Hawkesbury Herald (Windsor, NSW : 1902 - 1945), Friday 14 November 1902, page 15

The

Haunted
man's
-

Houso
'

on

Wise

Ferry Road,
-OR-

\

The

Shrieking Horror.

One night-a .few^ars ago-four sittings quietly smoking pf us were îîie atouiidfire in Far pud yarning, mer Dunn's kitchen, which was a;

rough slab

ftïUôturè.

Through the

wide chinks in the walls the Mind, bowled in a dismal manner, and the
old rafters creaked ominously, causing of the party-a young at least one and a new chum-to mah frequently give a furtive and half-frightened, look around. The house itself stood away from the road, in the midst of a very neglected farm, a few miles below Cattai bridge.

!

Jim Webster,.. a weather-beaten, hardened old traveller, sat on one side of the rough fire-place, alternately poking the fire and lighting his pipe, whilst Tom 'Wright, a young stock
strapping young fellow, who boasted that he was not afraid of or devil-sat on the other side, man and mate, Charlie Wilson-a my clerk just out from Home." young and myself closed in the half-circle round the flickering fire, which now would blaze up and light the old kitchen, and then die out and leave a blackness that gave ue a horrible sen sation of creeps. For some time we had all been rather quiet, each busy with his own thoughts, when, in one of the spells of darkness, the door opened, and a fairly gruff, hoarse voice-which caused us all to jump-said Good
man-à
n "

fine,

night!"

National Library of Australia

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66352740

vr

-

-

quiet so long that I nearly asleep. Any were how", it gave us a great start. Old in'answer to Jim said Good-night and vigorously poked the new-comer, all the tire into a blaze. Then we turned to look at the stranger, who he had as had stood quite still as soon spoken. He waB a young man, about quite were years of age, and we Startled to notice the white, scared He was a very tall, look in his face. thin fellow, with coal-black hair and eyes, and he had a very heavy, black, drooping moustache, which consider ably heightened the extreme deathly whiteness of his face. I rose from the log on which I_ was sitting and asked him if anything was the matter, when he took one step iell clay to nnd the forward headlong floor. We all rushed to lift him upv. .and found to our astonishment that he had fainted. Tom began to undo the neck of his crimean shirt, and Charlie chafing his hands, and commenced presently he came to. " How do you feel now, young fellow ?" asked Tom. He looked about in a dazed sort of and answered, "A lot better, manner, thank you," a sickly smile. passing " his face. over I feel alright again, will fool a think mo No doubt you whea l tell you ali about it; but I was thoroughly frightened." We looked surprised at him, and Tom gave a grunt of disgust. been
" ! "

We had think we

"

When
us

you

feel fit," said

I,

"

just

tell

what frightened you." into his eyes, A queer look came in voice he said, and "I a hushed heard a ghost!"

"Ghost!"
is no

such thing shook his head "X will tell you

"There snapped Tem. But the stranger
! "

all

about it There's

not much to

tell.*"

You

know the house

" about half-a-mile down the road ? " " Yes," dirty, said Charlie, a

red brick house, with half the windows boarded, and the other half broken
away, and no door, only a piece of torn sacking hanging down." " That's the place," said he. " Well,
"

tts

haunted!" You don't say so," said Charlie,
was

who
Tom

inclined to
««

said
:

Bot

!"

mained
tinued
*'

silent.

be superstitious. Old Jim and I re The stranger con
me or

Whether you believe
I

not,

it's
tl e

a

Ferry, and

have just travelled from told I should find sn was empty house along the road. As it I got to it, 1 was neai ly dark when in and had a look round. went There f< is window ur rooms, and every are ha boarded up. But the front one had half the boards knocked off, and
fact.
.

I «bon baa pioked a nlace io camp but I noticed that there were no signs p|; ^ecent ira^eïlers. JThe duet was thick on the 4oor, and bad not been disturbed for a * place as^ean^as I could with a bush;,
a

tîiôt lets

in

little

light./
'

a^r %d

;

.

ißha^j^i^y^jid:, billy made tea and had some supper. JTheij, being very tired, I turned in, ánd after, a few draws of the pipe I fell sound asleep. I couldn't have been asleep long, .when I woke with a strange, feeling creepy arranged
boiling,
a I.

that I

.

I listened in and could hear the wind hpwl ing and moaning outside. I shivered from head to foot with cold. After
was

not

alone.

tently,

few seconds T distinctly heard a faint moan, and then a curious sort of thumping in one of the Other still as rooms. Then ail was death for a few seconds, and L began to think I was the dreaming, when mysterious thumping began again, accompanied by a series of horrible, wheezing, moaning cries. I tell you straight I could feel my hair begin to rise, and I could hear my heart bump ing against my side like a sledge hammer.' Then came horrible sounds, like a fierce struggle, with the moans and cries coming quicker and nearer. A cold sweat was breaking out ali I wanted over to get up, but I me. I could not. rooted to the floor. was How I wished for a light ! But al though I had a box of matches in my pocket, I could not move finger to a
e

listening for

you know
it

all

about
at

it,

what

do

you

f' think of looked We Jim gave the

each other, and old fire auother poke, and lit bis pipe, which he had allowed to Charlie had a. wild, out, and go look, frightened when we heard voices outside, and then old Dunn's voice
saying,

."No

you

don't.

IVe-got
!

j

j

i

AU at once the fright ful struggle ceased, and all was silent. I lay ,with my hearing strained to the horrible utmost tension, in the moat
a

strike

light.

suspense, absolutely too frightened to breathe. My tongue was sticking to the roof of my mouth, and I coule feel lips painfully dry. I had just my
¡

noticed

glimmer of light under the old fagged bagging, waving backwards and forwards in the door
a

faint

!

j

I

way, when I heard a bumping close to me, and something as cold as death At the same touched my hand. time there
was
a

and the next minute the door kicked was open, and Dunn strode in I've got crying loudly, Here he is !" him The stranger looked inclined- to is it?" "What jump up.and run, asked Tom. "Oh," said old Dunn, "I was coming home from the Ferry, and as I was passing the old brick kouse 1 could hear a great bumping noise going on, so I rode up, and jumped off, and-went in to see what it was. it I listened a bit, but cOuldnViúake all, so out at I struck a matakana1 this fellow,, scooting^jb^nd then I seen and screeching out awful like, sis I made a. dive forjhim, when the match went Out; but 1 grabbed him and brought bim along, ¿nd there be îé'-^ tin, a postum with his head in a jam and couldn't get it out! Gb, by th« bye, 1 noticed a swag in the corner, Good night!"

you!

"

"

'

7

most

blood-curdling,
a

smothered
away
v

kind
horrible

of

shriek,

dying
of
a

in

a

moaning kind

almost close to my head. I cry, believe I should have died, when something cold and soft, with a sicken ing smell of brimstone, was laid across It was frightful, but it my mouth. life, for it electrified saved my me. Springing up I made a wild rush for the door, and never stopped running until I reached this place. And, now
all

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