2007 USDA Agriculture Census (preliminary results for the 2012 census were released in February and the full census is scheduled for May). The number of small farms in Placer grew 3.5 percent from 2002 to 2007, and Fake said she has received an “upsurge” in calls from prospective farmers since then. Over that same time period, Nevada County experienced a 15 percent growth, which Fake said is significant to Placer County because many of those growers participate in our local farmers markets.

Ag Census Results
Across America, mid-size farms are being lost, while the largest farms keep getting big-

ger, according to the census. About 2.1 million farms were reported in 2012, down from about 2.2 million in 2007. This farmland covers 914 million acres, and the average size of a farm is 434 acres. The median size is 80 acres. The vast majority of farms, at 75 percent, gross less than $50,000 a year. While the majority of American farmers are still white men, the number of minority farmers experienced a nearly 7 percent increase since the last census. The number of women farmers sharply increased in the early-aughts, and this group continues to compose 14 percent of principal operators; but men and women appear to have left farming at the same rate. Women farmers tend to operate small-scale, diversified farms that produce food for direct sale— rather than large commodity farms, according to Leigh Adcock, executive director of the Women, Food and Agriculture Network, in a press release. The 2007 census showed a 30 percent increase in the number

of female principal operators since 2002, which is when the census form first included space for two primary operators, an improved sampling technique that may account for some of that jump.

IN THE “BEGINNING FARMER ACADEMY,” PARTICIPANTS LEARN:
• Production skills • Market knowledge and marketing skills • Business skills and understanding that agriculture is an economic activity needed to meet the demand for safe, high-quality, fresh, local food • Importance of farming or ranching as a business. A farm is only sustainable as long as the farmer is sustainable. The farm or ranch supports the farmer; the farmer does not subsidize the farm. Profitable farms are difficult to develop, as costs of production are high due to land costs, labor costs and lack of an agricultural labor pool in this area. • Scale. Many people think they can make a living on an acre or two of vegetables or fruits. That’s possible for a couple of crops, but in general, at least 10 acres are needed to be profitable. • Access to land, which is a serious constraint for livestock producers, as that type of production is much more extensive and requires large contiguous acreage, especially of irrigated pasture, to produce efficiently. • Efficiency. Too many beginning farmers try to do too much with their operations before developing skills and knowledge. ~ Cindy Fake, horticulture and small farms adviser, UC Cooperative Extension

Informed Farmers Needed
The latest census indicates that California remains the largest agricultural state. There are 77,864 farms in California, which is down from 81,033 at the time of the last census. Acreage has fallen by about 207,000; most farms are between one acre and 49 acres and the average age of a Californian farmer is 60 years old. The aging of today’s farmer is one of the reasons the Extension wants to attract new and beginning farmers to grow fruits and vegetables and raise livestock. New farmers are those who have farmed for less than a year or who have not yet started commercial operations and, using the USDA definition, a beginning farmer or rancher is

Hillview Farms sells produce at a stand on their property in Auburn.

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APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

someone with 10 years or less in operation, Fake said. According to the Extension, the acreage of mandarins, wine grapes, ornamentals, and direct market vegetables and flowers is increasing — if slowly — and new farmers and ranchers are joining the ranks each season. But the Extension doesn’t just want more farmers: They want informed farmers who know what they’re undertaking. On the first weekend in April, the UC Cooperative Extension is hosting a two-day intensive introduction academy for beginning farmers planning to start a small commercial farm or ranch. Attendees learn about marketing, business and economic planning, and come out of the workshop with an action plan for launching an operation. The Beginning Farmer Academy, which Fake began in 2004, typically has three times as many applicants as it can accommodate. The Extension also offers farmer-tofarmer networking breakfasts, hosts an email listserv for ideas to be exchanged; and offers ongoing workshops with agricultural professionals. “Probably the most important thing new farmers and ranchers need is to understand the

business side of farming and its relationship to sustainability,” Fake said. “Most of our beginning farmers have little experience or knowledge of agriculture, as they did not come from farming or ranching families. The majority tends to be well educated, smart and passionate about agriculture, but they have a lot to learn.” Michael Whamond grows around 40 varieties of seasonal vegetables on his three-acre Hillview Farms in Auburn. This first-generation farmer and his girlfriend, Shanon Ousley, took over the operation, started by his parents, about a year ago and this season is the first time they will sell vegetables for market. “I didn’t come from a farming family, or get my bachelor’s degree in agriculture, so as one can imagine I had quite a learning curve ahead of me,” Whamond said. “The UCCE office was my saving grace when it came to learning everything I needed to know to kickstart my dream of starting a farm.” Whamond — who farms sustainably using cover groups, organic fertilizers and habitat for beneficial insects—said he has been paired with a veteran farmer to mentor him through his farming adventure.

Michael Whamond looks over an onion he pulled from the ground that he grows organically at Hillview Farms in Auburn.
PHOTOS BY PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

“From business to production skills they have launched me into a rewarding career,” Whamond said. “I have taken almost every course they offer, from a three-day business course to pest management. I honestly would not be where I am today without the help they have provided me.”
Reach Sena Christian at senac@goldcountrymedia.com.

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30

APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Get Into The Zone
Orangetheory Fitness opening in Roseville
BY MATTHEW WHITLEY

f you’ve recently driven down Douglas Boulevard in Roseville, you may have noticed a bright orange bike outside the Rocky Ridge Town Center, and wondered why it was parked there. The bike is all part of an effort by a soon-to-open fitness studio to drum up business and get people excited about its unique approach to exercise. The business in question is Orangetheory Fitness, which is part of a Florida-based company

I

that will open in Roseville on April 3. The “orange” theory behind this workout involves a 60-minute session broken into two components: cardiovascular and strength training. The exerciser is connected to a heart rate monitor and the results light up on a giant screen located above the exercise machine. The trainer assists each client with entering the ideal “orange zone.” The orange zone is the optimal rate at which the

Former MLB player Ralph Lagas and his wife, Heather Story-Lagas, are opening an Orangetheory Fitness Studio in Roseville.
MATTHEW WHITLEY • GRANITE BAY VIEW

human body burns calories and increases energy, according to Orangetheory. Here’s the science: After a cardiovascular workout, the body needs oxygen at a higher rate

than before the workout, which means the body burns calories as if it were still working out. This is known at EPOC, or excess post-exercise oxygen consumption. For

instance, after burning an average of 900 calories during the one-hour workout, the body will burn even more for the next 36 hours. The local Orangetheo-

ry studio is run by owners and Granite Bay residents Ralph Lagas and Heather Story-Lagas. Both athletes, Ralph Lagas, a former professional baseball
• SEE ORANGE PAGE 32

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continued from 31 player with the Montreal Expos, and his wife, Heather, a long-distance runner who grew up running track, learned about the Orangetheory fitness concept from friends. They flew out to Florida to try it out, loved it and decided to open a location in Roseville. Heather Story-Lagas also owns a Massage Envy in Monterey and calls herself a serial entrepreneur. “Being healthy makes a difference in people’s lives. If you’re healthier, you’re happier.” Heather Story–Lagas said. “We pride ourselves in being everything a gym isn’t.” They’re so sure customers will like the different approach that they offer a money-back guarantee. If a customer commits to 12 workouts in a one-month period and does not see any results, the business will refund the client’s money. Unlike a gym, there is no long-term membership required. Customers belong to the studio on a month-to-month basis. Because the workout consists of both cardio and strength-training, customers can try out a variety of exercise options, such as water

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rowing machines, treadmills, medicine balls, kettle balls, Reebok steps and more. The trainers mix these activities up, constantly changing each workout to prevent the exerciser from reaching a plateau. Orangetheory trainer Daniel Williams is making a long commute from Roseville to Vacaville because he believes so much in the concept and business. “I can create a workout but it’s not proven to have the efficiency of an Orangetheory workout,” Williams said, adding that this type of workout has shown quality results for exercisers. All Orangetheory trainers must obtain national accreditation as a Certified Personal Trainer, as well as be CPR certified.

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APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

The Gift That Keeps On Giving
Granite Bay resident Glenn Allen puts the finishing touches on a watercolor painting.
PHOTOS BY PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Granite Bay senior donates paintings to friends, volunteers
BY ANOKINA SHAHBAZ

W

hen Granite Bay resident Glenn Allen picked up a brush in an art class for the first time at age 63, he had no idea his pastime would turn into more than just a hobby. Now, almost 15 years and 210 paintings later, his love for the craft and the joy he feels sharing it with others has only grown. Allen’s paintings have won several ribbons at the Gold Country Fair in Auburn. With the popularity of his work, Allen received encouragement to open up a studio, but he had no interest in that. “I’m not in it for the money,” Allen said. What keeps him painting is seeing the joy his artwork brings to others when he gives his watercolors away as gifts. Born in San Francisco, Allen did not have a strong affinity for
• SEE PAINTER PAGE 34

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 33

PAINTER:

Churches And Missions

Glenn Allen often paints churches and religious buildings.
before moving on to another. It usually takes him about six hours to finish one piece. Eventually, Allen began giving his paintings away to friends and family, and then extended his reach to volunteers and members in his church and local community. Having been a volunteer for a variety of causes over the years, Allen makes it a habit to donate his paintings to other people who give of their time. Allen has frequently painted Granite Bay’s St. Joseph Marello Catholic Church, which he attends with his wife, Janet. He donated one painting to Deacon Dennis Gorsuch and his wife Jo, and a reprint is housed in the pastor’s church office. Other recipients of his donated work include local businesses, banks and museums. “Glenn is a true gentleman who is blessed with tremendous talent,” Deacon Dennis Gorsuch said. “He is also a man of great faith, who shares his love with others by giving them memorable paintings. Each of Glenn’s individualistic works show that he has given of himself.” Allen personalizes the painting he plans to give away. One such painting that was especially meaningful to him was of an owl he did for a woman who had surgery. She was touched by the piece, and told Allen that whenever she looked at the owl, she saw God returning her gaze. “That’s what you get back, which makes me happy,” Allen said. He has also painted a totem pole from British Columbia for one California State Indian Museum volunteer, and another for a dog owner whose dog, Miss Grace, passed away. When he’s feeling down, Allen said, all he has to do to cheer up is read one of the many thank you cards he has received over the years from recipients of his paintings. “That’s what keeps me going,” he said. “I look at my cards and see why I’m doing this.”

PHOTOS BY PHILIP WOOD • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Many of Glenn Allen’s watercolor paintings include churches. He’s also painted 19 of California’s 21 missions. He’s in the middle of painting No. 20. continued from 33 painting as a child or through much of adulthood, but the onset of retirement elicited a desire to pick up the hobby. His first class with instructor Pat Singleton at the Placer School for Adults introduced him to watercolor. He learned the techniques of using color to enhance depth perception, how to paint proper composition and how to construct trees and buildings. Allen’s second
teacher, Rosy Walcott, showed him how to paint on location through a series of field trips. “Both have been invaluable to the many seniors who take their classes,” Allen said of his teachers. He encourages other seniors to take up art. “It is also a chance to meet other people of similar interests.” Soon Allen discovered his favorite subjects: seascapes, lighthouses, old barns and missions. He has painted 19 of California’s 21 missions. From San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo Mission and the Basilica San Diego de Alcala, to the Mission San Juan Capistrano, many of these were painted on site. He is currently working on a painting of the Mission San Fernando Rey de Espana. “There are three ways I paint — from a photograph, onsite or in my head,” Allen said He completes one painting

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in brief

View Going Glossy
U
gh, it’s so boring to stay the same all the time. Change is the essence of life! Don’t you agree? With the goal to keep evolving, the View will become a full-glossy magazine starting with the May issue. We strive to include top-notch, interesting editorial content within each issue and now we’re also hoping to look a little prettier to appeal to both our readers and advertisers. Speaking of advertising, if you’d like to see your business advertised within the View’s new glossy pages, contact our magazine’s sales consultant Rebecca Regrut at rebeccar@goldcountry media.com. We’ve also launched a new-and-improved website for the View, which you can see at www.granitebayview.com.

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Eating Up For Emerald Brigade
E

eyes on granite bay
David Hays looks over one of the many auction items at the Granite Bay High School Emerald Brigade Crab Feed that benefits the band program. Auction items included Sacramento Kings tickets and a golf trip to a Maui resort. Emerald Brigade Jazz Band members Eric Jacobs, left, and Teddy White play with the rest of the band at the crab feed.
• SEE MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE 38

merald Brigade members, parents and supporters feasted on crab during a feed March 15 at Lutheran Church of the Resurrection in support of Granite Bay High School’s marching band. Funds raised from the sixth annual event help cover the cost of instruments, instructors’ stipends and parade and field show competition expenses. The Emerald Brigade includes a jazz band, concert band, winter guard and winter percussion.
~ Kim Palaferri

Kelsey Hag and Anissa Carter walk through the crab feed trying to raise some extra money by selling raffle tickets for the Emerald Brigade.
PHOTOS BY KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

KCRA’s Mallory Hoff emcees the crab feed on March 15.

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Leah Thomas ties a bib on to her father, Val Thomas, at the Granite Bay High School crab feed while mom, Beth Thomas, samples the goods.

Stacey Cook drops her raffle ticket into a box for a wine basket at the crab feed. The annual event helps raise money for the Emerald Brigade.

38

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• APRIL

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Granite Bay High School band plays Carnegie Hall
COURTESY PHOTOS • MARILEE ARMSTRONG

Emerald Brigade Overtakes New York

Emerald Brigade students and chaperones get stuck overnight in Houston on their return trip and sleep on cots at the airport.

“It was an incredible experience. We played where Tchaikovsky and the Beatles have played.”
Emily Wagner, bassoon player, Emerald Brigade

Members of Granite Bay High School’s Emerald Brigade line up for a tour of Rockefeller Center in New York City in March. The musicians were in the Big Apple to perform at Carnegie Hall.

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t was below freezing in New York City, but 110 members of the Granite Bay High School Emerald Brigade Band braved the cold for the honor of performing at the Big Apple’s famed Carnegie Hall. They were participating in the prestigious New York Wind Band Festival and, on March 4, performed for the first time a new score by

I

Ramon Castillo, a professional composer from the Boston Composers’ Coalition. Lynn Lewis has directed the Emerald Brigade Band for nine years, and described the New York experience as one of the best weeks of her life. “Looking at the kids’ faces when they walked through the door and onto the stage is something I’ll never forget,” Lewis said. Granite Bay High stu-

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dent Vishnu Dodballapur, who plays drums, said performing at Carnegie Hall was awesome and his first time playing on such a big stage. He said he enjoys being part of the band and has made a lot of great friends. “When you spend 3035 hours a week with those guys, you get to be a tight-knit team and feel good about yourself and everybody else,” Dodballapur said. As for becoming a drummer, well that was a bit of luck: He couldn’t decide between oboe and drums, so he flipped a coin. “The coin landed on tails,” he said. Fellow musician Emily Wagner, who plays bassoon, has been in a band since sixth grade when she began with the flute. She also plays trombone and violin. When she walked into Carnegie Hall, the first thing she noticed was its beauty. “It’s a white building,

40

APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

COURTESY • MARILEE ARMSTRONG

From left: Emerald Brigade musicians Sonia Matheus, Mikayla Hartford, Anissa Carter, Lucas Mackey, Becca White, Emily Wagner and Trey Armstrong get ready to board a plane from Sacramento International Airport to New York City.

COURTESY • DAVID FURMIDGE

Under the direction of Lynn Lewis, the Emerald Brigade performs an original composition by Ramon Castillo at Carnegie Hall in March.
ornate, incredible and when we ended the piece we were playing, you could hear an echo and it was beautiful,” Wagner said. “It was an incredible experience. We played where Tchaikovsky and the Beatles have played.” About the band members, Emily said they are the people she’s closest to and considers them her family. Anissa Carter, who plays flute with the band, has been playing the instrument for almost eight years. Playing at Carnegie Hall was absolutely unforgettable, she said. “Being on such hallowed ground and knowing who had performed there before us was a truly humbling experience,” Carter said. “We found it nearly impossible to sound bad on a stage with such incredible acoustics. Looking out onto a nearly sold out hall made our appearance feel like a professional performance with a captivated audience.” She said the hall itself was stunning, with gorgeous gold and ivory decor on the stage and red velvet on the seats. Carter loves being a part of the Emerald Brigade because she always feels welcome at school and feels lucky to have a home and family there that she can count on. “Band is a wonderful music experience and one that I’ve learned a lot from,” Carter said. New York was a whiz of a tour for the teenagers. Band members climbed to the top of the Empire State Building, saw the musical “Wicked,” took a dinner cruise on the Hudson River and visited the Statue of Liberty, Rockefeller Center, Central Park and Times Square. Dodballapur enjoyed touring the city with his friends, while Wagner felt lucky to be part of playing Carnegie Hall and being in New York City: “I loved the history and how every building, park and fountain seemed to have a story behind it.” As for Dodballapur, he has one piece of advice for any future Emerald Brigade musicians who may find themselves performing in New York in March: “Wear a warm jacket.”

“Being on such hallowed ground and knowing who had performed there before us was a truly humbling experience. We found it nearly impossible to sound bad on a stage with such incredible acoustics. Looking out onto a nearly sold out hall made our appearance feel like a professional performance with a captivated audience.”
Anissa Carter, flute player, Emerald Brigade

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

• APRIL

41

Cutest Critter

in brief

Pet Photo Contest
Hosted by : The Granite Bay View, Douglas Feed and Pet Supply and The Doggie Bag
COURTESY • SOFIA GUTIERREZ

Granite Bay High School students Austin Williams and Trevor Befort celebrate their win of Universal Technical Institute’s Top Tech Challenge.

PRIZE: $100 (store credit) Eligible: dog, cat, bird, small animals Provided by: Douglas Feed and Pet Supply PRIZE: $50 Gift Card Eligible: dog, cat, bird, small animals Provided by: Douglas Feed & Pet Supply PRIZE: One Year Supply of Dog Washes Eligible: dog Provided by: Douglas Feed and Pet Supply PRIZE: $25 Gift Card Eligible: dog Provided by: The Doggie Bag
Entries must be emailed, mailed or dropped off at the Granite Bay View office by 5pm on May 15th. No late entries will be accepted. Employees of Gold Country Media are welcome to submit photos but are not eligible for any prizes.

Granite Bay Teens Sweep Tech Challenge
wo Granite Bay High School seniors came out on top in the first Top Tech Challenge at Universal Technical Institute in Sacramento on Feb. 8. Teams from Northern California and the Central Valley tested their knowledge of vehicle parts, diagnostics, brakes and electrical systems. Granite Bay High’s Austin Williams and Trevor Befort, who participate in the Placer County Office of Education’s 49er Regional Occupational Program at Woodcreek High School, ended with the highest score during the day-long competition. The teens each won a $1,000 scholarship to UTI in Sacramento. Both Williams and Befort plan to attend UTI after graduating high school this spring, according to a press release. In addition to scholarships, the Placer County team won a large SNAP-ON Tool Box and tools, valued at $10,000, for their school’s program.
~ Sena Christian

T

CORRECTION
The March “Dining View” on Grandma’s Kitchen incorrectly identified when the restaurant is open for business. The eatery is open 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Grandma’s Kitchen is located at 8425 Sierra College Blvd. in Granite Bay. Carnitas Street Tacos For more information, are a breakfast favorite call (916) 780-6700. at Grandma’s Kitchen.

PET ENTRY FORM: Pet’s Name:_____________________________________ Owner’s Name(s)________________________________ Submitted by____________________________________ Address________________________________________ City_______________________________Zip_________ Phone__________________________________________
42 APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Mail or drop off entries: Granite Bay View 188 Cirby Way Roseville, CA95678

or email a photo to: GBView@goldcountrymedia.com For further information or questions call 916-786-8746

And the Winner is...The winning pets will be featured in the June issue of the Granite Bay View.

Get to Know

Oakmont of Roseville
1101 Secret Ravine Parkway, Roseville (916) 771-6700 oakmontofroseville.com

Oakmont of Roseville
hen you think of having your loved one move into an assisted-living community, do you wonder if they will be getting gourmet food? Will they ever experience a culinary display like one offered in a fivestar restaurant? Meet Chef Rina Younan, executive chef at Oakmont Senior Living of Roseville. With her extensive background in creating delightful cuisine dating back to her childhood, Younan followed her passion into college at San Diego Culinary Institute. After she worked her way up the culinary ladder, learning as much as she could from other executive chefs, Younan

and Mediterranean food influence. garden at the Roseville location Each meal is made to order. Much of to coordinate with her own the menu’s creativity is influenced by seasonal cooking. residents who want to re-create “Using fresh vegetables that family recipes. I have picked from the garden “I have one resident who handed is kind of who I’ve become in me a packet of her mother’s recipes my cooking,” she shared. and said, ‘I had to get permission With 85 residents fed from my family, please be dear to gourmet meals three times per them,’ and on the next Saturday I reday, Younan relies on her staff created her mother’s stuffed cabbage to help her create restaurantrolls for her and her family … and style dining. Each day, she that was a special night, and her creates a new specialty item whole family was pleased that I took menu that coordinates with the time to make them,” Younan said. dietary needs of residents. For Oakmont Senior Living’s “When our residents come Corporate Chef Adam Hrebiniak, in, we get a full bio assessment picking chefs with formal training done and we make sure we have and experience is essential to doctor’s orders in place, so that creating that fine restaurant quality: we can follow what meets their “We target creative chefs that have dietary criteria and needs,” grown up in the restaurant industry Younan explained. If there is a because we feel a good special request by a resident, she will create a dish. Chef Rina Younan uses only the freshest well-rounded chef that She brings her culinary background along with her has learned proper creativity and style to the menu, something of a California ingredients to help her make the five-star recipes she has learned over the years. cooking techniques can learn the healthcare Oakmont’s dining experience is not your and dietary average senior home meal. Each day there is a management side of specialty, like Cajun celery seed shrimp on a the industry much easier than a chef that bed of creamy smoked gouda grits. has grown up in the The dining experience at Oakmont of Roseville rates up there with some of healthcare system can the finest restaurants in the area because of the top notch-staff learn how to cook a variety of creative cuisines with proper techniques,” he said. landed her dream job as top chef at Oakmont of Roseville, Oakmont’s philosophy is, “Anyone can follow a where she leads a culinary staff of eight. recipe, but our well-trained chefs, prep cooks and line Meals at other senior living communities might cooks are the key to raising the bar in our industry and is include a rotation of the same menu, serving the same what separates us from our competition.” meals periodically, creating a mundane palette. Not the case at Oakmont. Younan has the freedom to bring her creativity and kitchen skill set to the table which enables her to make gourmet meals like a lunch salmon BLT special, or a sunchoke cream soup with garlic chips and baby sprouted greens. Also on the specialty menu is succulent and perfectly cooked Cajun celery seed shrimp that are as creamy as the smoked gouda grits that rounded out the dish. “This job came up, and I was a little hesitant at first because the stigma of senior living as far as their food is concerned — the culinary is not considered to be the equivalent of Napa, like fine dining,” Younan said. Oakmont Executive Director Courtney Siegel explained to Younan that the culinary program is different from any other program out there, and the menu is created daily, with fresh ingredients that are farm-to-fork. Having just opened in September 2013, Oakmont’s kitchen has a garden out back where herbs are Chef Rina Younan plates up one of the lunch specials for the day, a fresh Salmon An Oakmont server waits on residents at the senior living facility where they are treated as if they picked daily for culinary creations. Soon BLT were dining in a five-star restaurant. Younan will pull fresh vegetables from the

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CHURCHES: Serving Communities
continued from 14
Lutheran Church of the Resurrection presents two different

styles of worship. Their traditional service, according to Associate Pastor Ralph Supper, uses “upbeat, lively music and both of our preachers try to engage people at a relevant and energizing level.” The contemporary service has a full band and parishioners can sit at tables and have coffee and snacks while their children sit with them, engaged with such tools as coloring books and interactive Bible study. “We see ourselves as repre-

LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE RESURRECTION
Services: Traditional worship services 8 a.m. and 11 a.m., contemporary worship service 9:30 a.m. Sunday Where: 6365 Douglas Blvd., Granite Bay Info: (916) 791-4661, www.lcrchurch.org

senting God’s love in the community,” Supper said. “So just by simply being more positive, more loving people, we’re allowed to be the love of God in

our neighborhoods.” Supper said the outreach of the church has an amazing breadth. It serves people in the community both directly and through partnering organizations. “We are open and affirming of all people, groups, races and lifestyles,” Supper said. “We really do well at reaching out and making people feel welcome and loved where they’re at, rather than trying to make them change or be different before they go to a church.”
St. Joseph Marello Catholic Church is a relatively new

ST. JOSEPH MARELLO CATHOLIC CHURCH
Services: Weekday masses 8 a.m. Monday to Friday; 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday; 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., 5 p.m. on Sunday. Where: 7200 Auburn Folsom Rd., Granite Bay Info: (916) 786-5001, www.stjosephmarello.org

parish, established in 2004.

“Being 10 years old, there is a real spirit of newness,” said Pastor Father Philip Massetti. “Because of that, we have a tremendous response from our people to just volunteer to help out in whatever ministries come our way.”

The primary outreach currently being undertaken by the church is helping with St. Vincent de Paul Society out of Roseville in an effort to assist the poor and the hungry. “We have a good outreach to our people who are homebound, the elderly, those who can’t come in to church,” Massetti said. “Our people go to their homes.” The church also has an extensive youth program. “There is a real emphasis, and I guess that’s a uniqueness to our parish,” Massetti said. “We go the extra mile to educate and support our young people.”

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ou may have seen plenty of churches in the Roseville, Rocklin and Granite Bay area, but you haven’t seen everything. Ignite Community Church, originally based in Elk Grove, will open a Roseville location with two Easter services on Sunday, April 20. Ignite promises to be something different, but like many churches, the hope is to build a sense of community and belonging. Unlike most churches, Pastor Terry Morgan will focus the church’s outreach to first responders — firefighters, police personnel and veterans, as well as the community at large. Morgan’s two decades as a chaplain has driven him to connect with those who have witnessed tragedies that most of us can’t imagine. For the last five years, Morgan has been the senior chaplain for Gold Country Chaplaincy, and has been involved with the Placer County Veteran Stand Down in Roseville. “One thing we have noticed is that some churches aren’t veteran friendly,” Morgan said. What he means is that some pastors, priests and even congregation members might make comments about our nation’s involvement in foreign affairs; comments that might be unintentionally hurtful to veterans. “This is an unjust war, or we shouldn’t even be over there — if you’ve served your country honorably, those words are hard to hear,” Morgan said. “Pastors may not even realize that they have veterans in their midst.” Veterans and first responders need a church home where their feelings might be better understood. Morgan hopes to reach out to

Y

IGNITE COMMUNITY CHURCH OF ROSEVILLE
GRAND-OPENING CELEBRATION When: Services 8:15 a.m.
and 10:30 a.m. Easter Sunday, April 20 Where: 100 Stonehouse Court, Roseville

Silvi Steigerwald, veteran and board member, Vets in Tech

police officers and even journalists and photographers who see horrific images in their lines of work. Silvi Steigerwald, a veteran and a member of the advisory board for Vets in Tech, a group that supports veterans with reintegration and finding jobs in the technology industry, appreciates the idea of a church that supports vets. “Churches have the opportunity to be friendly to veterans and to welcome them — a church’s activities can range from recognizing veterans and saying a special prayer for them on Veterans Day, and other military holidays, to being more conscientious of what is said when delivering messages,” Steigerwald said. “Churches can support our military overseas by sending care packages, and probably the most important thing to consider is that veterans, when they are on active duty, have a very closeknit community with other military families and soldiers. The church can step in and provide that community feeling for people who have left the military.”

Morgan is president of the Placer County Veterans Stand Down Committee, a group that assists homeless veterans by providing medication, food and clothing, as well as helping veterans find jobs and become productive members of society. “We have extensive training in working with people who suffer from post traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injuries and moral injuries,” Morgan said. “The stress from a combat situation can be a real career killer.” His church will share space with the Seventhday Adventist church at the same location, and Morgan has made a promise to be involved in the Timothy Initiative — a group that plans to open 100 small churches in the Philippines over the next year.

Faith For Veterans
Ignite Community Church opens in Roseville
BY EILEEN WILSON

Terry Morgan is starting Ignite Community Church of Roseville, which opens Easter Sunday.
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indergarten and firstgrade students at Oakhills Elementary School, in Granite Bay, collected more than 400 pounds of new and gently used children’s clothing, shoes and books in February to be shipped to students in need at the Donaldsonville Primary School in Donaldsonville, La. Granite Bay mothers Susan Goodrich and Dr. Christa Clark led the project, which resulted in more than 20 boxes of items, according to a press release. Goodrich, the mother of two Oakhills first-graders, was inspired to do something for the Louisiana students after hearing about their poor living conditions from her niece, Kaitlin McCahan, who is in the Teach for America program in Donaldsonville. “When Kaitlin told me about her students, who are the same ages as mine, living in public housing with no electricity or water, their only meals the

K

ones given to them at school, their toes poking through their shoes, it just broke my heart and I immediately wanted to do something to help,” Goodrich said, in the release. “A clothing and shoe drive seemed like the natural solution.” She enlisted the help of firstgrade teachers Kim Emory and Mette Nagel, and kindergarten teacher Kristin Child. Clark volunteered to pay for the shipping costs. “Every child needs to feel cherished and important, so when I heard about the clothing and shoe drive at school I was compelled to help in any way possible,” Clark said, in the release. “The least I could do was offer to cover the shipping costs to ensure all the items that were graciously donated arrived safe and sound.”
~ Sena Christian

Oakhills School students collected more than 20 boxes worth of clothes, shoes and books for children in Louisiana.
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APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

professional view

he last Professional View article I wrote titled “How can I age at home safely?” was well received and I was delighted with positive feedback about in-home care options. But one reply stood out: The individual felt that having inhome care for her folks was a great idea, however, getting her parents to accept the help was another story entirely. Every day, I talk with adult children seeking inhome care for their aging parents who are overwhelmed with the responsibility of raising their own families, maintaining their careers and being available for a parent’s changing needs, such as medical appointments, cooking and

T

Helping Our Aging Parents
Susan Feldman

household chores. They are trying to be everything to both generations and are exhausted. If your aging parent could benefit from inhome care, including personal hygiene, walking assistance, toileting, dressing, meal preparation, laundry and transportation but is reluctant to accept help, here are a few tips to consider:

before speaking with your parents, you’ll come to the discussion prepared. Try getting a recommendation from their physician or faith community. Interview agencies on the phone, explain the needs and assess their ability to meet those needs with qualified caregivers.

The Doctor Said
Talk to the physician’s office ahead of time or send a letter explaining the situation. If the doctor said help is needed, your parent may take this to heart.

cy, so allowing help is an acknowledgement of increasing dependence and decline. Be sensitive to this milestone. Remind parents that assistance from a caregiver will not replace family visits but preserve the parent-child relationship, allowing for special time together rather than task-filled visits. Most seniors prefer a professional to assist with toileting and personal hygiene.

Part Of The Process
Suggest that a representative from the agency visit to share about their services, learn about care needs, do an assessment and home safety check and answer any questions. There is no cost for this and puts a friendly face to the whole idea of help. Rather than being told what they need, keep parents in the decisionmaking process.

allowance, the parent can have care for twice as long. And many insurances stop charging the premium while the policy is in use.

The Triggering Event
Often the triggering factor that propels the discussion into action is a scare like a fall that could have been a broken hip, a minor driving incident that could have been terrible or confusion that could have resulted in harm. Sometimes the triggering event happening to a friend or neighbor is enough to instill action.
Susan Feldman is the community relations representative for BrightStar Healthcare, Roseville.

Safety
A “stranger” coming into the home raises questions of security. Check the agency’s hiring practices, verifying that it does background checks, provides bonding, liability and workers compensation insurance.

LTC Insurance
If your parent has Long Term Care insurance, remind him it is a “use it or loose it” insurance and using it now before a catastrophic event would be sensible both financially and physically. By using half of the monthly

Validate Concerns
The decision to accept outside help is a big step. Most of us value our independence and priva-

Do The Research
By seeking out a qualified in-home care agency

GRANITE BAY VIEW

• APRIL

47

fitness view

W

Don’t Confuse Active With Fit
Debra Skelton

hen it comes to excuses for not exercising, we have probably about heard them all. Sometimes the excuse is self-inflicted: “I don’t have the time.” Other times the excuse is pure procrastination: “I’m going to start as soon as tax season ends.” And then there are excuses that seem a little funny: “I don’t like to sweat.”

As delicately as possible, I point out to these well-meaning excusemakers that even though they don’t want to do it, exercise is an important

part of cultivating a strong, healthy and attractive body. I tell them that if they would just exercise two to four times each week they would feel a dramatic improvement in their daily life, starting with renewed energy and strength. Then I bring up the health benefits and explain how many of

their health problems would improve or even disappear. I talk about how great they will feel, and look, dropping those extra pounds and rediscovering a fit and slender figure and physique. Even with all this experience in excuse squashing, there used to be an excuse that would leave me stumped. The sneaky excuse of, “Oh, I don’t need to exercise. I’m very active. I play golf and tennis and Wii.” Well, that is a good excuse, right? Golf, tennis and Wii are all active sports that burn calories. Maybe you can be fit without doing any other exercise. And then I started noticing a trend. Many golfers couldn’t

touch their toes in a simple flexibility test. The tennis players couldn’t jump rope for 60 seconds. The Wii players needed a week to recover from a mile jog. These socalled “active” people encountered injury after injury. And then it hit me: You can’t become fit simply by being active. Only by being fit can you become more active. To be lean and to maintain a level of fitness there is no substitute for a consistent, challenging exercise program. It’s the only way. To truly be fit is when your body is able to do whatever you ask of it. This comes from a combination of flexibility, strength and endurance. So, do you exercise? Or

are you fooling yourself with the idea of “being active?” How do you feel about your current level of fitness? Are you able to do each and everything you want? Or do you end up opting out of activities that you know will be too challenging? If you’ve used the excuse of “being active” in the past, take a minute to reconsider your position. Don’t bank on your active lifestyle with the hope of true results. As they say, there’s no trial run in the game of life.
Debra Skelton is a certified fitness consultant, a licensed nurse and owner of Motivative Health and Fitness. She can be reached at deb@gotatrainer.com.

48

APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

health in view

D

Full-Term Baby Worth The Wait
Dr. Chris Palkowski

uring my third year of medical school, I had the privilege of spending time in a clerkship in Obstetrics and Gynecology, where I helped deliver dozens of babies. It turned out to be one of the more joyful experiences of my medical training. I’m reminded of that experience now as April is when many physicians, nurses, midwives and other hospital personnel focus on an annual campaign called March for Babies, a national effort by the March of Dimes organization to help moms have full-term pregnancies and healthy deliveries. More than 8,000 babies are born in Placer County each year, and if statistics

hold true here as in the rest of the nation, about 1 in 9 of these babies is born prematurely. There are medical reasons to deliver a baby before a full term of 39 to 40 weeks — because the health of the mother or the infant is at risk. But, unfortunately, some of the early births across the United States are due to women choosing to schedule a Caesarian section before their baby is fully developed, which places the infant at risk. The March of Dimes

and a growing number of health-care systems are working to end the practice of scheduling early births for non-medical reasons. Kaiser Permanente followed the American Congress of Obstetrician and Gynecologists guidelines that have been in place for 30 years, and reaffirmed its own hospital policies several years ago against the practice. I am proud to say elective deliveries before 39 weeks have simply not been an issue for us. We communicate our concerns about an infant’s health from the time of a mom’s first visit, and carry that message throughout the pregnancy. We continue to get the word out because prematurity is the leading cause

of death among newborns in the United States. We know that premature babies are more susceptible to certain diseases and disabilities. The main complications related to giving birth to a premature baby, often called a “preemie,” is that the child’s major organs are not fully developed, which can cause health issues such as respiratory problems and infections. A baby’s brain at 35 weeks, for instance, weighs only two-thirds of what it will weigh at 39 to 40 weeks. Unfortunately, a large number of women don’t realize the definition of a full-term, 40-week pregnancy. A study published in the Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology a few

years ago noted that 25 percent of moms surveyed considered fullterm to be 34 to 37 weeks gestation, and half of them thought full-term was 32 to 38 weeks. Jeanne Conry, MD, a physician at Kaiser Permanente Roseville Medical Center who is also the national president of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, has led the efforts across California and the United States to reduce elective deliveries before 39 weeks, and reports marked improvement in our state. As part of the public education push in California, many hospitals have joined with key partners to educate mothers about waiting

until full term for delivery, and to encourage physicians everywhere to eliminate early elective deliveries. We know some babies will always be premature for medical reasons, and they will receive excellent care in a hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit where they stay until they become healthier. We also know we still have work to do to raise awareness about the risks of scheduling early deliveries for non-medical reasons. Help us spread the word. A full-term baby is well worth the wait.
Chris Palkowski, MD, is physician-in-chief of Kaiser Permanente, Roseville, and a Granite Bay resident.

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GRANITE BAY VIEW

mortgage view

How Mortgage Gains Can Eliminate Mortgage Insurance I
don’t know about you, but my brain pays much more attention to stocks and retirement funds when they are doing well. The same holds true for the value of my residence. I listen when things turn upward. I plug my ears when the news is bad. When the real estate market turned for the worse late last decade, I didn’t want to hear the value of my home. I wasn’t selling my home, but inevitably, when I would run a quick Zillow inquiry on my home’s value out of curiosity, I became salty and angry to the point that my eyes and skin would turn a Hulk-like shade of green. Fast forward to today. Now that the housing
Christian Hackett

“With the housing market improving and values going up, it made sense to get out of mortgage insurance. We chose a 15-year fixed (loan) to save on interest, pay our home off faster and erase the mortgage insurance from our loan.”
cent can eliminate the expensive mortgage insurance payment,” said Justin Johnson, a licensed loan professional with Sierra Pacific Mortgage of Roseville. Now for the math: If you have purchased your home in the past five years or so, and you obtained a home loan with mortgage insurance, then you may be an excellent candidate for a refinance. Any borrower

market is back to positive gains, there is a specific group of homeowners that can utilize these positive results to lower their monthly mortgage payment, and it doesn’t necessarily mean that you need a lower interest rate to save on your housing payment. “This is a very popular scenario for a refinance. Even if the rate on a new loan is higher, the fact is that a new loan with an improved loan-to-value ratio at or below 80 per-

Jessika Lehmer

who obtained an FHA 30year fixed loan during this timeframe would be strongly advised to check their loan situation. The monthly mortgage insurance (MMI) is very likely 1.25 percent or higher, depending on date of funding and down payment. Put in perspective of a monthly payment, a $300,000 loan would have a MMI payment of $312.12. Believe it or not, getting a new, higher

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interest rate on a mortgage-insurance free loan is likely a better payment right now than just continuing to shell out the MMI. Jessika Lehmer fits the above scenario perfectly, and she took action with a new conventional loan to improve her situation. “With the housing market improving and values going up, it made sense to get out of mortgage insurance,” Lehmer said. “We chose a 15-year fixed (loan) to save on interest, pay our home off faster and erase the mortgage insurance from our loan.” In Lehmer’s case, getting a new appraised value and 80 percent or lower loan-to-value was her ticket to a much better mortgage situation: one free of FHA MMI. For all the great things about FHA loans, including the ability to streamline refinance, the low down payment, the favorable income ratios, it comes with a negative. FHA mortgage insurance is, quite simply, an albatross. With the Housing and

Urban Development (HUD, who oversees FHA) monetary losses from the most recent housing crisis, it was likely on the verge of becoming insolvent like quasi-government agencies Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. HUD reserve fund levels were at a record low and below the required thresholds, which triggered the need for the insurance fees to vastly increase. As a result, FHA’s currently originated loans have the least borrowerfriendly terms for mortgage insurance of all time. Upfront mortgage insurance premium has nearly tripled. The duration of MMI has, in some cases, gone from a minimum of five years to as high as the entire length of the loan, or as disgruntled borrowers have told me, “forever.”

Christian Hackett is a partner and VP of Placer Mortgage Group, a mortgage banker/ broker based in Roseville. He lives in Granite Bay with wife and three children. Reach him at Christian.Hackett@Placer MortgageGroup.com.

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APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

gardening view

W

Potager: Beauty And Practicality Combined
Tim Krumal

hen my wife and I were visiting her grandparents in England many years ago, I wandered out to the garden one evening with her grandfather as dinner was being prepared. At one point, he reached down and deftly pulled several large handfuls of spinach from a row of well-tended vegetables. “Rose will be wanting these for dinner,” he said with his proper English accent, while depositing the deep green leaves into a worn garden tote. When they were served later, I determined then and there I was going to eat nothing but the freshest of veggies for the remainder of our stay. Needless to say there were plenty of succeeding meals away from her grandparents’ home where it was difficult to discern whether I was eating a vegetable or shoe leather, but nevertheless we arrived back in California with a clear determination to grow as much of our own food as possible. There are a myriad of worthy reasons for estab-

lishing a home vegetable and fruit garden: health, food traceability, freshness. I, however, love to eat and cook, so my No. 1 reason is flavor. If, like me, you enjoy spending a ridiculous amount of time in the kitchen creating the “perfect dish,” then does it not make sense to use the freshest, most flavorful ingredients? You can’t get any fresher than one’s own garden. If a kitchen table laden with homegrown fruit and vegetables sounds wonderful but the thought of rows of turnips crowding out your roses doesn’t, then what you need is what the French call a potager. Think of a potager as a flower garden that someone dropped in the middle of a vegetable patch with class. The potager, rooted in tradition and history, is a

highly structured and well-organized garden that combines the practicality of growing food with the beauty of ornamental plant material. Originating in France during Medieval times, monks grew herbs for medicinal purposes. To further the self-sufficiency of monastic life, vegetables were grown alongside. As great chateaux began to be established, the need for large kitchen gardens grew in order to maintain a ready supply of food for staff and guests, which were often quite large in number. Over time, the potager evolved into a symmetrical formal garden containing herbs,

vegetables and fruit that played not only a functional roll but an aesthetic one, as well. They often contained elaborately espaliered fruit trees and most employed some form of knot garden woven from various herbs. Flowers for cutting and ornamental plants were interspersed to add beauty. Structures such as obelisks and pergolas began to appear along with seating areas, and it wasn’t long before the potager moved out of the realm of a hidden part of the household and into the forefront of garden design and became a status symbol. While the contempo-

rary potager still functions as in ages past, it often belies its formal and structured roots by being less symmetrical and often whimsical in appearance. For those wishing to fully transform their garden or incorporate a potager into an existing scheme, first consider the site: It should get a minimum of six hours of good sunlight. Next, lay out pathways to give you easy access to all you wish to grow. Main paths should be a minimum of 32- inches to 36inches wide to allow for wheel barrows and garden carts. Ancillary pathways can be as little as 18-inches wide. Raised planting beds are recommended as

they give more control over soil conditions, while making maintenance and harvesting easier on the back. Pathways are generally covered in gravel. Make a list of all the types of plants you wish to grow; herbs, vegetables, fruits, ornamentals. Most large growing beds are edged with a clipped hedge, such as dwarf box, but there are many other fine substitutes. As with all forays into the garden; have fun, be creative and look forward to enjoying the fruits of your labor.
Tim Krumal, of Granite Bay, has practiced landscape and garden design for more than 30 years.

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GRANITE BAY VIEW • APRIL 51

ROSEVILLE

things to do
WHAT’S HAPPENING BY SENA CHRISTIAN
“A Day in the Mountains” by Georg Kickinger will be auctioned off at Lottery for the Arts.
COURTESY • BLUE LINE ARTS

YOUR LUCKY LOTTERY TICKET
South Placer’s premier art lottery and auction takes place with the sixth annual Lottery for the Arts, which benefits Blue Line Arts. The nonprofit organization in downtown Roseville oversees a gallery and art programming for children and adults. Every ticket holder for Lottery for the Arts takes home an original piece of artwork valued at $150 or more. What: Lottery for the Arts When: 6 p.m. Thursday, April 10 Where: Blue Line Gallery, 405 Vernon St., Roseville Cost: Admission only $100; two admission, four drinks, one lottery ticket $175 advance or $190 at the door. Info: bluelinearts.org/events/lottery.html

Showtimes at 7 p.m. april april Fridays and Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays at Tower Theater, 417 Vernon St. in Roseville. Presented by Stand Out Talent. Tickets cost $12 general admission, $10 seniors and $5 student/child. For more information, visit www.standouttalent.org.
to

“Copacabana: The Musical” 4 19

april

10

Placer County Department of Child Support Services Information Session
From 4-5 p.m. Tuesday at 1000 Sunset Blvd. april in Rocklin. Learn about programs and services of the department charged with overseeing child support issues for families. For more information, From 5:30-9:30 p.m. Friday at Sun City, 7050 Del Webb Blvd. in Roseville. No-host bar, dinner, award presentations, comedy visit http://placer.ca.gov/departapril show, silent and live auction. Benefits Placer SPCA. Tickets ments/childsupport.aspx or call (916) 435-5706. cost $100. For more information, visit www.placerspca.org.

Easter Egg Hunt
At 10 a.m. Saturday at Granite Springs Church, april 1170 E Joiner Parkway in Lincoln. There will be doughnuts and coffee for breakfast, hotdogs for lunch, dance houses, face painting and more. Free. For more information, call (916) 677-9922.
Search for Easter eggs at Granite Springs Church in Lincoln.
COURTESY

15

Funny Bones Comedy Show

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Celebrate the Earth Festival
From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Mahany april Regional Park, 1501 Pleasant Grove Blvd. in Roseville. Seventh annual event features live entertainment, music, food trucks, electric vehicles, local green vendors and more. Free. For more information, visit www.roseville.ca.us.

Yomen: A Spring Celebration
From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday at the Maidu april Museum & Historic Site, 1970 Johnson Ranch Drive in Roseville. Event includes tribal dance groups, traditional arts and crafts demonstrations, guided trail tours, native storytelling, children’s activities, craft fair, Indian tacos and other foods for sale. Free. For more information, visit www. roseville.ca.us/indianmuseum.
Yomen will feature tribal dance groups.
FILE PHOTO • GRANITE BAY VIEW

26

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Mes Amis Vintage Antique Market
From 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the 400 block of Oak St. in downtown Roseville. Free parking and admission. For april more information, visit http://theoliveandrose.blogspot.com.

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South Stanford Ranch Community Garage Sale
from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, with 200-plus homes in Rocklin participating. Garage sale maps are available at major streets: Stanford Ranch and Sunset, Park, West Oaks, Farrier, Darby, Crest, april Cobblestone and Stoney. Sponsored by the Rindy Merrifield Team. Visit www.rindymerrifield.com.

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APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

daytripper

Squaw Valley a great vacation spot for any season
BY JEFFREY WEIDEL

A

Get Ready For

Summer

COURTESY PHOTOS • SQUAW CREEK

The Resort at Squaw Creek is an ideal place to stay year-round. Squaw Creek’s golf course, pictured at top, is one of many places where visitors can enjoy an activity in the great outdoors.

fresh coat of snow has covered the activity a body can handle. Squaw Creek’s heated outside pool is nearby mountain, which has excitable skiers and snowboarders a hub of activity, starting in the early eager to slip into their gear on this gor- morning when ambitious guests can be seen swimming laps in the somewhat geous Sunday morning in Lake Tahoe. Skiers and snowboarders revel in a chilly mountain air. The area includes a smaller plunge visit to Squaw Valley, a full-service ski resort that received worldwide attention pool, a 120-foot waterslide, three hot more than five decades ago when this tubs of varying sizes, plus a bar area that anonymous Lake Tahoe ski resort features some very refreshing alcohol stepped on the world stage for the first and nonalcoholic concoctions. Other activities include: time, hosting the 1960 Winter Olympics. Squaw has grown in stature since Golf: Late afternoon discounts give those magical Olympic moments, families the opportunity to play a quick becoming a vacation destination for 9 holes from the family tees (about 150 many winter enthusiasts who want the yards from the green). Serious golfers experience of a big-time ski resort. What will find a challenging course that can is less publicized regarding this winter be penalizing with some tight fairways wonderland is it’s a tremendous place that require precise shot-making. for a summer vacation, as well. Biking: A ride along nearby Highway It won’t be long before the final group 89 or leisurely pedaling on the Truckee of skiers and riders take their last runs at River bike path to Tahoe City are among Squaw and the region makes its quick the choices. Bike rentals are available at transition into summer Squaw Creek. “I like (Squaw Creek) mode. Hiking, backpacking: Situated at the foot of Squaw Creek’s nature trail much better in the begins just beyond the the ski resort is one of Lake Tahoe’s finest lodgchairlift and connects to a summer ... There’s ing facilities — Resort at variety of trails around just so much to do; Squaw Valley’s peaks. Squaw Creek. It offers convenient ski-in, ski-out There’s also a guided hike we really look capability during the winup the Granite Chief trail forward to it.” ter months, but provides that features wooded Karen Moran, Folsom many more recreational areas and waterfalls. pursuits in the summer Horseback riding: Nearand fall when ideal temperatures and by Alpine Meadows offers a guided the scenic mountain backdrops entice horseback riding tour and gentle pony visitors to the great outdoors. rides for the kids. That was the plan for Karen Moran of Fly fishing: Squaw Creek’s on-site fly Folsom several years ago during a July fishing center features guided trips to visit to Squaw Creek. While her husband nearby ponds and the Truckee River, was busy attending a business confer- catering to both fly-fishing beginners ence, Moran and her twin teenage and enthusiasts. daughters rafted down the Truckee RivTennis: Tournaments, clinics, lessons er, went horseback riding, played golf and private court reservations are availand hiked. able. “I like (Squaw Creek) much better in There’s no shortage of activities at the summer,” Moran said. “There is Squaw Valley, which include roller skatmore to do and you don’t have to travel ing at the Olympic rink, mountain bikup here and worry about stressful ing, climbing wall, zip line, disc golf, mountain driving (in snow). There’s just paintball, shopping, plus a large swimso much to do; we really look forward to ming pool and hot tub at High Camp. it.” The Poolside Café is a great Located on the north shore of Lake outdoor/indoor spot to grab lunch and Tahoe, there are 405 luxury rooms and a beverage. suites residing on the property at Squaw The great thing about a visit to Squaw Creek. Creek is one never has to drive until it’s There are two pretty cool options time to go home. when you wake up each morning — stare out the window at a mesmerizing Jeffrey Weidel is a freelance writer from the Sacrapanoramic view of the nearby rugged mento area. Visit his website at www.tahoeskimountainside peaks, or cram in all the world.com.

GRANITE BAY VIEW

• APRIL

53

back and forth

BY TOBY LEWIS

A Conversation With Rabbi Korik
though I was 12 when he passed, I continued to study his teachings and was very inspired. His vision was that wherever there may be Jewish people, it doesn’t matter where in the world they are, that they have the ability to connect with their deeper Jewish heritage. So that’s why we came here, because we felt this was a place where we would have that opportunity.
What do you do for the Granite Bay community?

abbi Yossi Korik came to south Placer County a little more than eight years ago after having lived his entire life traveling, living and studying in just about every corner of the western world. A native of Sao Paulo, Brazil, 32-year-old Korik is the founder and director of Chabad Center of Placer County in Granite Bay, a cultural and religious hub for Jewish fellowship and education.
You grew up in Brazil, so is Portuguese your native language?

R

community here. The people here seem to be really friendly. You get the feeling that people really care about the community, they care about each other. People here seem to have a mutual desire to see this community be a safe place, a place where we can raise our children. My wife and I both really like that.
Speaking of children, what, in your opinion, would you say the youth of today are overly concerned with?

How, in your opinion, are the youth of today going to affect the world in a positive way?

Kind of. My first language is actually Yiddish, which is like a European/Jewish language. My parents spoke that to me when I was born. I still speak that fluently, but I obviously speak Portuguese. I also speak English, Hebrew and a little bit of French.
That’s it?

For now (laughs). I’m also working on Russian.
You moved from Sao Paulo to New York City when you were 12 years old. What was that like?

I actually didn’t live there for a long time. When I was 13, I went to study in a special rabbinic high school in France. So I lived there for two years and then I studied in Israel for a year. After I graduated high school, I went to a rabbinic seminary college in Canada for three years, in Montreal. Then I finished my rabbinic studies and was ordained in New York.
What brought you to this area?

Basically, we provide various opportunities — educational, social, religious. We have a preschool. We also have religious schools for older children, between ages 5 and 13, where they can learn how to read and write Hebrew, learn about Jewish holidays and basic Jewish principles of the Torah, which is the Jewish Bible. We also offer adult education classes and lectures on Jewish law, philosophy or emotional support. And then of course we have religious programs in connection with Jewish holidays. And we also offer opportunities for people to meet and celebrate together in a social and cultural way.
What do you love about the Granite Bay community?

My wife is from Chicago. We met in New York and got married in Chicago. We both really had this strong desire to dedicate our lives and go to some place where maybe there isn’t much of a Jewish community, and try to somehow create a presence of a Jewish community. The Chabad movement was inspired and led by a great Rabbi known as The Rebbe. He passed away in 1994, but as a child, I had the privilege and honor to meet with this great Rabbi, and receive blessings from him. Even

There are many things. I really enjoy the fact this is very suburban, it’s very peaceful. We don’t have the same chaotic type of lifestyle that exists in big cities and big places. And I really like the

They are overly concerned with their iPhones (laughs). They are just trying to keep up with every new technological development. I’m not that old — at all — but when I grew up we would go play outside. We had friends that we talked to. Yeah, there were a couple different electronic gadgets and things, but nothing major. Growing up in Brazil, all free time we had we were out playing soccer. I really liked playing soccer. It seems like maybe today’s youth, they are not so much into that. You go into Starbucks and you see two kids sitting across from each other and they are not even looking at each other. They are just texting on their phones.

One of the most amazing things about youth is the energy. If adults had the same amount of energy that youth have, then we would be able to do so much more. But the most important thing for youth is to be able to have the proper guidance so that they can channel that energy properly and accordingly. And not to be misunderstood, I think the advancements in technology are phenomenal. The opportunity to be able to do good in the world today is incredible, with social media and all that. People today can get a positive message across the world in seconds, something that 10 years ago would have taken weeks or months to get out. Hopefully, with the right education and guidance, we will see tremendous positive transformation and opportunities for the world at large.
As adults, parents and educators, how can we help facilitate that?

how to live in a proper, moral and ethical way, that has the strongest impact more than anything else we do. In addition to that, we have to make sure we communicate the right messages to the youth, to our children. We can’t just assume that they are going to know if we don’t teach them. The values that we have, that we grew up with, that we understand are fundamental principles of life, we have to make sure that we communicate those clearly to our children.
If you had to pick one thing in the world that needs the most healing, what would that be?

Rabbi Yossi Korik is the founder and director of Chabad of Placer County.
KIM PALAFERRI • GRANITE BAY VIEW

I would say two things. No. 1 we have to lead by example. We have to be good role models. One of the things about youth is they can tell very clearly what is real and what is not. Children today are not interested in anything that is fake. And when something is told to them, they can sense whether it is from someone who really means it or it is just words. They may not acknowledge it right away, they may not show any expression that it registered, but they really take notice. And when we act as proper role models without telling them what to do, just showing them by example

Today, there are big ideas and a strong emphasis for people to be concerned about the wellbeing of the universe, of the world, of humanity. All very important, and that is a very positive thing. Perhaps what I think may be lacking is the idea that there is a higher power. If everything we do is based on our own interests, on our own needs and the things that we care about, and not because of any greater cause, then God forbid, that can have a detrimental effect. That is dangerous. We need to be able to step outside of ourselves a little bit and recognize that there is something greater. There is something more important, a greater cause that is beyond ourselves.
I’d say it’s beyond our comprehension, really.

Exactly. Therefore, our efforts should not be limited or confined to how much we care or how much we feel. If something is right, then we need to do everything we can regardless of how much we understand it. So we need to be able to look within ourselves, within our family, our community, but keep that constantly extending further and recognizing that as a human being in this world, regardless of who we are, or what faith we are of, or whatever, that we are here for a reason.

54

APRIL • GRANITE BAY VIEW

Kraft Real Estate & Property Management
“The time and attention your investments deserve while you live the life you deserve”

CALL 916.723.0880
Call for a free over-the-phone home evaluation today!
NEW LISTING NEW LISTING

Dan & Lisa Kraft

DESIRABLE TREE LAKE HOME!!
• Amazing backyard w/Pool/SPA • Whole house fan • Fabulous Home for entertaining • Needs updating but has great bones • Located near walking trails and schools • Don’t miss the opportunity • Very well kept home looking for new owner 4618 Dorchester Lane • Granite Bay

SOLAR HOME! AND NO MELLO ROOS!
• Amazing 4 Beds, 4 bath home • 4,207 sq ft of Incredible living space • Gourmet kitchen w/Granite & large island • Five burner gas stove & GE appliances • 1/3 acre lot w/incredible landscaping • 4 car finished garage w/ painted concrete 3180 River Bank Ct. Roseville

COME HOME TO TRANQUILITY!!!
• 3 Beds 2 Baths 2.4 beautiful acres • Remodeled kitchen/baths • Beautiful horse pasture • Tranquil country setting • NID irrigation water • A MUST SEE! • New well water pump • Two year roof certification 7624 Horseshoe Bar Rd. Loomis

$639,900
Address
8560 Christy Ln Granite Bay 8315 Hillgrove St Granite Bay 7244 Harbor Way Granite Bay 8257 Oak Knoll Dr Granite Bay 9949 Villa Granito Ln Granite Bay 7845 Hill Rd Granite Bay 5320 Cavitt Stallman RdGranite Bay 8372 Tracy Terrace Granite Bay 4684 Rolling Oaks Dr Granite Bay 141 Eagleton Ct Granite Bay 8174 Shadowood Ct Granite Bay 7855 Eagle View Ln Granite Bay 9815 Carlton Ct Granite Bay 5455 Lions Cross Cir Granite Bay 5300 Old Moss Ln Granite Bay 8200 Warren Ct Granite Bay

Call Mina Rowe at 916.303.6056
Bth
2 (2 0) 2 (2 0) 2 (2 0) 3 (3 0) 3 (2 1) 3 (2 1) 2 (2 0) 3 (2 1) 3 (2 1) 4 (4 0) 4 (3 1) 3 (3 0) 4 (4 0) 3 (3 0) 4 (3 1) 5 (5 0)

$579,900
LIC#01747355

LIC#01858325

$559,900

LIC#01747355

Call Debbie Cancilla at 916.474.4180
Year
1980 1962 1990 1960 1998 1977 1992 1977 1989 2001 1984 1977 1991 1995 1986 1987

LIC#00895098 Call Mina Rowe at 916.303.6056

RECENT GRANITE BAY HOME SALES
Bd
4 3 3 4 3 4 2 4 4 4-5 4 4 5 4-5 4-5 6

SqFt
1784 1542 1544 2394 1945 2019 1600 2536 2346 3440 2773 2584 4525 3068 4327 5296

LotSz
0.2011ac 0.1728ac 0.0847ac 1.2500ac 0.0656ac 0.2362ac 4.6000ac 0.4018ac 0.2032ac 0.1899ac 0.3233ac 3.1000ac 0.4350ac 0.9149ac 4.9000ac 1.0286ac

Date
02/21/14 02/25/14 02/14/14 02/10/14 03/12/14 02/13/14 02/24/14 02/18/14 02/27/14 02/11/14 02/26/14 02/24/14 02/25/14 02/25/14 02/14/14 02/18/14

$/SqFt
170.63 217.25 220.14 143.48 196.66 213.97 311.88 211.75 233.16 164.24 210.96 265.09 188.95 309.32 226.48 195.43

DOM
127 36 4 5 11 78 1 72 44 137 106 65 0 14 116 9

List Price
299,900 347,900 339,900 305,000 389,999 439,000 499,000 559,000 569,000 575,000 585,000 699,000 900,000 949,000 989,000 1,050,000

Sale Price
304,400 335,000 339,900 343,500 382,500 432,000 499,000 537,000 547,000 565,000 585,000 685,000 855,000 949,000 980,000 1,035,000

Information deemed to be reliable but not verified. Home sales are based in information from MetroList Services, Inc.

NEW LISTING

PENDING

PRICED TO SELL IN SUN CITY!!

BROADSTONE GATED COMMUNITY!
• 4 Beds 3 Baths, 2548 sq ft. of living space • One Bedroom and Bath downstairs • Newer Tile Roof, Water Heater, HVAC • Real Hardwood Floors on 1st level • Eureka School & Granite Bay HS • SS appl w/granite counters in kitn • Walk to JRRC for some tennis 2206 Broadstone Dr. • Roseville

• Gorgeous Tehama model in Sun City! • Almost 100K in upgrades • Cherry cabinets w/under lighting pull outs • Granite counters, Custom backsplashes & paint • Professional closet organizer in master • Larger backyard w/fruit trees • This home is upgraded from toilets to Faucet 122 Whitehall Lane • Lincoln

BEAUTIFUL CUSTOM HOME ON 1.19 AC
• 5 bed, 3 bath Beauty • Expansive Front & Rear Yards • 2 pastures + stalls incl. foal stall • Open flowing kitchen w/custom granite 7222 Chestnut Ave. Orangevale

REDUCED $100,000K!!!
• 70% Financing available (must qualify) • All permit’s pulled & Paid (Per Seller) • 3756 sq ft Custom home plans INCLUDED • .67 Acre lot sits between 13th & 14th fairway Call listing agent for more details. 2030 Shady Trail Lane • Rocklin

$520,000

LIC#01747355

$410,000

LIC#01442325

$699,000

LIC#01235568

$275,000

LIC#01384510

Call Mina Rowe at 916.303.6056

Call Della at 916.337.5233

Call Kristi O’Neil at 916.3247.6915

LIC#01747355 Call Lucy Allen at 916.220.5539

Finding an experienced & knowledgeable Realtor is just a phone call away.

916.723.0880 • www.KraftRealEstate.com • www.kraftrentals.com