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Doctoral Research Prospectus

2013 admissions
inspirational9
00
SINCE
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Aii Hisioiy, Iilm anu Visual Siuuics ai Biimingham
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AN INSPIRATIONAL
ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE
AT A LEADING GLOBAL
UNIVERSITY
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Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
WHAT DOES THIS MEAN FOR YOU?
An elite academic experience
at a university that pushes the
boundaries of knowledge
Our research has powered our university
for over 100 years, won Nobel Prizes and
made an impact on the region, the nation
and the world. This track record of research
excellence means we can offer you a
world-class experience, studying with
academics who are global experts and
leaders in their eld. We belong to the
prestigious Russell Group of research-active
UK universities and have longstanding
research partnerships with leading
companies and other academic institutions.
This ensures that as a doctoral researcher
here you will have access to the very
latest theoretical and applied knowledge
in your eld. Our range of research is one
of the widest in the UK, creating exciting
opportunities for interdisciplinary links and
an exceptional ability to supervise ambitious
and innovative research projects.
Preparing you for success
Doctoral research at Birmingham offers you
a wealth of opportunities that can transform
your thinking, widen your horizons and
ensure you have all the skills you need to
succeed in the employment market. You can
gain a global perspective on your research
by visiting one of our international partner
universities, or boost your understanding
of business through events such as our
Postgraduate Enterprise Summer School.
A wide range of training and development
courses, opportunities to teach and the
chance to get involved in volunteering will
help you acquire the transferable skills that
all employers look for. Our excellent links
with companies in all sectors can help you
gain work-wisdom to complement your
specialist subject knowledge. Time spent
on your doctorate is a sound investment,
as you will be well rewarded by improved
career prospects and accelerated
progress once you start work.
An outstanding research
environment in a global city
As one of the most popular universities for
postgraduate study in the UK, Birmingham
has a vibrant and lively doctoral research
community. All doctoral researchers are
brought together by the University Graduate
School, which provides an abundance of
opportunities to meet researchers from
other disciplines, share experiences and
enrich both your academic and social life.
You cannot fail to be inspired by our campus,
which is rich in heritage and beauty, set in a
leafy green site with a wealth of amenities
and attractions. Its world-class facilities are
continually being improved and developed
for the benet of our students, with an
investment of around 1 million each
week. We are just ten minutes away from
the centre of Birmingham, which is one
of Europes most dynamic and culturally
diverse cities.
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AT THE UNlvEPSlTY OF BlPMlNGHAM WE OFFEP AN ELlTE EDUCATlON
AND AN lNSPlPATlONAL PESEAPCH ENvlPONMENT. AS A DOCTOPAL
PESEAPCHEP YOU WlLL BE A vALUED MEMBEP OF OUP ACADEMlC
COMMUNlTY AND WlLL BENEFlT FPOM A CONTlNUOUSLY DEvELOPlNG
PANGE OF SEPvlCES, FAClLlTlES, OPPOPTUNlTlES AND PESOUPCES.
Wclcomc
Dear 1ulie Christine
Thank you lor your interest in undertaking
doctoral research in the Department ol Art
History, Film and visual Studies at the
University ol Birmingham. l hope this
prospectus gives you an insight into our
department, the research programme you wish
to pursue and lile as a researcher here.
As a doctoral researcher in the Department you
will join a thriving research community which
ollers a stimulating intellectual environment and
internationally excellent research culture. We
host regular public lectures, seminar courses,
symposia and conlerences, and we actively
encourage our doctoral researchers to
participate, as speakers or in the planning and
organisation.These provide opportunities to
engage with leading scholars in the lield, as
well as to discuss the latest research ol those
working in the University.
Birmingham has long been established as one
ol the UK's leading universities lor
postgraduate study, and our research has
proven international impact. The most recent
UK Pesearch Assessment Exercise rated 90%
ol the University's research activity as 'world
leading' or 'internationally excellent', so il you
join us you will be working with academics who
are globally recognised in their lield.
The University values its doctoral researchers
and recognises their importance within the
academic community. We constantly strive to
develop and enhance the services, lacilities
and opportunities available to you.
Birmingham also invests in linancial support lor
postgraduate students, ollering lull or partial
lunding awards totalling more than 19 million
per year.
The Department also has AHPC recognition lor
its graduate programmes.
Please take a little time to browse through this
prospectus, which l hope will answer any
queries you may have. ll you have any lurther
questions about doctoral research here please
do not hesitate to contact us.
l hope you will decide to join our dynamic
research community and let us help you to
achieve your ambitions.
Yours sincerely,
Di Kaic Incc
Hcau ol ihc Dcaiimcni ol Aii Hisioiy,
Iilm anu Visual Siuuics
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Doctoral
Researcher
The International Herald Tribune has ranked the
University of Birmingham 55th in the world and
9th in the UK for post-qualication employability.
We have been shortlisted
as University of the Year
for 2013 by The Sunday
Times. Each year a
university is chosen by
a panel of experts based
on all round academic
excellence.
The University is a
founding member of
the Russell Group of
research universities
and Universitas 21 a
network of 21 research
universities from 13
countries.
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Doctoral
Researcher
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Why Birmingham? 8
PUSH THE BOUNDAPlES OF KNOWLEDGE
Doctoral research study options 12
University Graduate School 13
SElZE THE OPPOPTUNlTY
Help & support 16
Careers & Employability 18
lMMEPSE YOUPSELF lN THE EXPEPlENCE
Our campus 20
The city on your doorstep 22
Doctoral lile 24
BPOADEN YOUP HOPlZONS
Sport 26
Accommodation 28
Essentla| lnformatlon 31
Fees inlormation 30
Sources ol linance 32
APT HlSTOPY, FlLM AND vlSUAL STUDlES
AT BlPMlNGHAM
About us 34
Facilities and resources 35
Our alumni 36
DOCTOPAL LlFE lN APT HlSTOPY, FlLM
AND vlSUAL STUDlES
Our doctoral researcher community 38
What is it like to be a doctoral
researcher in the Department ol Art
History, Film and visual Studies? 39
Academic support 40
Financial support 42
MAKlNG YOUP APPLlCATlON
The lour-step process explained 44
Entry requirements 46
OUP PESEAPCH
Our research strengths 47
Art History, Film and visual Studies 48
DlSCOvEP YOUP POTENTlAL
How to lind us 52
The small print 56
Contact Us 60
27.76
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Why Birmingham?
At Birmingham, we work hard to provide
our students with a rst-class academic
experience. Our priority is to deliver
exceptional teaching and learning resources
to allow you to achieve your full potential.
A tradition of excellence
For more than 100 years, the University
of Birmingham has produced innovative,
imaginative and ambitious research that
has made an impact on society and
peoples lives.
In the 20th century our researchers pioneered
transplant surgery and the use of microwaves,
created articial Vitamin C, and proved that
the glutens in wheat cause coeliac disease,
leading to the introduction of gluten-free diets.
In the 21st century we continue to break new
ground with research that is internationally
signicant and addresses real life issues.
We lead the eld in many of todays emerging
disciplines and can support research in areas
such as hydrogen vehicle technology,
nanotechnology, gene therapy, robotics, and
the use of virtual reality in archaeology. Among
many recent developments, researchers from
diverse disciplines have successfully used a
herpes vaccine to attack and kill cancer cells,
developed the rst over-the-counter home
fertility test for men, and discovered a major
ceremonial monument less than one kilometre
away from Stonehenge.
An international university
The quality and range of our research places
many of our academics at the global forefront
of their disciplines, fostering international
connections. Birmingham is also a member
of Universitas 21, a global network of 23
research-intensive universities. This creates
opportunities for international research
collaborations and for our students to travel
to partner institutions to learn about relevant
research developments. As an international
university we are keen to measure up on a
global stage. Out of over 8,000 universities
in the world, we are:
T 77th in the QS World University Rankings,
placing us 10th out of 29 UK universities
to feature in the rankings
T 101st in the Jiao Tong (China) Worldwide
League Table
T Ranked 55th in the world and 9th in the
UK for post-qualication employability
by The International Herald Tribune
T One of only 25 European institutions to
be designated a Jean Monnet European
Centre of Excellence by the European
Commission in recognition of our expertise
in European affairs
A top-class postgraduate experience
The Postgraduate Research Experience
Survey (PRES) gives research students at
Birmingham the opportunity to voice their
opinions on their experience. In the most
recent PRES survey to date (2011):
T Birmingham doctoral researchers report
particularly high scores for supervision
and 98% of students consider supervisory
support and guidance as important to
them. 71% say support and guidance
has exceeded their expectations.
T The University performs well in the area of
skills development. Scores are particularly
high for the ability to learn independently
(87%) and the improvement of analytical
skills (85%).
WHEN YOU ARE CHOOSING A UNIVERSITY FOR DOCTORAL
RESEARCH, ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT THINGS TO
CONSIDER IS ITS ACADEMIC REPUTATION. YOU WANT TO
STUDY SOMEWHERE WITH A STRONG RESEARCH CULTURE,
AN INSTITUTION WHICH IS AT THE FOREFRONT OF DISCOVERY
AND INNOVATION. YOU WANT A UNIVERSITY THAT MEASURES
UP TO YOUR EXPECTATIONS.
Investing in
postgraduate study
As a research-rich university, we are
ambitious for the future and are committed
to developing and investing in new
academic talent. We work to provide
the best possible research environment,
offer support services that are second to
none and will encourage you to full your
potential. We are investing in our doctoral
researchers and are pleased to offer
over 200 full- or partially-funded awards
to outstanding applicants wishing to
undertake PhD research at the University
of Birmingham. A searchable database of
our directly funded and competition funded
PhD research opportunities is available
at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
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Doctoral
Researcher
Original thinking
Our position as a leading research-intensive
university and a member of the Russell Group
gives researchers here a real chance to make
a difference. Eight of our academics and
alumni have been awarded Nobel Prizes
for their work.
T Francis Aston (18771945)
Awarded the Nobel Prize for
Chemistry 1922
T Sir Norman Haworth (18831950)
Awarded (jointly) the Nobel Prize for
Chemistry 1937
T Lord Robert Cecil (18641958)
Awarded the Nobel Peace Prize 1937
T Sir Peter Medawar (19151987)
Awarded the Nobel Prize (jointly)
for Physiology or Medicine 1960
T Maurice Wilkins (19162004)
Awarded the Nobel Prize (jointly)
for Physiology or Medicine 1962
T Sir John Vane (19272004)
Awarded (jointly) the Nobel Prize
for Medicine 1982
T Sir Paul Nurse (1949present)
Awarded (jointly) the Nobel Prize
for Physiology or Medicine 2001
T Professor Peter Bullock (19372008)
Awarded (collectively) the Nobel Peace
Prize 2007
The breadth and depth of our
academic portfolio
Our range of research is one of the widest
available at any UK university, creating exciting
opportunities for interdisciplinary links and
broad thematic topics. This gives us an
exceptional ability to supervise ambitious
and innovative research projects and cater
for postgraduates with interdisciplinary
research interests.
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Why Birmingham?
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Many of our resources are of national
signicance, and all are fully available
to doctoral researchers. They include:
T Our Special Collections and archives
consisting of 120,000 pre-1850 books
and three million manuscripts
T The Mingana Collection of Middle Eastern
manuscripts, the largest such collection
after the Vatican and the Bibliothque
nationale de France
T The largest superconducting magnet for
molecular imaging in the UK, housed in
the Universitys Henry Wellcome Building
T The Shakespeare Institute Library in
Stratford-upon-Avon, which holds an
internationally signicant collection of
books, manuscripts and archive material
on the history and performance of
Renaissance drama
Research power
Birmingham is a research-rich university with
academic staff who are global experts in their
eld, including people whose work pushes
forward the frontiers of their subject.
The results of the 2008 Research Assessment
Exercise (RAE) prove the University of
Birminghams research power has global reach
and leads the world in a range of disciplines.
The University was the top ranked in the West
Midlands and 12th in the UK. Birmingham is
named as the leading Cancer Studies centre
outside London, while for Sports Science we
are ranked second and for Psychology third
in the UK. Overall the RAE results show that
90% of the Universitys research has global
reach with 16% assessed as world leading
(4*) and 41% as internationally excellent (3*).
Research partnerships
We are involved in a wide range of research
partnerships with business, industry and
government, and we work to ensure that
our knowledge is transferred to practical
applications rapidly and effectively.
Established links with companies such as
Airbus, Rolls-Royce, Shell, Barclays Bank,
Kodak and GlaxoSmithKline ensure that our
researchers are well-placed to nd commercial
opportunities for their work and skills.
We also work closely with academic partners
in the UK and beyond, creating internationally
signicant research teams that focus on
developing practical solutions to both local
and global challenges. Examples of such
partnerships include the Midlands Energy
Consortium, the Manufacturing Technology
Centre, Birmingham Science City Alliance
and the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.
Facilities and resources
The University has the largest research
support facilities in the West Midlands, offering
over 2.7 million books and periodicals and
more than 16,000 electronic resources.
I beneted from collaboration
with industry and other
leading universities, as well as
encouragement to publish my
research work and present
at leading conferences.
Ranjit Kulkarni, Doctoral Researcher in
Chemical Engineering, now Regional
Manager, UOP (Honeywell)
As a doctoral researcher
at Birmingham I received
research support and
supervision from a caring,
internationally renowned
faculty with rst-rate expertise
in their eld. I also beneted
from being part of an equally
dynamic postgraduate
community.
Caroline Mei Lin Ho, Doctoral Researcher,
Department of English
We also have a wide range of services
designed to help you access and use these
resources most effectively, including:
T Electronic databases and journals in the
eLibrary, available both on and off campus
T Online library catalogue of printed
collections
T One-to-one information clinics for
doctoral researchers to support individual
learning needs
T Subject and database guides to help
identify useful information sources
T Skills guides to help you get the most
out of your research
T A range of library services by telephone
or online
Doctoral researchers also have access to
the high-performance research computing
facility, BlueBEAR, one of the most powerful
computers in the UK, developed in partnership
with IBM.
Shakespeare Institute Library
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Doctoral
Researcher
MY RESEARCH EXAMINES MONASTIC COMMUNITIES AND
PILGRIMAGE SITES IN THE HOLY LAND FOLLOWING THE
ESTABLISHMENT OF ISLAMIC RULE, WITH THE AIM OF
DISPELLING ANTI-ARAB PREJUDICE.
My ndings offer a more nuanced analysis of ChristianMuslim interfacing in this formative
period than that which is repeatedly evoked in modern interfaith dialogue. Undertaking my
doctoral research at Birmingham has enabled me to work with some of the most renowned
scholars in my discipline in an institution which remains dedicated to a strong tradition of innovative
research and exceptional standards of supervision. Thanks to the support I have received from
the University I have become part of a global research environment, participating in academic
events across the UK, Europe and the Middle East. These experiences have not only proved
invaluable for my career development, but they have also given me some fantastic opportunities
to meet many interesting people and visit some fascinating places.
Daniel Reynolds
Doctoral Researcher, College of Arts and Law
push
the boundaries of knowledge
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OUP PPOGPAMMES lNCLUDE PESEAPCH SKlLLS TPAlNlNG
THAT WlLL EOUlP YOU TO BECOME AN lNDEPENDENT
PESEAPCHEP CAPABLE OF ADvANClNG KNOWLEDGE lN
YOUP FlELD.
Remember: it is hard work
but you will grow and gain
a new way of looking at the
world. There are times when
you will become consumed
by it all but being able to
see an end point keeps
you focused and in control.
Regular meetings with your
tutor keep you grounded
and ensure you create a
self-help network with
fellow researchers.
Claire Largan, Doctoral Researcher,
School of Education
Docioial icscaich siuuy oiions
Push the boundaries ol knowledge 12
The doctoral research programme options that
we oller in History ol Art are:
I History ol Art PhD
I History ol Art PhD by Distance Learning
The nature of doctora| research
Completion ol a PhD consists ol undertaking
an extensive period ol advanced research
under the supervision and guidance ol one or
more experienced members ol academic stall.
To be awarded a PhD you must complete an
original work ol merit in the lorm ol an 80,000-
word thesis, all, or a signilicant part ol which,
must be worthy ol publication in a learned
journal or equivalent.
You will also need to delend your thesis and
display an adequate knowledge ol the
discipline within which your specilic lield ol
study lalls during an oral examination (vivo
voce). For detailed guidance on the viva
process, including practical advice, visit:
https://intranet.birmingham.ac.uk/as/
studentservices/graduateschool/rsa/
vivaexamination.aspx
Doctora| research by dlstance |earnlng
A PhD by Distance Learning allows you to
undertake the majority ol your research at an
oll-campus location, only making one
compulsory annual visit to the University. The
linancial and practical implications ol relocating
to the UK, such as work or lamilial obligations,
sometimes make distance learning a more
leasible option. Similarly, il your PhD topic is
related to your area ol residence then moving
could be detrimental to your research.
Whilst there is no lee discount associated with
studying in this way, the cost ol travel lor an
annual visit to the University is built into the lee
structure, meaning that - at no extra cost - you
can benelit lrom on-campus lacilities,
specialised training and peer discussions.
The nature ol the work produced and the
examination process are the same as lor a
standard PhD. You will also receive the same
level ol support and supervision as on-campus
students. The only dillerence is that supervisory
sessions will take place via audio and visual
communication services such as Skype or
Facetime, rather than in person.
lt should be noted, however, that distance
learning is not lor everyone. You have to have a
very clear idea ol your project and be able to
motivate yoursell. Belore we can oller you a
place it is important that your potential
supervisor is satislied that you will be able to
undertake the PhD on an oll-campus basis.
This may mean that, in addition to the basic
entry requirements lor undertaking doctoral
research, you will also need to prove that you
have adequate research skills. For lurther
inlormation please see the Moking yout
opplicoIion section.
Entry requlrements
Normally an Honours degree (2:1 or above)
and a good Masters in a relevant subject, or
equivalent qualilications. ll you have not already
completed a Masters you will usually be
registered on a Masters by Pesearch in the lirst
instance and apply to upgrade your registration
to a PhD on the basis ol progress made.
We also accept a range ol qualilications lrom
dillerent countries. For inlormation on entry
requirements specilic to your country ol origin
please visit: www.birmingham.ac.uk/
international/students/country/index.aspx
ll your lirst language is not English you will
need to demonstrate that you have a high level
ol written and spoken English. Full details ol
international qualilications that lullil the
University's minimum requirements can be
lound on the FnIty tequitemenIs page.
Duratlon
Three years lull-time. There is no part-time
option lor on-campus study, however you can
choose to undertake the PhD by Distance
Learning on a part-time basis (six years).
Fees (2013-14)
12,140 per year lull-time, 6,0?0 per year
part-time (PhD by Distance Learning only).
Start date
Pesearch degrees may start at any time ol the
year, though lor most this will be September.
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Doctoral
Researcher
University Graduate School
THE UNIVERSITY GRADUATE SCHOOL BRINGS TOGETHER
ALL DOCTORAL RESEARCHERS AT BIRMINGHAM. IT ACTS AS
YOUR CENTRAL RESOURCE POINT, GIVING YOU ACCESS TO A
WEALTH OF SERVICES TO SUPPORT YOU IN YOUR RESEARCH,
DEVELOP YOUR SKILLS AND PREPARE YOU FOR SUCCESS IN A
COMPETITIVE GLOBAL MARKET.
Our services for doctoral researchers
include: a welcome and induction programme;
skills training and development courses;
information and advice; and research-focused
events, giving you the chance to meet
researchers from other disciplines across
the University. We also provide a number
of travel scholarships each year to enable
doctoral researchers to visit other
international universities and institutes.
Welcome and induction
The University Graduate School Induction
Day in October will introduce you to the
facilities available to doctoral researchers
and will outline how we can support you in
your studies. We also run a dedicated
Welcome programme, including lunches
and coffee mornings, where you can get
to know other new doctoral researchers
in a friendly, informal setting.
Additionally, our Doctoral Researcher
Essentials package provides an online guide
to your rst year as a doctoral researcher.
The course consists of ve separate modules
covering key stages of the incipient doctoral
research career. The course is self-paced and
you can dip in and out, or work through it in its
entirety as you need to.
Skills training and development
Our wide range of doctoral researcher training
enables you to develop both your skills as a
researcher and skills that you can transfer to
the workplace, improving your work-based
competencies and employability. Whether
you need to deliver a conference presentation,
improve your communication skills or get to
grips with project management, we offer
courses that will help you. We also help you
to carry out a training needs analysis to identify
the skills you need to develop in each year of
your PhD and how you plan to do this.
Training courses
IT and research skills development training is
offered to all doctoral researchers. Courses
offered include:
T Research and information
T Data analysis
T Intellectual property and
knowledge transfer
T Business and enterprise
T Networking and teamworking
T Communication skills
T Academic publishing
T Presentation skills
T Personal effectiveness
T Career development
T Teaching and learning
T Subject-specic skills development
T E-learning
T Writing and presenting your thesis
Many courses are delivered online so you can
learn at your own pace and at a time that suits
your schedule.
Many doctoral researchers have opportunities
to teach within their departments, which can
provide valuable experience as well as a
source of income. The University Graduate
School offers training in basic teaching
skills to enable you to take advantage of
these opportunities. If you teach for at least
15 hours over an 18-month period you can
take the Pathway Module that leads to
Associate membership of the Higher
Education Academy.
Information and advice
Our Research Student Administration team
is available to answer all your questions about
the University rules and regulations governing
doctoral research, including how to present
and submit your thesis, how to prepare for
your viva and how to request a leave of
absence or an extension.
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A sense of community
The University Graduate School helps foster
a sense of community amongst doctoral
researchers through our regular programme of
events. As a Birmingham doctoral researcher
you can take part in networking sessions and
annual events, such as our Research Poster
Conference and Doctoral Researcher
Community Day, which provide you with
valuable opportunities to meet and learn
from colleagues across the University
research community.
Overseas travel scholarships
We offer a number of scholarships each year
to enable doctoral researchers to travel to
partner universities within Universitas 21
the global network of research-intensive
universities to learn more about relevant
research developments. Each scholarship
pays up to 1,500 to assist with travel and
accommodation costs, and a visit is usually
for a period of approximately one month.
Universitas 21 Joint PhDs
Universitas 21 (U21) has established a unique
framework for jointly awarded PhDs. Under
this scheme, two partner universities create
a tailor-made programme of study for the
doctoral researcher, taking their specic
research needs into account and enabling
collaboration with another U21 university.
Each institution will allocate the doctoral
researcher a minimum of one supervisor with
whom they will have actual or virtual joint
meetings, and they will enjoy access to the
same facilities as other doctoral researchers
enrolled at that institution.
For a list of participating institutions and to nd
out more please visit www.birmingham.ac.uk/
international/collaborate/universitas21.aspx
For more information about the support
available from the University Graduate School
please visit www.graduateschool.bham.ac.uk
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Doctoral
Researcher
seize
the opportunities that
will shape your future
UNDERTAKING DOCTORAL RESEARCH AT BIRMINGHAM HAS
HELPED ME WIDEN MY HORIZONS AND KEEP MY FUTURE
CAREER OPTIONS OPEN.
I have had the opportunity to nurture my dreams of being an entrepreneur through various
initiatives like Enterprising Birmingham, Talent Pool and the Postgraduate Enterprise Summer
School. I have also been fortunate enough to obtain a U21 Research Student Travel Bursary
from the University which enabled me to carry out research at the National University of
Singapore. This has proved to be an invaluable investment both for completing my PhD thesis
and for my future. At this nal stage of my doctoral research at Birmingham, I can condently
say that I have had one of the best times of my life and I will remain ever grateful for the
countless opportunities Birmingham has given me to invest in my future.
Olubayode Ero-Phillips
Doctoral Researcher, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences
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Help and support
WE AIM TO PROVIDE YOU WITH ALL THE RESOURCES WE
CAN TO FACILITATE YOUR RESEARCH AND HELP YOU REALISE
YOUR POTENTIAL. THIS INCLUDES ENSURING THAT YOUR
EVERYDAY LIFE RUNS AS SMOOTHLY AS POSSIBLE DURING
YOUR TIME HERE.
Our International Students Advisory Service
(ISAS) provides you with a strong network
of support, starting before you arrive and
continuing throughout your studies. We offer
specialist help and advice on a wide range
of issues including immigration, nance and
family concerns.
We can advise you by email (isas@contacts.
bham.ac.uk) or in person at our walk-in
guidance service. Alternatively you can book
a one-to-one condential appointment with
an adviser.
In addition to the tailor-made services
provided by ISAS, you have access to the full
range of general support services available to
all students here. These are outlined over
the following pages.
Welcome International
To welcome you and help you settle into
University life, we run a dedicated ve-day
programme in September called Welcome
International. This begins with an airport
collection service and includes tours of the
campus and the city, help with administrative
tasks such as registering with a doctor and
the police, if necessary, and social events
where you can meet other international
postgraduates. We also arrange social events
for students and their dependants throughout
the year, including a Christmas party for
students children.
Immigration advice and services
ISAS offers immigration advice and information
relating to specic immigration categories
including Visitors, Student Visitors, Students,
Student Dependants, EEA Nationals,
non-EEA Family Members, and certain
employment categories.
For a full list of our immigration advice and
visa services please see www.as.bham.ac.uk/
studentlife/international/visa/index.shtml
Family life
As well as helping you to apply for visas
for your family members, we also offer
information for families when they arrive here.
A comprehensive guide Bringing your Family
to the UK covering areas such as childcare,
healthcare, education, budgeting, banking and
driving in the UK, can be downloaded from our
website at www.as.bham.ac.uk/studentlife/
international/guides.shtml
Finance
The ISAS website offers information on
sources of funding and scholarships from the
University. ISAS can also help you clarify your
tuition fee status and eligibility for student
support, and can give advice in cases of
nancial difculty. We have a range of
information guides on nancial issues that
can be downloaded from www.as.bham.ac.uk/
studentlife/international/guides.shtml

Living and working in the UK
ISAS provides support to help you settle
into life at Birmingham and the University,
including guidance on opening a bank
account, registering with a doctor and
shopping locally. If you need to work to
support your studies during your time
here, we can advise you about working
in the UK and the various work schemes
that are available for international students
following graduation.
Meet us in your country
If you need help and advice before making
your decision to study here you can meet
our International Relations staff in your own
country. We attend exhibitions and events,
and work with a network of overseas
representatives who can give you advice
and guidance on your application. To nd
out when we will be visiting your country
please visit www.birmingham.ac.uk/
international/meet/index.aspx
I was both excited and
anxious about coming to
the UK to study. However,
all of my apprehension was
dissolved by the overwhelming
experience of the local people
welcoming me to the city and
to the University.
Vinod More, Doctoral Researcher,
International Business
The University of Birmingham
exposed me to a critical way
of academic learning. I really
enjoyed this and am now using
it practically in delivering public
services as a state bureaucrat.
Sitendra Singh, Doctoral Researcher,
Public Service
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Doctoral
Researcher
A wide network of support services is
on hand to help you with any practical
and personal issues you may encounter,
leaving you free to focus on achieving
your academic goals.
Before you arrive:
Doctoral ReSEARCHer Enquiry
Service (DRES)
The Doctoral ReSEARCHer Enquiry Service
provides advice and guidance to prospective
students on:
T Searching for advertised PhD opportunities
T Identifying a potential supervisor
T The PhD application process
T Writing the PhD proposal
T Scholarships, bursaries and funding
opportunities
T Lifestyle and accommodation
You can either call the DRES centre on
+44 (0)121 414 5005 or email:
dr@contacts.bham.ac.uk
Postgraduate mentors
If you have queries or concerns about any
aspect of life as a doctoral researcher at
Birmingham, you can get rst-hand information
and advice from current students as soon
as you have received your offer of a place.
Postgraduate student mentors are available
to answer your questions via email based
on their own experience of campus life, their
school and college, the city, the transition to
postgraduate study, and anything else you
need to know about studying and living here.
They can also help you with registration and
administration procedures once you arrive.
Email: pgmentor@contacts.bham.ac.uk for
more information on this service.
Once you are here:
Counselling and guidance
The Counselling and Guidance Service is
here to help students get the most out of
their time at university. The service provides
counselling for all registered students in order
to help them engage more effectively in their
academic and social environment and to
achieve their potential.
Advice and representation
The Advice and Representation Centre offers
free, impartial and condential information,
advice and representation on a wide range
of issues, including housing, nance and
legal issues.
Financial advice
The Student Funding Ofce offers support
and training on all aspects of student nance,
from scholarships and fees to managing
your money.
Health and dental care
The University has its own Medical Practice
and University Dental and Implant Centre on
the edge of our main campus, catering for our
students and staff.
Social life
As a member of the Guild of Students you
have access to over 190 student groups,
societies and associations. Whether you want
to meet new people, continue a hobby or skill,
learn something new or just get involved in
student life, there is a group for everyone.
Postgraduate and Mature
Students Association
There is an association of postgraduate and
mature students, where specic issues can be
discussed. There is also a Postgraduate and
Mature Students Ofcer (PMSO) to represent
these views and offer support.
Nightline
Nightline is a free and condential listening
service run by students for students, where
you can talk about anything, from your
research stresses to your personal life.
Disability and dyslexia advice and support
The University offers support for a range of
disabilities. We are here to help and to make
sure that you can take full advantage of the
university experience, whatever your disability
or support needs.
Supporting your faith
Birmingham is a secular university, but
respects all faiths and provides opportunities
for prayer. In our multi-faith Chaplaincy
students of all faiths and those interested
in world religions are invited to take part
in a varied programme of events, worship
and activities. For further information on the
services offered by the Chaplaincy please
visit: www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/
support/faith.aspx
Childcare facilities
For students with childcare needs we have
two day nurseries offering high standards
of care, one of which includes a pre-school
unit. For more information please visit
www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/
support/nursery.aspx
Learn more
Further information on all our student
support services can be found at
www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/support
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EMPLOYERS VALUE DOCTORAL GRADUATES. A 2010 SURVEY
OF AROUND 100 HUMAN RESOURCES DIRECTORS AND
MANAGERS FOUND THAT SEVEN OUT OF TEN SOUGHT
TO RECRUIT EMPLOYEES WHO HAVE A DOCTORATE.
Careers and employability
Of these, approximately nine out of ten
said they valued the subject-specic skills,
the research and technical skills, and the
analytical thinking and problem-solving skills
of doctoral graduates.
So your qualication adds signicant value for
an employer but it is not, in itself, a guarantee
that you will meet their needs. In an increasingly
competitive employment market, you need
access to high quality opportunities and
resources to help you market yourself
to employers and ensure you are well
prepared for success.
Career development services
Our Careers and Employability Centre offers
a range of services to support you in this.
We can offer one-to-one advice to help you
plan your career, explore employment areas,
research further study options, review your
CV, complete application forms and prepare
for interviews. We work closely with a number
of networks to customise your job searches
to your home country and provide access to
virtual recruitment fairs to ensure that you are
able to access suitable job roles there.
We also offer a range of specialist services for
international students who wish to work in the
UK after graduation.
Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Entrepreneurship and Innovation, part of
the Careers and Employability Centre, runs
a number of initiatives to help doctoral
researchers develop their entrepreneurial
and business skills. These include:
T Postgraduate Enterprise Summer School
This intensive week-long training course for
doctoral researchers covers a wide range
of topics related to enterprise and
entrepreneurship. These include innovation,
business planning, marketing, nancing
and commercialisation, as well as
communication, presentation and
networking skills.
T The Talent Pool
The Talent Pool aims to create a network of
doctoral and postdoctoral researchers and
give them access to real-life opportunities
such as work experience, placements,
internships or consultancy contracts,
or assist them in setting up their own
business. Entry to the Talent Pool requires
some basic enterprise and professional
skills training to be undertaken in the form
of ve interactive and engaging workshops
and a one-day assessment.
T Enterprising Birmingham
Business Plan Competition
This challenging competition offers all
internal research staff and PhD students
(supported by their supervisor) the chance
to develop a research-related business
idea and win a share of 30,000.
For more information about Entrepreneurship
and Innovation please visit www.as.bham.ac.uk/
ei/enterprise/doctoral.shtml
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Doctoral
Researcher
immerse
yourself in the Birmingham experience
THERE IS A REALLY STRONG POSTGRADUATE COMMUNITY
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM AND YOU TRULY FEEL
THAT YOU ARE AN IMPORTANT AND VALUED MEMBER OF
THE INSTITUTION.
I have been given some fantastic opportunities to get involved in the research community
and I have beneted from an excellent level of interaction with the academic staff. The
research centre for my subject area invited me to act as the postgraduate representative on
its management board, a role which allowed me to champion the interests of the postgraduate
community whilst gaining a better understanding of academic practices. The University
was also kind enough to give our Postgraduate Forum some funding to enable us to host
a symposium, which attracted over 50 participants from institutions across the country.
I have also received numerous grants that have allowed me to present my research at
a variety of international conferences. These experiences have been of immeasurable
benet to both my personal development and my future career.
Emily Rozier
Doctoral Researcher, College of Arts and Law
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WITH ITS MAGNIFICENT ARCHITECTURE AND LEAFY GREEN
SITE, OUR CAMPUS PROVIDES AN INSPIRATIONAL ENVIRONMENT
FOR YOUR RESEARCH. STUDYING HERE GIVES YOU THE BEST
OF BOTH WORLDS A PEACEFUL YET THRIVING CAMPUS
COMMUNITY ON THE DOORSTEP OF ONE OF EUROPES
MOST DYNAMIC AND CULTURALLY DIVERSE CITIES.
Our campus
Heritage and beauty
The main campus at Edgbaston is set in 25
acres of parkland with spacious lawns, trees,
a lake, and signicant works of sculpture
enhancing its landscape. With its domed
redbrick buildings and landmark 100-metre
high clock tower built to commemorate
the Universitys rst Chancellor, Joseph
Chamberlain, the campus is rich in
heritage and beauty.
Our Selly Oak campus, two miles from
Edgbaston, is a green 80-acre site with a
village atmosphere. Among the facilities here
are the School of Education and the BBC
Drama Village where several national
network drama series are produced.
Amenities and attractions
The Edgbaston campus has all the amenities
of a small town, including shops, bars, cafs,
banks, medical and dental surgeries, sports
facilities and a train station, all within easy
reach. An award-winning art gallery, a concert
hall and a museum are among the cultural
attractions that make it a place to enjoy.
Culture on campus
The collections at Birmingham are here
to be savoured and treasured. But the
huge range of cultural artefacts on campus
from Old Master paintings to historic physics
instruments also plays a crucial role
in our research.

The Barber Institute of Fine Arts
With works by major artists including Monet,
Van Gogh, Botticelli, Degas, Picasso and
Magritte, the Barber Institute has been
described as one of the nest small art
galleries in Europe and was voted Gallery of
the Year in 2004 by the Good Britain Guide.
It is a Grade II listed building in distinctive
Art Deco style, with its own concert hall.
The Barber hosts a range of concerts,
talks, lectures, classes and family activities,
and is fully open to the public.
Learn more
www.barber.org.uk
Lapworth Museum of Geology
Our Lapworth Museum of Geology,
located at the centre of the Edgbaston
campus, holds 250,000 specimens of
rocks, fossils and minerals, and has been
designated an Outstanding Collection
by the Arts and Humanities Research
Council. Dating back to 1880, it is
one of the oldest specialist geological
museums in the UK.
Learn more
www.birmingham.ac.uk/facilities/
lapworth-museum
Special Collections and archives
The Universitys Cadbury Research Library is
the home of approximately 120,000 pre-1850
books dating from 1471 and some three
million manuscripts. The collection contains
some remarkable pieces, including: diaries
showing Chamberlains personal thoughts
about his meetings with Hitler during the
Munich crisis of 1938; beautifully illuminated
Persian medieval manuscripts; rst editions of
Charles Dickens and works from the printing
press of William Morris, illustrated by Edward
Burne-Jones.
Winterbourne House and Garden
Recently restored, this elegant Edwardian
Arts and Crafts-style house is set within
seven acres of beautiful botanic gardens,
home to over 6,000 plant species from
around the world.
Learn more
www.winterbourne.org.uk
Continual improvement
Our campus is a constant work in progress.
We are continually investing in campus
improvements, and spend around 1 million
each week on developing buildings, facilities
and resources. The prestigious Bramall Music
Building, opened in 2012, completes the
semi-circle of buildings that have been the
heart of the campus since 1909, fullling its
original architectural vision. Its state-of-the-art
auditorium offers the most exible performance
space at a UK university. Over the next ve
years the University also plans to invest 175
million in transforming the Edgbaston campus.
The redevelopments include a new sports
centre and a new library which will benet
not only our students and staff but also
the local community.
Learn more
Find out about the amenities and attractions
on our campuses, their fascinating history and
their importance to the city of Birmingham
www.birmingham.ac.uk/community/
university-campus/index.aspx
The green and quiet campus
at Edgbaston is a relaxed
environment for study and
the facilities are excellent.
Cai Heath, Doctoral Researcher,
International Development Department
Winterbourne Botanic Garden
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Doctoral
Researcher
The Church at Varengeville, Claude Monet,
Barber Institute of Fine Arts
When these buildings are
complete, they will be the best
of their kind in Europe and
perhaps the world.
The Rt Hon. Joseph Chamberlain,
Chancellor of the University, 19001914
Ammonites, The Lapworth Museum The Danford Collection of West African Art and Artefacts
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The city on your doorstep
BIRMINGHAM HAS BEEN TRANSFORMED INTO ONE OF
EUROPES MOST EXCITING CITIES. IT IS MORE THAN
SOMEWHERE TO STUDY; IT IS SOMEWHERE TO BUILD
A SUCCESSFUL FUTURE.
When you choose to study at Birmingham,
youll be minutes away from a condent,
modern commercial centre. The city is home
to the largest nancial services and creative
sectors outside London and a thriving business
community that offers you a wealth of career
opportunities.
Away from your studies, the city provides you
with the perfect backdrop to relax. Alongside
restaurants and bars, Birmingham is a hive of live
entertainment, from mainstream contemporary
acts at the O2 Academy and National Indoor
Arena for music, to the Glee Club for comedy.
The city also boasts one of Europes nest
concert halls, Symphony Hall, home to the
City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra.
The Hippodrome Theatre is home to the
Birmingham Royal Ballet. The city centre has
three other theatres and a number of cinemas,
including Star City, an entertainment complex
featuring 24 screens with the latest Asian and
mainstream lms under one roof.
For shopping you are spoilt for choice with the
iconic Bullring being one of Europes largest
city centre shopping areas. Birmingham also
has four bustling indoor and outdoor markets
selling everything from vintage clothes to fresh
fruit and vegetables; while for a real treat you
could visit the Mailbox, which brings together
designer fashion and lifestyle shops, luxury
apartments, hotels and an array of restaurants
and caf bars.
The Jewellery Quarter is home to
Birminghams historic jewellery trade, and
the area still boasts more than 400 shops
to enjoy: the perfect place to pick up a
unique piece at a bargain price.
This is a great place to live. Birmingham is the best of both worlds.
It is well known for being a vibrant city, but less well known for being
on the doorstep of some of the most beautiful countryside in England.
David Newsome, Doctoral Researcher in Ancient History and Archaeology,
now Major Gifts Ofcer at the University of Birmingham
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Doctoral
Researcher
The surrounding area
If you want a break from city living, some of
Englands most beautiful countryside is within
easy reach. The Severn Valley, the Malvern Hills,
Ironbridge Gorge (a UNESCO world heritage
site) and the picturesque Cotswolds villages
are all ideal destinations for a day trip. Nearby
Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwick Castle,
Kenilworth Castle and the Black Country
Museum are rich in historical interest. Canals
and waterways thread their way through the
region, offering a relaxing way to explore its
natural landscapes.
Fact
T Close to 9 billion has been
invested in the city centre over
the past 20 years
T Bullring is the most visited
shopping centre outside
Londons West End, with more
than 150 shops inside the 530
million complex
T There are more than 500 restaurants
in Birmingham offering a vast range
of international cuisine
T Birmingham was the rst city to be
awarded National City of Sport status
and hosts top level football, cricket,
tennis and golf
For hobbit fans, Sarehole Mill is a 200-year-
old watermill providing a tranquil haven from
21st century life outside. It was a favourite
haunt of the young JRR Tolkien and it is said
that the mill and nearby Moseley Bog provided
the inspiration for the Shire home to Frodo
and Bilbo Baggins.
There is something for everyone in Birmingham
and you will get a warm welcome in one of the
most culturally diverse cities in Britain.
Ironbridge Gorge, world heritage site
The Shakespeare Institute, Stratford-upon-Avon
Birmingham Town Hall
Selfridges, Bullring Brindleyplace
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Doctoral life
DOCTORAL RESEARCHERS ARE AN INTEGRAL PART OF
OUR STUDENT COMMUNITY AND HAVE OPPORTUNITIES
TO GET INVOLVED IN EVERY ASPECT OF UNIVERSITY LIFE.
Activities such as volunteering, becoming a
student representative (rep) or a postgraduate
ambassador can enhance your experience and
help you develop valuable transferable skills
that will benet you in your career.
The Guild of Students
The University of Birmingham Guild of
Students is our recognised students union,
run by students for students. It represents
and involves everyone studying here, whether
undergraduate or postgraduate, from the
UK or overseas, on all campuses.
Every student at Birmingham is automatically
a member of the Guild. This offers a wealth
of benets including support, entertainment,
training and a wide range of opportunities
to get involved in student life.
Student representation
The student representation system is a
partnership between the Guild of Students
and the University. It enables all students
to make their voices heard, raise issues
that affect them and get things changed
for the better.
Students reps canvass doctoral researchers
within their schools and represent their views
at school, college and university level. Reps
sit on research staffstudent committees and
can also be elected to attend the University
Senate. Becoming a student rep is a positive
way to air your views, and those of your
fellow doctoral researchers, while enhancing
your personal skills and giving you rst-hand
knowledge of decision-making within a
complex organisation.
Volunteering
As a postgraduate volunteer, you can
gain valuable transferable skills, which can
boost your employability and broaden your
experience. Volunteering also gives you the
opportunity to meet other people and have
fun, while making a difference to the local
community.
Volunteering does not have to take up a lot
of time all the volunteer projects the Guild of
Students work with understand that your time
is precious, and many offer exible or one-off
placements. Staff at the Guild can help you
nd a placement that suits your skills and time
commitments. The Guild also offers training
and recognition for volunteers, including
certicates, prizes and recognition events.
Student groups
There are over 190 recognised student
groups hosted by the Guild, covering a wide
range of interests including sports, music,
culture, faith and many more. They include
the Postgraduate and Mature Students
Association (PGMSA), which offers a forum
for discussion and support on issues of
specic interest to postgraduates.
Postgraduate ambassadors
Doctoral researchers also have the opportunity
to become ambassadors for the University and
get involved in a range of public engagement
activities. These might include leading tours on
open days and assisting at postgraduate fairs,
as well as taking part in focus groups and
market research. Working hours are exible
and can be tted in around your study. As an
ambassador you will be provided with training
and support to ensure you get the most out
of the role. For more information about our
Postgraduate Ambassadors Scheme please
email dr@contacts.bham.ac.uk
Being a postgraduate
ambassador gives you
fantastic opportunities
to interact with the wider
postgraduate community. It
also allows you to t paid work
around your research as the
hours are extremely exible
and you gain useful CV
material whilst making new
friends in the process.
Michael Rush, Doctoral Researcher,
Department of History
Postgraduate virtual
community
To see some of the vodcasts produced by
postgraduates and members of academic
staff at the University visit our YouTube
channel: www.youtube.com/
unibirmingham
You can also join our virtual community
through Facebook: wwwfacebook.com/
unibirminghampostgrads
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Doctoral
Researcher
broaden
your horizons
DESPITE THE PRESSURES OF DOCTORAL RESEARCH
I STRONGLY RECOMMEND MAKING TIME TO GET
INVOLVED WITH SOME OF THE STUDENT GROUPS
ACTIVE AT THE UNIVERSITY.
Though the primary focus of my time at Birmingham is completing my PhD thesis, I have
been continually impressed by the opportunities to get involved with extra-curricular activities
at the University. I have worked as a student representative for my school, my college and
the Guild, championing student opinions to the University. These roles have also enabled
me to organise guest lectures from internationally acclaimed authors along with full-day
conferences. There has been strong support, both in terms of time from the academics
and training and nancial support from the University Graduate School. Involvement in
these activities has not only greatly increased my social circle, but it has also broadened
my future career options thanks to the variety of new skills I have gained.
Andrew Logsdail
Doctoral Researcher, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences
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ENJOY YOUR TIME HERE AND EXTEND YOUR LEARNING
BEYOND THE LIBRARY OR LAB BY TAKING PART IN ONE OF
THE VAST ARRAY OF SPORTING ACTIVITIES ON OFFER AT
BIRMINGHAM. FROM ARCHERY TO WINDSURFING, UNIVERSITY
OF BIRMINGHAM SPORT OFFERS YOU THE OPPORTUNITY TO
PURSUE A SPORT THAT SUITS YOU, WHATEVER YOUR LEVEL
OF EXPERIENCE OR ABILITY.
Sport
Performance sport
The University is a recognised centre of
excellence in UK higher education sport,
attracting athletes from across the world to
study, train and compete. For example, we
have been selected as the training camp for
the world-beating Jamaican Track and Field
Team for the London 2012 Olympics.
We have been ranked as one of the top
sporting universities in the UK by British
Universities and Colleges Sport (formerly
BUSA) for the past 18 years. Competing in
more than 40 sports, Birmingham sportsmen
and women currently excel in crosscountry
running, squash, hockey, rowing, American
football and golf, to name a few.
Active Lifestyle programme
If competitive sport is not for you, there are
plenty of opportunities to simply get t, feel
healthier, meet people and have fun. Our Active
Lifestyle programme offers tness, dance and
sports classes to suit all ages, abilities and
tness levels. It is the largest programme of
its type in the country and includes everything
from boxercise and studio cycling to martial
arts, salsa and yoga.
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Doctoral
Researcher
Sports facilities
Our campus-based sports facilities include:
T Fully equipped tness suite with extensive
free weights area (awarded Gym of the
Year 2010 for Midlands and Wales by
Workout UK magazine)
T Three multi-purpose sports halls
T 25-metre swimming pool
T Seven squash courts
T Gymnastics centre
T Dojo (martial arts room)
T Athletics track
T A range of pitches including water-based
and 3G synthetic pitches
T A specialised Human Performance Lab,
offering training assistance, nutritional
advice and performance monitoring
Off campus, the Raymond Priestley Outdoor
Pursuits Centre in the Lake District offers the
opportunity to try a range of outdoor activities
including sailing, windsurng, mountaineering,
rock climbing, kayaking and canoeing.
Tailored support
Whatever sporting activity you are interested
in, at whatever level, our Health and Fitness
team (Thrive) offers a range of professional
support services to help you develop and
improve. Services include tness and health
assessments, personal training, healthy heart
and cholesterol checks, weight and muscle
analysis, sports massage and access to the
Sports Medicine Clinic.
Learn more
www.sport.bham.ac.uk
Second place overall in the
Universities and Colleges
Sport league is a fantastic
achievement for Birmingham
students, and also a reection
of great teamwork between
student clubs and the
University of Birmingham
Sport team that supports
them on and off the pitch.
Zena Wooldridge, Director of Sport at
the University of Birmingham
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WE AIM TO ENSURE THAT YOUR EVERYDAY LIFE CAN RUN AS
SMOOTHLY AS POSSIBLE DURING YOUR TIME HERE, LEAVING
YOU FREE TO FOCUS ON ACHIEVING YOUR ACADEMIC GOALS.
Accommodation
So we guarantee a place in University
accommodation to all international students
who are new to Birmingham, ensuring you
have no concerns about nding a suitable,
safe and sociable place to live.
The guarantee is subject to the
following conditions:
T You must have rmly accepted the
offer of a course
T Your application for accommodation
must be received by our Accommodation
Services Ofce no later than 31 July
T You must be applying for single
accommodation (the University also has
a limited supply of accommodation for
students wishing to bring their families to
Birmingham but this cannot be provided
on a guaranteed basis)
T You agree to remain in your University
accommodation for the full term of
your contract
University accommodation
Most University accommodation for
postgraduate students is located in two
student villages Pritchatts Park and Selly
Oak. Both are safe and secure environments
offering a 24-hour reception service, CCTV
coverage across the whole village, personal
possessions insurance, mentors and a
residents association.
Pritchatts Park Village
Based in Edgbaston, ten minutes walk from
the main campus, Pritchatts Park houses both
undergraduate and postgraduate students.
Accommodation is in single study/bedrooms
(all with internet access) with shared kitchen
and bathroom facilities. A social centre offers
a range of leisure facilities including a licensed
bar, games room, large screen television,
vending area and quiet study zone. Limited
car parking is available.
Selly Oak Village (Jarratt Hall)
Just ve minutes walk from the main campus,
Selly Oak Village is a popular choice for
international postgraduates. Built around
a pleasant central courtyard and three
landscaped areas, it accommodates over
400 postgraduate students in three- to
six-bedroom apartments with en suite facilities,
internet access and shared kitchens and
lounges. Jarratt Hall benets from an ID card
access control system, and some rooms have
wheelchair access and/or deaf alerts installed.
The University also owns or manages a
number of houses within the Selly Oak
neighbourhood. Some of these are exclusively
for postgraduate students, and a few are
suitable for students with families.
Private rented accommodation
If you prefer not to live in University
accommodation, our Accommodation
My home base: Pritchatts Park Village
Student village living offered Elisabeth Kempf, a Doctoral Researcher in English,
a friendly and supportive environment with a minimum of daily distractions
ideal conditions for her to concentrate on her research.
I am an EU student and I was very thankful that the University guaranteed a place in one
of their postgraduate halls for me. I lived in Oakley Court, which is a part of Pritchatts Park
Village, in a six-bedroom at that I shared with three other female postgraduate students.
Our at was fully furnished and modern and we even had a cleaner come and take care of
the communal areas every week! The staff at the reception were always very helpful and
whenever we needed help they sent someone immediately.
Oakley Court is very close to the University: its only a ten-minute walk to the main campus.
Harborne, a local shopping area, is also close by, and buses to and from the city centre leave
on Pritchatts Road, which is only a few hundred metres from our door.
I really enjoyed living in halls and I was able to focus on my research most of the time, as I
didnt have to deal with any problems concerning the at. It also gave me the opportunity to
live with other postgraduate students, which was a great experience.
Services team can help you nd a suitable
private property to rent. There is a wide range
of accommodation available in the local area,
including single ats, shared ats, houses for
different sized groups, properties for families
and lodgings with a residential landlord.
Our at search scheme can put you in
touch with other prospective students
before arriving in Birmingham, enabling you
to rent accommodation as part of a group.
You can also use our new online search
service www.birminghamstudentpad.co.uk
providing a comprehensive and up-to-date
database of private sector properties so you
can nd the property most suited to your
needs as quickly and easily as possible.
We operate a quality control system covering
all properties featured online so you can be
sure any property you nd has been checked
and graded against minimum standards
stipulated by the University.
7952 DR INTERNATIONAL front st2.indd 28 19/02/2013 12:08
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563_28
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
My home base: University
owned/managed house
Lisa Kranzer, a Doctoral Researcher
in Medieval Studies, describes her
experience of living in a University
owned/managed house.
I live in a University-owned house
that is reserved solely for postgraduate
students, which means that the people
I share with have roughly the same work
commitments and pressures as I do.
If you are new to the University then this
type of accommodation is an excellent
means by which to meet fellow students
and make friends. The house is in
Selly Oak village, which is very close
to the University.
I found my accommodation through
www.birminghamstudentpad.co.uk
Both University-owned and private sector
accommodation is advertised on this
website. It is a great resource because
all landlords have been checked for their
reliability and quality of accommodation.
So you wont need to be scared of ending
up with an awful landlord or sub-standard
room. I denitely recommend using this
website to all students who are new
to the city.
For more information email
l.a.bartram@bham.ac.uk or
birminghamstudentpad@contacts.bham.ac.uk
SHAC is a lettings agency run by our
Guild of Students. The service charges no
fees to student tenants and only advertises
accredited landlords who sign up to a code
of standards which guarantees the quality
and condition of all housing. For more
information visit www.guildshac.co.uk
email shac@guild.bham.ac.uk or search
on Facebook for Guild SHAC.
Learn more
Accommodation information will be included
in your offer pack. For further details on all
the accommodation available please visit
www.accommodation.bham.ac.uk where you
can also apply for your accommodation online.
Average rents in local area
Accommodation
type
Weekly fee
Single room
(at share)
5570 per week
(bills extra)
Three-bedroom
house for a family
500750 per
calendar month
(bills extra)
Self-catered room
(sharing kitchen with
owner)
5080 per week
(bills included)
7952 DR INTERNATIONAL front st2.indd 29 19/02/2013 12:08
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WE WANT YOU TO BE COMPLETELY AWARE OF YOUR
FINANCIAL COMMITMENT BEFORE BECOMING A DOCTORAL
RESEARCHER AT BIRMINGHAM. THIS SECTION PROVIDES
YOU WITH INFORMATION ON TUITION FEES AND OTHER
COSTS INVOLVED IN POSTGRADUATE STUDY.
Fees information
The University charges an annual tuition
fee. This covers the cost of your tuition,
examination and graduation, and includes
membership of the Guild of Students.
Fees are payable when you register
for your programme.
When you accept the offer of a place, you are
also accepting responsibility for the payment
of your tuition fees, even if you are sponsored
or in receipt of an award and the sponsor fails
to pay. It is therefore very important that you
have sufcient funds available to you.
Fee band Subjects included in this band Tuition fee
A Clinical Dentistry*
Clinical Medical Education*
28,100
B Anatomy
Biosciences
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Civil Engineering
Computer Science
Dentistry (laboratory)*
Earth Sciences
Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Environmental Health and Risk Management
Health Sciences (laboratory)*
Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering
Medical Education*
Metallurgy and Materials
Physics and Astronomy
15,680
C Geography and Environmental Sciences (laboratory)*
Music

Psychology (classroom and laboratory)
Sport and Exercise Sciences
13,385
D Accounting and Finance
American and Canadian Studies
Applied Social Studies
Archaeology and Antiquity
Business
Drama and Theatre Studies
Economics
Education
English Language
English Literature
French Studies
Geography and Environmental Sciences (classroom)*
German Studies
Government and Society
Health Sciences (classroom)*
Health Services Management
Heritage Management (Ironbridge Institute)
Hispanic Studies
History
History of Art
International Development
International Studies
Italian Studies
Language and Cultures
Law
Local Government Studies
Management
Marketing
Mathematics
Philosophy
Political Science
Russian and East European Studies
Shakespeare Studies
Theology and Religion
Urban and Regional Studies
West African Studies
12,140
* Schools may require two price points
Unfortunately if you fail to pay the fees, you
will not be permitted to continue your studies.
Annual fees
The standard annual tuition fees for overseas
doctoral research students in 201314 are:
7952 DR INTERNATIONAL front st2.indd 30 19/02/2013 12:08
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Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
However, some programmes charge non-
standard fees, which may be higher than this.
The fee for each programme is listed on the
individual programme page on the University
website (accesed via www.birmingham.ac.uk/
students/courses/postgraduate/research/
listing.aspx) and on the Doctoral research
programme options page of this prospectus.
Your tuition fee will be conrmed in your
offer letter.
The annual tuition fee is set for a 12-month
session, which usually runs from October
to the end of the following September. For
doctoral research programmes that begin and/
or end mid-session, fees are normally charged
on a pro rata basis according to the number of
months studied within a session. For example,
if you are on a 15-month research programme
beginning in October 2013, you pay the
annual tuition fee in the 201314 session,
and three-twelfths of the fee for 201415
from October to December 2014.
Doctoral research students who choose, or
are required, to register beyond the minimum
period required for their degree pay the full
tuition fee for that period. If your normal period
of registration has ended but you have yet to
submit your thesis, you are liable to pay a
continuation fee (180 in 201213).
Other costs
Some departments may levy a bench fee or
other fee in addition to the tuition fee. You will
be notied of any additional fee with your offer
of admission. You are also expected to meet
the costs of typing and binding your thesis.
This might be in the region of 300 for a
doctoral degree.
Payment methods
You may make monthly or termly instalment
payments using the University direct debit
scheme from a UK bank account. Where
the instalments total more than 4,000
there is a 3% non-refundable administration
fee. For more information on the payment
options available please visit
www.payments.bham.ac.uk
Living costs
As well as having sufcient funds for your
full tuition, you need to ensure you can cover
your living expenses and the living expenses
of any dependants during your period of study.
You should have this funding secured before
travelling to the UK and starting your course.
The University estimates that the cost of
living for a single student is 670 per month
(8,040 for a year) including accommodation.
If you are bringing dependants with you, you
should allow about 3,5004,500 extra
per year for a spouse or civil partner and
2,5003,000 extra per year for
each child.
Please note that the actual amount you
will spend will depend on your lifestyle. We
can only give you an approximate indication
of how much you will need. We can send
you more detailed information about living
costs if you require it. Additional information
on fees and nance can be found at
www.as.bham.ac.uk/funding
7952 DR INTERNATIONAL front st2.indd 31 19/02/2013 12:08
Essential inlormation
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COMING TO STUDY IN THE UK IS A CONSIDERABLE
FINANCIAL COMMITMENT AND YOU ARE ENCOURAGED
TO THINK CAREFULLY ABOUT THE COSTS INVOLVED
BEFORE EMBARKING ON YOUR COURSE, BUT WE
ARE HERE TO HELP YOU EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS.
Sources of nance
As an international student, you will not be
eligible for any nancial assistance from the
UK government. It is therefore important to
make sure that your funding is secure before
you begin your studies.
The University offers a number of
scholarships in order to contribute to the
costs of study for international postgraduate
students. Scholarships are also offered
by external organisations. For more
details of the scholarships available to
international postgraduates please see
www.birmingham.ac.uk/international/
students/nance/scholarships/index.aspx
For information on other sources of funding for
international students, we would advise you to
consult the following sources:
T The British Council, Embassy or High
Commission in your home country
T The Ministry or Department of Education
in your home country
T Your current academic institution
(particularly if you are a member of
academic staff looking to upgrade
your qualications)
Earning while you learn
Part-time work is another potential source of
nance for international doctoral researchers.
The Job Zone, based in the Guild of Students,
can help you nd part-time employment
while you study. Hundreds of vacancies are
advertised online at www.guildofstudents.com/
jobzone Doctoral researchers are very
welcome to drop in and discuss their
employment needs with Job Zone staff.
Please note, however, that there are
certain restrictions on the number of hours
and the types of employment that international
students can undertake. These will depend on
the country you are coming from and the type
of visa you have. Our International Students
Advisory Service can help you with any
queries or issues you may have regarding
your eligibility to work during your studies.
Learn more
www.as.bham.ac.uk/studentlife/international
There are also opportunities within
the University itself to earn money
while broadening your experience
and transferable skills.
T Student mentoring
Student mentors provide help and
support to students in University
accommodation. Since mentors live
in, they have guaranteed accommodation
alongside paid work. For more information
visit www.guildofstudents.com/
studentmentors
T Postgraduate ambassadors
We regularly employ researchers to
support postgraduate recruitment activity
and encourage prospective students to
consider research careers. For more
information about our Postgraduate
Ambassador Scheme please
email dr@contacts.bham.ac.uk
There were lots of
opportunities to work and
study alongside each other
at Birmingham, which was
essential for me.
Rachel Stokes, Doctoral Researcher,
International Development, now
International Alumni Ofcer at the
University of Exeter
University Graduate School
Doctoral Researcher Elite
Scholarships
The University Graduate School has ten
Doctoral Researcher Elite Scholarships
available for the 20132014 academic
year. These are available to outstanding
overseas candidates of the highest
academic aptitude holding an offer of a
place to study on a PhD at Birmingham
starting in September 2013.
The scholarship is conditional on
nominated candidates achieving a rst
class mark (or equivalent) in their nal
examinations before beginning their
PhD at the University. The application
deadline for these scholarships will
be in January 2013.
For more information please visit
www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/
fees/dr/elite.aspx
7952 DR INTERNATIONAL front st2.indd 32 19/02/2013 12:08
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563_32
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Doctoral
Researcher
enhance
your employability
WORKING ALONGSIDE MY STUDIES HAS NOT ONLY
GIVEN ME THE OPPORTUNITY TO FURTHER DEVELOP MY
COMMUNICATION AND INTERPERSONAL SKILLS, BUT IT HAS
ALSO EXPANDED MY PROFESSIONAL CONTACTS NETWORK.
I work part-time as a student demonstrator, assisting undergraduates during lectures
and tutorial sessions. I help them to interpret information and assess assumptions critically
when solving technical problems. I am also a postgraduate ambassador, in which role I give
campus tours to prospective students and answer any questions they have about life as a
postgraduate at the University of Birmingham. I also help to staff the Doctoral Researcher
Enquiry Service Centre by offering guidance on course content, assisting with the application
process and providing student life mentoring to prospective doctoral researchers. These
roles have not only signicantly developed my technical and transferable skills, but have
also sparked my interest to continue working in higher education.
Fabricio Marques
Doctoral Researcher, College of Engineering and Physical Sciences
7952 DR UKEU front st1.indd 33 19/02/2013 12:11
563_33
Aii Hisioiy, Iilm anu Visual Siuuics
ai Biimingham
Art History, Film and visual Studies at Birmingham
The Department ol Art History, Film and visual
Studies (lormerly the Department ol History ol
Art) was established in 1990 and has grown
steadily in stall and student numbers since
then. This vibrant department strives to
understand and research works ol art lrom
many diverse historical and theoretical
standpoints.
World-class research
The 2008 Pesearch Assessment Exercise
(PAE) ranked ?0% ol research within History ol
Art as either world-leading or internationally
excellent. Nationally, History ol Art at
Birmingham is ranked in the top ten.
The Department is located in the Barber
lnstitute ol Fine Arts. This is an excellent and
representative collection ol post-medieval
European art, which has been recognised as
one ol the world's linest small galleries. lt
includes paintings, engravings and drawings by
such artists as Pembrandt, van Dyck,
veronese, Picasso and Magritte, as well as an
important collection ol nineteenth-century
painting by artists such as Monet, Manet,
Degas, Gauguin, Turner and Whistler. This is a
valuable and convenient teaching collection
which all members ol stall use on a regular
basis.
Our research community
There is a thriving research community at
Birmingham, which ollers a stimulating
intellectual environment. The Department hosts
a wide range ol public lectures and seminar
programmes, some ol which postgraduates
help to plan and organise. These provide
opportunities to discuss art-historical questions
with visiting speakers as well as to engage with
the latest research being carried out within the
University.
The Department is a member ol the PX-
Network ol universities, (along with Warwick,
Peading, Bristol and Kingston) which losters
research exchange and collaboration in Art
History. The network hosts a range ol training
workshops as well as an annual postgraduate
research conlerence. We are also home to
the Joutnol oI AtI HisIotiogtophy, which has a
postgraduate assistant editor and ollers
students the chance to present papers at its
associated annual conlerence.
Collaboration with other institutions is an
important part ol our research ethos. Our
current major collaborative project is the
380,000 Arts and Humanities Pesearch
Council-lunded 'Suburban Birmingham:
Spaces and Places, 1880-1960' in
collaboration with Birmingham Museum and Art
Gallery and Birmingham Central Library
Archives and Heritage Service. We have
worked on joint projects with a wide variety ol
other partners including the victoria and Albert
Museum; the Austrian Monument Protection
Service; the Open Society Archives, Budapest;
the Hungarian National Gallery; the National
Gallery ol Slovenia; the lkon Gallery; and the
Ben Uri Gallery.
563_34
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
5561 DR INTERNATIONAL front AW.indd 13 31/05/2012 15:41
DOCTOPAL PESEAPCHEPS lN APT HlSTOPY, FlLM AND vlSUAL
STUDlES AT BlPMlNGHAM APE ABLE TO DPAW ON A PlCH
APPAY OF FAClLlTlES WHlCH MAKE lT ONE OF THE BEST
PESOUPCED DEPAPTMENTS lN THE UK.
Iaciliiics anu icsouiccs
Barber Instltute and Flne Art Llbrary
The Barber lnstitute's world-renowned
collection ol paintings, engravings, drawings
and sculptures is a unique resource lor all our
History ol Art students. Pegular exhibitions and
concerts allow students to make the most ol
this lacility, which is also one ol Birmingham's
linest purpose-built Art Deco buildings. You
also have access to the Barber Fine Art Library,
an exceptional research and relerence lacility.
The collection includes an extensive archive ol
sales catalogues and nineteenth-century books
representing most ol the major European
schools ol painting lrom the early Penaissance
to the beginning ol the twenty-lirst century, in
addition to excellent holdings in all areas ol art
history. The library is equipped with networked
computers, allowing students access to both
internal and external inlormation resources.
Coln co||ectlon
The Barber lnstitute also houses one ol the
most signilicant collections ol coins and seals
in the UK. The lirst mass medium ol the image,
coins are a crucial component ol visual culture,
and the Barber lnstitute's dedicated Coin
Gallery complements its painting and sculpture
galleries. History ol Art stall play a prominent
role in the exhibitions ol the Coin Gallery, such
as the recent MoIIhew BoulIon ond Ihe AtI oI
Moking Money.
Vlsua| resources |lbrary
The Department has a signilicant visual
resources library, comprising a slide collection
ol more than ?0,000 catalogued slides.
Although the vast majority are ol line art
images, these are complemented by a
substantial collection ol architectural images,
as well as collections ol applied arts and
miscellaneous subjects. The library's main
asset, however, is 'Diaphanous', a searchable
online catalogue with high-resolution digital
images, accessible to students and stall via the
intranet. 'Diaphanous' holds digital images ol
similar subject matter as the slide collection
and it can additionally be used as a catalogue
lor locating analogue slides in the collection.
The Flne Art Photograph Poom
The Photograph Poom (lrequently used lor
seminar teaching) houses an extensive
collection ol black and white photographs and
can be opened on request.
Maln Llbrary
The University's Main Library provides an
additional research resource ol international
quality, containing almost two million books, a
wide range ol periodicals and lT lacilities. lts
research holdings include important collections
ol historical and art-historical documents such
as papers and photographs relating to Sir
Lawrence Alma-Tadema.
Blrmlngham Museum and Art Ga||ery
The city ol Birmingham also contains one ol the
linest municipal art galleries in the country, with
exceptional holdings ol Old Master, Pre-
Paphaelite and modern paintings, drawings
and prints. The city's central location on road
and rail networks allows easy access to
libraries and art collections elsewhere in the
country.
35 Art History, Film and visual Studies at Birmingham
563_35
Oui alumni
36 Art History, Film and visual Studies at Birmingham
Dr Amelia Yeates
Doctoral Pesearcher in History ol Art
Graduated 200?
Pesearch pro[ect. 'The artist and masculinity in Edward Burne-1ones's Pygmolion
ond Ihe lmoge'
Now. Lecturer in Art History at Liverpool Hope niversity
The support lrom stall in the Department whilst l was undertaking my PhD was excellent. My
supervisor was great and all the stall in the Department took an interest in my work and my
development, regardless ol whether they were lormally involved with me or not. As a doctoral
researcher l undertook seminar teaching, and arranged a major two-day postgraduate
conlerence on a theme relating to my PhD research, lunded by the AHPC. The postgraduate
research community in the Department was incredibly active, with a very high calibre ol
students who really supported each other. The postgraduates in the Department lormed a
close-knit community who regularly came together both academically and socially. Alter
completing my PhD l obtained a position as a Pesearcher at Birmingham Museum & Art
Gallery lor one year. Following this, l took up a post as a Lecturer in Art History at Liverpool
Hope niversity in 2008. lt was at the niversity ol Birmingham that l learnt how to research
at an advanced level, which l continue now in my role as a research-active and publishing art
historian.
563_36
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
www.birmingham.ac.uk/
pg-mentor
THE UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAMS
POSTGRADUATE MENTOR SCHEME IS A
STUDENT-TO-STUDENT SUPPORT NETWORK
FOR PROSPECTIVE POSTGRADUATES.
THE MENTORS ARE EXPERIENCED
POSTGRADUATES WHO CURRENTLY STUDY
HERE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF BIRMINGHAM.
THEY WILL BE ABLE TO OFFER HELP AND
SUPPORT FROM A STUDENT PERSPECTIVE.
You do not need to have already applied to the University to take
advantage of this scheme it is open to enquirers, applicants and
offer-holders.
You can nd out more about the scheme, browse mentor
proles and access mentor contact details at:
Postgraduate
Mentor Scheme
7952 DR ADVERTS (with DRES footer) AW.indd 2 19/02/2013 12:09
563_37
THE DEPAPTMENT OFFEPS DOCTOPAL PESEAPCHEPS THE
OPPOPTUNlTY TO BE PAPT OF A THPlvlNG PESEAPCH
CULTUPE WHlCH lS ENEPGETlCALLY SUPPOPTED BY THE
ACTlvlTlES OF lTS SCHOLAPS, AND BY A vAPlETY OF
PESEAPCH SEMlNAPS TO WHlCH DOCTOPAL PESEAPCHEPS,
STAFF AND lNvlTED vlSlTlNG SPEAKEPS ALL CONTPlBUTE.
Oui uocioial icscaichci communiiy
Pesearch seminars in the Department are held
once a lortnight during term time. These
provide valuable opportunities to learn lrom
both internal and external speakers about
current and recent work in the discipline.
Doctoral researchers have the opportunity to
get involved either by helping to run the
seminar series or by giving their own research
paper.
The Department's postgraduates also take an
active role in the research culture ol the School
ol Languages, Cultures, Art History and Music,
presenting research papers at the termly
School Postgraduate Forum.
The Barber lnstitute ollers research students a
wide range ol valuable opportunities lor training
and development, including six-monthly
lellowships in either marketing or curatorial
practice, and opportunities to assist in activities
and events such as gallery tours, open days
and school workshops. You have the
opportunity to get involved with the co-curation
ol an exhibition at the Barber lnstitute on an
annual basis and to co-author an
accompanying catalogue. There are also a
number ol research-specilic reading groups
that postgraduate students convene.
The Department also publishes the Joutnol oI
AtI HisIotiogtophy, an internationally peer-
reviewed online journal:
http://arthistoriography.wordpress.com/
Interdlsclp|lnary student groups
ln addition to the activities run by the
Department, there are numerous student
groups and research lora open to doctoral
researchers in Art History, Film and visual
Studies.
B-Film: The Birmingham Centre lor Film
Studies
This is a new interdisciplinary and laculty-wide
research centre dedicated to lilm studies. The
Centre enjoys numerous international links and
is involved in a wide variety ol research
projects. lts activities include a prestigious
seminar series, lilm screenings with invited
speakers, thematic workshops, symposia and
major conlerences on themes ol particular
interest to the research culture at Birmingham.
The EMPEM Forum
The EMPEM Forum is designed to lacilitate
discussion amongst postgraduate students
who are interested in the Early Medieval-
Medieval-Penaissance-Pelormation-Early
Modern period. The Forum aims to generate an
inlormal atmosphere in which postgraduates
(and stall) can share their research and
participate in interdisciplinary and cross-period
debate. We welcome members lrom all
institutions and disciplines.
To get involved in the EMPEM Forum:
I 1oin our Facebook group (search lor
EMPEM Forum)
I visit our website:
http://emremlorum.wordpress.com
I Email the committee at:
emremlorum_googlemail.com
'Poles': An interdisciplinary gender and
sexuality research lorum
'Poles' provides a supportive, stimulating
environment in which postgraduate researchers
lrom all disciplines can share, discuss and
debate how issues ol gender and sexuality
inlorm, allect and are bound up in both our
academic and our daily lives.
For more inlormation please contact
g.roles_hotmail.co.uk
The Bitminghom Joutnol oI liIetoIute ond
longuoge (BJll)
The BJll was set up in 200? by a group ol
postgraduate researchers. The journal gives
doctoral researchers the opportunity to obtain
lirst-hand experience ol producing and peer-
reviewing articles lor publication. Each issue ol
the BJll contains the work ol current
Birmingham postgraduates alongside one
article lrom an external postgraduate and one
article lrom a Birmingham alumnus. ln addition,
each issue includes notes, reviews and artwork.
The journal is available in print and online
at http://ejournals.org.uk/bjll or you can contact
the editors at webbjll_googlemail.com
'The Making ol Modernity' research seminars
Pun by the Centre lor the Study ol Cultural
Modernity, this series ol research seminars
ollers doctoral researchers and members ol
academic stall an opportunity to discuss
research into questions ol modernity and
identity. For lurther inlormation on the events
run by the Centre please visit:
www.birmingham.ac.uk/culturalmodernity
Graduate Centre lor Europe
The Graduate Centre lor Europe (GClE) is a
major interdisciplinary initiative involving
students and stall lrom across the University.
The GClE has been established with the aim ol
enabling the exchange ol ideas onEurope
among graduate students and ol promoting the
acquisition ol research skills. The GClE also
runs an annual symposium every April.
For lurther inlormation please visit:
www.birmingham.ac.uk/gcle
38 Doctoral lile in Art History, Film and visual Studies
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Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
5561 DR INTERNATIONAL front AW.indd 13 31/05/2012 15:41
Whai is ii liIc io lc a uocioial
icscaichci in Aii Hisioiy, Iilm anu Visual Siuuics.
39 Art History, Film and visual Studies at Birmingham
Carly Hegenbarth
Doctoral Pesearcher in British Art History
Pesearch pro[ect. 'The visual cultures ol Catholic emancipation in Great Britain
and lreland, 1821-32'
Cotly's teseotch Iocuses on Ihe BtiIish ptinI Itodes in Ihe 1820s ond eotly 1830s ond Ihe
tecepIion oI CoIholic emoncipoIion. Het Ihesis exomines o body oI soIiticol ptinIs IhoI wete
ptoduced in tesponse Io Ihe ptospecI oI Iull civil ond teligious libetIy Iot Romon CoIholics
beIote, duting ond oIIet Ihe possoge oI Ihe telieI bill Ihtough PotliomenI in 1829.
l completed my BA and Masters degrees here. Staying on to research at doctoral level was
an easy decision to make - l knew the quality ol supervision, opportunities and lacilities that
the Department, niversity and city had to oller. ln the Department there is a delinite sense
ol belonging to a thriving, supportive community ol researchers. l have had plenty ol
opportunities, lrom attending a postgraduate reading group to giving a paper in an inlormal
research seminar. Likewise, the relationship between the Department and the Barber
lnstitute ol Fine Arts is such that l have been able to gain practical experience: l have worked
as a gallery intern and postgraduate volunteer in areas such as curating, collections
management and education. ln addition, the Fine Art Library is a lantastic resource. The city
centre boasts the BMAG, lkon and the PBSA galleries and, opening in 2013, the Library ol
Birmingham, making the city a dynamic cultural centre and exciting place to study.
Elaine Williams
Doctoral Pesearcher in History ol Art
Pesearch pro[ect. 'Florence Camm 18?4-1960: Artist in stained glass'
Floine's teseotch Iocuses on Ihe sIoined gloss designet, poinIet ond decotoIive meIolwotket
Flotence Comm. She invesIigoIes Comm's deIetminoIion Io succeed wiIhin Ihe Iitm oI TW
Comm, ollied Io Ihe ideolism oI sociolisI wotk ptocIices odvocoIed by Ihe AtIs ond CtoIIs
MovemenI.
l have lound the Graduate School to be welcoming and an excellent lorum in which to meet
other new doctoral researchers. l'd advise any new doctoral researcher to attend events that
look as il they may interest you, such as seminars, training courses and induction events.
Make use ol these to talk to other postgraduates, swap emails and meet lor collee and a
chat. l lound mysell speaking at a postgraduate conlerence within weeks - this was
daunting, but with my admission to the audience that l was at the beginning ol this adventure
and putting initial ideas lorward lor discussion, l lound it to be valuable experience. l have
successlully pushed mysell out ol my 'comlort zone' and l have now opened up my work to
the wider community. l am in contact with Smethwick Heritage Centre and working with
them on an exhibition ol Florence Camm's work in the autumn. This came about through
talking to stall at various archives and making sure interested parties knew about my
research. lt has amazed me how many people have now contacted me to ask about my work.
563_39
AT BlPMlNGHAM, WE EXPECT A LOT FPOM OUP DOCTOPAL
PESEAPCHEPS, BUT WE HAvE CPEATED AND CONTlNUE TO
lNvEST lN AN ACADEMlC ENvlPONMENT WHlCH WlLL HELP
YOU SUCCEED.
Acaucmic suoii
As a doctoral researcher in Art History, Film
and visual Studies, you can expect the
lollowing support lor your research activities:
I Supervision by a person with appropriate
research experience and expertise
I Access to training programmes on research
skills, lT skills and other translerable skills
through the University Graduate School
I Support lrom the College ol Arts and Law
Graduate School
I Participation in regular research seminars
I Full use ol the lacilities ol the University,
including the library, computing lacilities and
training courses
I Access to wellare support through
membership ol the Guild ol Students
The University ollers a wide range ol general
support services - lrom counselling to
childcare lacilities - lor all registered students.
For more details on these services, please see
the Help ond suppotI section ol this
prospectus.
College ol Arts and Law Graduate School
The Department is part ol the College ol Arts
and Law (CAL), and all our students are also
part ol the wider College community. The
College has its own dedicated Graduate
School (www.birmingham.ac.uk/calgs), which
benelits lrom excellent research resources and
a supportive environment that allows research
to llourish.
All doctoral researchers in Arts and Law have
access to the College and departmental
handbooks, are able to attend a wide variety ol
research seminars across the College and to
access the support networks provided by the
CAL Graduate School.
Tralnlng and deve|opment
All doctoral researchers also need to acquire a
range ol skills beyond their subject area in
order to advance their academic, personal and
prolessional development. The CAL Graduate
School has identilied a number ol key areas ol
skills development that are ol particular
importance to all doctoral researchers in the
College:
I Academic reading and relerencing in Arts
and Law
I Presenting academic papers - getting the
most lrom conlerences
I Academic publishing: writing and how to
get published in Arts and Law
I Academic and non-academic job-hunting:
how to write a Cv in Arts and Law
I Knowledge transler and academia
I Additional skills training, eg, how to get
started on your dissertation or extended
essay; plagiarism; research ethics; project
management; viva preparation; career
planning in the Arts, Humanities and Social
Sciences; research methods in the Arts and
Humanities
Your specilic needs are assessed via a
development needs analysis, and you are
encouraged to meet these needs via the
extensive range ol courses ollered by our
Doctoral Pesearcher Skills Development
Programme, which is co-ordinated by the
University Graduate School.
For more details ol the training and
development opportunities ollered via the
University Graduate School please see: https://
intranet.birmingham.ac.uk/as/studentservices/
graduateschool/skills/index.aspx
Work experlence
We strongly recommend that doctoral
researchers who want to work in galleries or
museums should gain work experience during
their period ol study. ln Birmingham there are
plenty ol opportunities to do so, and many ol
our postgraduates gain such experience at
Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery
(BMAG), the lkon Gallery, the Midlands Arts
Centre (MAC) or the Barber lnstitute.
Progress revlews
Throughout your research programme we keep
track ol your progress and invite you to rellect
on your own academic and personal
development. The review process will also help
you to identily areas ol strength and weakness
in your project and can help to oller you new
directions in your research. The University
Graduate School - the central resource point
which supports the postgraduate research
community at the University - can oller you
help and advice on the progress review
procedure.
For more inlormation on how we manage and
review your progress please see: https://
intranet.birmingham.ac.uk/as/studentservices/
graduateschool/rsa/progressreviews.aspx
40 Doctoral lile in Art History, Film and visual Studies
563_40
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
IVE LIVED, LEARNED AND GATHERED A WEALTH OF
EXPERIENCES AT BIRMINGHAM THAT HAVE HELPED ME
TO REALISE MY PASSIONS AND TO DISCOVER WHERE
MY TRUE TALENTS LIE.
At Birmingham, Ive not only completed a doctoral thesis working with experts in my eld,
but have had unique and valuable opportunities to teach undergraduates in their second year.
I received full training free of charge and beneted from the support of a current member of
academic staff who acted as my teaching mentor. She was great, letting me observe and
team-teach as many of her seminars as I liked to help me prepare for my own. I thoroughly
enjoyed teaching and found the students to be engaged and motivated. If you give a group
the right incentives, they can then do a lot of the work for you and some of the discussions
we had in seminars genuinely made me think! Through teaching I gained many useful
transferable skills and developed a passion for disseminating knowledge that will stay
with me forever.
Holly Prescott
Doctoral Researcher, College of Arts and Law
create
your own future
7952 DR extra SPLASH SCHOOLS AW (with footer).indd 1 19/02/2013 11:51
563_41
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
5561 DR INTERNATIONAL front AW.indd 13 31/05/2012 15:41
THEPE APE MANY WAYS TO FlNANCE YOUP POSTGPADUATE
STUDY. HEPE WE TAKE YOU THPOUGH WHAT lS AvAlLABLE TO
HELP FUND DOCTOPAL PESEAPCH lN APT HlSTOPY.
Iinancial suoii
42
Pesearch councl| fundlng
There are seven government-lunded research
councils that oller linancial support to
postgraduate students. All ol them support
academic excellence in their own specilic lield.
As such, competition lor these scholarships is
extremely high and is mainly based around
academic perlormance.
The Arts and Humanities Pesearch Council
(AHPC) ollers lunding to a limited number ol
applicants. The quota ol doctoral researchers
who can be put lorward to the AHPC by the
University varies lrom year to year. For
2013-14 the University was able to oller 13
AHPC awards lor lees (at UK/EU rate) and
maintenance. The competition is open to UK
students and EU students who have been
ordinarily resident in the UK throughout the
three-year period preceding the start ol their
doctoral research.
ll you wish to apply lor AHPC lunding you must
do so through the University as part ol your
PhD application and not directly to the
research council. Please see the Moking yout
opplicoIion section ol this prospectus lor
lurther inlormation on using the online
application system. The 2013-14 deadline lor
applications was 28 1anuary 2013. Details ol
the 2014-15 competition will be available later
in the year.
Unlverslty scho|arshlps
The University also ollers a number ol centrally
managed scholarships that are open to
prospective doctoral researchers in Art History,
Film and visual Studies. All ol the awards are
tenable lor one year only and, subject to
available lunds, will cover the UK/EU rate ol
postgraduate tuition lee in addition to ollering a
maintenance stipend set at research council
rates. Scholarships available lor 2013 are as
lollows:
I Alumni Scholarship lor a University ol
Birmingham alumnus, or the son or daughter
ol an alumnus
I AE Hills Scholarship lor any student
registered lor a lull-time degree
I Francis Corder Clayton Scholarship lor an
Arts student registered lor a lull-time
degree
I George Henry Marshall Scholarship lor
historically-locused research; prelerence is
given to students lrom the West Midlands
area
I Neville Chamberlain Scholarship lor any
student undertaking a programme in an Arts
subject
I Pichard Fenwick Scholarship lor a student
registered lor a lull-time degree
Applications cannot be made directly lor these
awards as candidates must be nominated by
their school or department. ll you are interested
in applying then please let your supervisor
know. Nominations are open lrom mid-March
and close at the end ol May.
Doctoral Pesearcher Elite Scholarships
Maintained by the University Graduate School,
these scholarships are available to outstanding
overseas candidates ol the highest academic
aptitude holding an oller ol a place to study on
a PhD at Birmingham. ll you are an overseas
candidate, please see the Soutces oI Iinonce
section ol this prospectus lor more details.
Co||ege of Arts and Law (CAL) fundlng
CAL ollers a number ol lull-value scholarships
lor lull-time home, EU and overseas research
students. These cover tuition lees lor up to
three years ol PhD research and provide a
maintenance grant similar to research council
rates, subject to an annual review ol student
progress. Applications are welcome lrom
students studying any disciplines covered
within the College. You can apply lor a college
scholarship as part ol your PhD application.
CAL also has lour bursaries available
specilically lor the PhD by Distance Learning.
The bursary provides a one-oll lee contribution
ol 2,000, lor which awardees can re-apply
each year. Applications are welcome lrom UK,
EU and international students studying any
discipline covered within the College. The
deadline lor applications is Thursday 25 Aprl|
2013 at 4.00pm.
Postgraduate Pesearch Development Fund
Each year doctoral researchers at the
University are eligible to apply lor lunding to
help support the research activities ol their
postgraduate community. Although lunding is
limited to the provision ol 'generic' skills this
covers a very wide remit, including: developing
interactive websites; holding exhibitions;
publishing journals and organising conlerences
and workshops. There are two application
deadlines every academic year and there is no
limit (so long as the expenses can be justilied)
to the amount ol money lor which you can
apply.
Postgraduate Pesearch Support Fund
Attending academic conlerences is an
important aspect ol lile as a doctoral
researcher. The CAL Graduate School's
Postgraduate Pesearch Support Fund ollers
opportunities to apply lor grants to cover your
research and conlerence expenses at several
points throughout the year.
Teaching assistantships
Doctoral researchers in Art History, Film and
visual Studies may have the chance to carry
out some undergraduate teaching in their
Doctoral lile in Art History, Film and visual Studies
563_42
Doctoral lile in Art History, Film and visual Studies 43
second and third (or equivalent lor part-time)
years. This also includes the support ol a
teaching mentor to help prepare doctoral
researchers to teach and to evaluate their
perlormance. This teaching is paid at an hourly
rate; whilst this does not oller the support ol a
lull scholarship, it does provide extremely
valuable teaching experience and some uselul
extra income.
Departmenta| scho|arshlps
ln addition to the scholarships ollered by the
College, History ol Art postgraduates can also
apply lor the Haywood Scholarship lor the
History ol Art. The Haywood is available on a
competitive basis and is normally reserved lor
second-year PhD students and above. This
scholarship ollers lull payment ol lees (at UK/
EU rates) and a stipend lor one year. For more
inlormation on this award please contact the
Departmental Postgraduate Director, Dr
Camilla Smith, at h.c.smith_bham.ac.uk
Externa| fundlng sources
Funds lor Women Graduates (FFWG)
The FFWG ollers various dillerent grants which
are available to lemale postgraduate students.
Awards take the lorm ol non-renewable grants
worth up to 4,000. For lurther inlormation
including conditions, eligibility and how to apply
please visit: www.llwg.org.uk
Leverhulme Trade Charities Trust
This trust ollers awards ol up to 5,000 to
postgraduate students who are resident in the
UK and who are the wile, widow, widower,
spouse or child ol a Commercial Traveller,
Grocer or Chemist. The deadline lor these
awards is October each year. Application lorms
can be obtained lrom the Trust's website:
www.leverhulme-trade.org.uk
Learn more
For inlormation on sources ol lunding lor
doctoral researchers in CAL visit: www.
birmingham.ac.uk/artslawscholarships
For guidance on research council lunding visit:
https://intranet.birmingham.ac.uk/linance/ris/
research-lunding/resources/PesearchCouncils.
aspx
Details ol alternative sources ol lunding,
including trusts, charities and loans, can be
lound at: www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/
lees/dr/loans-charities.aspx
563_43
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
5561 DR INTERNATIONAL front AW.indd 13 31/05/2012 15:41
APPLYlNG FOP A DOCTOPAL PESEAPCH POSlTlON lN HlSTOPY
OF APT lS A SlMPLE, FOUP-STEP PPOCESS.
MaIing youi alicaiion
44
Step one. Ensure that you meet our entry
requlrements
Details ol these can be lound on the DocIotol
teseotch sIudy opIions page. ll your lirst
language is not English you will also need to
demonstrate that you have a high level ol
written and spoken English. ll you indicated
that you are either an EU or an international
student when ordering this prospectus, then
lull details ol international qualilications that
lullil the University's minimum requirements can
be lound on the FnIty tequitemenIs page.
Step two. Flnd a sultab|e supervlsor
Perhaps the most important step in the
lormulation ol your research project is to
identily a member ol academic stall with
appropriate expertise to supervise your area ol
interest. Your supervisor will act as the main
source ol academic supervisory support and
research mentoring during your time as a
doctoral researcher at the University and, as
such, it is vital that you ensure that the
department to which you are applying is able to
oller appropriate supervisory support in your
chosen subject area.
Belore submitting your application to the
University you will need to identily potential
supervisors in your desired lield and contact
them directly about your research proposal.
The Out teseotch section ol this prospectus
lists all members ol our academic stall who
supervise doctoral researchers in your chosen
area, together with their contact details.
All doctoral researchers in the Department are
provided with a lead supervisor, though in
some cases doctoral researchers may require
additional supervision lrom another member ol
academic stall. ll your proposed PhD project is
highly interdisciplinary, there is also the
possibility ol being supervised across
departments, with one supervisor lrom the
Department ol Art History, Film and visual
Studies and a second supervisor lrom another
discipline. The appointment ol a co-supervisor
is generally decided between the prospective
student and the lead supervisor.
Step three. Deve|op your research proposa|
You should include a research proposal with
your application. This is a short statement ol
your chosen research interest that will help us
identily exactly what you are hoping to study
and also to decide which member ol our
academic stall is likely to supervise you. This is
one ol the most important lactors that we take
into account when reaching our decision. lt is
therelore advisable to discuss your proposal
with your potential supervisor belore submitting
the linal version with your application to the
University.
ln your proposal you should include:
I An outline ol your chosen topic
I The importance ol this topic
I Your research aims in studying it
I A summary ol the research context lor your
topic (key debates and current research
agendas)
I Any major scholarly works in which it is
discussed in general
I The main kinds ol sources ol evidence you
expect to use
I The methods that you intend to employ in
your research
I The interpretive and theoretical approaches
to be used
This proposal should be about 1,000-1,500
words in length and typed with double spacing
between lines. During the application process
we may ask you to reline or relormulate your
proposal in the light ol comments lrom stall
involved in assessing your project. You will also
be invited lor an interview.
Step four. Submlt your app|lcatlon to the
Unlverslty
Formal applications must be made directly to
the University using course linder:
www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/courses
By clicking on the 'apply now' button on the
page lor the specilic programme lor which you
wish to apply, lor example History ol Art PhD,
you will be directed to an application portal
where you will create your account with the
University and submit your application and
supporting documents online.
Your application lorm is specilically designed
lor the programme lor which you choose to
apply and the system is sensitive to the
answers you provide as you proceed through
the application.
Applications are accepted at any time, though
we strongly encourage students to begin their
studies at the start ol the UK academic year
(late September/early October). There are,
however, deadlines lor applying lor linancial
support through our postgraduate teaching
assistantships and scholarships.
lt normally takes us between 8 and 12 weeks
to make a decision about an application; we
select students with care and your application
is likely to be considered by several members
ol the academic stall. You should take this into
account when planning the start date ol your
studies. So, whilst there is no lormal deadline
lor doctoral research applications, il you wish
to start in late September/early October you
will need to make your application by the end ol
1une.
Making your application
563_44
Making your application
Supporting documents
ln addition to completing the online application
lorm you will also need to upload (or post to
the Admissions Department) the lollowing
documents:
I Your research proposal (this may be sent
online with your application)
I The email addresses ol your two academic
relerees (or, il appropriate to the
programme applied lor, one could be lrom
your employer)
I Your academic transcripts and any
additional supporting material such as
transcripts ol your employment record
I Certilicate to show competency in the
English language (il English is not your lirst
language)
I Personal statement, approximately one side
ol A4 in length, explaining why you are
interested in studying on your chosen
programme
I ll you wish, applications lor research council
lunding and University scholarships
PhD by Distance Learning
ll you wish to undertake your doctoral research
by distance learning you will also need to
provide evidence to demonstrate that you have
the time, commitment, lacilities and experience
to study lor a PhD oll-campus. Please be
prepared to provide evidence, and details, ol
the lollowing:
I Examples ol your previous research
experience and ability to work independently
(eg, papers/presentations at prolessional
and academic conlerences, publications in
prolessional journals or previous completion
ol an independent research project)
I Full reasons (academic and personal) lor
registering lor the distance learning mode ol
study rather than by standard lull- or part-
time on-campus options; in particular, how
you will be able to carry out your project in
your chosen location
I Access to local library lacilities (where
needed)
I Access to lT lacilities
I Access to communications, including email
and visual communication media such as
Skype and Facetime
I Where appropriate, access to lacilities to
support any study-related disability
All documents must be in English or have a
certilied translation. Transcripts should be
either original or a certilied photocopy. ll you
send a photocopy it must have the original
certilication stamp and be certilied by a notary,
an organisation such as the British Council,
your institution or a University ol Birmingham
overseas representative in your country. ll you
provide documents by uploading them into the
course linder system and are made an oller,
you will be required to send certilied copies or
original documents as a condition ol the oller.
The postal address is:
Admissions
Aston Webb Building
University ol Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
United Kingdom
For general enquiries and assistance with the
application process please contact the
Doctoral Pesearcher Enquiry Service (DPES)
helpline on +44 (0)121 414 5005 or
at dr_contacts.bham.ac.uk
563_45
WE WELCOME APPLlCATlONS FPOM CANDlDATES OFFEPlNG A
PANGE OF OvEPSEAS OUALlFlCATlONS. AS WELL AS
ACHlEvlNG APPPOPPlATE GPADES lN YOUP EXAMlNATlONS,
YOU ALSO NEED TO SUBMlT OFFlClAL TPANSCPlPTS OF YOUP
OUALlFlCATlONS TPANSLATED lNTO ENGLlSH AND SHOWlNG
THE SUB1ECTS AND GPADES OBTAlNED.
Eniiy icquiicmcnis
Making your application 46
Genera| entry requlrements
For admission to a PhD programme the
University usually requires that both EU and
international candidates possess the overseas
equivalent to a lirst-class or upper second-
class UK Honours degree in a subject related
to the proposed area ol research.
We accept a wide range ol qualilications lrom
across the world. For specilic inlormation on
the qualilications lrom your home country that
meet the University's minimum requirements
please visit: www.birmingham.ac.uk/
international/students/country/index.aspx
ll you are unsure whether your particular
qualilications meet these requirements please
contact lnternational Pelations lor lurther
inlormation and guidance - tel: +44 (0)121
414 2894 or email: international_bham.ac.uk
Eng|lsh |anguage requlrements
ll your lirst language is not English then you will
need to demonstrate that you have a high level
ol written and spoken English. For those
ollering an lELTS, TOEFL or PTE (Academic)
qualilication, the table below will tell you what
grades you need in these qualilications lor your
research area.
Please note: some degree programmes may
have slightly higher requirements than those
stated here. When this is so, we will ensure
that you are inlormed using the contact details
you have provided on your application.
ll you have been instructed and assessed in
English language at a recognised institution
you may be exempt lrom these requirements.
The University also accepts a range ol
alternative English language qualilications. For
details ol these please visit: www.birmingham.
ac.uk/students/requirements/requirements-pg/
international/index.aspx
Eng|lsh |anguage courses
ll you do not have the required level ol English,
or would like to improve your English belore the
start ol the academic year, you can take one ol
our pre-sessional English language courses.
Pun by our English lor lnternational Students
Unit (ElSU), these courses locus on English
language improvement in reading, writing,
listening and speaking, and also on the
development ol academic English and study
skills.
Further details ol the courses available can be
lound at: www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/
requirements/requirements-pg/international/
english-courses.aspx
ElSU also provides lree, term-time English
language support to all registered students
whose lirst language is not English throughout
their time at the University.
IELTS TOEFL IBT Pearson Test of Eng|lsh (PTE)
6.5 with no less than 6.0 in any
band
93 overall: with no less than 22
in Reading, 21 in Listening, 23
in Speaking, 21 in Writing
Academic 59 in all four skills
563_46
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
5561 DR INTERNATIONAL front AW.indd 13 31/05/2012 15:41
WE OFFEP A DYNAMlC PESEAPCH CULTUPE WHlCH
PPODUCES lNNOvATlvE AND CHALLENGlNG WOPK.
85 5.6.*5,1

All members ol stall within the Department are


active researchers, publishing regularly with
leading national and international journals and
publishers. Our research leeds directly into the
supervisory support we oller and helps to
loster a spirit ol research-based enquiry
amongst all our doctoral researchers.
We have a broad array ol research interests but
the principal current areas ol research are:
I Art criticism and the historiography ol art
I Art, design and visual culture in nineteenth-
and twentieth-century France
I Avant-garde and independent cinema
I Early cinema
I Feminist approaches to art history
I Film theory, history and aesthetics
I German and Central European art, design
and visual culture lrom the mid-nineteenth
century to the present
I lconoclasm
I llluminated manuscripts
I Modern and contemporary art and exhibition
cultures in Europe
I National, Transnational, lnternational and
lntra-national cinema
I Philosophy and lilm
I Penaissance art and architecture in ltaly
I Swiss art ol the late eighteenth century
I The visual, devotional and material cultures
ol ltaly and Northern Europe in the late
medieval and early modern periods
I The visual cultures ol revolutionary France
I European women's and auteur cinema
I Feminist thought
I French cinema ol the sound era
I French twentieth-century visual art
On the lollowing pages you will lind a list ol
academic stall who are interested in
supervising doctoral research in Art History,
Film and visual Studies, together with their
contact details and inlormation on their
particular lields ol expertise. Please note that
this is not an exhaustive list ol all the research
undertaken in the Department, but is rather a
tool through which you can identily potential
supervisors.
ll you would like more detailed inlormation
about the research activities and interests ol a
particular member ol stall, please visit their
web page via: www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/
lcahm/departments/historyolart/stall
Our research
563_47
Aii Hisioiy, Iilm anu Visual Siuuics
48 Our research
Dr Francesca Berry
Lecturer ln Hlstory of Art
Emal|. f.berry@bham.ac.uk
Te|. +44 (0)121 414 3930
Pesearch lnterests. French art, deslgn and vlsua| cu|ture
1840-1940, wlth partlcu|ar emphasls on the domestlc lnterlor; the
representatlon of Blrmlngham's suburban domestlclty; femlnlst
methodo|ogles
The main locus ol Francesca Berry's research is the artistic and visual
culture ol the domestic interior in mid nineteenth- to early twentieth-
century France. She is completing a book examining this topic in
relation to the work ol French Symbolist artist Edouard vuillard. She is
also planning a book on the interior as a pictorial motil in French art
and visual culture 1850-1950. As co-investigator on the AHPC-lunded
collaborative research project 'Suburban Birmingham: Spaces and
Places 1880-1960' she is currently researching the representation ol
the city's suburban domesticity.
Dr Berry is currently supervising or co-supervising doctoral research on
the lollowing topics:
I Florence Camm
I Displaying childhood spaces
I visual responses to pacilism and leminism in Britain during World
War One
Dr Pichard Clay
Senlor Lecturer ln Hlstory of Art
Emal|. r.s.c|ay@bham.ac.uk
Te|. +44 (0)121 414 7331
Pesearch lnterests. Elghteenth- and ear|y nlneteenth-century
French vlsua| cu|ture, wlth a partlcu|ar specla|lsm ln the
revo|utlonary perlods, especla||y lconoc|asm and prlnt cu|ture;
Brltlsh vlsua| cu|tures
Pichard Clay's research has locused particularly on iconoclasm,
especially in revolutionary Paris, and on French visual cultures ol
Catholicism during the Enlightenment. He is an academic adviser lor
the Tate Britain lconoclosm exhibition due to open in September
2013, and co-investigator (with Prolessor Leslie Brubaker, lAA) lor
the associated AHPC-lunded lconoclosms international network. As
principal investigator on the AHPC-lunded collaborative research
project, 'Suburban Birmingham: Spaces and Place, 1880-1960',
Pichard is conducting research into visual representations ol bombing
in the city's suburbs during World War Two. He has also published on
contemporary jewellery as 'wearable art'. Dr Clay is also co-
investigator lor 'Shipshape 3D' with Nigel Nayling (niversity ol
Wales, Trinity Saint David) on a project whose team includes human-
computer interaction experts, and lor a cross-sector AHPC-lunded
project that locuses on cultural learning and cultural intermediation
historically and in the contemporary world. Dr Clay would be happy to
supervise doctoral research on any ol these themes.
Dr Elizabeth L'Estrange
Lecturer ln Hlstory of Art
Emal|. e.a.|estrange@bham.ac.uk
Te|. +44 (0)121 414 8042
Pesearch lnterests. The art and cu|ture of the |ate medleva| and
ear|y modern perlod; l||umlnated manuscrlpts; French and
Burgundlan court art; text-lmage re|atlons; women as sub[ects
and consumers of vlsua| cu|tures
Elizabeth L'Estrange's research locuses mainly on the art and culture ol
the medieval and early modern periods (c. 1350-1600) with a
particular emphasis on illuminated manuscripts and on questions ol
gender in visual culture. ln 2008 she published Holy MoIhethood.
Gendet, DynosIy ond Visuol CulIute in Ihe loIe Middle Ages (MP,
2008) which won the Society lor Medieval Feminist Scholarship's First
Book Prize in 2010. This study ol maternal imagery in books ol hours
owned by aristocratic women and its relationship to the material culture
ol childbearing has led to other articles on the patronage ol women at
the French court, including Anne ol Brittany, Anne ol France, and
Claude ol France. Her research has also locused on the lemale gaze
and methodological approaches to assessing women's agency as
viewers. She is also interested in broader questions ol gender and
sexuality in the medieval and early modern periods.
Dr L'Estrange welcomes enquiries lrom prospective doctoral
researchers wishing to research areas that overlap with her research
interests.
David Hemsoll
Senlor Lecturer ln Hlstory of Art
Emal|. d.e.hemso||@bham.ac.uk
Te|. +44 (0)121 414 5751
Pesearch lnterests. Poman archltecture; Ita|lan art, 1400-1600;
Penalssance and post-Penalssance archltecture ln Ita|y and
Brltaln; the Barber Instltute co||ectlons; archltectura| deslgn and
theory
David Hemsoll is a specialist in Penaissance art and architecture,
especially that ol venice and Florence. He also has a particular
interest in architectural design and theory. Much ol his research has
been on the veronese/venetian architect Michele Sanmicheli, on
whom he co-authored a major monograph in 2004. He also works on
sixteenth-century architectural theory, looking particularly at sixteenth-
century ltalian architects such as Paphael, Giulio and Pomano. ln
recent years he has locused particularly on Michelangelo and his
architecture in both Florence and Pome. David is also on the editorial
board ol AtchiIecIutol HisIoty. He is interested in supervising doctoral
researchers specialising not only in architecture and architectural
theory, but also in ltalian Penaissance and Northern Penaissance
painting and sculpture.
563_48
Aii Hisioiy, Iilm anu Visual Siuuics
49 Our research
Dr Kate lnce
Peader ln French Fl|m and Gender
Studles
Emal|. k.|.lnce@bham.ac.uk
Te|. +44 (0)121 414 5972
Pesearch lnterests. French clnema, lnc|udlng auteur clnema and
women dlrectors; European women's clnema; phl|osophy and
theory of fl|m; French vlsua| art; femlnlst thought, lnc|udlng the
work of Beauvolr, Irlgaray and femlnlst phenomeno|ogy
Kate lnce's research now locuses on French-language cinema
(Franois Ozon, Michael Haneke, Catherine Breillat, Agnes varda) and
women's and auteur cinema in a European lramework. She has
published a monograph on the post-Surrealist director Georges Franju
that has also been translated into French (Geotges Ftonju, MP 2005
and Harmattan/Presses de l'niversite de Laval 2008); edited a volume
ol essays on European lrancophone auteur directors (Five DitecIots.
AuIeutism Itom Assoyos Io Ozon, MP 2008); and is now working on
a critical edition ol translations lrom the French lilmology movement
with colleagues lrom Franklurt and Zurich. She is also currently
researching lor a book on lemale subjectivity in lilms directed by
French and British women. She is on the Editorial Board ol the lntellect
journal SIudies in Ftench Cinemo and a member ol its association,
BAFTSS, NECS and the Oregon-based Society lor lnterdisciplinary
Feminist Phenomenology.
Dr lnce welcomes enquiries lrom potential doctoral researchers on any
aspect ol her research interests.
Prolessor Matthew
Pampley
Chalr of Art Hlstory
Emal|. m.[.ramp|ey@bham.ac.uk
Te|. +44 (0)121 415 8344

Pesearch lnterests. Art crltlclsm, aesthetlcs and the
hlstorlography of art; art slnce 1945. the po|ltlcs of museums, art
hlstory and crltlclsm ln Centra| Europe, 1850 to the present
Matthew Pampley's main interests are art criticism and the
historiography ol art, with a particular emphasis on Austrian, German
and Central European intellectual traditions since the mid nineteenth
century. He is currently locusing on heritage and visual culture in
Austria-Hungary lrom the mid nineteenth century to its demise in
1918, with particular relerence to the role ol museums, galleries,
monument protection ollices, art academies and universities in
shaping and communicating ideas ol national artistic heritage. He is
completing a book on the rise ol art history as a discipline in vienna at
the end ol the nineteenth century (the so-called 'vienna School ol Art
History'), examining the links between research into art and wider
political debates over the social and cultural identity ol Austria-
Hungary.
Prolessor Pampley welcomes enquiries lrom potential doctoral
researchers wishing to research any subject that overlaps with his
interests.
Dr Camilla Smith
Lecturer ln Hlstory of Art
Emal|. h.c.smlth@bham.ac.uk
Te|. +44 (0)121 414 7568
Pesearch lnterests. Elghteenth-century Swlss and Brltlsh vlsua|
cu|ture; |ate nlneteenth- and ear|y twentleth-century Austrlan and
German vlsua| cu|tures; tourlsm and art ln Europe, elghteenth to
ear|y twentleth century; Iin-de-siecle Ber|ln and Vlenna; the Welmar
Pepub|lc
Camilla Smith specialises in eighteenth-century Swiss, and to a lesser
extent British, visual cultures, with a growing interest in German visual
cultures in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Her
research has locused particularly on the Swiss artist Henry Fuseli, with
emphasis on his early drawings produced during his ministerial training
in Zurich. She is currently working on a monograph entitled Fools,
Hetoes ond Whotes. Henty Fuseli's SwiIzetlond. She has also
published on travellers' perceptions and the myth-making ol
Switzerland during the Enlightenment. ln 2006 she co-curated an
exhibition on eighteenth-century travel books at the Barber lnstitute ol
Fine Arts. Dr Smith's more recent research deals with sexuality,
eroticism and travel in relation to tourist guides, and wider perceptions
ol homosexuality in visual culture ol 1920s Berlin. She ollers
supervison lor doctoral research on Iin-de-siecle Berlin and vienna, the
Weimar Pepublic, eighteenth-century Swiss visual culture and aspects
ol British visual culture.
Prolessor Pob Stone
Professor of European Fl|m
Emal|. r.stone@bham.ac.uk
Pesearch lnterests. European and Wor|d clnema, Hlspanlc
clnema (especla||y Spanlsh, Cuban and Basque), lndependent
Amerlcan clnema, Modernlsm and fl|m (especla||y Surrea|lsm and
Cublsm), fl|m aesthetlcs and po|ltlcs
Pob Stone's research has locused on Spanish, Basque and Cuban
cinema and paid particular attention to the use ol lilm as a medium ol
political and philosophical dissent. He has published widely in these
areas and has explored the modernist ideas associated with
Surrealism and Cubism in relation to lilm in numerous publications. He
has also published monographs on the lilmmakers Carlos Saura, 1ulio
Medem and Pichard Linklater and has edited works on Surrealism, the
lile and lilms ol Luis Bunuel, and the use and perlormance ol songs in
Hispanic and Lusophone cinema. He currently holds a Leverhulme
Trust Major Pesearch Fellowship which has enabled him to research
and write a book on Basque cinema, its history, politics and art, with a
colleague at the niversity ol Deusto in San Sebastian.
Prolessor Stone directs B-Film; the Birmingham Centre lor Film
Studies and is on the editorial or advisory boards ol several academic
journals including studies in European Cinema, Hispanic Pesearch
1ournal and Studies in Hispanic Cinemas. He welcomes enquiries
lrom potential doctoral researchers on any aspect ol his research.
563_49
Aii Hisioiy, Iilm anu Visual Siuuics
50 Our research
Dr 1utta vinzent
Senlor Lecturer ln Modern and
Contemporary Art and Vlsua| Cu|ture
Emal|. [.vlnzent@bham.ac.uk
Te|. +44 (0)121 414 3259
Pesearch lnterests. Modern and contemporary art;
postco|onla|lsm and exl|e studles wlth emphasls on art practlces,
exhlbltlon cu|tures and ldentlty formatlons ln Brltaln and Germany;
post-communlst art ln a European context; postco|onla| art and
neo-co|onla| conf|lcts
1utta vinzent specialises in modern and contemporary art. She locuses
on issues ol postcolonialism (including hybridity, ethnicity, migration
and diasporas) and exile studies as twentieth-century narratives, with a
particular emphasis on art practices, exhibition cultures and identity
lormation in Germany and Britain in the 1930s and post-1989 Europe.
She is currently working on a book project on migration and its impact
on modernist spaces in 1930s Britain.
Dr vinzent ollers supervision ol doctoral theses on modern and
contemporary art, with prelerred areas including art and migration,
visual cultures ol diasphoric communities in Germany and Britain, post-
communist art in a European context and exhibition cultures in
Germany, Britain or post-1989 Europe. She is currently supervising or
co-supervising doctoral research on topics including visual responses
to pacilism and leminism in Britain during World War One; the impact
ol emigre photographers on PicIute PosI; and issues ol national
identity and neohellenic art.
563_50
WHETHER YOUR AIM IS A CAREER IN ACADEMIA OR IN THE
WIDER WORLD, THE VARIETY OF EXPERIENCES THAT YOU CAN
GAIN DURING THE COURSE OF YOUR DOCTORAL RESEARCH
CAN BE OF IMMENSE VALUE.
Undertaking a PhD has given me the chance to improve myself and my CV with experiences
that are otherwise hard to come by. I have learned skills such as lm making and editing,
writing funding applications, teaching seminars and proofreading journal articles. The University
Graduate School offers a wealth of free training opportunities which can be really helpful. As
a historian I have handled manuscripts and been allowed behind the scenes at museums and
libraries. My research has given me the opportunity to speak at academic conferences in
several countries, and I have organised conferences and events at Birmingham as part of
various student groups. As a freelance artist I have also had opportunities to do graphic
design work for the promotion of events and journals, which has been a great way to
exercise my talents.
Mike Rush
Doctoral Researcher, College of Arts and Law
discover
your potential
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
7952 DR BACK AW.indd 1 19/02/2013 12:10
563_51
The University is committed to reducing
its impact on the environment and has a
Sustainable Travel Plan containing a series
of initiatives to encourage all members of the
University community to walk, cycle, car share
or use public transport to travel, where possible.
For information on the travel options available
to you please visit www.birmingham.ac.uk/
contact/directions
By road
Birminghams central location makes it easy
to get here by car. Simply pop our postcode
B15 2TT into your sat nav or route planner
for step-by-step directions.
By rail
We are the only mainland UK university
to have its own railway station. Most
cross-country services arrive at Birmingham
New Street station in the city centre. Up to six
trains an hour depart for the University on the
cross-city line (nal destination Longbridge or
Redditch). The centre of the main campus is a
ve-minute walk from University Station.
How to nd us
By coach
There are frequent express coach services
to Birmingham from Londons Heathrow and
Gatwick airports and many UK cities. The
long-distance coach station is in Digbeth
in the city centre.
By bus
There are frequent services from the city
centre to the Universitys Edgbaston and
Selly Oak campuses. You can nd bus
timetables and departure point information
at nxbus.co.uk/westmidlands
By taxi
There are taxi ranks at Birmingham New
Street station and throughout the city centre.
The journey to the University takes about
ten minutes.
By air
Birmingham Airport has direct ights from
locations in the UK, as well as from the USA,
Canada, Europe and the Middle East. The
journey by taxi from the airport to the University
takes approximately half an hour. A free air
rail link runs from the airport to Birmingham
International railway station every two minutes
and connects with frequent services to
Birmingham New Street station.
If you are arriving at a London airport, there
is a frequent train service from London
Euston railway station to Birmingham
New Street station.
T From Heathrow airport, take the Heathrow
Express train to Paddington station and
then the Underground or a taxi to Euston.
Alternatively, take an Airbus from Heathrow
airport direct to Euston station
T From Gatwick airport, take the Airport
Express train to Victoria station and then
the Underground or a taxi to Euston
Directions to other University locations
The School of Dentistry is located in Birmingham
city centre. For directions on how to get there
by car, enter the postcode B4 6NN into your
chosen route planner or sat nav.
There are also a number of University locations
away from the city. For directions to Stratford-
upon-Avon (the Shakespeare Institute) and
Ironbridge (the Ironbridge Institute) go to
www.birmingham.ac.uk/contact/directions
BIRMINGHAM IS AT THE HEART OF THE UKS ROAD AND RAIL
NETWORK, AND IS EASILY ACCESSIBLE FROM OTHER PARTS
OF THE COUNTRY AND BEYOND. THE UNIVERSITYS MAIN
CAMPUS IS A MAJOR LANDMARK IN BIRMINGHAM.
7952 DR BACK AW.indd 2 19/02/2013 12:10
563_52
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
The Selly Oak campus
THE SELLY OAK CAMPUS IS 15 MINUTES FROM BIRMINGHAM
CITY CENTRE AND ONLY FIVE MINUTES AWAY BY CAR FROM
THE EDGBASTON CAMPUS, ON AN 80-ACRE GARDEN SITE NEAR
THE VILLAGE OF BOURNVILLE. IT IS HOME TO THE ORCHARD
LEARNING RESOURCES CENTRE AND BBC DRAMA VILLAGE.
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The Edgbaston campus
THE UNIVERSITYS EDGBASTON CAMPUS IS SET IN 250 ACRES AND HAS
ALL THE FACILITIES OF A BUSY TOWN. LAWNS, MATURE TREES AND
WALKWAYS CONTRIBUTE TO THE PEACEFUL ATMOSPHERE AND MAKE
THE CAMPUS A WONDERFUL SPOT FOR PICNICS AND WALKING.
P|ease note our campus ls undergolng ma[or redeve|opment. For more detal|ed and up-to-date maps vlslt www.blrmlngham.ac.uk/contact/dlrectlons

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Information point
Level access entrance
Steps
Public car park
Hospital
average walk time
from Chancellors Court
Bus stops
Library
Museum
Sport facilities
First aid
Food and drink
Retail
ATM
Toilets
Sculpture trail
24 hour security
Canal bridge
7952 DR BACK AW.indd 4 19/02/2013 12:10
563_54
Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
Red Zone
R1 Law Building
R2 Frankland Building
R3 Hills Building
R4 Aston Webb A Block,
Earth Sciences
R5 Aston Webb B Block
R6 Aston Webb Great Hall
R7 Aston Webb C Block
R8 Physics West
R9 Nufeld
R10 Physics East
R11 Medical Physics
R12 Bramall Music Building
R13 Poynting Building
R14 Barber Institute of Fine Arts
R15 Watson Building
R16 Arts Building
R17 Ashley Building
R18 Strathcona Building
R19 Education Building
R20 J G Smith Building
R21 Muirhead Tower
R22 Main Library
R23 University Centre
R24 Staff House
R25 Munrow Sports Centre
R26 Geography
R27 Biosciences Building
R28 Learning Centre and Primary Care
Blue Zone
B1 Medical School
B2 Institute of Biomedical
Research including IBR West
B3 Wellcome Clinical Research
Facility (1st oor)
B4 Robert Aitken Institute for
Clinical Research
B5 CRUK Institute for Cancer Studies
and Denis Howell Building
B6 Research Park
B7 90 Vincent Drive
B8 Henry Wellcome Building for
Biomolecular NMR Spectroscopy
B9 Medical Practice and Dental Centre
Orange Zone
O1 The Guild of Students
O2 St Francis Hall
O3 University House
O4 Elm House
Green Zone
G1 32 Pritchatts Road
G2 31 Pritchatts Road
G3 European Research Institute
G4 3 Elms Road
G5 Computer Centre
G6 Metallurgy and Materials
G7 IRC Net Shape Laboratory
G8 Gisbert Kapp Building
G9 52 Pritchatts Road
G10 54 Pritchatts Road
G11 Nicholson Building
G12 Winterbourne House and Garden
G15 Westmere
G18 Priorseld
G19 Park House
G20 Elms Plant
G21 Park Grange
G22 Elms Day Nursery
Green Zone Conference Park
G13 Hornton Grange
G14 Garth House
G16 Lucas House
G17 Peter Scott House
Yellow Zone
Y1 Old Gymnasium
Y2 Haworth Building
Y3 Mechanical and
Civil Engineering Building
Y4 Terrace Huts
Y5 Estates West
Y6 Maintenance Building
Y7 Grounds and Gardens
Y8 Chemistry West
Y9 Computer Science
Y10 Alta Bioscience
Y11 Chemical Engineering
Y12 Biochemical Engineering
Y13 Chemical Engineering Workshop
Y14 Sport and Exercise Sciences
Y15 Civil Engineering Laboratories
Y16 Occupational Health
Y17 Public Health
7952 DR BACK AW.indd 5 19/02/2013 12:10
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The small print essential
information for all students
THE FOLLOWING SECTION COVERS ESSENTIAL INFORMATION
FOR ALL APPLICANTS, INCLUDING IMPORTANT TERMS,
CONDITIONS AND REQUIREMENTS THAT THE UNIVERSITY
WILL APPLY AND RELY UPON IN ITS FUTURE RELATIONSHIP
WITH YOU. THE UNIVERSITY THEREFORE CONSIDERS IT
ESSENTIAL THAT YOU READ THEM CAREFULLY.
The following documentation and legislation
provides a framework through which the
University and its students work together
to create a positive environment for learning
and academic achievement:
T The Undergraduate and
Postgraduate Prospectuses
T The offer letter
T The Universitys Royal Charter, statutes,
ordinances and regulations
T Code of practice and related
information on admission to the
University of Birmingham
T School guidelines
T Programme requirements
T Registration documentation
This documentation establishes the basis
of an agreement between the University
and its students as to the rights, roles
and responsibilities of both parties.
Admission to the University is subject
to the requirement that the applicant will
comply with the Universitys registration
procedure and will duly observe this
documentation. The documentation
(except for the Prospectus, offer letter
and registration documentation) is
available on the Universitys website
at www.as.bham.ac.uk/legislation/
regulations.shtml
Application and admission to the University:
information and requirements
It is essential that you provide accurate and
complete information in your application form.
If you fail to do so the University can withdraw
the offer of a place and insist that you leave.
Criminal convictions
When you apply to the University, you must
disclose any unspent criminal convictions.
Some programmes will require the disclosure
of all convictions, spent or unspent. The
University will consider whether such
convictions are compatible with membership
and a place on a particular programme. If your
situation changes after the offer of a place
please notify the Admissions Tutor for your
programme, or if you have already enrolled,
the Programme Director.
Disabilities
If you have study support needs related
to a disability, including dyslexia and other
specic learning difculties, mental health
conditions, or other health conditions,
the University will seek to support you
whenever possible. If you have not yet
disclosed that disability, we would
encourage you to do so at the earliest
opportunity to assist us in putting in place
the appropriate support in good time. We
would normally document the support to be
provided in an agreed statement. Even if you
have already disclosed a disability, please
make sure you contact the Disability and
Learning Support Service before you accept
any offer of a place, in order to establish what
support is available and the information we
need to ensure this can be arranged. You
should be aware that if you choose not to
disclose your disability, or to limit that
disclosure, while we will do our best to help
you, you may not be able to access the full
range of support available. The Disability and
Learning Support Team can be contacted
by telephone on +44 (0)121 414 5130
or by email at disability@bham.ac.uk.
Further information is also available at
www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/disability
Programme entry requirements
The programme requirements for
admission are set out in the relevant section
of the prospectus. Please consider these
carefully to ensure you are eligible for your
chosen subject.
Health requirements
The University and bodies such as
the General Medical Council and the
Department for Education require applicants
for certain programmes to provide information
regarding their physical health. Applicants may
also be required to undergo a health check
and to provide evidence of immunisation
against certain diseases. The offer of a
place is conditional on such requirements
being met.
Blood-borne viruses
The regulations on the screening and
admissions to medical schools of students with
blood-borne viruses, and other regulations, are
subject to change from time to time and you
are advised to consult the relevant college
website for up-to-date information.
Fees and payment
It is your responsibility to make sure your
tuition fees and all other expenses relating to
your programme are paid in a timely manner.
The tuition fee will be stated in your offer pack.
The fee quoted is revised each academic year.
When you register online, you will be required
to indicate how your fees will be paid. If you
are paying the fee yourself, the University will
require either full payment or an application
to make payment using the University
direct debit scheme.
As a member of the University you will be
bound by the Universitys regulations on the
payment of fees. Failure to make payment in
accordance with the regulations will ultimately
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Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
result in exclusion from the University. The
regulations are set out on the Universitys
website at www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/
payments
If you are a sponsored student and your
sponsor fails to pay your tuition fees, you
will become responsible for payment.
Your offer letter will indicate whether
you will be considered as home/EU or
overseas for fees purposes. If you feel
this classication to be incorrect it is
your responsibility to contact the
Admissions Ofce.
Unless stated otherwise, the programme and
course fees do not include any charges for
residential accommodation, examination resits,
extensions to the designated period of study,
travelling expenses, or other miscellaneous
expenses which may be related to your
programme of study.
If you would like the University to be able to
discuss your fee account with a third party, we
will require you to complete a Disclosure to a
Third Party form in accordance with the Data
Protection Act 1998. This form can be found
at www.birmingham.ac.uk/students/payments
Scholarships
Information on sources of funding for
postgraduate students can be found
at www.as.bham.ac.uk/study/support/
nance/pgstudents
Financial hardship
In addition to the scholarship schemes,
the University is able to provide nancial
assistance to students who suffer nancial
hardship during their studies. In particular,
the Access to Learning Fund can be used to
make a means-tested, non-repayable grant
to part-time or full-time undergraduate
or postgraduate students who have been
resident in the UK throughout the three years
prior to the start of their course. Further details
of this and other awards are available from the
Student Funding Ofce at www.as.bham.ac.uk/
study/support/nance or the Department
for Education www.direct.gov.uk/en/
educationandlearning/index.htm
Registration and University membership:
information and requirements
General guidance and regulations
All members of the University (which includes
registered students) are required to comply
with the following:
T Health and safety guidance
T Code of practice on use of
computing facilities
T Equality policy
T Discrimination and harassment guidance
T Data protection policy
T Public interest disclosure policy
T Rules on car parking on University
premises
Further details of these requirements can
be found at www.as.bham.ac.uk/support/
rights.shtml
Data protection and disclosure
of personal information
The application procedure, registration
and your academic progress will provide the
University with a range of information about
you. It will use this to support you on your
programme and for the administration and
management of the University, including
statistical analysis. Some information may
be disclosed outside the University, either
at your request or in your interest.
The information is collected from a number of
sources including your application, registration
forms and references, and from carrying out
Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) or health
checks (if necessary). We may disclose
information relating to your academic progress
to your sponsor (if you have one). Medical
information disclosed to the Universitys
Medical Ofcer or the Student Support
and Development team will be treated as
condential and disclosed only in accordance
with their normal procedures. Information arising
from Criminal Records Bureau checks will be
used only in accordance with the CRBs code
of practice (See www.crb.homeofce.gov.uk).
We will also ask for emergency contact details
and by providing them, you conrm that these
individuals have consented to the processing
of their personal data by the University. All
information will be kept for a reasonable period
in accordance with legal requirements and for
administration purposes.
Further information can be found at
www.birmingham.ac.uk/university/
data-protection
Programmes, courses and modules
The University will make all reasonable
efforts to deliver your programme as described
in the Universitys offer letter. However, the
University may have to vary the method of
delivery of your programme, and in some
cases the syllabus may be altered or updated,
or your supervisor changed. When an agreed
supervisor becomes unavailable, for example,
through leaving the Universitys employment,
the University will endeavour to nd a suitable
replacement or make alternative arrangements.
In extreme circumstances the University
may have to discontinue your programme or
amalgamate modules. The modules described
in this prospectus are provided as an illustration
and may be subject to change. In the unlikely
event that the University discontinues your
programme or changes it signicantly we will
tell you at the earliest possible opportunity.
Under such circumstances you may wish to
withdraw your application; if you do so, the
University will assist you in nding an alternative
programme either at Birmingham or at another
UK university.
Deposits
We reserve the right to charge a deposit for
some programmes. Full details will be included
in our offer letter where appropriate.
Conduct
Students are required to attend such lectures,
tutorials, examinations and other activities as
form part of their programme. This includes
the requirement to submit theses, dissertations
and coursework on time. Students must also
be aware of and observe the Universitys
discipline regulations and codes of conduct
(which include the Universitys right to
suspend or exclude a student in exceptional
circumstances on disciplinary grounds),
which can be seen at www.as.bham.ac.uk/
legislation/codesofpractice.shtml
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You may also be subject to the Universitys
regulations on Fitness to Practise, and, if so,
additional information will be included with
the offer letter.
Diversity and equality
The University prides itself on being a
diverse community within a diverse city. Our
commitment to equality and diversity and the
elimination of discrimination is embodied in
the Universitys Charter and our aim is to
ensure that the University remains an inclusive
environment where equality of opportunity and
tolerance for all are fostered and promoted.
Termination
Subject to the completion of any internal
appeals procedures, you may be asked
to leave the University if:
T Your academic performance is
not satisfactory
T Action is taken against you in accordance
with the Universitys disciplinary or Fitness
to Practise procedures
T You fail to pay your fees in accordance
with the Universitys regulations on
payment of fees
T You are expelled or dismissed from
any other organisation which you are
required to attend or be a member
of as part of your programme
T In the reasonable opinion of the University,
you have failed to provide the University
with all relevant information, or have
supplied false or misleading information,
relating to your application for your
programme
T As a result of your actions the University is
unable to nd a suitable placement which
is required to complete your programme
Depending on the circumstances the
University may also be entitled to take legal
action against you (for example to recover an
outstanding debt). Provided the action taken
to terminate the agreement is in accordance
with the Universitys procedures, the University
will not be liable for any loss or damage which
you may suffer as a result. Neither the student
nor the University shall be liable to each other
for any failure or delay in performing obligations,
if the failure or delay is due to any cause
beyond that partys reasonable control, for
example re, ood or industrial dispute.
Intellectual property
You are subject to the University regulations
regarding exploitable new inventions and
intellectual property arising whilst you are a
student of the University. The regulations are
available through the Universitys website
www.birmingham.ac.uk
Generally the procedure is the same
for both students and members of staff. The
University claims ownership of the intellectual
property, and if it is exploited, it passes a
substantial benet from the net prots back to
the student or staff member. However, if you
have any questions or concerns regarding
these provisions please discuss them with
your supervisor or Head of School.
Accommodation
If you apply to the University to reside
in University accommodation this is dependent
on you continuing to study at the University.
There are separate terms and conditions
which apply to your occupation of University
accommodation and further details of these
are available from Housing Services at
www.birmingham.ac.uk/accommodation
Religious observance
Whilst the University promotes an egalitarian
learning community, applicants and students
should be aware that:
T In an intensive course we have to routinely
schedule activities, including examinations,
on Fridays and Saturdays. Where this may
conict with the observance of religious
days for some students, the University
will endeavour to make alternative
arrangements where reasonably possible.
Therefore students are advised to inform
the relevant school and/or the Examinations
Ofce in writing of such issues as soon
as possible.
T The General Medical Council and
the British Dental Association stipulate
that the wearing of gloves and/or burkas
is not permitted in the clinical setting.
Medical students are required to sign a
code of practice in which they agree to
show their faces at all times, and must be
prepared to examine and touch patients of
both sexes. See www.birmingham.ac.uk/
students/support
General matters
The agreement is between the University and
the student and only these two parties can
enforce the agreement between them. The
Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act 1999
shall not apply. The agreement between the
student and the University is governed by
English law. Further information can be found
on our website www.birmingham.ac.uk
If you have any questions please contact
the Doctoral Researcher Enquiry Service
at dr@contacts.bham.ac.uk
Further information
The University of Birmingham reserves the
right, without notice, to withdraw programmes
or raise fees at any time before or after an
applicants admission. If you have any
complaints regarding the accuracy or fairness
of this prospectus, they should be addressed
to the Director of Communications and
Marketing, who will investigate the matter
and reply, in writing, within 21 days of
receiving the letter.
The University is an exempt charity under Schedule
3 of the Charities Act 2011. An exempt charity enjoys
all the tax exemptions and other benets of a charity,
but is exempt from certain requirements, including
the need to register with the Charity Commission.
As it is not on the Register of Charities, the
University does not have a charity registration
number, and although it is a corporate body, the
University is not a limited company, therefore it is
not registered at Companies House. It does have
a tax-exempt Inland Revenue charities reference
number (X7237).
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Search for doctoral research opportunities at www.birmingham.ac.uk/dr
Doctoral
Researcher
UNDERTAKING DOCTORAL RESEARCH AT
BIRMINGHAM ALLOWS YOU TO WORK ALONGSIDE
INTERNATIONALLY-RANKED ACADEMICS.

TO FIND OUT MORE ABOUT JOINING OUR
DYNAMIC RESEARCH COMMUNITY AND THE
POSTGRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES WE HAVE
AVAILABLE CONTACT OUR DEDICATED DOCTORAL
RESEARCH ENQUIRY TEAM WHO CAN PROVIDE
ADVICE AND GUIDANCE ON:
T PhD opportunities
T Searching for a potential supervisor
T The PhD application process
T Writing the PhD proposal
T Scholarships, bursaries and funding opportunities
T Lifestyle and accommodation
Contact the DRES team on:
Telephone: +44 (0)121 414 5005
Email: dr@contacts.bham.ac.uk
Doctoral Researcher
Enquiry Service
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OUP GPOUNDBPEAKlNG PESEAPCH HAS MADE AN lMPACT
ON THE WOPLD FOP OvEP 100 YEAPS. WE CONTlNUE TO
UPHOLD THlS TPADlTlON OF lNNOvATlON WlTH PESEAPCH
WHlCH HAS PEAL BENEFlTS LOCALLY, NATlONALLY, AND
lNTEPNATlONALLY. WE ASK OUESTlONS. WE CPEATE lMPACT.
WE USE OUP PESEAPCH EXPEPTlSE TO SOLvE TOMOPPOW'S
PPOBLEMS TODAY. 1OlN US.
27*,7 86
Thank you lor your interest in undertaking
doctoral research at the University ol
Birmingham. We hope that this prospectus has
been ol use to you. Should you require any
lurther inlormation, or il you would like some
assistance with lormulating your research
proposal and completing your application to
the University, then please do not hesitate to
contact us. We look lorward to hearing lrom
you.
Doctora| Pesearcher Enqulry Servlce
Student Pecruitment
University ol Birmingham
Ground Floor, Beech House
353 Bristol Poad
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
United Kingdom
Email: dr_contacts.bham.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 5005
Website: www.birmingham.ac.uk/dres
Department of Art Hlstory, Fl|m and Vlsua|
Studles
The Barber lnstitute ol Fine Arts
University ol Birmingham
Edgbaston
Birmingham
B15 2TT
United Kingdom
Email: t.mann_bham.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 2218
Website: www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/
lcahm/departments/historyolart
Postgraduate dlrector.
Dr Camilla Smith
Email: h.c.smith_bham.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 ?568
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Contact us
Doctoral ReSEARCHer Enquiry Service
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 5005
Email: dr@contacts.bham.ac.uk
Postgraduate Admissions
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 5488
Email: admissions@bham.ac.uk
Main University switchboard
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 3344
Student Funding Ofce
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 7391
Email: sfo@contacts.bham.ac.uk
International Relations
Tel: +44 (0)121 414 2894
Email: international@bham.ac.uk
Shape the future with us
Become a Birmingham postgraduate www.birmingham.ac.uk/pg
At Birmingham, our vision is to inspire todays
brightest postgraduates to make a major impact
on global society, and to become the leaders of
tomorrow in whatever eld they pursue. Thats why
we work to provide the best possible teaching,
research facilities and support services to ensure
our postgraduates reach the peak of their potential.
Dates for your dlary 2013-2014
Autumn Term
30 September 2013-13 December 2013
Sprlng Term
13 1anuary 2014-28 March 2014
Summer Term
28 April 2014-20 1une 2014
Postgraduate Open Day
The next open day will take place on 2?
November 2013. ln addition to visiting our
beautilul campus, the event ollers opportunities
to talk to potential supervisors and current
doctoral researchers working in your area.
Pegister to attend at:
www.birmingham.ac.uk/pgopenday
Vlrtua| open days
ll you are unable to attend the Postgraduate
Open Day, the University organises numerous
chat events throughout the year. For lurther
details, together with videos ol our open day
presentations, visit: www.birmingham.ac.uk/pg
Meet us ln your country
Pecruitment ollicers, academic stall and
current postgraduate students lrom the
University regularly travel overseas to meet with
potential applicants. These visits are an
excellent opportunity to have your questions
about studying at Birmingham answered. For a
list ol lorthcoming events please visit: www.
birmingham.ac.uk/international/meet/index.aspx
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Edgbaston, Birmingham,
B15 2TT, United Kingdom
www.birmingham.ac.uk
Founded in 1900, Birmingham grew out of the radical vision of its rst
Chancellor, Joseph Chamberlain, and was Englands rst civic university
where students from all religions and backgrounds were accepted on
an equal basis. From the embryonic beginnings of our Medical School
in 1825, Birmingham has maintained the spirit of innovation of our
founder and remains a university with a passion for original thought.
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