Lab#: 2 How many drops of mysterious liquid will it take to raise the liquid 1 milliliter?

Jiangsang Lau 703

Purpose: How many drops of mysterious liquid will it take to equal 1 milliliter?

Research/background information: According to my notebook the properties of water is that water “sticks” to the glassware. Cohesion is the act of uniting or sticking together. There is also adhesion which is force that attracts molecules to a surface they are in contact with. The graduated cylinder we used had graduations of 1 milliliter. This made finding the number of drops of liquid to raise 1 milliliter of water much more accurate.

Hypothesis: If there are 19 drops of mysterious liquid in the graduated cylinder, it will raise the liquid 1 milliliter. Experiment: Materials: 1. Graduated cylinder 2. Beaker 3. Ruler 4. Dropper 5. Mysterious Liquid Procedure: 1. Fill a small graduated cylinder with 10mL of mysterious liquid.

2. Count the number of drops it takes to raise the mysterious liquid to 11mL. Record the number in the chart. 3. Leave the mysterious liquid in the graduated cylinder and count the number of drops it takes to raise the water to 12mL. Record the number in the chart. 4. Leave the mysterious liquid in the graduated cylinder and count the number of drops it takes to raise the level to 13mL. Record the number in the chart. 5. Calculate your average and round to the nearest tenth.

Conclusion: My hypothesis was not correct. My hypothesis was not correct because when I averaged all the number of drops I got about 18 drops of mysterious liquid to raise 1 milliliter. I averaged all the number of drops of mysterious liquid. I got 106 drops and I had 2 trials. I raised the liquid 1 milliliter 3 times every trial. That is a total of 6 times. 106 divided by 6 is 17.6666 which rounds to 18 drops. My hypothesis was 50 drops and I was not close to my hypothesis at all. In this experiment I learned that there is cohesion and adhesion which is why there is always a little bit of water left in the glassware. I also learned that the graduated cylinder with the graduations going up by 1mL at a time gave the most accurate measurements. I used a dropper to measure the number of drops equivalent to 1mL. This tool provides me the most precise answer because every time I squeeze it, it drops out a small droplet of liquid. So if I am close to 1 milliliter I can still drop a few more

drops to make it exactly or closer than it was to 1 milliliter. This experiment provides enough data to provide an accurate result because no matter how many times you try the experiment the average will be somewhere around 15-20 drops. Also in the experiment we had 2 trials. Both trials results were 15-20 drops. I think that the way I estimated on how close the liquid is to the graduation affected the results. I think this because the estimate is the way I see. I see the mysterious close enough to the next graduation but that might not be the way other people see it. Also if I see the mysterious liquid close enough to the next graduation it can still be off by 1-2 drops of liquid. For example my first trial was 10 drops and then the rest of the trials were from 16-21 drops. There obviously was something wrong. I probably put too much mysterious liquid into the graduated cylinder and that affected the results a lot. Also if you missed a count or didn’t see the liquid while dropping the liquid into the graduated cylinder that could’ve affected the results. The amount of pressure you put on the dropper affects the results too. If you put too much pressure on the dropper the liquid might drop a bigger drop of liquid or drop out too much.