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The French revolution instilled the French with the ideals of liberty, social equality and fraternity as opposed to life under the oppressive rule of the Bourbon kings. The Revolution also destabilised France, destroying the economy, thus making it easier for rivals to capture French territory and colonies. Neighbouring monarchies found these revolutionary ideals threatening to their power as well as to world stability. Now, crowned the Emperor of France, Napoleon has maintained his popularity with many victories in Europe. The French now have an impressive empire under Napoleon who has used his strength to redraw the map of Europe. He also has a great weakness; his treatment of enemies and rivals has not been entirely tactful or polite. He has caused offence to nearly everyone, taking not giving, even when he should have been conciliatory. He has managed, through poor diplomacy, to make the British look like attractive allies to many.

As a result, the Austrians are waiting for an opportunity to strike back at France for their recent humiliations and losses. The Russians, too, will strike down this new upstart emperor if given a chance, and will they ignore Napoleon's instructions to ban trade with England? The Prussians, apparently, are content to sit and wait, but for how long? Will they idly sit by if it becomes necessary to extend French power into northern Germany? And then there is always the British, that vindictive little island will have to be dealt with at some time. The stage is set as all of Europe stands on the brink of conflict. Diplomacy has failed, negotiations have moved onto the battlefield, where the musket and bayonet are the order of the day, artillery is the most feared weapon, yet cavalry and sword are still necessary for victory. Who will prevail? Will Napoleon capture all of Europe or will the old order be able to preserve the status quo.

Introduction Eagles and Colours (E&C for short) is a set of rules designed for two players to compete against each other in a Napoleonic era tactical wargame. Eagles and Colours is well suited for battles from Brigade to Corps sizes which can be played and finished within about two or three hours. Eagles and Colours is designed as a Napoleonic inspired game, not a military simulation; the rules are simple and fast paced compared to most games set in this era. E&C allows players to concentrate on tactics and enjoy the “feel” for warfare of the Napoleonic wars instead of having their head buried in endless, convoluted rules. These rules encourage generalship, manoeuvre and combined arms tactics as opposed to optimised list construction and cheesy unrealistic tactics. Eagles and Colours uses the “I go, you go” turn style, which will be familiar to most wargamers. Game play focuses on units, rather than individual models. When units take damage single models are not removed and the units fighting ability is not reduced. Damage to units is not only represented in terms of casualties but in terms of reduced moral, fatigue, wounds and loss of command and control. The more damage a unit takes the more likely it will be to route. This rule book is to be interpreted as positive instructions, meaning if a situation is not specified in the rules, it is therefore prohibited. However these rules may not cover all possible eventualities and situations may arise that are not covered in the rules. Players are encouraged to resolves these situation in a friendly, mutually agreeable manner in order to continue the game as quickly as possible. If a

rules dispute cannot be resolved with both players in agreement, roll a D6 to determine which players interpretation applies in that instance. On a 1-3, player A may decide, on a 4-6 player B may decide. What you need to play. An Army Eagles and Colours uses 10mm scale “RISK” board game figures based on 20mm square bases which represent various infantry battalions, cavalry regiments and artillery batteries from the Napoleonic era. Generals are based on 20mm diameter round bases. However other miniature and scales and basing conventions can be used with a little adaptation. Each unit has an assigned point’s value, given in their relevant army list. Point’s values reflect a units worth within its army. Players choose a force from one of the army lists to a predetermined total point’s value to ensure forces are evenly matched. Dice The game system uses standard six sided dice; 1D6 means one six sided dice reading 1 to 6; 2D6 means two six sided dice added together to read 2 to 12; D3 means a six sided dice used to read 1, 2 or 3, use the following method; 1 or 2 = 1, 3 or 4 = 2 and 5 or 6 = 3. Battlefield You will need a battlefield for your armies to fight over, whether it is the kitchen table, lounge room floor or a well modelled wargames table. The players set up the terrain for there armies to fight over in a mutually agreeable manner. Battlefield size can be as large or small as you want but a battlefield of 120 x 120 cm will allow enough room to deploy and manoeuvre two good sized armies.

Markers Units are stands of miniatures with infantry, cavalry, or artillery figures. All other figures used in the game are Markers. Players may need to create Markers to represent; • • • • • • Damage Disruption Wavering A Morale test is required Unit rank Command rating

First, we’ll assume that your unit can only see things that are at least partially in its front arc – its ‘arc of sight’. The flank and rear arcs are completely blind. Real Line of Sight Of course, terrain and other units can get in the way and hide targets that are in your unit’s arc of sight. To determine whether your unit can actually see a target that is in its arc of sight, simply lean down on the table and look from behind the unit. If the unit can ‘see’ over 50% of a target unit then the entire unit can see it. It is acceptable to ‘see’ a target unit by looking over the heads of an intervening unit, assuming that the shooting unit is on a hill or elevated position. It is not acceptable however to ‘see’ an enemy through the tiny gaps in-between the models of any intervening units – assume that units are ‘solid’. If you’re unsure whether your unit can see a target or not, roll a die. On a 4+ he can see it, on 3 or less he cannot. Units Units are made up of one, two or four “elements” of the same type and must remain in edge and corner contact with another element of their unit and usually facing the same direction. Units must be in a legal formation at all times, the most common are listed below.

Markers are not bases; they do not exist for purposes of combat, shooting (they can’t be targets), distance to the enemy, etc. General Principals Front, Rear, Flank Normally units have four facings: front, rear, left flank and right flank. Each of these facings possesses an ‘arc’, an area determined by drawing imaginary lines at 45 degree angles from each corner of the unit, as shown in below.

Arc of Sight During the game, you will at times need to determine whether one of your units can see another unit, normally an enemy unit that your unit intends to charge or shoot.

Examples of 3 types of elements, Artillery, Cavalry and Line Infantry.

Formations Units must be in a legal formation at all times. All the elements of a unit must face the same direction and must be in base-to-base contact with each other unless noted otherwise. Thus elements within units and within lines and columns must be kept as straight as possible (as shown below). Elements may not fire through other elements of the same unit, therefore some formations will reduce a units Firepower in the shoot phase. Regardless of formation, Firepower is never reduced in Melee. Legal unit formations allowed are these: Line A one element deep line formation has all of its bases abreast, in flush contact in a single line. Line Formation maximises a unit’s firepower, with men standing shoulder to shoulder in long ranks providing the maximum frontage to deliver volleys of musket fire, while sacrificing manoeuvrability and defence against a charging enemy.

Column of March The one element wide Column of March has all of its bases lined up one behind the other in a single column. Column of March has the advantage of being easier to advance and manoeuvre than all other formations. It however lacks firepower and is vulnerable to the flanks.

A unit moving in a column of March follows its leading element, which may pivot in any direction, any number of times with the trailing elements “snaking” a path behind it.

Units in line formation are able to direct all their fire power in there arc of sight, causing maximum damage to targets in the shoot phase.

Units in column of March are able to advance over difficult terrain without movement penalty and may “March” through open terrain. The disadvantages of column of March formation are due to it narrow frontage, only the front element may shoot, reducing a unit’s fire power to one.

Column of Attack Also known as Mass formation, heavy column or the French Column. The term “column” is a misnomer as this formation bears no resemblance to a long, sender line of men marching down a road. The Column of attack uses a narrow frontage with the rest of the unit in close support behind. The effect is successive waves of melee attacks concentrated on a smaller portion of an enemy’s line. A unit in Column of Attack has two elements in the front rank and two precisely behind them in the second rank.

Square Only line infantry can form square in order to stand firm against a melee charge, they are especially successful against cavalry. A tightly formed square presents a wall of bristling bayonet’s and musket fire to a charging enemy. A square is formed by placing each element in rear corner to rear corner contact with the two of its neighbours, forming an all round defensive formation with all elements facing out.

Units in Column of Attack formation receive a +1 to hit modifier in melee. Only the front elements may shoot therefore Columns of Attack have a reduced fire power of two when shooting. Due to the close packed nature of units in Column of Attack formation, enemy shooting attacks receive a +1 to hit modifier.

Infantry squares have a 360’ arc of sight, and do not have any flanks or rear facings. Each element may shoot independently to its frontal arc, with a firepower value of one. Infantry in Squares are the only units which may split fire over different enemy units. Squares may only receive Halt! & Change Formation! orders. Units attacking a Square in melee must reroll all successful hits, the second result stands. In addition enemy cavalry units receive a -1 to hit modifier. Due to the close packed nature of units in Square formation, enemy shooting attacks receive a +1 to hit modifier.

Stats Each unit has a series of statistics (‘stats’ for short), which define how powerful it is in the game. These are: • Name. The units name and rank marker. • Size. The number of elements that make up the unit. • Speed (Sp) How fast the unit moves, in centimetres (cm). • Range The range in cm of the units shooting attack.

•Accuracy (Ac) The score needed by the unit to hit an enemy with a ranged attack. If it has no normal ranged attacks, this is a ‘–’. •Melee Skill (MS) The score needed by the unit to hit an enemy with a melee attack. • Morale (Mo) A combination of the unit’s size and its training and discipline, this stat shows how resistant it is to damage suffered. • Special Rules Any special equipment (like ranged weapons) and rules that apply to the unit.

•Fire Power (Fp) The number of dice the unit rolls when attacking at range • Cost The points value of the unit. and in melee. Example of unit stats
Name Old Guard 4 5 24 4 4+ 5+ -/13 Size Speed Range Firepower Accuracy Melee Skill Morale Special rules Brave Elite(1) Inspiring Fear Cost

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•Rank Markers: Used to tell the difference in the quality of units from the same troop type. Rank markers distinguish between elite, veteran Guard units and poorly led, untrained Militia. Basically, the higher the units rank, the better it is. It is important that you place the correct rank markers with your units so they are easily recognisable to your opponent. Measuring Distance You can measure distances at any time you like. Distances are always measured to or from the nearest points between elements in the two units. In order to avoid confusion, keep your units at least 1cm away from all other units (friends and enemies) at all times. This is not true when charging – see ″Charge!”

The Turn Much like chess, Eagles and Colours is played in turns. Just roll a die to decide who is going to have the first turn – the player winning the die roll decides who goes first. That player moves, shoots and strikes blows in close combat with his units – this concludes Turn 1 of the game. After that, his opponent takes a turn – Turn 2 of the game, and then the players keep alternating this way until an agreed time or turn limit is reached or a victory condition is met. In his turn a player goes through the following three phases: 1) Move phase; 2) Shoot phase; 3) Melee phase. We’ll examine each of these phases in detail later.

Troop Types

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Light Infantry Light infantry generally have a longer range and better Accuracy than other infantry and are able to make the best use of terrain, allowing them to attack without ever getting hit back. Light Infantry’s Skirmish special rule makes them fast and agile but leaves them vulnerable in melee. Light Infantry may form Line and Column of March formation. A light Infantry unit consists of two elements of two figures per element in a staggered formation.

Line Infantry Line Infantry are the core of your army. These troops hold down the opponents centre and either overpower it or hold it in place for a flanking force to deliver the coup de grace. Line Infantry are extremely versatile units with a balance of manoeuvrability, firepower and melee skill. All line Infantry can form Line, Column of March, Column of Attack and Square formation meaning they are your most flexible troops which can participate in all phases of the game. A Line Infantry unit consists of four elements of four figures each.

Example of Light Infantry: French Voltigeurs.

Example of Line Infantry: French Fusiliers in line formation

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Similar to how line infantry are able to shoot over light infantry, ranged cavalry are elevated and can shoot over all friendly infantry units. All cavalry units have the “Sound the Charge” special rule. Light Cavalry Light Cavalry are riders of exceptional prowess, trained in lightning fast manoeuvres and flank attacks. They are more lightly armed and armoured than other cavalry, but make up for it by being much faster and far more versatile then heavy cavalry. Light Cavalry can form Line and Column of March formation. • Light Cavalry use the Nimble special rule. Light Cavalry consists of two elements of two Cavalry figures each. Heavy Cavalry Intended to charge and break enemy units in melee. Heavy Cavalry is slower than light cavalry, but has higher Melee Skill, making them harder hitting and ideal for clearing away enemy units after shooting damage has been inflicted. They are rightly feared by enemy infantry, and other cavalry forces are foolish not to treat them with a degree of respect. Heavy Cavalry can form Line, Column of March, and Massed formation. • Heavy Cavalry use the Breakthrough special rule. Heavy Cavalry consists of four elements of two Cavalry figures each.

Example of Light Cavalry: Chasseurs a cheval.

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Units attacking Artillery in melee always treble their Attacks, regardless of position. Artillery units may only form Line (unlimbered) and Column of March (limbered) formation. Artillery units may only fire while unlimbered and only if they received a Halt! order that turn. All artillery units consist of four elements; for horse artillery these are a mixture of cavalry and artillery elements (see below). Artillery Precise and deadly at all ranges; Artillery can be loaded with round or canister shot. Lethal while stationary but if left behind and undefended, will be vulnerable to fast moving cavalry attacks. Artillery units were often deployed with a mix of guns. These rules make no distinction between the actual sizes of the guns; an artillery battery is simply classified as Light, Medium, Heavy, howitzer or unicorn. Horse Artillery To keep up with fast moving cavalry, horse artillery batteries put entire gun crews on horseback. The cannon used by horse artillery lack the range and firepower of other artillery pieces. This is considered unimportant; speed is all. Unlimbered Horse Artillery has two Artillery elements in the front rank and two Cavalry elements precisely behind them in a second rank. See diagram below;

Unlimbered French Artillery Battery.

Limbered Horse Artillery

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General units are the centrepiece of your army. Your Generals are represented by a single element on a 20mm round base which must include the great man himself, but may also include his body guards, messengers, observers and other hangers-on as make up his entourage. All Generals have the “Very Inspiring” and “Special Orders” special rules. Generals as game pieces Generals are different from other pieces in the game. Most stands represent a substantial body of troops. Generals represent a tiny number of individuals, some of whom may be scattered about the battle field in the role of messenger, scouts and observers. The following rules represent this; • Generals do not have flanks or rear facings. Consequently, enemies never double/triple there firepower when attacking a General.

• Generals move with a Speed of 12cm and can make any number of pivots. Generals may move At the Double! But will lose a command star for the rest of that turn. • When shooting at a General, enemies suffer an additional -1 to hit modifier. • In melee, enemies receive an additional +1 to hit modifier to their rolls.

Generals’ stats Unlike other troops Generals don’t have a value for Fire Power, Accuracy or Melee skill. Instead they have a command rating (represented by stars). Each General then receives a command radius depending on the commander’s rating thus: General’s Rank Field Marshal General Lieutenant General Major General Brigadier General Command Rating Command Radius 20 cm 18 cm 16 cm

Special Rules Very Inspiring As per the “Inspiring” Special rule, except the range is increased to the Generals Command Radius. Special Orders A General can use the Special Orders rule during his turn to bolster the army’s fighting ability. Each command rating star the General has on his profile, entitles the player to do one of the following actions for any friendly unit that is “in command”; • At the Double! During the move phase allow a unit to make an additional Advance! move. Retreat! During the move phase allow a unit to make an additional Retreat! move. On my Command, unleash hell! During the shoot or melee phases, you may modify the Firepower, Accuracy or Melee Skill value (you choose which) of a unit by +1 until the start of your next turn. Rally! Anytime during your turn, roll a number of dice equal to the current damage markers on a unit. Each dice that rolls 4+ succeeds in removing one damage marker.

14 cm • 12 cm

If any part of a friendly unit is within the command radius of the Army’s General (as measured base-to-base) then that unit is considered to be “in command”. A unit that is in command is subject to the Generals special rules. If a unit is more than the command radius from the Armies General (as measured base-to-base) then that unit is not in command. The more stars a general has, the less likely your troops will be to run away and the better they will fight.

Once used, a star is considered exhausted and may not be reused until it is replenished. All command rating stars are replenished at the start of the players next move phase. You must declare to your opponent that you are using a command star and what you are using it for, before the unit carries out the action.

Move Phase
During the Move phase of your turn, pick each of your units in turn, and give them one of the following orders: unit into contact with the enemy for hand-to-hand combat. Halt! The unit does not move at all. If To change formation, one stand of the already in melee the unit will continue unit must remain in place whilst the to fight this turn. other stands form the new formation around it. An infantry unit changing Change Facing! formation from a square into another The unit remains stationary and can formation may form up into its new pivot around its centre to face any formation facing any direction. direction. Advance! The unit can advance straight forward up to a number of centimetres equal to its Speed. At any point during this move (i.e. before or after advancing, or anywhere along its advance), the unit can make a single pivot around its centre of up to 90 degrees from its original facing and may also make a single Change Formation! (See below). Back! Only infantry units in line formation can move backwards at up to a number of centimetres equal to half its Speed. The unit remains facing the same direction that it was facing before the Back! order. At any point during this move (i.e. before or after moving backwards, or anywhere along its retrograde move), the unit can make a single pivot around its centre of up to 90 degrees from its original facing. Change formation! A unit may only make one formation change during its move phase. A unit with an Advance! order may make a formation change either before it moves or after it moves (but not both). A unit that is charging may not make a formation change. A formation change does not use any of the unit’s movement allowance and changing formation can never be used to bring a Sidestep! Only infantry units in line formation can Sidestep, that is, move sideways straight to its left or straight to its right at up to a number of centimetres equal to half its Speed. The unit remains facing the same direction that it was facing before the side-step. Sidestepping cannot be used to bring a unit into contact with the enemy for handto-hand combat March! Only units starting the Move Phase in column formation and with no enemy units within 12cm may March! The unit can advance up to triple its Speed value. Units with March orders can not shoot in the shoot phase or move within 12cm of an enemy unit. Retreat! The unit must make a single pivot around its centre of 180 degrees from its original facing, then moves 2D6 plus the unit’s Speed value; if a retreat takes the unit off the table, it is considered routed. A retreating unit may move through any area of difficult terrain or obstacle without penalty. Charge! This is by far the most exciting of orders. It is also the most complicated and so it’s described in detail below.

Charge!

A charge is the only way your units can move into contact with the enemy. A unit can charge a single enemy unit (‘the target’) as long as the following conditions are met: • The target is at least partially in your unit’s front arc; • The distance between the charging unit’s closest base and the closest point of the target unit is equal to or less than the result on a roll of 2D6 plus your unit’s Speed value; if this distance is not sufficient to reach the enemy unit, than it has made a “failed charge”. Rules for failed charges are detailed below. • There is enough space for your unit to physically move into contact with the target by moving as described below.

Moving Chargers As they move, charging units can move forward without measuring how much distance they actually cover, and pivot twice around their centre up to 90º, at any point during their move. They must, however, always use the shortest way possible, going around any blocking terrain and any unit in their way (friends and foes). Note that they must go through any area of difficult terrain or obstacle that would normally slow down their movement. These elements of terrain do not slow down Charge moves, but they cause the charging unit to suffer a slight penalty in the ensuing melee. Basically, the only thing that matters during a Charge move is that the unit has physically enough space to move into contact with the target. Once the charging unit is in contact with the target, align it with the side of the target you are charging so that it is flush with it. Finally, shuffle the

chargers sideways until their formation centre is facing directly opposite the centre of the target unit, or as close as possible to it. Flank and Rear Charges If a charging unit is mostly in the target’s front arc when the order to Charge is given, the unit must charge the target’s front facing. If a charging unit is mostly in the target’s right or left flank arc when the order to Charge is given, the unit must charge the target’s appropriate flank facing. If a charging unit is mostly in the target’s rear arc when the order to Charge is given, the unit must charge the target’s rear facing. Multiple Charges Against the Same Target If two or more of your units are able to charge the same enemy unit, they can do so, as long as they can fit. Just issue a simultaneous order to all of the units that are charging the same target. Once contact is made, any units that have

charged the same facing of the target will have to share the space available as equally as possible, so shuffle them sideways. If there isn’t enough space for all of the units to fit against the facing of the target they are charging, some of the units will not charge and must be given a different order. Remember that when charging, units don’t have to stay 1cm away from friends and enemies, and this means that sometimes a charging unit may end up in contact with both its target and one or more enemy units it has not charged (e.g. when charging a unit that is part of a tight enemy battle line). In this case, you’ll have to nudge these enemy units backwards until they are no longer touching. Failed Charge A unit that makes a failed charge moves directly towards its target a number of centimetres equal to the highest single dice rolled for the charge distance.

Unit Interpenetration Friends Friendly units can be moved through (except when charging), but you cannot end a unit’s move on top of another unit, so you’ll have to be sure that your units have enough movement to end up clear of their friends. Also, at the end of their move, your units must be at least 1cm away from friendly units. This ensures that both you and your opponent can clearly tell them apart. Enemies Enemy units, on the other hand, block movement. Your units can never approach to within 1cm of them, except when charging. Interpenetration When Pivoting In reality, regimented units are more flexible in rearranging their ranks than our miniatures, so we allow units that are pivoting around their centre as part of their move (whether it’s a Change Facing, an Advance, etc.), to move through both friends and enemy units, and all types of terrain, including blocking terrain and even the edge of the table. They must of course still end their move clear of blocking terrain (and completely on the table!), and 1cm away from both friendly and enemy units.

Terrain
Defending Obstacles Sometimes an enemy will be placed right behind an obstacle, as this makes for a strong defensive position. Your units can still charge a target behind an obstacle. Measure the distance to the obstacle rather than the target unit. Elements of terrain make your table look more impressive, but they also make the game more complex, so don’t use too much terrain in your first game. In wargames, terrain is normally made in either of two ways: single terrain pieces or areas of terrain. The rules for both are below. Before the game, it’s always a good idea to agree with your opponent how you are going to treat each of the pieces of terrain on the table. something that a man could see over and clamber across easily. Units can move over obstacles normally (even ending halfway over them), but cannot cross them while Marching. • Decorative Terrain. A unit can move over decorative terrain pieces as it pleases, ignoring them altogether and nudging them out of the way if it ends its move on top of any (but remember to put them back in their original position once the unit moves off!). This is best for small terrain pieces like small bushes or individual trees. Areas of Difficult Terrain This type of terrain consists of things like woods, farms/hamlets, crop fields, areas of broken, rocky terrain or scree, and so on. They are normally made by gluing a number of pieces of terrain onto a large base. This conveniently shows the area of the terrain – the entire area of this base counts as difficult terrain. Units can move through these areas, but every centimetre they cross counts as two centimetres.

Single Terrain Pieces These are individual pieces like a lone tree, a house, a boulder, a fence, a hedge or a wall. They will be either blocking terrain, an obstacle or decorative terrain. • Blocking Terrain. Units cannot move across blocking terrain and must go around it. We recommend treating rivers, high walls and other large pieces as blocking terrain. • Obstacles. Obstacles are long and narrow pieces of terrain, like a low wall, a fence, a hedge, a stream, etc. –

Buildings

Buildings are, without a doubt, amongst the most important pieces of terrain on a battlefield. They offer substantial protection to those inside and are a good vantage point to rain fire on the enemy. Defenders firmly ensconced in a building can only be driven out by determined assault or concentrated artillery barrage. Infantry units can occupy buildings and gain defensive bonuses against enemy shooting and melee attacks. Cavalry and artillery units may never enter a building. Occupying buildings An infantry unit may occupy an empty building if it can move into base contact with the building during the Move phase. A unit may not enter a building on the same turn in which it was ordered to “March!”. Then remove the unit from the table and mark the

building in some way as a reminder that the unit is inside. Only room for one No more than one unit may occupy a building at any time. No other unit may enter the structure unless the previous tenants have left (or been driven out). Abandoning a Building A unit can exit a building in the move phase, though not in the same turn that it entered the structure. Place the unit in any desired formation, with at least one stand touching the building. A unit may not move any further in the turn it exits the building – its far to busy reordering its battle formation. Units may not charge from buildings.

Shooting from buildings Infantry in the buildings may shoot in any direction with range measured from the wall closest to the target. All shooting is considered to be from the buildings top floor for line of site purposes. Shooting at units in buildings Enemy units may fire at the unit in a building by measuring range and line of site to any part of the building. Infantry in buildings are very well protected and are treated as being in hard cover for both ranged and melee attacks. Assaulting a building An occupied building may be assaulted by infantry units during the move phase. A charge is resolved just as if the building were the target unit. If the units charging distance is equal to or greater than the distance to the building, the charge is successful, otherwise the assaulting unit made a failed charge. The charging units are aligned against the out side of the buildings walls. We assume that the melee takes place

around the buildings doors, windows and other openings. It’s hard to maintain the impetus of a charge in such a confined area, so units assaulting a building suffer from a disrupted charge and therefore have a 1 modifier to their melee Skill on the turn they charge. Combat Resolution Combat is resolved as normal with the attacker testing the defenders morale. If the result is Steady! or Wavering! the assaulting unit may either Halt or Retreat in the next turn as usual. If the assaulting unit Halts, it remains in contact with the building and the melee continues in the next players turn and will go on until one side routes or retreats. The normal disruption or wavering rules apply. However, if the occupying unit is routed, any one of the assaulting units may immediately occupy the building. If the assaulting unit does not occupy the building it pulls back 1cm.

Hills
Few pieces of terrain are as strategically important as a hill. Whoever controls the high ground will dominate the battlefield. Hills provide a major advantage to an army, giving them an elevated firing position and forcing an opposing army to charge uphill to attack them. Hills may also conceal forces behind them, allowing a force to lay in wait behind the crest, using it for cover and firing on the attackers as they broach the hilltop. Hills and shooting Units on a hill are able to draw line of sight over other units (friends and foes) on a lower level, making hills practical vantage points for your troops to rain fire down upon you foes. Units on a hill may fire at any unit within their arc of sight and range. They are not restricted to only shooting at the closest enemy unit. Hills and Melee Units holding the high ground have a distinct advantage in melee as the enemy will tire more quickly and move more slowly when fighting up hill. While units charging down hill will gain extra momentum for the charge. Any unit whose charge began uphill from an enemy unit receives +1 to their melee skill. Any unit whose charge began downhill from an enemy unit receives -1 to their melee skill.

Shoot Phase
The effects of your armies fire power is worked out in the shoot phase. This includes units armed with Muskets, rifles as well as your long ranged artillery. Pick one of your units at a time, choose a target and let loose! If you start the Shoot phase and have not issued orders to all of your units, it is assumed that all units you have not ordered during the Move phase have been ordered to Halt. Units armed with missile weapons can shoot only once in their turn. All elements of a unit must shoot at the same target. If a unit has two or more types of ranged attacks, it can only use one per turn. Formations and Shooting Units in Column of March or Square formation (who have a ranged attack) have their firepower value reduced to 1. Melee and Shooting Units that are in base contact with enemies cannot shoot, and cannot be shot at. Disrupted Units that have just come out of melee with the enemy (i.e. had been melee in the previous turn and survived) cannot shoot or use any other form of ranged attack. This is because they still have their close combat weapons out or bayonets attached and need the rest of the Shoot phase to put them away, reload their missile weapons and recover the necessary concentration and organization that are necessary to start using their ranged attacks again. Picking a Target A unit can pick a single enemy unit as a target for its ranged attacks as long as the following conditions are met:

In its next Move phase a disrupted unit can not receive Change Formation! Or At the Double! orders.

The target is the closest, visible enemy unit at least partially in the unit’s front arc. If two of more enemy units are equally close, the player may choose which to shoot at. The distance between the base of the shooting unit and the closest point of the target is equal to or less than your unit’s weapon range. Shooting and Hitting the Target Once the target has been picked, roll a number of dice equal to the firing unit’s Fire Power value. Your unit’s dice rolls, with any modifiers that apply, must score a number equal to or higher than its Accuracy value in order to hit its target. Discard any dice that score less than that.

Firing on Flanks and Rears Being fired upon from the flank or rear is not only devastating for the amount of casualties sustained but will drain the morale of even the most elite units. Any unit fired upon from the flank or rear must take extra damage. If your unit is shooting an enemy to the flank, it doubles its Fire Power. If your unit is attacking an enemy to the rear, it trebles its Fire Power. Modifiers A number of factors can make a hit less likely to happen. The most common are: • -1 extreme range. The target is over half of the attack’s range away. • -1 soft cover. The target is in soft cover. • -2 hard cover. The target is behind hard cover or in a building. • -1 moving. The firing unit received any order other than Halt that turn. Each of these factors is deducted from the score rolled by the dice. For example, if your unit normally needs a 4+ to hit, but it’s shooting at a target in cover, you will need 5 or more to hit instead. If the target was at extreme range as well, you would need 6s. Any dice that rolls a 1 is always a miss, regardless of modifiers. However, if modifiers to the roll mean that the unit

would need more than 6 to hit, it can still shoot and will need 6 to hit, but it only rolls dice equal to half of its Fire Power (rounding down). Recording Damage For each hit, place a damage marker next to the unit. This represents physical damage and casualties as well as a decline in the unit’s morale, cohesion and its will to fight on. As the unit accumulates damage markers, it might be more convenient to record this by writing it down, or placing a die (possibly an unusual one, of a different size or colour, to avoid rolling it by mistake) next to a single damage marker behind the unit, or using some other suitable tokens. Testing Morale At the end of the Shoot phase, test the Morale of any unit you inflicted damage on in that phase. This test is described later, and will determine whether the damaged units stand, waver or route.

Melee Phase
Melee represents a combination of hand to hand fighting and extremely close ranged missile fire between your soldiers and the enemies. For the sake of playability we imagine that in your turn the impetus of the melee will be in your favour, which means that your men will be doing most of the hacking and slashing, while the enemy mostly defend themselves. If the enemy is not annihilated or routed, your men will brace themselves, for you can be sure that the enemy will fight back during their turn to avenge their fallen comrades. At this stage, there may be a number of combats on the table. Pick one of these combats and resolve it completely before moving to the next, and so on until all combats have been resolved. Who can fight? Units can fight in melee if they are in base contact with at lease one enemy unit during your melee phase, even if the bases only touch at the corner. Even units attacked in the flanks and rear may fight, although the unit is not turned to face the enemy. If a unit is touching more than one enemy it may choose which one to attack. The player may even divide a unit’s attacks to strike at multiple enemies, as long as this is made clear to your opponent before rolling to hit. Mêlée and Hitting the Target To attack a unit in melee, roll a number of dice equal to the attacking unit’s Fire Power value. Your unit’s dice rolls, with any modifiers that apply, must score a number equal to or higher than its Melee value in order to hit its • -1 disrupted charge. The chargers’ move has gone through any portion of one or more areas of difficult terrain, over an obstacle, into a defended building or any kind of cover. The disrupted charge modifier only counts on the turn that the attacking unit charged. target. Discard any dice that score less than that. Melee on Flanks and Rears If an attacking unit is on the target’s right or left flank facing, the unit must attack the target’s appropriate flank facing. If a firing unit is mostly in the target’s rear arc, the unit must fire on the target’s rear facing. Being attacked from the flank or rear is not only devastating for the amount of casualties sustained but will quickly drain the morale of even the most elite units. Any unit charged on the flank or rear must take extra damage. If your unit is attacking an enemy to the flank, it doubles its Attacks. If your unit is attacking an enemy to the rear, it trebles its Attacks. Melee modifiers The following modifiers apply to a unit’s to hit rolls: • +1 Column of Attack. The attacking unit is in column of attack formation. • +1 Charge from high ground. The unit charged down hill. Bonus only applies on the turn that the unit charged.

• -1 Target on High Ground. The unit charged uphill or an elevated position. This modifier only applies for the turn the unit charged into melee. Testing Morale At the end of each individual combat, test the Morale of the enemy unit regardless of wether you inflicted damage or not. This test is described later, and will determine whether the damaged units stand, waver or route. Target Destroyed –Regroup If your unit(s) managed to rout the target, it can do one of the following: • stay where it is and pivot around its centre to face any direction (as per a Change Facing order). • move directly forward D6cm, it must move the full distance rolled but must not contact another enemy unit. • move directly backwards D3cm (with the same restrictions).

Target Remains – Fight on If, on the other hand, your unit(s) did not manage to rout their enemies, the units remain in contact so the melee will continue in the next players turn and will go on until one side routes or retreats. Halt! Or Retreat! In subsequent turns, any non charging units already in melee may only receive orders to Halt! or to Retreat! A Halt! Order is used when you want your units to remain in melee and continue to fight on. A Retreat! Order is used to disengage your units from melee. Both your units and the enemies will be disrupted after a retreat from melee. As a unit accumulates damage, it will become more and more likely to lose combat, until eventually it will turn tail and run from the field, never to return. Also remember to make the melee modifiers work for you!

Morale
As a unit accumulates damage, it will become more and more likely to lose cohesion, until eventually it will turn tail and run from the field, never to return. When to Test • At the end of the Shoot phase of your turn - test the Morale of any enemy unit you inflicted damage upon during that phase. • In the Melee phase - test immediately at the end of each combat. • When an enemy unit is subject to Panic! See below. Panic! Battles are usually won or lost when an Army panics and flees, even though it has not been beaten in combat. Troops who see their comrades’ rout or their Army’s General slain can easily loose their nerve and flee themselves; causing other troops to lose heart until soon the whole army is routed in blind panic as rumour of defeat spreads across the battlefield like wildfire. A unit must be tested for panic in the following circumstances; • When an enemy unit routes – immediately test all other enemy units within 12cm of the routed unit. • Enemy General is routed – all enemy units within their Generals command radius must immediately test their morale. Note that there are three circumstances under which a unit does not have to take a Panic test. • A unit does not take a panic test if it is already in Melee – the immediate threat blots out all other events going on around them. • A unit does not take a panic test if it is already Wavering – fear has already taken these soldiers, the prospect of further jeopardy does not accelerate their flight. • A unit does not take a panic test if it has already passed one earlier in that phase (Shoot or Melee) even if there are multiple reasons to test for Panic. How to Test Each unit has two numbers under its Morale value. The first number is the unit’s Wavering limit; the second number is its Routing limit. Units with a”-“instead of a wavering limit cannot be wavered. To test the Nerve of an enemy unit, roll 2D6 and add to the result the current damage points on the unit. This is the total you’re using to ‘attack’ the enemy unit’s Morale. This total is then compared with the Morale value of the enemy unit. • If the total is equal to or higher than the unit’s Routing limit, the unit suffers a Rout (see below). • If the total is lower than the Routing limit, but equal to or higher than the Wavering limit, the unit suffers from a Wavering result (see below). • If the total is lower than the unit’s Wavering limit, then the unit is said to be Steady, which means it is completely unaffected and continues to fight on as normal.

Steady! The unit continues to fight normally and does not suffer any negative effects. Remember however that units with ranged attacks, will usually be disrupted by being engaged in close combat and will not be able to use their ranged attacks in their next turn. You may want to mark these units with a ″disrupted″ marker. Wavering! The unit continues to fight, but is severely disordered. In its next Move phase, it can only be given one of the following orders: Halt! Change Facing! or Retreat! In addition, the unit is so disrupted that it will not be able to shoot in its next Shoot phase. It is normally a good idea to mark Wavering units with a marker of some kind (like a bit of cotton wool).

Rout! The unit routs off the field, is butchered to a man, or surrenders to the enemy and is taken prisoner – in any case, as far as this game is concerned, it is destroyed. Remove it.

Exceptional Results Double Six – We Are Doomed! If you roll double six when testing Nerve the unit is always routed regardless of nerve value, as insidious news of defeat start to spread through the ranks. Hold Your Ground! If you roll snake eyes (double ones) when testing Nerve, the enemy is filled with implacable resolve and will always be Steady and fight on, regardless of any modifier.

Special rules
Some units, or even entire armies, possess what we call ‘special rules’. Each of these special rules is an exception to the normal rules. The most common are listed below. Blast (Dn) This rule is used for all weapons that explode on impact with the target or otherwise inflict massive amounts of damage with a single hit. If the unit’s ranged attack hits the target, roll a die as indicated in the bracket and multiply the hit by the result of the die. For example, if a unit suffers a hit from a Blast (D6) ranged attack, it will suffer from one to six hits rather than a single one. Brave These soldiers are elite veterans who are utterly fearless and will neve give up a battle, no matter how hopeless the situation. A unit with the brave special rule passes all panic tests automatically. Breakthrough Experts at mêlée combat whos role are to penetrate through enemy lines in a decisive blow. If the unit managed to rout its target in melee, it can move directly forward 2D6cm (instead of the normal D6cm); also, it may make contact with another enemy unit, and if so will immediately engage in another round of melee, as if it has charged. Canister Instead of normal shot, cannons can be loaded with canister shot which allows them to be fired against enemies nearby like a massive shotgun. The unit may either fire normally or fire Canister shot. Canister shot has a range of 12cm, roll to hit as normal, then pair the missed dice so the sum of the pairs equals or exceeds the value required for a hit. For example, An Artillery battery (Firepower of 4) fires canister at an approaching enemy and rolls 5, 4, 3 and a 2. The batteries Accuracy is 5+ so the roll of 5 is a hit. The canister rule allows the 2 and 3 (or 4) to be added together to make a 5 (or 6 or 7), so another hit, for a total of 2 hits. The roll of remaining dice is a miss. Elite(n) Troops with this rule are supremely skilled – true masters of the art of war. Whenever the unit rolls to hit, it can reroll up to n failed to hit dice. Fear These soldiers prowess is worldrenowned and the mere presence of these men on the battlefield can strike fear into the hearts of their enemies. All enemy units within 12cm of this unit re-roll all Steady results for Morale tests. The second result stands. Units subject to both Fear and Inspiring use the result of the first Morale test and do not re-roll. Headstrong Whenever the unit begins a turn Wavering, it rolls a die. On a 4+ it shrugs off the effects of Wavering and can act normally that turn.

Indirect The unit fires its shots in high arcing trajectories, which means that the distance to the target is pretty much irrelevant and that most cover is pretty much useless. The unit may fire indirectly, which means it may shoot at a target it cannot see. Indirect weapons are able to shoot in an arc, over obstacles and other troops, but incur a further -1 to hit modifier. In addition the shots never count as flank or rear attacks. Inspiring The bravery of a heroic general, or the presence of a renowned friendly unit, can convince warriors to stand their ground a little longer. If this unit, or any friendly unit within 12cm of this unit, is Routed, the opponent must re-roll that Morale test. The second result stands. Militia Militia are poorly equipped and trained; rarely expected to be sent into battle. If they do find themselves on a battlefield, they should be expected to run away, and not handle their weaponry with great proficiency. Militia may appear useless, then, but they are cheap. Militia units may not form square. Nimble Used by lightly armed units like light cavalry, this rule makes the unit considerably more manoeuvrable. The unit can make a single extra pivot of up to 90 degrees around its centre at any point during its movement, even while charging.

Piercing This rule is used for all ranged attacks that can penetrate cover with ease. All shooting hits inflicted by the unit are so powerful that they can punch their way through cover easily, so they never suffer the -1 penalty for soft cover on their rolls to hit. They also suffer a -1 rather than -2 to hit when shooting at targets in hard cover. Skirmish Fast and agile, these men are experts in using every scrap of cover and every fold in the landscape to hide. This makes them hard to spot and worse, hard to kill. Their range and accuracy are exemplary, but they lack the skills necessary for close combat. Skirmishing units move as normal but are allowed to pivot as many times as they want during an Advance move. Skirmishers move through area terrain as though its open ground. Enemies shooting at skirmishers receive an additional -1 to hit modifier. Skirmishers can be seen through and shot through by friendly troops. Enemies attacking skirmishing troops in melee receive an additional +1 to hit modifier. Sound the Charge The speed of a cavalry charge is its main defence against the enemy fire and increases the shock value in combat. When charging units with this special rule roll 3D6, discard the lowest result, and add this result to their speed value.

Choosing your Army
Each nation has its own army list with all the rules and characteristics needed to forge your miniatures into a mighty fighting force. Cost Every unit has been assigned a “Cost” value, which reflects a units worth within its army. Generally, the higher the Cost, the better the unit will be. By adding the cost of all the units you have selected together, you can find out the total cost of your army. Knowing the total cost of your army is important, as it give you a way of reckoning your army’s effectiveness. To play a game, you and your opponent will need to decide the size of battle to fight. The larger the battle, the larger the total cost of the armies involved. For the sake of balance, most games will take place between armies of an equal total cost. However, your games don’t have to be balanced; you don’t have to have an equal total cost on both sides. It allows you to tweak your games to enact a famous last stand of a hopelessly outnumbered defender, a charge of ‘light brigade’ proportions, re-fight an historic battle or to simply impose a handicap on a more experienced opponent. Size of Game What total cost you and your opponent decide on will depend upon how long you want the game to take. At a total cost of up to 250 points per side you will have enough units for a Brigade sized battle which will be competed in less that an hour. 500 points would be a divisional sized battle, which will take 1-2 hours, A Corps sized battle (over 1,000 point and up to 2,000 points) will probably last most of an evening. Anything over 2,000 points (multiple Corps) may take most of a day to complete. Restrictions There are no restrictions to the type and combinations of units you can include in your army. However, this can sometime lead to unbalanced armies that may get in the way of a fun game. Therefore players can impose any army restrictions they see fit. i.e. you might think Artillery units are over powered and therefore impose a maximum of 2 artillery units for each army.

Fighting a Battle
In the course of the Napoleonic wars many battles were fought. Wether by chance or design no two battles were ever the same. Each General tried to outwit his enemies in strategy, by leading his army by devious routes to cut off the enemy’s lines of supply and communication, or luring him into unfavourable positions. By following the 7 steps below, you can randomly build a battle of evenly matched armies where the situation gives neither side a particular advantage.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Set up Battlefield Roll for Battle Dice off for defender and attacker Roll for Victory conditions Roll for deployment Deploy armies Fight the Battle
fords, bridges crossings such Borodino. and other water as the battle of

1. Set up Battlefield Now that you have selected your armies, the next thing to do is set up a suitable battlefield. A battlefield could be as simple as draping a green cloth of your dinning table to a fully sculpted purpose built gaming table. However battlefields are never wide open flat plains, so you will want to add scenery. A Napoleonic battle could happen anywhere, on the edge of a town such as Austerlitz or Waterloo, on the treacherous and frozen slopes of a mountain pass such as the battle of Rivoli or an assault over a river with 2. Roll for Battle There are two ways to determine which type of battle to fight. The first is to pick randomly, by rolling a D6 and consulting the table below; 1-2 3-4 5-6 Pitched Battle Surprise Attack Flank Attack

Players set up scenery in a mutually agreeable manner. There are no hard and fast rules about how you set up the battlefield. Remember that the objective of setting up a battlefield is to provide an interesting and entertaining battle, not to impede movement to the point where armies are unable to get to grips.

The second method is to discuss the matter with your opponent and agree which battle you want to fight. Each battle is described below. The details of battlefield layout including army deployment areas are detailed using a battle map.

Pitched Battle In a pitched battle both Generals have decided to confront each other at this disputed piece of terrain. Both armies are fully prepared for battle and there is still plenty of time to manoeuvre units into an unyielding battleline before the battle starts.

Attackers Deployment Zone

60cm

Defenders Deployment Zone

Surprise Attack In a surprise attack the attacking army has been able to move deep into the defenders territory without detection. Luckily for the defending General, his army occupy tactically advantageous ground. Each army has prepared a devastating surprise attack giving each other little time to respond.

Attackers Deployment Zone

24cm

Defenders Deployment Zone

Flank Attack The attacking force has used speed and manoeuvrability to out flank the defenders position. The attackers are attempting to surround the defenders and annihilate them, while the defender must quickly react and counter attack their enemies own exposed flanks.

Attackers Deployment Zone

Defenders Deployment Zone

3. Dice off for Attacker and Defender Both players roll a D6, The highest scoring player decides whether he will be the attacker or the defender. There are advantages to either defending or attacking. The defender has the choice of the best ground to deploy his army, where the attacker

holds the initiative during the opening phases of the battle. The defender always chooses which deployment zone he will deploy his army. The attacker always decides which player will take the first turn of the game.

4. Roll for victory conditions There are many ways to determine the victor of a battle, was it the General who captured and held all his objectives, the army who annulated the opposition or was it the force that out fought their opponents before night fall called an end to hostilities. There are two ways to determine what the victory condition of your battle will be. The first is to pick randomly, by

rolling a D6 and consulting the table below; 1-2 3-4 5-6 Victory Points Objectives Eagles and Colours

The second method is to discuss the matter with your opponent and agree which battle you want to fight. Each victory condition is described below.

Victory Points Unless one player concedes beforehand • You receive a number of victory the winner is the player who has points equal to half the point’s value accumulated the most victory points at (rounding up) of each enemy unit the end of the game. Victory points are wavering at the end of the game. scored as follows; • If you routed the enemy general you • You receive a number of victory receive 100 victory points in addition points equal to the points’ value of to the victory points scored for his each enemy unit you have routed. point’s value. Objectives Each player has two objective markers Unless one player concedes beforehand which they place on the battlefield the winner is the player who has before they deploy their army but after captured the most objectives at the end the attacker and defender have been of the game. An objective is captured determined. The players must place by the closest non wavering unit within one of their objectives in their 12cm of the objective. If it is unclear deployment zone and the other in the which of two opposing units has “no mans land” area of the battlefield captured an objective, then that (i.e. not in theirs or the opponents objective is considered contested and deployment zones). It is encouraged neither side can claim it. that the objectives are placed on key terrain features such as a building, In the event of both players having an bridge or hill ect and not in the middle equal number of objectives, use victory of an open field which has no tactical points to determine the winner. importance.

Eagles and Colours Unless one player concedes beforehand units in the army plus two for the the winner is the player who breaks the army’s general. enemy army first. An army breaks as soon as its courage value equals its For example, an army with five line break point. infantry units (5 courage points) and a general (2 courage points) has a An army’s break point is equal to a starting courage value of 7and a break quarter of its starting courage value point of 2, meaning it will break once (rounding up). its courage value is reduced to 2. An army’s courage value is equal to the current number of line infantry 5. Roll for deployment There are two ways to determine the method the players will deploy their armies for battle. The first is to pick randomly, by rolling a D6 and consulting the table below; 1-2 Meeting Engagement 3-4 Hidden dispositions 5-6 Escalating Engagement

The second method is to discuss the matter with your opponent and agree which deployment method you want to use. Each deployment method is described below.

Meeting Engagement You have encountered the enemy as Starting with the defender, players take they are deploying for battle, however it in turns to deploy a single unit at a there is still enough time to deploy and time in their deployment zones. prepare your own forces before the enemy can initiate hostilities. Hidden dispositions Conditions have made scouting the battlefield. Both players deploy impossible; however the enemy’s their entire army out of sight of the battlefield intelligence is as bad as enemy behind the screen. Once yours. deployment is complete the screen is removed to reveal both armies. In order to keep deployment a secret, a screen is erected across the centre of Escalating Engagement Your forces are dispersed across the does the same. The players start the country side with your fast cavalry and game with the attacker deciding who skirmishers scouting for the enemies must play the first turn. location. As soon as they are sighted your forces are to converge and engage From the start of each players second them. turn, the players must roll a D6 for each non deployed unit. On a 4+ that The defender deploys all of his fast unit must move onto the battlefield cavalry and light infantry units within from any table edge within the players’ his deployment zone. Then the attacker deployment zone.

6. Deploy Armies Now, that both armies have been chosen and the battlefield has been set up, its time to put your forces on the table. The defending player must always deploy first (except for when Hidden dispositions is being used). The 7. Fight the Battle First turn Once deployment has finished, the attacking player determines who will play the first turn. There are advantages to going first, being the first to inflict damage on the enemy and capturing key terrain unopposed. Game Length Unless one player concedes or his army breaks beforehand, the battle will last for 12 turns, at the end of which

defender places his units or unit into his chosen deployment zone, then the attacker places his unit/s in the opposite deployment zone. Continue deploying both armies until the deployment instructions have been satisfied.

However, going second also has advantages, being able to react to your opponents’ manoeuvrers and using the last turn of the game to take objectives from the enemy who will not be able to fight back.

the winner is determined by the victory conditions chosen for the battle.

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Francis I is the first Hapsburg monarch to use the title Emperor of Austria. His ancient possessions in the Holy Roman Empire have been largely stripped away by a series of military disasters inflicted by the "Emperor" Napoleon. The old Empire is no more. In Italy and Germany, General Bonaparte personally oversaw military campaigns that broke Austrian Hapsburg dominance. Despite a relatively generous peace settlement in 1801, the Hapsburg throne lost too much. France remains a threat: it is unlikely that Napoleon can ever let matters rest as they are now. His legitimacy as a ruler is bought and paid for in military glory, and that cannot be won in times of peace. His attitude towards other nations is tinged with contempt at best, and hostility at worst. Austria, then,

has to choose sides. Fortunately, there are potential allies in the Russians and the British. Indeed, the British may be ideal allies, for they are likely to want the return of Hanover, thus weakening Prussian power within Germany. They also have an exceptionally large amount of money to help finance their continental allies. The Russians will expect to be compensated for any efforts against Napoleon by Polish territory, but Austria can put up with such an arrangement. The difficulty may lie in coming to an arrangement with Prussia: can Germany be divided equably? But there is much to be gained by finding allies: Austria needs help if she is to regain the lost lands of Italy and, finally, remove the revolutionary threat that is France.

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Name Brigadier General 1 Major General 1 Lieutenant General 1 General 1 Field Marshal 1 Size Special rules Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Command Radius 12 cm Morale 8/10 Cost 36 Pts

14 cm

9/11

98 Pts

16 cm

10/12

192 Pts

18 cm

11/13

324 Pts

20 cm

12/14

498 Pts

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Name German Fusiliers Hungarian Fusiliers Size 4 Speed 5 Range 24 Firepower 4 Accuracy 5+ Melee 6+ Morale 10/12 Special rules Cost 39 4 5 24 4 5+ 5+ 10/12 46

German Grenadiers

4

5

24

4

5+

5+

10/12

Headstrong Elite(1) Brave Elite(1)

55

Hungarian Grenadiers

4

4

24

4

5+

5+

-/12

69

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Name Grenzers Landesschutzen 2 Jaegers 2 Windbüchse Jaegers 6 30 2 4+ 6+ 8/10 6 30 2 4+ 6+ 8/10 Skirmish Skirmish Headstrong Skirmish Elite(1) 39 Size 2 Speed 6 Range 27 Firepower 2 Accuracy 5+ Melee 6+ Morale 8/10 Special rules Skirmish Cost 33

60

2

6

30

3

4+

6+

-/10

71

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Name Uhlans 2 Dragoons 2 Hussars 2 12 2 5+ 8/10 12 12 2 5+ 5+ 8/10 12 2 4+ 8/10 Size Speed Range Firepower Accuracy Melee Morale Special rules Nimble Elite(1) Sound the Charge Nimble Elite(1) Sound the Charge Nimble Headstrong Elite(1) Sound the Charge Brave Nimble Elite(1) Sound the Charge Cost 42

44

49

1st Hussars 2 12 2 4+ -/10

60

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Name Cuirassiers Size 4 Chevauxléger 4 10 4 6+ 10/12 Speed 10 Range Firepower 4 Accuracy Melee 5+ Morale 10/12 Special rules Breakthrough Sound the Charge Breakthrough Nimble Sound the Charge Cost 42 49

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Name Light Artillery 7 Inch Howitzer Size 4 Speed 5 Range 36 Firepower 4 Accuracy 5+ Melee Morale 8/10 Special rules Canister Piercing Canister Indirect Blast(D3) Canister Piercing Canister Indirect Blast(D6) Cost 35 4 5 36 4 5+ 8/10 69

Heavy Artillery

4

5

60

4

5+

-

8/10

74

Experimental Howitzer

4

5

36

4

5+

-

8/10

91

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Napoleon Bonaparte, born in 1769, to a minor Corsican noble family. Educated at royal military schools and commissioned into the artillery. His military talents amounted to genius but it was the Revolution that offered him the opportunity to rise to high command in his twenties. His political connections placed him in charge of the artillery during the siege of Toulon, where he not only commanded the artillery but personally led the assault on the earthworks guarding the city. Praised by the revolutionary government for him actions, he was raised from captain to brigadier general. On 5 October 1795, an armed uprising threatened the newly installed Directoire; General Bonaparte was put in charge of 5,000 troops to defend the government. Deploying artillery, he smashed the insurgents. The Directors thanked him with promotion to general of division and appointed him generalin-chief of the Army of Italy, a few nearmutinous and starving divisions in the Ligurian Alps. This command became the crucial opportunity in Napoleon's meteoric ascent. In Italy he revealed the characteristics of his way of war,

self-confident and mobile. He transformed what had been intended as a secondary theatre into a primary one, defeating the Austrians in Italy and in the following year compelling Austria to make peace. Bonaparte's return as an acclaimed conquering hero frightened the weak Directoire. In 1798, Austria and Russia with support from Britain; formed a coalition to attempt to roll back Frances military conquests. Refusing command of an army to invade England Napoleon led an expedition to Egypt to attack Britain's trade and possessions in India. He returned in 1799 and took personal command of the army in Italy where he defeated the Austrian. Later that year he staged a coup d’etat and installed himself as First Consul and in 1804 crowned himself emperor. But by crowning himself Emperor, Napoleon has provoked Russia and Austria, who are prepared to march on Paris from the East. Realising the British will keep on supporting coalitions against France, Napoleon decides to tackle the problem at it root. The famous Grande Armee, now in it prime, is prepared to set sail to invade England at any time.

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Name Brigadier General 1 Major General 1 Lieutenant General 1 General 1 Field Marshal 1 Size Special rules Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Command Radius 12 cm Morale 8/10 Cost 36 Pts

14 cm

9/11

98 Pts

16 cm

10/12

192 Pts

18 cm

11/13

324 Pts

20 cm

12/14

498 Pts

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Name National Guard Fusiliers Size 4 4 Grenadiers 4 Old Guard 4 5 24 4 4+ 5+ -/13 5 24 4 5+ 5+ 10/12 Headstrong Elite(1) Inspiring Fear Brave 49 Speed 5 5 Range 24 24 Firepower 4 4 Accuracy 6+ 5+ Melee 6+ 6+ Morale 9/11 10/12 Special rules Militia Cost 25 39

95

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Name Chasseurs Voltigeurs Size 2 2 Tirailleurs 2 Voltigeurs of the Guard 6 27 2 4+ 6+ 8/10 Speed 6 6 Range 27 27 Firepower 2 2 Accuracy 5+ 4+ Melee 6+ 6+ Morale 8/10 8/10 Special rules Skirmish Skirmish Skirmish Elite(1) Cost 33 37

41

2

6

27

2

4+

6+

-/10

Skirmish Elite(1)

59

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Name Chasseurs a Cheval Lancers 2 Hussars 2 Dragoons 2 12 12 2 5+ 5+ 8/10 12 2 5+ 8/10 12 2 4+ 8/10 Size Speed Range Firepower Accuracy Melee Morale 2 12 2 5+ 8/10 Special rules Nimble Sound the Charge Nimble Elite(1) Sound the Charge Nimble Headstrong Sound the Charge Nimble Elite(1) Sound the Charge Cost 39

42

47

64

[xtäç VtätÄÜç VtätÄÜç
Name Cuirassiers Carbiniers a Cheval Size 4 Speed 10 Range Firepower 4 Accuracy Melee 5+ Morale 10/12 Special rules Breakthrough Elite(1) Sound the Charge Breakthrough Elite(2) Sound the Charge Breakthrough Elite(1) Inspiring Sound the Charge Brave Breakthrough Inspiring Elite(1) Sound the Charge Cost 44

4

10

-

4

-

5+

10/12

46

Guard Lancers 4 10 4 4+ 10/12

61

Empress Dragoons 4 10 4 5+ -/12

66

TÜà|ÄÄxÜç
Name Medium Artillery 6 Inch Howitzer Size Speed Range Firepower Accuracy Melee Morale 4 5 48 4 5+ 8/10 Special rules Canister Piercing Elite(1) Canister Indirect Blast(D3) Elite(1) Canister Piercing Elite(1) Canister Piercing Inspiring Elite(1) Cost 59

4

5

36

4

5+

-

8/10

74

Heavy Artillery

4

4

60

4

5+

-

8/10

85

Artillerie a Pied

4

5

60

4

4+

-

-/10

177

[ÉÜáx TÜà|ÄÄxÜç
Name Horse Artillery Artillerie a Cheval Size Speed Range Firepower Accuracy Melee Morale 2/2 10 36 2 5+ 8/10 Special rules Canister Piercing Elite(1) Canister Piercing Inspiring Elite(1) Cost 36

2/2

10

36

2

4+

-

-/10

61

ZÜxtà UÜ|àt|Ç

Great Britain is a constitutional monarchy, a nation of free trade and personal liberty. Its people are seemingly devoted to making money and disliking foreigners in equal measure. Foreigners are, quite simply, just not very good at anything, be that running an empire or making a decent pie. Britons make no secret of their prejudice, a crass attitude that makes diplomacy difficult. The "English" as, much to the annoyance of the Scots, everyone calls them, are disliked in every court in Europe for this arrogance and their willingness to let everyone else do all the fighting and dying against the French. The apparent truth of this last point has been a gift to Bonaparte. If the British do have a truly visceral dislike, then it would be the French, thanks to traditional rivalry and a genuine horror at the consequences of the French Revolution. While many British politicians were pleased to see an end to the Bourbon monarchy, they were repulsed by the insatiable bloodshed of the Terror, and fearful that the infection of

revolution might cross the English Channel, with or without French bayonets to help it along. Invasion is a constant fear and, as always, an enemy in control of the Low Countries is enough to scare London. France also threatens British trade and commerce with the rest of Europe; which must be protected at all costs. Britain's position in 1805 is better than might be expected, but not due to its own efforts: Napoleon has managed to upset almost every other nation in Europe with his highhandedness. This is an opportunity for the British to build a new alliance, although this will mean paying handsome subsidies to its partners. As long as the Royal Navy can keep control of the seas, Britain is safe from invasion, but without a substantial army and continental allies this counts for little against France. Britain can contribute to the downfall of France, but needs time and resolve to muster its strength. Napoleon may not grant that time.

ZxÇxÜtÄá
Name Brigadier General 1 Major General 1 Lieutenant General 1 General 1 Field Marshal 1 Size Special rules Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Command Radius 12 cm Morale 8/10 Cost 36 Pts

14 cm

9/11

98 Pts

16 cm

10/12

192 Pts

18 cm

11/13

324 Pts

20 cm

12/14

498 Pts

_|Çx \ÇytÇàÜç
Name Fencibles Foot Size 4 4 Highlander Foot Speed 5 5 Range 24 24 Firepower 4 4 Accuracy 6+ 5+ Melee 6+ 6+ Morale 9/11 10/12 Special rules Militia Elite(1) Brave Headstrong Elite(1) Brave Elite(2) Inspiring Cost 25 43

4

5

24

4

5+

5+

10/12

55

Foot Guard

4

5

24

4

4+

5+

-/12

101

_|z{à \ÇytÇàÜç
Name Light Foot KG Legion Light Foot Size 2 2 Speed 6 6 Range 27 27 Firepower 2 2 Accuracy 5+ 4+ Melee 6+ 6+ Morale 8/10 8/10 Special rules Skirmish Skirmish Cost 33 37

Rifles 2 95 Rifles “Green Jackets” 6 30 2 4+ 6+ 8/10 Skirmish 39

2

6

30

2

4+

6+

-/10

Skirmish Elite(1)

61

_|z{à VtätÄÜç
Name Light Dragoons Kings German Legion Light Dragoons
th

Size

Speed

Range

Firepower

Accuracy

Melee

Morale

2

12

12

2

5+

6+

8/10

Special rules Nimble Sound the Charge

Cost

40

2

12

12

2

5+

5+

8/10

Nimble Sound the Charge

42

15 Hussars
th

2

12

-

2

-

5+

8/10

Nimble Headstrong Sound the Charge Nimble Sound the Charge

47

10 Hussars

2

12

-

2

-

4+

-/10

58

[xtäç VtätÄÜç
Name Heavy Dragoons Dragoon Guards Size 4 Speed 10 Range 12 Firepower 4 Accuracy 5+ Melee 6+ Morale 10/12 Special rules Breakthrough Sound the Charge Breakthrough Sound the Charge Breakthrough Sound the Charge Breakthrough Inspiring Sound the Charge Cost 44 4 10 12 4 5+ 5+ 10/12 51

Royal Scots Greys

4

10

12

4

4+

5+

10/12

55

Horse Guards

4

10

-

4

-

5+

10/12

59

TÜà|ÄÄxÜç
Name Light Artillery Medium Artillery Size 4 Speed 5 Range 36 Firepower 4 Accuracy 5+ Melee Morale 8/10 Special rules Canister Piercing Canister Piercing Canister Indirect Blast(D3) Indirect Blast(D6) Cost 35 4 5 48 4 5+ 8/10 52

Howitzer 4 Rocket Battery 4 36 4 5+ 8/10

79

4

5

48

4

6+

-

8/10

92

[ÉÜáx TÜà|ÄÄxÜç
Name Horse Artillery Size 2/2 Speed 10 Range 36 Firepower 2 Accuracy 5+ Melee Morale 8/10 Special rules Canister Piercing Cost 33

cÜâáá|tÇ TÜÅç

Prussia has a proud military heritage: what else could be the case for the nation of Frederick the Great? The country has been at peace for ten years, the result of getting a free hand in northern Germany east of the Rhine in exchange for recognising French control west of the Rhine. Political realities have to be recognised. Napoleon, however, is not an easy neighbour to endure. His ambitions are seemingly limitless, his army is growing every day, and he is in need of new victories to add lustre and legitimacy to his crown. It may only be a matter of time before he once again looks to secure the borders of France through war. Perhaps, though, he can be persuaded to go

south, against Austria, even if that only leaves a stronger France to face at a later date. There are allies available, if the Prussians can stomach them. The British are condescending and unwilling to fight on land, but they have the wealth needed to finance a war. The Russians and Austrians may be willing to help bring down the upstart empire of Napoleon, even as they will do their best to hamper Prussian ambitions. Neither the Austrians nor the Russians have any wish to see Germany or Poland dominated by Prussia, even as they prepare for war against France. Such then, is the situation facing Frederick William III. Danger and opportunity wait.

ZxÇxÜtÄá
Name Brigadier General 1 Major General 1 Lieutenant General 1 General 1 Field Marshal 1 Size Special rules Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Command Radius 12 cm Morale 8/10 Cost 36 Pts

14 cm

9/11

98 Pts

16 cm

10/12

192 Pts

18 cm

11/13

324 Pts

20 cm

12/14

498 Pts

_|Çx \ÇytÇàÜç
Name Landwehr Musketeers Size 4 4 Grenadiers 4 Foot Guard 4 5 24 4 4+ 5+ -/12 5 24 4 5+ 5+ 10/12 Speed 5 5 Range 24 24 Firepower 4 4 Accuracy 6+ 5+ Melee 6+ 5+ Morale 9/11 10/12 Special rules Militia Headstrong Elite(1) Brave Inspiring Elite(1) Cost 25 46

55

80

_|z{à \ÇytÇàÜç
Name Jaegers 2 Silesian Schuetzen 6 30 2 4+ 6+ 8/10 Skirmish Skirmish Elite(1) 39 Size Speed Range Firepower Accuracy Melee Morale Special rules Cost

2

6

30

2

4+

6+

8/10

43

Prussian Fusiliers

4

6

27

4

5+

6+

9/11

Skirmish militia

54

Fusiliers are an elite light infantry unit, able to form a firing line or skirmish as required.

_|z{à VtätÄÜç
Name Lancers Brandenburg Uhlans Size 2 Speed 12 Range Firepower 2 Accuracy Melee 4+ Morale 8/10 Special rules Nimble Nimble Elite(1) Nimble Headstrong Cost 41 2 12 2 4+ 8/10 42

Hussars 2 12 2 5+ 8/10

47

[xtäç VtätÄÜç
Name Cuirassiers Life Hussars Size 4 4 Towarczys 4 Dragoons 4 10 12 4 5+ 5+ 10/12 Breakthrough 51 10 4 4+ 10/12 Breakthrough 51 Speed 10 10 Range Firepower 4 4 Accuracy Melee 5+ 5+ Morale 10/12 10/12 Special rules Breakthrough Breakthrough Elite(1) Cost 42 44

TÜà|ÄÄxÜç
Name Light Artillery 7 Inch Howitzer Size 4 Speed 5 Range 36 Firepower 4 Accuracy 5+ Melee Morale 8/10 Special rules Canister Piercing Canister Indirect Blast(D3) Canister Piercing Canister Indirect Blast(D6) Cost 35 4 5 36 4 5+ 8/10 69

Heavy Artillery

4

5

60

4

5+

-

8/10

74

Experimental Howitzer

4

5

36

4

5+

-

8/10

91

[ÉÜáx TÜà|ÄÄxÜç
Name Horse Artillery Size 2/2 Speed 10 Range 36 Firepower 2 Accuracy 5+ Melee Morale 8/10 Special rules Canister Piercing Cost 33

eâáá|t

Russia is a giant, if it can be mobilised to face the deadly danger to peace that is Napoleon Bonaparte. It is also a nation that is recovering from the assassination of the reforming Tsar Paul in 1801, a man who was too interested in reform to be left on the throne. Rumour has it that Tsar Alexander was complicit, at the very least, in his father's death. Paul had taken Russia to war against revolutionary France. Now Alexander is beginning to realise that a French, or rather, Napoleonic hunger for victories will drag Russia into war once again. If Russia is to be seen as a major power in Europe, she must behave as a major power, or accept French domination of Europe.

This is why Russia now contemplates war against France again. There may be incidental gains to be made in Poland and Prussiandominated Germany, but the threat of the new French Empire is real. Napoleon has set himself up as the equal of the Tsar, and that is an implicit challenge. There are potential allies and some, like the English, have very large treasuries. Russian soldiers may be rough and ready, but her generals are cunning commanders. Russia also has the advantage of time and space, should a war go badly. No invader from the west can comprehend the emptiness of the steppes, deal with the vast distances of Russia, or survive the merciless campaigns of "General Winter".

ZxÇxÜtÄá ZxÇxÜtÄá
Name Brigadier General 1 Major General 1 Lieutenant General 1 General 1 Field Marshal 1 Size Special rules Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Special Orders Very Inspiring Command Radius 12 cm Morale 8/10 Cost 36 Pts

14 cm

9/11

98 Pts

16 cm

10/12

192 Pts

18 cm

11/13

324 Pts

20 cm

12/14

498 Pts

_|Çx \ÇytÇàÜç
Name Opelchenie Musketeers Size 4 4 Grenadiers 4 Lifeguard 4 5 24 4 4+ 5+ -/12 5 24 4 5+ 5+ 10/12 Speed 5 5 Range 24 24 Firepower 4 4 Accuracy 6+ 5+ Melee 6+ 5+ Morale 9/11 10/12 Special rules Militia Headstrong Elite(1) Brave Inspiring Elite(1) Cost 24 46

55

80

_|z{à \ÇytÇàÜç
Name Russian Jaegers 17th Jaeger Regiment
th

Size 2

Speed 6

Range 30

Firepower 2

Accuracy 5+

Melee 6+

Morale 8/10

Special rules Skirmish

Cost 34

4

6

27

4

5+

6+

9/11

Skirmish Militia

54

17 Jaegers are an elite light infantry unit, able to form a firing line or skirmish as required.

_|z{à VtätÄÜç
Name Cossack Cavalry Uhlans 2 Hussars 2 42Mounted Rifles 12 2 5+ 8/10 12 2 4+ 8/10 Size Speed Range Firepower Accuracy Melee Morale 2 12 2 5+ 8/10 Special rules Nimble Sound the Charge Nimble Sound the Charge Nimble Headstrong Sound the Charge Nimble Sound the Charge Cost 39

41

47

2

12

30

2

4+

6+

8/10

49

[xtäç VtätÄÜç
Name Pavlograd Hussars Dragoons Size 4 4 Cuirassiers 4 Chevaliers Garde 10 4 4+ 10/12 Breakthrough Breakthrough Elite(1) Inspiring 49 Speed 10 10 Range 12 Firepower 4 4 Accuracy 5+ Melee 5+ 6+ Morale 10/12 10/12 Special rules Breakthrough Breakthrough Cost 42 44

4

10

-

4

-

5+

-/12

61

TÜà|ÄÄxÜç
Name Light Artillery Heavy Artillery Size 4 Speed 5 Range 36 Firepower 4 Accuracy 5+ Melee Morale 8/10 Special rules Canister Piercing Canister Piercing Canister Indirect Blast(D6) Canister Indirect Blast(D6) Cost 35 4 5 60 4 5+ 8/10 72

Experimental Howitzer

4

5

36

4

5+

-

8/10

91

20-lber Unicorn

4

5

60

4

5+

-

8/10

230

[ÉÜáx TÜà|ÄÄxÜç
Name Horse Artillery Size 2/2 Speed 10 Range 36 Firepower 2 Accuracy 5+ Melee Morale 8/10 Special rules Canister Piercing Cost 33