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Contents
4 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
SD
05/14
Passage
of Light
Greenland is a land of
plenty for divers look-
ing for an adventure:
You’ll be happy to run
into icebergs in these
unspoiled waters.
TEXT AND PHOTOS BY
TOBI AS FRI EDRI CH
pg.
34
On the Cover:
A two-banded
clownfish and
diver in Eliat, Red
Sea, Egypt.
Photo by
Mark Fuller
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WHAT’S INSIDE:
42
pg.
28
pg.
52
pg.
Dive Until
You Drop
Fill your
logbook to
bursting in these
nine dive-crazy
destinations.
By Terry Ward
Gear
Ditch the
table and
make the
switch to one
of these dive
computers.
By Roger Roy
Bermuda:
Treasure
Revealed
Text by Tara
Bradley
Photos by
Stuart
Philpott
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ART
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SALES
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Want to win a SeaLife Sea Dragon
Mini 600 light? All you have to do is
tell us about your favorite destination
for filling your logbook, or anything else
in this issue, at editor@sportdiver.com
or post on our Facebook wall. If we pick
your letter, you could win.
CONNECT AT:
EMAIL THE EDITOR at editor@sportdiver.com.
f
FACEBOOK.COM/SPORTDIVER
t
@SPORTDIVERMAG
@SPORTDIVER
few years ago, I spent eight days in south-
ern Belize, hopscotching my way along
the coast, from Dangriga to Placencia, and
diving a number of spots on the Mesoamerican barrier reef.
It was one of those trips where your logbook gets crammed
with myriad details — swimming with an ancient loggerhead turtle as we ex-
plored a shallow reef off Hopkins, tagging Morelet’s crocodiles on a New River
expedition to Lamanai, having a pinch-me-I-can’t-believe-I’m-here encounter
with four whale sharks in the Gladden Spit and Silk Cayes Marine Reserve off
Placencia. Dive trips like this that our Sport Diver staff have had inspired the
theme of our travel feature on page 42, “Dive Until You Drop.” The diving in
these destinations is guaranteed to give you something to write about — and
remember. We hope we’ll inspire you to plan your next dive trip — and don’t
forget your logbook; we want to hear about it.
GET IT IN WRITING
Log your dives — and create a memory book
L
ate last year, I was lucky enough to visit two fantastic dive
destinations, Komodo and Fiji. My one objective was to get a
shot of a pygmy seahorse. After two weeks on the Dive Damai
II live-aboard, a few days in Pemuteran, Bali, and more than 50
dives, I still had not seen this elusive creature. I was beginning
to think they were a figment of someone’s imagination. Fast
forward to Fiji three weeks later. While exploring the 80-foot bottom of the
dive site Kansas from the Fiji Aggressor with my dive guide, he pointed to a
speck on the sand. As I mounted a 10x wet diopter to my 100mm macro lens
and looked through the viewfinder, I finally realized he had found what I
had been so diligently searching for: a Severn’s pygmy seahorse.
I took several shots of the
3
/
16
-inch-long critter before I reluctantly
retreated to the beautiful field of anemones near the surface
to do my safety stop. They are real. They do exist. And with
persistence, and diving with an experienced dive guide, you
can find what you are searching for. Keep on diving!
— Jim van Gogh, Sunnyvale, California
Jim, your persistence has paid off with more than this shot. For writing
us and being selected as our Tribe Prize letter winner, we’re sending you a
Sport Diver prize pack, including a baseball hat, mask strap and backpack.
PREDIVE // MAY 2 0 1 4
Patricia Wuest
Editor-in-Chief
A
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8 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
SD
05/14
Dive Briefs
DB
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M
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T
he elusive ocean
sunfish, also known as
mola mola, are the heavi-
est known bony fish in the
world. These gentle giants
can be found in temper-
ate and tropical waters like
those off the coast of Bali.
Oddly enough, these fish
named for the sun prefer
colder depths and can be
tricky to spot out of season.
Although ocean sunfish
inhabit these waters year-
round, your best chance to
see them in Bali is anytime
between June and Novem-
ber, when upwellings bring
colder water to the surface.
WHEN TO GO
Your best bet to spot
mola mola is between
June and November.
WHERE TO GO
AquaMarine Diving
aquamarinediving.com
Here
Come the
Sunfish
More mola mola are
coming your way
· Alor · Bahamas · Belize · Cayman Islands · Cocos Island ·
· Dominican Republic · Fiji · Galapagos · Hawaii · Komodo ·
· Maldives · Myanmar · Palau · Pulau Weh, Indonesia ·
· Red Sea · Tailand · Turks & Caicos ·
It’s Your Dive Vacation,
so LIVE it to the FULLEST!
New HD Videos www.liveaboardfeet.tv r www.aggressor.com r www.dancerfeet.com
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The choice is clear. Aggressor Fleet and Dancer Fleet
LiveAboards pamper you with around-the-clock service,
deluxe accommodations, scrumptious chef-prepared meals,
and easy access to the world’s best diving.
So leave the ordinary dive vacation behind and
evolve to the extraordinary LiveAboard Lifestyle.
The choice is clear. Aggressor Fleet and Dancer Fleet
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and easy access to the world’s best diving.
So leave the ordinary dive vacation behind and
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Bonaire
Where the only
crowds you’ll see
are fish
Buddy Dive Resort
9 boat dives • Rental vehicle
from $1001
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2nd diver dives free
from $794
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Daily 2-tank boat diving
from $1016
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Free Nitrox • Rental vehicle
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Plaza Beach Resort Bonaire
All-Inclusive
from $1128
YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT
On these islands, diving and dining go hand in hand
BY TRAVI S MARSHALL
L
ogging time underwater works up an appetite, and after a long day on the
boat, there’s nothing better than tucking into local cuisine. Here we’ve pulled
together our five favorite island dishes from around the dive world — the
kind of meals where locally sourced ingredients and decades of tradition coalesce
into sublime flavors you’ve got to try for yourself.
Goat Stew, Bonaire
L
ike the best comfort foods,
authentic Caribbean fare is
food born of necessity; modest
ingredients turn into hearty
meals using potent spices and
long cooking times. On the dive-
centric island of Bonaire, no dish
captures that authenticity better
than a steaming plate of kabritu
stoba (goat stew). You know
this rich meaty stew, served
with a side of fungi (similar to
polenta), is fresh made when
you purchase it from Maiky
Snack, which sits in the desert a
few miles east of Kralendijk sur-
rounded by pens of goats bound
for the next day’s stew pot.
Poisson Cru,
French Polynesia
I
n French Polynesia, a
cevichelike salad of raw fish
tossed with lime juice, coconut
cream, local herbs and vegeta-
bles goes by the name poisson
cru, though similar incarnations
exist throughout the South
Pacific. In the Cook Islands,
it’s ika mata; to the Fijians, it’s
kokoda. But no matter what
the name, expect an explosion
of flavors. The fresh herbs and
sharp lime cut the richness of
the meaty fish and heavy coco-
nut, taking ceviche to a whole
new level. Take a Blue Lagoon
tour on Fakarava to eat this dish
on the beach where it belongs.
Roti, Tobago
E
astern Caribbean cooking
has an undeniable — and
delicious — Indian influence.
Perhaps the best example of
this East/West Indies fusion is
the roti, a burritolike concoction
of soft, Indian flatbread wrapped
around curried meat or vegeta-
bles. After a morning riding the
drifts off Tobago, make a stop
at Jabba’s on the Charlotteville
waterfront for a rib-sticking
roti lunch.
Babi Guling, Bali
P
igs are a common
denominator in the Pacific.
Polynesian islands have a
penchant for putting their pork
in the ground to slow roast
among hot stones, but no prep-
aration can compare to Bali’s
babi guling. The Indonesian
island’s version of suckling pig
roasted on a spit over blazing
coals results in juicy, slow-
cooked pork, served with a slice
of crispy crackling. Warung Ibu
Oka in Ubud is the best-known
babi guling spot on island, but
warungs (cafés) abound
wherever you are on Bali.
Conch Salad, Provo
I
f you find yourself in the
Bahamas or Turks and
Caicos, there’s one ingredient
that’s bound to appear at pretty
much every meal — conch.
The massive shellfish thrive in
the shallow sand flats of these
islands in the stream, so it’s
no surprise locals have found
a million and one ways to eat
their sweet meat. Head to Da
Conch Shack on Provo to get
a taste of what is often lauded
as the best conch salad in the
Caribbean, featuring tenderized
chunks of conch meat tossed
with lime juice, tomatoes,
peppers and onions.
Z
A
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H

S
T
O
V
A
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(
3
)
It’s no
surprise
that locals
have found
a million
and one
ways to
eat their
sweet meat.
T
o
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TRAVEL / SUBCULTURE / CONSERVATION / SPECIES
TRAVEL / SUBCULTURE / CONSERVATION / SPECIES
P E R F E C T 1 0
VISI T SPORTDIVER.COM FOR
MORE I NFO ON ANGUI LLA
GOING TO THE DOGS
It’s worth the (at times) bumpy ride to Dog Island, an unin-
habited spot of land 8 miles northwest of Anguilla. Beautiful
coral overhangs and plentiful sea life (watch for blacktip reef
sharks and rays) make the underwater ride sublime.
ANGUILLA
This beachy Caribbean
island offers the
perfect vacation above
and below the waves
BY REBECCA STRAUSS
1
GET SCILLY
This tiny speck of
land just offshore of Island
Harbour is home to a big
party. Every Wednesday
and Sunday, Sandra and
Eudoxie Wallace fire up
the grill and pour a mean
rum punch. They don’t say
“one and done” for nothing.
scillycayanguilla.com
2
WRECK CENTRAL
Anguilla is best
known for its wrecks — at
least six of them beckon
to divers. The Sarah is the
island’s largest at 232 feet
long, and is home to blue
tangs and turtles.
shoalbayscuba.com
3
FOLK MUSIC
If you’re itching
for some local culture,
charming boutique hotel
Anacaona hosts the weekly
Mayoumba Folkloric
Theatre on Thursday
nights, along with a tasty
buffet of island-style food.
anacaonahotel.com
4
FIRED UP
The wreck of the
Catheley H accidentally
caught fire and was
subsequently purpose-
sunk in 1993. It teems with
spiny lobsters and
octopuses come
October and
November, and
the rest of the year
you’ll see plentiful
marine life such as
rays and reef fish.
5
DRAWING STRAWS
Anguilla’s well known
as a foodie destination, and
for good reason — over 100
restaurants serve this small
island. For an upscale take
on local cuisine, try Straw
Hat, where curried goat
sliders compete with local
red snapper crudo for your
attention. strawhat.com
6
DUTCH DELIGHT
The wreck of the
Dutch cargo ship the
Oosterdiep was deliberately
sunk upright, northwest
of Meads Bay in 1990, and
it makes for an absolutely
fantastic night dive, with
dozens of turtles cruising
around the 150-foot-long
ship and posing for pictures.
Snapper, jacks, spiny lob-
sters and a sandy field
full of garden eels next to
the wreck round out the
wreck’s marine offerings.
7
SANDY SOJOURN
We’d be remiss if we
didn’t mention the glorious
Anguilla beaches. Shoal
Bay East is the island’s
superlative stretch of sand;
Rendezvous Bay offers
2.5 stunning miles facing
St. Martin. When it’s time
to party, hit Sandy Ground,
another lovely stretch and
home to the island’s finest
beach bars.
8
SPA DAY
Cuisinart is so much
more than a kitchen appli-
ance on Anguilla — there’s
a hydroponic garden,
available for tours to the
public, and a spa that
will pamper you with a
decadent treatment, such
as the warmed-seashell
massage. Stop by the pool
bar afterward for a fresh
mango smoothie.
cuisinartresort.com
9
DOUBLE DUTY
Before it was an
Anguillan wreck dive, the
M/V Meppel led another
life as the M/V Hilda, and
played a key role in evacu-
ating troops from Dunkirk
during World War II. These
days the Meppel sits at
80 feet, and attracts marine
life such as turtles and rays.
shoalbayscuba.com
Hot in
Here
Rockfield’s
Pepper
Sauce is
de riguer
on Anguilla.
Monsta
Lobsta
Scilly Cay
is well
known for
its grilled
lobster and
chicken.
IT’S ALL IN THE EYES
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ANGUI LLA
12 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
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OCEANUS
TRAVEL / SUBCULTURE / CONSERVATION / SPECIES
ROUGHING IT IN MEXICO
BY TARA BRADLEY
I
t can be challenging for divers who are traveling with kids or nondiving partners to find
an underwater experience where both snorkelers and divers can have a killer time —
together. Mexico’s Isla Espiritu Santo — off La Paz, Baja California Sur (or BCS) — tops the list
of spots that cater to both types of water lovers simultaneously.
A 60-minute (depending on weather
conditions) boat ride from La Paz will
deliver divers and snorkelers to a massive
rock that’s home to colonies of sea lions.
And the playful pups aren’t biased when
it comes to guests. Bobbing around on the
surface grants snorkelers up-close encoun-
ters and serenades of friendly barks, while
divers witness the action from below as the
underwater lap dogs weave around coral
heads, and even go in for a cuddle or two.
Up the adventure ante with a camping
excursion on the nearby deserted Ensenda
Grande Beach, offered by Fun Baja. But
don’t let the word “camping” fool you.
Outdoor showers, freshwater wash bins,
and bathrooms so clean that they put
many hotels to shame are just some of the
amenities found here. What’s even better:
Meals are cooked family style with quite
possibly the world’s best tortillas. Don’t ask
what makes them that way. (It’s lard.)
Work off the home-cooked meals (and the
Mexican hot chocolate) with a hike, snorkel
or swim — all just steps from your tent. In the
evening, after you let the moonlight lead you
back to your tent, you might decide “roughing
it” really is for you. funbaja.com L
U
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+
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and security when your travel
doesn’t go as planned. Whether
it’s a problem with your bags or
cancellation of the entire trip,
DAN Travel Insurance helps you
be prepared for the unexpected.
Call 1-800-446-2671 to speak
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WHAT WE’RE READING
BY AMANDA MORALES
2 Sharks & People
Exploring Our Relationship
with the Most Feared Fish
in the Sea
By Thomas P. Peschak
N
ow more than ever the relationship
between humans and sharks is on
the rocks. And even though humans
pose an infinitely larger threat to sharks
than sharks do to us, we remain both
fascinated and terrified by this complex
species. A contributing photographer to
National Geographic, author Thomas P.
Peschak uses both words and images
to share his personal encounters with
sharks as a lifelong diver and marine
conservationist. press.chicago.edu
1 Fits Like a Glove
The Bill & Bob Meistrell Story
By Frank Gromling
L
earn the rags-to-riches story of Bob
and Bill Meistrell, the founders of
Body Glove International and legends in
the diving and board-sports industries.
The twin brothers grew the iconic wet-
suit and surf brand from a dive shop in
Redondo Beach more than 60 years ago
to the global presence it is today. Author
Frank Gromling includes rare photos
of the company’s early start along with
interviews with legendary divers and
surfers, made all the more poignant by
Bob Meistrell’s passing in 2013 at the
age of 84. oceanpublishing.org
3 Seaduction
The Sensuous Side of the Sea
By Beverly Factor
Y
ou’ll be captivated by this
sumptuous coffee-table book
that showcases the beauty found
in every nook and cranny in a
coral reef. Underwater
photographer Beverly
Factor’s images capture
the vibrant colors,
behavior and habitat
of some of the reef’s
smallest creatures —
and remind us of the
ocean’s seductive allure.
beverlyfactor.com
1
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16 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
READ MORE
TRAVEL / SUBCULTURE / CONSERVATION / SPECIES
A
ndy Brandy Casagrande IV remembers
what his parents said when he was
7: Very little on TV is real. He be-
lieved them — until he saw a great
white shark on the screen. “When I re-
alized it was real, I was like, ‘Wow,’”
he says. “Everything after that was all
about sharks.” It was a fixation that led
to a cinematography career. On staf f
for Nat ional Geographic, Casagrande became the go-to guy to pursue
anything deadly: king cobras, crocodiles, lions and, yes, sharks.
Q: You got your big break in South Africa.
How did it happen?
A: At 22, I moved to Cape Town to accept an
unpaid job on a research boat as a camera-
man, working with great whites and taking
stills of dorsal fins for a population study.
National Geographic sent a documentary
crew who worked with us for three weeks.
They thought I was crazy when they saw me
swimming outside the cage with the sharks.
No one was doing that back then.
Q: So they liked your bravado?
A: They must have. They offered me a staff
job on the spot.
Q: And you said?
A: F--- yeah. That’s every wildlife camera-
man’s dream.
Q: You don’t seem afraid of sharks.
Where does that come from?
A: I’ve always known sharks were
dangerous, but I never saw them
as vindictive. They’re no different
from you or me eating a bowl of
spaghetti. If we bite down on the
fork, we immediately stop because
it’s not what we’re expecting.
Q: You and I swam together
with oceanic whitetip sharks
off Cat Island. You seem to
understand them.
A: My No. 1 rule: Don’t act like prey,
and they won’t treat you like prey.
Q: You don’t act at all like prey. You act
more like the alpha shark.
A: Sharks, especially great whites, expect
you to retreat. Everything in the ocean
swims away from a great white except or-
cas. So when I swim toward one, it’s like,
“What the hell; why are you swimming to-
ward me?” They’re very inquisitive, and I
like to show that.
Q: And that’s why you invent and
jury-rig so many camera attachments
and setups?
A: Exactly. Critter cams (aka remote
animal imaging) aren’t my idea. With
GoPro, it’s really exploded. I’ve put a GoPro
inside a shark’s mouth. I’ve spring-loaded
them to dorsal fins using an attachment
that eventually dissolves in salt water. We
all want to see a shark’s secret life, what it’s
doing when it’s not a circus shark with all
the boats around.
DON’T CAGE HIM IN
Andy Brandy Casagrande IV on the animal that inspires him to go big
BY BROOKE MORTON
To read more about Andy Brandy Casagrande IV (and other
notable divers), go to sportdiver.com.
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hey thought
I was crazy
when they saw
me swimming outside
the cage with the
sharks. No one was
doing that back then.”

of honduras
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Palmetto Bay Plantation, Roatan
Dive or snorkel the world’s 2nd
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Deep Blue Resort, Utila
A beachfront resort surrounded
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Spacious rooms with air-conditioning and private balconies overlooking the
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CoCo View Resort, Roatan
Dive! Dive! Dive! Discover the
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UNLIMITED (24-hr!) shore diving in
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Barefoot Cay Resort, Roatan
Luxury boutique resort offering
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gourmet dining, spa services, beach, pool and palapa.
1-866-246-3706
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Q: I will be turning 60 next
month and am concerned that I
will have to give up diving in the
near future. Are you ever too old
to dive?
A: As I too have joined the ranks of
“mature divers” (loosely defined
as over 50), I am increasingly more
sympathetic in my response.
Fortunately, the dive-medicine
community generally concurs.
Many people who took up diving in
their youth want to continue to dive.
Others, who perhaps lacked the
opportunity to dive recreationally
until retirement approached, are
taking it up. There is no upper- age
limit for diving. If a diver is free
of health problems that would
potentially put him or her at a sig-
nificantly higher risk of injury in the
water than the average diver, there
is no reason to refrain from diving.
Cardiovascular disease is by far
the biggest health concern facing us
as we age, but it is not an inevitable
condition. Genetics plays a large
role, but making smart choices re-
garding diet and exercise can pay
huge dividends. Regular medical
checkups and focused evaluations
to exclude significant medical is-
sues are more important for older
divers. If you do not have a medical
problem or take a medication that
precludes safe diving, there is no
reason you cannot continue to dive
well into old age.
Diving
Doctor
The Aging Diver
BY JAMES L. CARUSO, M. D.
18 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
TRAVEL / SUBCULTURE / CONSERVATION / SPECIES
tf
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Shiffman is happy to answer any questions you have about sharks on Twitter
(@WhySharksMatter) or Facebook (facebook.com/WhySharksMatter).
VISIT SPORTDIVER.COM FOR MORE ON OUR SHARK OF THE MONTH
C
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Preserving Palau
Commercial fishing to become
a thing of the past in the
island nation’s waters
By Amanda Morales
A
lready an environmentally forward-
thinking country, Palau decided in
February of this year to ban commercial
fishing within the nation’s waters.
The country’s Exclusive Economic Zone —
which extends 200 nautical miles off Palau’s
coasts — will be declared a marine sanctuary
and be off-limits to commercial fishing, pro-
tecting all fish species in 230,000 square
miles of the Pacific nation’s waters. Existing
commercial-fishing contracts will continue
until their expiration date.
Palau president Tommy Remengesau Jr.
made the announcement during his keynote
address at the United Nations Sustainable
Oceans Forum earlier this year,
noting that the effects of climate
change and global warming
have impacted fish populations.
Remengesau said the move
will preserve Palau’s marine re-
sources, which are at the heart
of the Pacific nation’s economy.
“Palau’s economic potential lies in tourism,
not tuna,” Remengesau said.
More than half the gross domestic product
for Palau is generated by tourism. Locals and
tourists will still be allowed to fish, provided
it is not on a commercial basis. Creating the
massive sanctuary is an example of Palau’s
commitment to eco-tourism; in 2009 the
nation declared its waters to be a sanctuary
for sharks, making it the first country in the
world to do so.
T
hese relatively small,
bottom-dwelling
sharks mostly eat
invertebrates like crabs,
shrimp and sea urchins,
and hunt primarily at night.
Named for the ridges behind
their eyes, horn sharks are
also best known for their
beautiful spiral-shaped
egg cases, which females
wedge between rocks in the
springtime. Horn sharks are
slow swimmers, and have
been known to crawl along
the bottom using their fins.
Population declines have
been reported in areas of
Southern California fre-
quented by divers, but beware:
Divers who poke and grab
them have been bitten by
sharks defending themselves.
HORN SHARK
Heterodontus francisci
David Shiffman is a Ph.D. student at the University of Miami’s Abess Center for
Ecosystem Science and Policy, where he studies shark ecology and conservation.
Facts About Horn Sharks
Where to Find Them
In shallow waters in the Pacific, off the coast of
Southern California and Mexico
Threat Level
Data Deficient (IUCN Red List)
Maximum Size
Up to 4 feet
» While some species of sharks are highly migratory,
studies suggest that horn sharks have an extremely
small home range of about 11,000 square feet. One
was found in the exact spot where it had once been
caught, tagged and released 11 years earlier, and
the farthest any tagged horn shark has traveled is
10 miles.
» The scientific name heterodontus means “different
teeth,” referring to the fact that horn sharks have
some teeth that are sharp and some that are used for
crushing invertebrates.
» Though there is no targeted commercial fishery for
horn sharks, they are commonly caught as bycatch.
» Horn sharks frequently hide
under rocks and in crevices
or small caves during the
day. They have even been
known to shelter in the
small sand pits created
when California bay rays
dig for food.
HORSING AROUND
New iPhone app tracks
seahorses all over the world
By Amanda Morales
S
eahorse behavior
and habitat is among
the most mysterious in
the marine world, but a
new smartphone app,
iSeahorse Explore,
aims to help demystify
the tiny creatures.
Developed by marine
conservationists from
the University of British
Columbia, the Zoolog-
ical Society of London
and the John G. Shedd
Aquarium in Chicago,
iSeahorse Explore al-
lows users to become
citizen scientists when
it comes to seahorses.
There is little existing
data on the estimated
48 seahorse species;
the IUCN Red List of
Threatened Species
names 11 of them as
Threatened, and 26
are listed as Data
Deficient due to in-
formation deemed
inadequate to make
an assessment on
the species’ risk
of  extinction.
With the iSeahorse
Explore app, divers
can contribute data
and photos from
seahorse sightings.
Users can then create
a login on the accom-
panying website, track
observations and view
recent recordings
by other users from
around the world.
The useful app, which
also incorporates a
guide to help identify
seahorse species,
is offered free to
iPhone users from
the App Store.
Palau’s
waters
are
100 %
marine
sanctuary.
OF THE
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 19
TRAVEL / SUBCULTURE / CONSERVATION / SPECIES
Before bedding down
for the night, yellowhead
jawfishes cover the
entrance to their burrow
with rocks to prevent
home invasions.
FOLLOW THE UNDERSEA ADVENTURES OF NED AND ANNA DELOACH AT MARINELIFEBLOG.COM
To mix and aerate
their eggs, males
occasionally partially
spit out and quickly
suck clutches back in,
a behavior known
as churning.
Jawfishes have
been documented
sharing their burrows
with, surprisingly,
moray eels.
To protect their turf,
jawfishes occasionally
spit mouthfuls of sand at
small intruders.
8
It takes an adult
yellowhead jawfish
to construct
a new burrow.
Jawfishes stabilize the
entranceway to their
burrow with rocks and shell
fragments, placed with
the skill and precision of a
stonemason.
about
hours
THE JAWFISH
This little guy has a mighty big mouth
BY NED AND ANNA DELOACH
The giant jawfish of
the eastern Pacific can
measure a whopping
20 inches in length.
20 in.
Dive Life
N E W S , E V E N T S & P E O P L E O F T H E P A D I D I V I N G S O C I E T Y
DL
SD
05/14
20 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
Dive
Deeper
with
ScubaEarth
Premium
PADI’s online forum
is a one-stop shop
for dedicated divers
By Ashley Atkin
W
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D
igital technology has forever
changed the world of media. Most
industries — including diving
— are continually evolving in the digital
landscape, and experiencing a significant
growth in information, digital products
and social-media sharing. The dive in-
dustry has expanded into the digital realm
with products such as digital certification
cards (PADI eCards), online scuba-diving
programs (PADI eLearning) and
social-media communities (ScubaEarth).
There are many options for finding
information online, but in the past, div-
ers had to visit multiple websites to find
the specific scuba-diving information
they were looking for. With the growth
of ScubaEarth, divers can find most of
what they need on one website — they
can search for PADI Dive Centers and
Resorts, locate the top dive sites, search
for dive buddies and more. Now, with the
launch of ScubaEarth Premium, there
are even more reasons to use ScubaEarth
for all your online scuba-diving needs.
With ScubaEarth Premium divers can
look forward to a few new features:
READY,
SET,
DIVE
FOR MORE I NFORMATION ABOUT SCUBAEARTH, VISI T SCUBAEARTH.COM
UPCOMING SOCIETY EVENTS
Critter Finder
This new application allows divers to
search for detailed critter information
and photos for just about any species
they might encounter underwater, and
photographers can tag and upload imag-
es with confidence. Users can also take
advantage of aggregate data populated
by other ScubaEarth users to find recent
sightings of their favorite critters and the
top dive-site locations where they might
spot them. This is real-time data, so it
cannot be found by searching online.
Personalized Dive Dashboard
Divers can track their favorite dive
or plan for the dive day ahead.
With ScubaEarth Premium, divers
can fully immerse themselves in the
dive lifestyle, and there are more features
and benefits to come. For more informa-
tion about ScubaEarth Premium, visit
scubaearth.com.
Total Submersion June 14-22 Celebrate Total Sub’s 15th anniversary in Grand
Cayman. It’s hosted at Sunset House, and sponsored by Sport Diver, Aqua Lung, Divers Alert
Network, Caybrew, and Cayman Islands Tourism. For reservations, contact PADI Travel Network
at 800-729-7234 (U.S. and Canada) or 949-858-7234, ext. 2539, or email ptn1@padi.com.
Kids Sea Camp 2014 Give
them a week they will remember
forever. Visit familydivers.com
for all 2014 event dates and details.
destinations, dive
buddies, dive sites
and critters using
the dive dashboard,
a hub of interactive
slates that can be
personalized to suit
each user. Divers
who love diving in
a certain locale can now track specific dive
sites to see the most recently logged dives
and dive conditions associated with that
site. Users also can view images that have
been posted by other ScubaEarth users
from this destination. It’s the perfect way
to daydream about your next dive vacation,
Dashboard
The ScubaEarth
dashboard makes the
user experience easy.
Project AWARE
22 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
FOR MORE, VISI T PROJECTAWARE.ORG
M
ay 16 is Endangered Species Day, meant to create
awareness about endangered species and the ev-
eryday actions we all can take to protect them. You
can use every tip from Project AWARE’s modernized 10 Tips
for Divers to Protect the Ocean Planet to help the world’s most
threatened marine species every time you dive and travel.
This month we feature
Tip 3: Take Only Photos —
Leave Only Bubbles.
Experienced divers
know that nearly everything
natural found underwater
is alive or can be used by a
living critter. We know that
taking coral, animals and
shells can deplete dive sites,
as well as disturb delicate
ecosystems. It is important
to be a role model for
this behavior every time
we dive.
Just being a good
eco-tourist can have a
positive impact as well.
Being a knowledgeable and
responsible diver can help
support some of the world’s
most threatened animals,
such as manta rays, through
education and photography.
Through the first global
study of extinction risk ac-
cording to the criteria of the
IUCN Red List of Threatened
Species, the IUCN Shark
Specialist Group estimates
that 25 percent of the world’s
sharks and rays are threat-
ened with extinction. Rays
make up five of the seven
most threatened families of
cartilaginous fishes.
Fished at alarming rates,
manta and devil
rays fetch a one-
time payout of
about $250 per
kilogram, versus
approximately
$1 million in
tourism over
the ray’s lifetime.
What can
you do to be a
good eco-tourist
and support
species on
the brink
of extinction?
1. Take only
photos. You can also share
your underwater images to
support conservation.
2. Dive or snorkel
with mantas to support
a valuable alternative to
unsustainable fishing.
3. Choose to dive with
locally owned operators
who employ local staff.
4. Make sure your guides
follow procedures and local
codes of conduct intended
to protect mantas during
viewing experiences.
Before you dive in,
pledge to follow Project
AWARE’s 10 Tips for Divers
at projectaware.org.
TAKE ONLY PHOTOS
Help protect our ocean planet with Project AWARE’s 10 tips
BY TI FFANY LEI TE, ASSOCI ATE DI RECTOR, COMMUNI CATI ONS & OUTREACH
PROJECT AWARE FOUNDATI ON
Tip 3:
N
early everything natural found
underwater is alive or will
be used by a living creature.
If you take a coral, shell or animal,
you can disturb the delicate
balance and add to the depletion
of dive sites for future generations.
J
E
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Y
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Take Only
Photos
— Leave
Only
Bubbles
Together, we can make
a difference by adopting
some simple changes in
our everyday lives.
1
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Be a
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444444
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Life
6666
Make
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Seafood
Choices
88
Be an
Eco-tourist
10 10 10 10 10 10
Give
Back
11111
Be a
Buoyancy
Expert
55
Become
a Debris
Activist
777
Take
Action
99
Shrink
Your
Carbon
Footprint
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Images
24 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
S
wimming among schools of fish is
an irresistible attraction for every
diver, but producing stunning im-
ages of them means curbing our
enthusiasm. Schooling photos need to
communicate the togetherness of the fish
— that’s what schooling is all about. The
one thing that is sure to destroy a pleasing
arrangement of fish is a careless diver.
More than any specific technical
expertise with the camera, striking
schooling shots require excellent diving
skills to avoid breaking up the formations,
as well as the patience to hold your position
and let the school come to you.
Often experienced photographers find
this hardest to learn. The golden rule of
underwater photography is “get close, then
get closer.” Shooting schools successfully
goes against the grain. If we want attractive
formations right in front of our lens, we
have to let the fish come to us.
SCHOOL’S OUT
It’s all about diving skills when shooting schooling fish
Alex Mustard is a marine biologist
who has been a full-time underwater
photographer and author since 2004.
To view more of his work, visit
amustard.com.
By
Alex
Mustard
S
trong formations
visually commu-
nicate togetherness.
So pictures say
“schooling” best
when the fish are
neat and we can see
the whole school as
a finite entity within
the frame.
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 25
VISI T SPORTDIVER.COM/PHOTOS FOR MORE TI PS
ON UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY
Waiting to Exhale
Time your breathing to avoid splitting the school
When you’re swimming below a school of fish avoid exhaling in the middle —
the fish won’t swim through the bubbles and you’ll end up splitting them apart,
ruining your photo opp.
PhotobyAlexMustard
CAMERANikonD2X // HOUSING Subal // LENS Nikkor
17-35mm// STROBES Subtronic// SETTINGS f/8, 1/50sec,
ISO100// LOCATIONAri Atoll, Maldives
PhotobyHenryJager
CAMERAOlympusE-3// HOUSING BS Kinetics // LENS Zuiko
8mmfish-eye // STROBES InonZ-240// SETTINGS f/5.6, 1/250
sec, ISO250// LOCATIONPescadorIsland, Cebu, Philippines
Photoby
TobiasFriedrich
CAMERA Canon
5D Mark II //
HOUSING UK-
GERMANY // LENS
Canon 17-40mm
// STROBES none
// SETTINGS f/10,
1/200 sec, ISO 200 //
LOCATIONLiberty
wreck, Bali
WALL-TO-WALL FISH
Capturing an Entire School
When shooting schooling fish, I aim for two main
compositions. If the school is small enough and
my lens wide enough, I want to get the whole
school in my picture. Nothing says togetherness
better than a group of fish surrounded by open
water. Once I’m in tight, I’ll go for wall-to-wall fish,
focusing my camera on the densest part of the
school, where the fish are most aligned.
GEOMETRIC SHAPES
Shoot a Silhouette
Neat schools make for neat
photos. And our images get
even stronger when the
formations form pleasing
geometric shapes, some-
thing that is rare in the
oceans. Schools regularly
form circles and ovals, and
if we’re lucky, occasionally
even rings. The better the
shape, the better our shot.
Often big schools are
hard to illuminate well
with strobes, so consider
turning them off and
shooting the formation as
a silhouette.
DYNAMIC MOVEMENT
Some Schools Stick Together
Schooling fish are sticky, but species vary. Some,
like barracuda, are magnetic, and you can swim
right through the middle of them and they’ll
hold formation, parting just enough to let you
pass. With some other species, you need only to
breathe out in their direction, and they soon start
pointing in all directions.
That said, some natural movement of the fish
will infuse schooling shots with the energy of
movement. Watch the school, and try to time your
photos to capture the fish sweeping past your lens,
which will produce a dynamic composition.
sealife-cameras.com
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Shown with DC1400 camera
using optional cold shoe mount
Taken with SeaLife DC1400
New Flex-Connect
Trays, grips and
arms click together
in seconds
Sea Dragon 1200 Lumen
Perfect for compact
cameras like GoPro®
Versatile
Simply remove from grip for a
compact and powerful dive light
Powerful new lights for dive, video or photo.
Light for any camera, any dive, any adventure.
Sea Dragon 2000 Lumen
Shown with SeaLife DC1400,
includes Flex-Connect tray and grip
DC1400 Sea Dragon Pro Duo
DC1400 with Flex-Connect Dual Tray
& grips, Sea Dragon 2000 Light and
Flash, featuring optional Flex Arms
Images COMPACT CAMERA PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS
C
O
M
P
A
C
T

C
A
M
E
R
A
S
SeaLife recently introduced its powerful Sea Dragon
Lighting, including two LED photo/video/dive lights
and a compact flash. In addition to long battery
duration and compatibility with all underwater
cameras, Sea Dragon Lights feature the innovative
new Flex-Connect mounting system with grips, trays
and arms that assemble instantly with a “click.”
Sea Dragon 2000
For a constant, ultra-bright source of
light for photos and videos – or just
to brighten your dive - this compact,
2000 lumen light features the latest
in LED technology, a 100-degree
wide beam,
single-button
control, and 3
power levels.
Sea Dragon Flash
Producing rich, deep colors in
underwater photos, the Sea Dragon
Flash makes it easy to fine-tune
brightness with variable power
adjustment, a
snap-on diffuser
and a quick-
release head.
Sea Dragon 1200
With its included grip, Micro
Tray, and adapter for GoPro
®
cameras, this 1200-lumen photo/
video/dive light is perfect for
adding light and
stability to ultra-
compact and full
sized cameras.
sealife-cameras.com
MASTERING LIGHT
To create a spectacular image, you must first understand the
direction, intensity and quality of light
1
WHY IT
MATTERS
Light dominates
photography. It controls the
shapes, colors and contrast
that define pictures, and
will sometimes be the dom-
inant feature of an image.
You need to understand
the direction, intensity and
quality of light to make a
great image. So always be
aware of sun position and
your flash’s power settings.
.
2
NATURAL AND
ARTIFICIAL
LIGHT
Natural light paints shapes
and color into the whole
image. If you want sun-
bursts, stay shallow — 15 feet
or less — and use a high
shutter speed (1/500 sec).
Don’t shoot straight into the
sun; hide the sun ball off the
frame edge or behind
something. Due to the water
column, a flash lights only
foregrounds, typically 3 to
6 feet from the camera. So
get close to your main
subject to make colors and
contrast pop.
3
COMBINING
BOTH
Set and leave a
small aperture (f/8 in clear
water and bright sun). Use
manual-exposure mode
and adjust shutter speed to
get a pleasing background
water color. Be prepared to
set speeds as low as
1/30 sec, and don’t worry —
the flash will freeze
foreground movement.
Then simply use through-
the-lens metering or adjust
flash power manually until
the foreground is well lit,
but not so harshly that it
looks unnatural.
CAMERA Olympus XZ-2 compact camera // HOUSING Olympus
PT-054 // STROBE Inon Z-240// SETTINGS f/8, 1/100 sec, ISO 100 //
NOTESNatural-light background, low-power flash-lit foreground
at 20-foot depth and 1.5 feet from the foreground subject
BROUGHT TO YOU BY SEALIFE- CAMERAS.COM
Paul Colley is an award-
winning underwater
photographer, compact-
camera instructor and
author of Winning Images
with Any Underwater
Camera. mpcolley.com
By Paul Colley
28 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
SD
05/14
DG
Dive Gear
E DI TOR’ S PI CK
EP 2
0
1
4
Sport Diver
SMART,
SLEEK AND
SEXY: 10
NEW DIVE
COMPUTER
Divers using tables
are as common
these days as NASA
engineers using slide
rules — and that’s
a good thing. Here
are 10 new feature-
packed computers
that can help you
dive more, dive
longer and dive safer.
BY ROGER ROY
PHOTOS BY
CARRI E GARCIA
ii SHERWOOD SCUBA
AMPHOS AIR
The original Amphos had the
algorithms and display of the
popular Wisdom 3 console in a
stylish wristwatch with a black
plastic and stainless-steel bezel.
The new version offers those
same features plus air integra-
tion and an all-stainless-steel
bezel. The Amphos Air has four
control buttons and screen
prompts for easy navigation,
four operating modes, and two-
gas switching capability.
CONTACT: sherwoodscuba.com
MSRP: $1,150 with transmitter
and download cable
FOR MORE DI VE COMPUTERS AND ACCESSORI ES,
VISI T SPORTDIV ER.COM/GEAR
KEY WEST BI G PI NE KEY & THE LOWER KEYS
M
ARATH
O
N

I S
L
A
M
O
R
A
D
A















K
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L
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G
O
Dive Key West, Inc.
Keys Premiere Dive Center. Our 42nd yr.
Custom dive pkgs. Dive the Vandenberg!
800-426-0707 or 305-296-3823
divekeywest.com
Amy Slate’s Amoray Dive Resort,
Key Largo
Waterfront rooms, pool, beach, scuba,
snorkel instr & boat charters.
3nts/2dive pkg from $330 pp d/o.
305-451-3595 or 800-426-6729
amoray.com
Key Largo Bay Marriott Beach Resort
Grab your fins! Blue skies, coral reefs and an
on-site dive shop await you!
888-731-9056 or 305-453-0000
keylargobaymarriott.com
Florida Keys Dive Center, Islamorada
PADI 5 Star CDC Facility. Diving the REEFS &
WRECKS of Key Largo & Islamorada.
800-433-8946 or 305-852-4599
mykeysdiving.com
Marina Del Mar Resort & Marina Key Largo
Keys casual hotel. Steps from full-service dive
merchants. Includes breakfast.
800-451-3483 or 305-451-4107
marinadelmarkeylargo.com
Hawks Cay Resort, Marathon
5 pools, spa, full-service marina and a private
saltwater lagoon.
855-395-7639 or 305-743-7000
hawkscay.com
Hall’s Diving Center & Career Institute,
Marathon
Beautiful Wreck and Reef diving.
Lessons for starters and Career
Training for professionals. Great fun
at Hall’s. Come see us.
800-331-4255 or 305-743-5929
hallsdiving.com
Courtyard by Marriott Key Largo
Dive/Stay packages. Hotel within walking
distance to full-service dive merchants.
888-731-9092 or 305-451-3939
marriott.com/mthcy
Learning to dive is easier than you think, and there’s no better place to do it
than The Florida Keys & Key West. Whether you’re just getting your feet
wet or seeking advanced certification, our world-renowned dive
instructors will take you through it, top to bottom, in no time.
fla-keys.com/diving
Surrender to the deep.
30 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
W R I S T M O U N T
FOR MORE DI VE COMPUTERS AND ACCESSORI ES,
VISI T SPORTDIVER.COM/GEAR
SD
05/14
T
he latest dive
computers have
features like
advanced logarithms,
multiple gases, air
integration and lots of
customization options.
SCUBAPRO CHROMIS
The distinctive characters in the
Chromis display — inspired by
the shape of a Samurai sword —
make it easy to read underwater.
The four-button control is intui-
tive and includes word prompts,
and can be operated even with
thick gloves. Designed with top-
side and submerged capabilities,
the Chromis includes a built-in
altimeter and a programmable
stroke counter in swim mode.
CONTACT: scubapro.com
MSRP: $499
CRESSI GIOTTO
The Giotto combines easy
three-button operation and a
large, user-friendly display with
an impressive list of features,
including two-gas switching,
audio and visual alarms, and
a deep-stop option. Divers will
appreciate the backlit alphanu-
meric display, which has large
figures for easy reading, and
also displays the status of the
user-replaceable battery.
CONTACT: cressi.com
MSRP: $399
TUSAIQ-750 ELEMENT II
The Element II squeezes a lot
into a compact wrist mount,
including two-gas switching,
audible alarms and a deep-stop
option. The backlit display
includes easy-to-read N
2
, O
2
and
ascent-rate bar graphs. Two
buttons on the face and one on
the side control the action, and
the battery is user replaceable.
Tusa has a PC kit that is available
as an option.
CONTACT: tusa.com
MSRP: $430
C O O L D E A L
CD
FOR MORE DI VE COMPUTERS AND ACCESSORI ES,
A I R - I N T E G R A T E D W R I S T
VISI T SPORTDIVER.COM/GEAR
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 31
SD
05/14
MARES ICON HD AI
The Icon boasts a full-color
LCD screen nearly the size of a
smartphone — and packs it full of
data that’s easy to read, including
color-coded bar graphs for tissue
loading and ascent rate. Intuitive
controls use four buttons along
the bottom, and features include
three gases programmable to
99 percent O
2
. A rechargeable
l ithium-ion battery fuels the fun.
CONTACT: mares.com
MSRP: $1,800
SUUNTO D6I
It might look like a wristwatch,
but the D6I packs in impressive
capabilities, including three-gas
switching, five dive modes, a
compact display that’s easy to
read, four-button navigation, and
an excellent tilt-compensated 3-D
compass. With its durable steel
case and anti-reflective sapphire
crystal, the D6I is especially stylish
with the optional steel bracelet.
CONTACT: suunto.com
MSRP: $1,125 with elastomer strap,
transmitter and USB cable
AERIS A300CS OLED
A bright, high-contrast color display,
wireless connection to upload settings or
download data, and optional hoseless air
integration are among the features of the
latest wrist-mounted data cruncher from
Aeris. The A300 CS handles up to four
nitrox mixes, has a full-tilt electronic com-
pass and an intuitive menu system with a
“step back” feature for easy navigation.
Contact: diveaeris.com
MSRP: $949.95; with air-integration
transmitter $1,295.95
FOR MORE DI VE COMPUTERS AND ACCESSORI ES,
32 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
C O N S O L E C O M P U T E R S
C
H
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O
S
I
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G

Y
O
U
R

D
I
V
E

C
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P
U
T
E
R
SD
05/14
FOR MORE DI VE COMPUTERS AND ACCESSORI ES,
VISI T SPORTDIVER.COM/GEAR
SUBGEAR XP-3H
Barely 2 inches across, the XP-3H is about as
compact as console computers get, but you
still get lots of features, including a program-
mable safety-stop timer and the option of
selecting from five settings to increase the
conservatism of the algorithm. A three-color
bar graph tracks tissue loading, and the
memory retains more than a week of dives.
It’s available in a one- or two-gauge console.
CONTACT: subgear.com
MSRP: $475
ATOMIC AQUATICS COBALT 2
The latest version of Atomic’s console
unit has new software and an upgraded
microprocessor to process dive stats even
quicker. It retains all the features that made
it a favorite, including the high-contrast
full-color display and adjustable screen il-
lumination. The Cobalt 2 uses four buttons
to navigate through one of the most intui-
tive dive-computer menus on the market.
CONTACT: atomicaquatics.com
MSRP: $1,299
SHERWOOD SCUBA WISDOM 3
The original Wisdom was a quick hit,
and every version since has added
new capabilities. The Wisdom’s
two-button control with screen
prompts makes it easy to program,
and its dive simulator is top notch. The
large screen and selectable audio and
visual alarms make sure you have all
the data you need, and the expanded
memory retains 110 dives in the log.
CONTACT: sherwoodscuba.com
MSRP: from $750
Wrist-mount or console?
Air integration? Multiple
gases? Color screen?
T
oday’s dive computers offer
so many configurations and
features, it can be a challenge to
sort out exactly which one is best
for you. Simplify your search by
identifying which designs and
features best fit your diving style.
1
Decide where you prefer to have
your info — strapped to your
wrist or clipped to your BC. Nowadays,
this is simply a matter of personal
preference. The latest computers offer
comparable capabilities, whether you
choose wristwatch, wrist-mount or
console style.
2
Identify which features and
capabilities are most important
to you. Do you want air integration? If
you’re considering consoles, you can
choose hoseless or hose. (If hose, do
you want a quick-disconnect option?)
3
What level of simplicity do
you want in operation? Some
computers are so intuitive that you’ll
be tempted to dive them without
looking at the manual (not that you
ever should), while others take some
study to master.
4
How good are your eyes? While
the newest screen displays
have improved the readability of
computers, for some divers, bigger is
still better. Also, new multicolored
displays can help highlight info.
5
Are you an early adopter or a
die-hard analog fan? Some
divers are happy to cast off their
SPGs and compasses for new
electronic versions inside their
computers. Others would prefer to
stick with their air hoses and
magnets, thank you very much.
6
Which options do you want for
personalizing your settings?
Your choices used to be limited to
meters versus feet. Now your options
include adjustable safety factors and
a choice of audio and visual alarms,
deep stops, and depth warnings.
P A S S A G E o f L I G H T


34 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
A fin whale
— also called
a finback,
razorback
or common
rorqual —
surfaces in
the Arctic
waters near
Kulusuk
Island in
Eastern
Greenland.
T H E R E A R E F E W T R U LY U NT O U C H E D P L A C E S L E F T O N
E A RT H; E A S T E R N G R E E N L A N D I S O N E O F T H E M.
P A S S A G E o f L I G H T
T
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 35
Passage
of Light
here are few truly untouched places left on Earth, but Eastern Greenland still provides
visitors with a nearly pristine environment both above and below the water. Most of
the dive sites are completely unknown, and a visit here leaves a diver feeling like a
true explorer. The best time to visit is late summer, when the icebergs are still drifting
down from the North Pole and the whales arrive from the south. Water temperatures
in Greenland usually range from 30 to 37 degrees Fahrenheit, so reliable cold-water
P A S S A G E o f L I G H T
36 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
equipment and a good drysuit are essential to dive here, but extraordinary dive skill is not; divers
must simply be trained in cold-water diving and feel safe with their equipment. Photo opportunities
above water are impressive as well, so plan some time for land-based activities — and don’t forget
your telephoto lenses.
Although every cold-water diver’s dream is probably to dive next to an iceberg, this unique
experience is difcult to capture with your camera. In summertime, when the visibility in Greenland
P A S S A G E o f L I G H T
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 37
is about 26 to 40 feet, you want to be close to the iceberg so it doesn’t get blurred out from far
away. This requires quite a small iceberg so you are able to capture as much as possible in the frame.
Shooting upward from below shows the lighter surface and not the iceberg’s very dark bottom.
Placing a diver in the background or foreground for scale helps illustrate the iceberg’s size. Over/
under shots of an iceberg are another great way to show its dimensions, but framing a good one
is more dif cult than it appears. A photographer must first find an iceberg small enough to capture
Proper
protection
from the
chilly waters
is essential,
especially
when seated
on an iceberg.
This one’s near
the eastern
Greenland
village
of Tasiilaq.
Opposite,
clockwise from
top: Dwarf
fireweed colors
a Greenland
hillside; young
sled dogs take a
training break;
a humpback
whale nears
the surface.
R E L I A B L E C O L D- WAT E R E Q U I P ME NT A N D A G O O D D RY S U I T
A R E E S S E NT I A L T O D I V E H E R E .
Continued on page 41
P A S S A G E o f L I G H T
38 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
DIVERS
DAY OFF
With a population of around only
57,000 in 836,300 square miles
(75 percent of which is covered
by an ice sheet), Greenland really
is a new frontier.
DAY 1
Cetacean spotting is a Greenland
must-do. On good days you’ll see
humpback whales, fn whales,
sperm whales and minke whales
— if you’re very lucky, orcas
might cross your path as well.
Snorkeling is allowed, but only
inasmuch as it does not disturb
the animals.
DAY 2
Everyone should see the Aurora
Borealis at least once, and the
Northern Lights is one of the
primary reasons visitors come
to Greenland.
In the sum-
mer months,
it’s quite rare
to see these
mystical
solar winds,
but as winter
nears, an
Aurora
Borealis spot-
ting becomes
more likely.
DAY 3
Within a day trip from the coast
is the Knud Rasmussen Glacier,
where big blocks of ice calve
from the main glacier from time
to time. On the way back, check
out the abandoned World War II
army camp.
A V I S I T H E R E L E A V E S A D I V E R
F E E L I N G L I K E A T R U E E XP L O R E R.
P A S S A G E o f L I G H T
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 39
For a dynamic
composition,
try using the
iceberg to cre-
ate leading
lines to the
diver.
P A S S A G E o f L I G H T
GREENLAND
ICELAND
NUUK
KULUSUK
ISLAND
DIVERS GUIDE TO GREENLAND
40 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
Placing a
diver near an
iceberg when
photographing
it helps to
demonstrate
its colossal
dimensions.
T H E L I MI T E D V I S I B I L I T Y O F A R C T I C WAT E R S ME A N S
A S H O OT E R MU S T S TAY C L O S E T O T H E I C E .
DON’T-MISS DIVES
Icebergs
The iceberg dives are the one thing
you must not miss in Greenland. The
shapes and curves vary so much with
every new iceberg that diving each is
like discovering a whole new world.
Coastline
Dive under a thick kelp forest, which
grows to about 5 feet high. Once you
push the leaves away, a universe of
small life — such as nudibranchs, crabs,
shrimp and sea stars — bursts forth.
Whales
If you’re very lucky, you’ll get the
chance to snorkel with whales. It’s
an incredible experience to meet
humpback, fn, sperm and minke
whales underwater.
Average water temp 30 to 40 degrees F » What to wear drysuit with a thick undergarment » Average viz 30 to 90 feet,
depending on the season » When to go May to August » For more information northern-explorers.com
P A S S A G E o f L I G H T
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 41
Skeleton
shrimp and
bull kelp (right)
populate the
rich coastal
waters near
Kulusuk
and Tasiilaq.
An eerie
iceberg drifts
in the fog
near Kulusuk
and Tasiilaq.
its full dimensions above water, and the limited visibility of the Arctic waters means a shooter must
stay close to the ice. Smaller icebergs reside inside the fjords, but visibility drops quickly. Visibility
is usually better along the coastline, but the icebergs are quite large. This leads to another issue:
The bigger the iceberg, the bigger the risk that ice is breaking under or above the water, which
can fall down onto divers. On an organized trip, trust your dive guide — he or she will know where
the risk is low and the reward is high.
Continued from page 37
42 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
By Terry Ward
M
aybe you’re one of those divers who feels better underwater,
any water, like you should have been born with gills instead
of lungs. Perhaps you want dive-shop-stamped proof of your 200-plus
plunges. Or maybe you simply love the ritual of filling out that dive
book and watching it grow fatter with experiences, trip after trip — hey,
we’re not judging. Here are some of the world’s best
places for squeezing the most out of every dive day.
1
.

J
O
E
B
E
L
A
N
G
E
R
/
T
H
I
N
K
S
T
O
C
K
;

2
.

M
I
C
H
A
E
L

S
T
U
B
B
L
E
F
I
E
L
D
/
T
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I
N
K
S
T
O
C
K
;

3
.

F
R
A
N
C
O

B
A
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F
I
/
W
A
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E
R
F
R
A
M
E
;

4
.

D
I
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K
-
J
A
N

M
A
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T
A
A
R
/
T
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K
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T
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;

5
.

C
H
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I
S
T
I
A
N

L
O
A
D
E
R
/
S
C
U
B
A
Z
O
O
;

6
.

N
A
T
A
L
I
A
M
D
E
P
/
T
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I
N
K
S
T
O
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K
;

7
.

D
A
V
E
B
L
U
C
K
/
T
H
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N
K
S
T
O
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K
;

8
.

T
O
P

P
H
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O

C
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R
P
O
R
A
T
I
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N
/
T
H
I
N
K
S
T
O
C
K
;

9
.

J
O
E
L

P
E
N
N
E
R
These 9 dive-crazy destinations will leave
you wishing for extra pages in your dive log
1 Roatan The largest of
Honduras’ Bay Islands offers
350 miles of coral reef; barred
hamlets are common residents.
2 Bonaire The Bonaire
National Marine Park was start-
ed in 1979, and it encompasses
seven separate ecosystems.
3 Turks and Caicos Diving
via live-aboard is one of the best
ways to experience the plunging
walls (and resident Nassau
grouper) that lure divers to the
Turks and Caicos.
4 Tulamben, Bali Huge schools
of fish, such as these black
jacks, inhabit the USAT Liberty
wreck in Tulamben, Bali.
5 Great Barrier Reef, Australia
It’s not a bucket-list destination
for nothing: Roughly 1,600 miles
of reef offer everything from
sightings of scorpionfish to
reef sharks.
6 Marsa Alam, Egypt A Clark’s
anemonefish protects his
home turf in Marsa Alam,
Egypt, a spot well-known among
European divers.
7 Sipadan and Mabul,
Malaysia It’s easy to get
overwhelmed by the big guys
in Sipadan, but watch out for
plentiful macro life too, like this
delicate porcelain crab.
8 Chuuk The dive sites in
Chuuk Lagoon — also known as
Truk Lagoon — offer up plentiful
World War II wrecks, many
covered in bright coral.
9 Grand Cayman Dive sites
surround Grand Cayman,
one of the most popular
destinations for North American
scuba divers. This reef
shark is at east end site
Jack McKenny’s Canyon.


Maybe you’re one
of those divers
who should
have been born
with gills.
DROP
DIVE
DROP
until you
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 43
ROATAN, BAY ISLANDS, Honduras
W
hen you stay at one of the many resorts
on Roatan offering unlimited shore div-
ing, it’s hardly far-fetched to log up to six
dives a day. Roatan has approximately 350 miles
of coral reef, with a fringing wall just 300 yards
offshore. From the front yard of the CoCo View
Resort, you can access the 140-foot-long wreck of
the Prince Albert. House reefs around the island,
including the one at Anthony’s Key, are alive with
parrotfish, wrasse and angelfish. And Spooky
Channel is another top shore dive, featuring
an inside reef carpeted with coral heads and a
canyonlike channel that leads from the lagoon to
the outer reef. Choose a resort that offers a package
with a few daily boat-trip options to reach outlying
drop-offs, caverns, crevasses and swim-throughs.
CoCo View Resort features two walls and a
wreck, all divable from the resort’s shore. Seven-night
packages, from $1,199 per person, include all meals,
accommodations, unlimited day and night shore
diving, tanks, belts and weights, and two daily
boat-dive trips. cocoviewresort.com
RIGHT: Lizardfish sport an intimidating
set of razor-sharp teeth. OPPOSITE,
TOP: French angelfish are a common
sight on Bonaire’s healthy reefs.
Squid are easy to spot
in shallow water at the
edge of the CoCo View
house reef.
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 45
F
R
O
M

T
O
P
:

M
A
R
T
I
N

S
T
R
M
I
S
K
A
;

R
O
D

K
L
E
I
N
/
W
A
T
E
R
F
R
A
M
E
;

O
P
P
O
S
I
T
E
:

E
R
I
N

Q
U
I
G
L
E
Y

(
2
)
TURKS AND CAICOS
F
ar and away the best way to rack up the most dives and truly
experience everything the vertigo-inducing clear waters of Turks
and Caicos have to offer is by live-aboard, where you can easily log
five dives a day (as long as you forgo happy hour until after your night
dive, of course). An off-the-beaten-reef Caribbean-diving experience like
no other, a live-aboard trip here features days spent exploring the plung-
ing walls along Providenciales, West Caicos, and French Cay alongside
black corals, cavernous elephant ear sponges painted orange, and count-
less turtles and eagle rays. Be sure to keep an eye on the blue from January
through March in particular, when migrating humpbacks are likely to
be finning past. Eat, sleep, and log those dives — both for the incredible
memories you’re sure to make and for bragging rights too.
The Turks and Caicos Aggressor II runs seven-day trips starting from
$2,595 for twin occupancy, which include airport transfers, tanks and
weights, all meals and snacks, and beer/wine. aggressor.com
BONAIRE
A
s far as dive-friendly destinations go,
Bonaire pretty much wins Miss Con-
geniality. Few destinations make it as
easy to get in the water as often as you want,
any time you want. Dive right in front of
your resort on the colorful walls or explore
elsewhere via easy road access around the
island. Bonaire’s shore diving is legendary
— there are more than 60 clearly marked
spots around the island; look for yellow
rocks painted with the dive site’s name
along the road. Many dive resorts offer
drive-through tank fills, so you can load up
your rental truck for the day and set off on
a trip of discovery. Home to the Caribbean’s
first designated marine park, Bonaire’s wa-
ters ripple with colorful wrasse, angelfish,
eels, sponges and fans, and bigger things
too, like spotted eagle rays and tarpon (the
latter are particularly prevalent on night-
time shore dives). You can reach the Hilma
Hooker, one of the Caribbean’s top wrecks,
from shore, but it’s worth taking a boat
(most resorts offer boat trips in their pack-
ages) to dive sites around Klein Bonaire.
Buddy Dive’s drive-through air/nitrox
fill station is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and
a tank room at the resort’s dock is accessible
24/7. Seven-night Drive and Dive packages
start from $1,195.52 per person, and come
with a pick-up truck, accommodations, six
boat dives, unlimited air/nitrox fills, daily
breakfast and more. buddydive.com
A coral-encrusted
anchor complements
coral-encrusted walls in
the Turks and Caicos.
46 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
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TULAMBEN, Bali
J
ust under the shadow
of volcanic Mount
Agung is Tulamben,
the best destination for
logging nearly
limitless dives
on the island of
the gods. A few
hotels line the
black-sand beach
at Tulamben Bay,
and locals are
on hand to carry
your tanks (two
or three deep
atop their heads,
no less) the few yards to
the put-in place for diving
one of the best wrecks in
the world accessible by
shore. The USAT Liberty —
blanketed in all manner of
soft corals — lies less than
100 feet offshore, and puls-
es with schooling jacks,
bumphead parrotfish and
glassy sweepers. Count on
tons of macro life here too,
including pygmy seahors-
es, nudibranchs and ghost
pipefish. You could dive it
every day of your vacation,
several times, and never
get bored or run short on
bottom time. Look
for blue ribbon
eels and frogfish at
another shore dive
site called Coral
Garden. And take
advantage of short
boat trips on ju-
kungs (traditional
outrigger fishing
boats) to reach
sites like Drop-Off
on the east end of Tulam-
ben Bay, an old lava flow
from Mount Agung where
whale sharks and mola
mola have been spotted.
Aquamarine Bali has
seven-day packages with
unlimited day and night div-
ing in Tulamben Bay, which
include accommodations,
breakfast and lunch daily,
dive guides, all gear and insur-
ance, from $1,095 per person.
aquamarinediving.com
A school of horse-eye jacks
surrounds a diver on the popular
dive site USAT Liberty. BELOW,
RIGHT: Local Balinese people
have been known to carry tanks
three deep atop their heads.
Tulamben
is the best
destination for
logging nearly
limitless dives
on the island of
the gods.
48 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
Plentiful (and friendly)
potato cod abound
on the GBR. RIGHT:
On a calm day, the
waters of the GBR are
almost transparent.
GREAT BARRIER REEF, Australia
Y
ou didn’t travel halfway
around the world to the
biggest barrier reef on the
planet to head out on day dives
from shore locales like Cairns
that hardly get to the heart of
things. For long days of diving
and to ensure that you see the
superlatives in the sprawling
Great Barrier Reef Marine Park,
a live-aboard is the only way to
go. Hit the famed Ribbon Reef
— a 55-mile-long chain of reef
that’s considered the jewel of
the entire Great Barrier — for
thrilling drift dives, stops at
isolated pinnacles, and dives at
legendary sites like Cod Hole,
where the grouper are likely
to be as big as you, and you
might see reef and bull sharks
too. With so much to see, from
mantas to pygmy seahorses,
the greatest thing about the
Great Barrier Reef surely won’t
be how many dives you log but
how many you stack up in a
place so sublime.
On open-deck days aboard
Mike Ball Dive Expeditions trips,
you can squeeze in as many as
six dives, but four or five is more
the norm. Seven-night Coral Sea
Safaris include all meals and
wine with dinner, an underwater
photo workshop and more, from
$3,225 per person.
mikeball.com


MARSA
ALAM, Egypt
W
ith the 2001 opening of an
airport bringing direct flights
from Germany and England
to this Red Sea hot spot, Marsa Alam,
south of Hurghada, is well known
among keen European divers as a
spot to bulk up their logbooks in the
land of year-round sunshine and
balmy waters. For the rest of us in
search of the exotic, it’s worth the
trip here for the chance to experi-
ence the extreme contrast of the dry
earth above the water’s surface and
the impossibly colorful coral of the
Red Sea below. The house reef in
front of the Concorde Moreen Beach
Resort accesses two different reefs
that include a cavern swim-through
and an area of rubble excellent for
critter hunting. Boat trips depart for
legendary spots like Elphinstone
Reef for high-adrenalin drift dives
along steep walls where you’ll get a
pelagic rush alongside barracudas
and trevallies, and might even find
yourself finning alongside one of the
world’s most elusive apex predators,
an oceanic whitetip shark.
Emperor Divers offers packages
with the Concorde Moreen Beach
Resort that include accommodations,
all meals, and five days of unlimited
house-reef diving (with the option
to add boat dives), from around
$623 per person.
emperordivers.com
ABOVE: Mabul is known for colorful macro
life, like this porcelain crab perched atop an
anemone. BELOW: A dugong near Marsa Alam,
Egypt, busily munches the sea grass. Dugongs
and manatees are related, although the dugong’s
tail is fluked like a whale’s.
Sipadan is one
of those pelagic-
rich places where
you want to be
underwater as
much as possible.
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 49
SIPADAN AND
MABUL, Malaysia
O
ne of the world’s most wondrous spots for
diving — and a haul to get to from almost
anywhere — the region around Sipadan
is one of those pelagic-rich places where, dive-
logging obsession aside, you definitely want
to be underwater as much as possible. Resorts
on the nearby island of Mabul, better known
for its macro sites, make
a perfect launching point
for the area. Blennies,
lionfish, frogfish, man-
darinfish, seahorses,
schooling scad, and sea
turtles are among the
denizens commonly
spotted on shore dives
in Mabul. And dive boats
leave regularly for Sipadan, so you can mix it
up among the huge schools of barracuda and
spectacular hard-coral formations there.
Seven-night packages at Sipadan Water
Village Resort include transfers to the island,
all meals, three boat dives daily (including one
daily to Mabul, Kapalai or Sipadan Island) and
unlimited diving on the house reef, from $2,650
per person. swvresort.com
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CHUUK LAGOON, Micronesia
Q
uick access to dive sites in this wreck- diving
mecca in Micronesia means that days spent
diving the haunting World War II sunken
ships of Truk Lagoon (also known as Chuuk
Lagoon) can easily mean as many as five dives
per day, particularly if you dive via live-aboard.
More than 60 Japanese wrecks are scattered
across a lagoon just 77 square miles in size, which
might sound large until you realize it takes just
minutes to motor between dive sites. And once
you’re atop a wreck, you’ll sit on it for several
hours to log as many dives as your computer
allows before motoring to the next. You’ll want to
dive nitrox (30 percent is the standard mix) here
to make the most of your bottom time, and five
dives a day (including a night dive) are complete-
ly within reach, despite some of the wrecks being
quite deep. In addition to tanks and aircraft are
eerie sights that include human skulls among the
wreckage. On a lighter note, dive sites here also
deliver fish life on par with any tropical coral reef,
and even the odd shark.
Seven-day trips aboard the Truk Odyssey
cost $3,095 (plus tax and $50 dive permit fee), and
include six days of diving, nitrox, all meals, and wine
and beer. trukodyssey.com
GRAND CAYMAN, Cayman Islands
T
ropical year-round temps,
vertical walls blanketed with
life just offshore, and guest
houses and hotels that fly dive
flags as if they were the national
banner make Grand Cayman
one of the easiest destinations
for diving your brains out. The
house reefs fronting many dive
resorts make it easy to grab a
coffee in the morning and get
a dive in — spotting things like
rays, grouper and eels — before
the first boat even heads out, or
to squeeze in one more night
dive at day’s end. A plethora
of dedicated dive resorts have
packages that get you out on
boats several times a day to hit
legendary sites like Devil’s Grotto,
crowded with tarpon and silver-
sides, and to see the pinnacle and
black corals at Babylon. A mix
of shore and boat time will have
your logbook’s pages turning at a
record rate.
The house reef at Cobalt
Coast Dive Resort has a deep
wall, mini wall, and shallower
reef area awash with fans and
corals on the island’s spectacular
Northwest side. On-site Divetech
runs a package with the resort
that includes six days of two-tank
boat trips daily, unlimited
shore diving and seven nights
accommodations from $1,310
per person. cobaltcoast .com;
divetech.com
ABOVE: One of
Grand Cayman’s
marquee dive sites,
the Kittiwake deserves
more than one dive.
OPPOSITE: Truk
Lagoon (also known
as Chuuk Lagoon)
is well known for its
WWII wrecks, many
encrusted in colorful
coral blankets.
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 51
52 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
After more than
350 years under-
water, the Virginia
Merchant wreck is
brightly encrust ed
with corals.
Bermuda:
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 53
BELOW: Bermuda
is famous for its
pink-sand beaches,
like this one at
the Fairmont
Southampton hotel.
X
B
ermuda isn’t just for divers. Couples come
here for its pink-sand beaches and Ber-
muda “moon gates”: Asian- influenced
garden gates said to bring luck to lovers. Golfers
fly in, woods and irons in tow, for resorts like the
Rosewood Tucker’s Point hotel. Catering to all
par levels, some refer to the course as “golf porn”
— which explains the devoted repeat clientele.
(New Yorkers can leave LaGuardia Airport and
be on the green in two hours.)
Bermuda’s position in the central North At-
lantic brings stormy seas that, in addition to
its shallow reefs, are largely responsible for its
storied wrecks. Thankfully so: Bermudians val-
ue their rainfall. As early as the 1600s, houses
were built with white limestone filters on their
roofs that deposit rainwater into tanks under the
homes. Even today, after a good rain, you hear lo-
cals happily say, “My tank is full.” Bermuda was
eco-friendly before there was even a name for it.
Those life-giving storms have been good for
divers too. Along with Bermuda’s almost record-
breaking number of wrecks — 300 plus — storms
are still rearranging the underwater landscape
here. Each one brings a glimmer of hope that
the next dive might be the one that reveals that
still-unfound treasure — a silver Spanish dol-
lar or doubloon waiting to make an appearance,
ending a century or more in hiding.
On this visit, I’m told the operators we’re
diving with — Dive Bermuda, FantaSea Diving
& Watersports, and Triangle Diving — are just
beginning their hunt to uncover the location of
the long-lost Roanoke.
In 1864, the 218-foot-long steam-packet
The next dive might be
the one that reveals that
still-unfound treasure
— a silver Spanish
dollar or doubloon.
Treasure Revealed
“You go to heaven if you want,
I’ll stay here in Bermuda.”
all of whom took inspiration from stories of these shores dating back to the 1500s.
Mark Twain wasn’t even a diver, but he succumbed to Bermuda’s allure,
along with authors and artists from William Shakespeare to Georgia O’Keeffe,
BY TARA BRADLEY PHOTOS BY STUART PHI LPOTT
Bermuda
Savvy
Side
Trips
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54 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
1
33
H
ire a cabbie for the day to get your own personal island
tour. It’s more convenient than a group tour, and you’ll
have the freedom to stop as you please, whether it be for
a look atop one of the historic forts or a stop at
1
Crystal
Caves (water-filled caves found by boys playing cricket),
2 Gibb’s Hill Lighthouse (for one of the best views on is-
land),
3
Somerset Bridge (said to be the world’s smallest),
or for a beer at one of the local pubs (which won’t be hard to
find). Word on the street: There’s one church for every pub.
Cab it! (like a local)
The Hermes spent 10
months in St. George’s
Harbour before it was
donated to the Bermuda
Dive Association .
ship left Havana bound for New
York. It was taken captive by the
Confederate States of America
and was scuttled off Bermuda’s
east end. For more than 100 years
it has been lost at sea, defying mod-
ern notions that technology like
radar and GPS can locate anything.
Shipwreck Graveyard
W
ith a few days to kill before
the hunt to find the elu-
sive Roanoke, I gear up with Dive
Bermuda to explore wrecks that
already have their places on the
dive map.
First up: Hermes. The proud,
still-intact 165-foot steel buoy ten-
der was purpose-sunk in 1984.
Visibility here is about 100 feet,
offering a clear view of a ship full of
open-water passageways and port-
holes streaming with light, rays
hiding in the nearby sand patches,
hovering barracuda, and clouds of
yellowtail snapper.
Our second target, the Mary
Celestia, is not as intact. It found
its final resting place after crash-
ing into a reef on the south side of
the island in 1864. What was intact:
five bottles of 148-year-old wine in
its bow, revealed in 2011 by storms
from the previous winter.
The 225-foot side-paddlewheel
steamer, in its day, served as a
Confederate blockade runner.
Like many Civil War-era ships,
Mary Celestia was made of wood
and is not as well-preserved as its
steel neighbors. The difference
calls for a sharp eye: More than
once I watch as coral heads buzz-
ing with chromis miraculously
transform into paddlewheels, an-
chors or bows, revealing glimpses
of their former life. And you never
know, there could always be an-
other stray bottle of wine lurking
in the shadows.
Wrecks like the Mary Celestia
give divers more time to explore
nearby swim-throughs — Bermuda
has tons. Which is why many of the
More than once,
I watch as coral
heads buzzing
with chromis
transform
into anchors
or bows.
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 55
A blockade runner for
the Confederacy dur-
ing the Civil War, the
Mary Celestia went
down on a Bermuda
reef in 1864.
The Rita Zorvetta, an
Italian cargo steamer,
is intact enough for
penetration, with tons
of tunnels for divers
to explore.
56 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
In Bermuda there’s always
another wreck to find, another
treasure to dream about,
another dive to be explored.
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 57
Divers can visit
two wrecks in one
dive: the 55-foot-
long King tugboat
(pictured), and
the nearby
75-foot-long
Forceful tugboat.
Top Side
to-dos
Bermud
58 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
S
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M
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Explore
If you can’t pull yourself
from the water, check
out the ferry schedule on
Sea Express. Departing out
of the Hamilton Ferry Ter-
minal, choose a route, and
catch glimpses of Bermuda’s
charming cottages, regal
homes, the historic town
of St. George — a UNESCO
World Heritage site — and
the Royal Navy Dockyard.
seaexpress.bm
Bike
Explore the island and
get some exercise via the
Bermuda Railway Trail, cre-
ated in 1984 on 18 miles of
former railway. Bike rental
shops with knowledgeable
owners can give you a map
with all of Bermuda’s must-
see spots. Bikes are limited,
so make a reservation if you
can. Try Eve’s Cycles.
evecycles.com
Eat
Even if you’re not staying
at Elbow Beach Bermuda,
head over to Mickey’s Beach
Bistro and Bar (open sea-
sonally). You’ll find a menu
of fresh offerings, and this
spot is one of the only places
that offers beachside din-
ing during the day. (Locals
love it too, so you know it’s
good.) Pompano Beach
Club’s Ocean Grill is the spot
to celebrate a week of killer
diving. On the menu:
Bermuda fish chowder,
Atlantic salmon and
Bermuda rum cake.
elbowbeachbermuda.com;
pompanobeachclub.com
Aqua Lung Alu Trio
Four C batteries and a triple LED
lens give this handy primary a
broad, powerful beam that will
light up any wreck interior. The
elliptical shape makes it com-
fortable to grip, and the locking
magnetic thumb switch is easy for
one-handed  control.
Contact: aqualung.com
MSRP: $359
Ikelite Gamma LED
Just 5½ inches long, the
featherweight Gamma is
ruggedly constructed from
aircraft-grade aluminum, has an
easy-grip shape, a rear push-
button switch, and a surprisingly
bright LED beam.
Contact: ikelite.com
MSRP: $120
The reef around the wreck
of the Virginia Merchant
offers plentiful cracks and
crevices for exploration.
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 59
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AIRPORT
HAMILTON
Atlantic Ocean
Cristobal Colon
BERMUDA
Hermes
Rita
Zovetta
DON’T-MISS DIVES
CRISTOBAL COLON
The Spanish transatlantic
luxury liner sank in 1936 and is
Bermuda’s largest shipwreck,
measuring 499 feet and three
decks high. Used for bombing
practice during WWII, today it’s
a haven for large grouper and
other reef fsh.
HERMES
This intact 165-foot U.S. Coast
Guard buoy tender was sunk as
an artifcial reef in 1984. Today
divers can circumnavigate the
outside of the ship or safely
explore the vessel’s interior
rooms and hallways.
RITA ZOVETTA
Afer running aground on the
south side of the island, the 394-
foot Italian cargo ship found its
resting place at 69 feet, making
it ideal for photographers for
its lengthy bottom time and an
abundance of marine life.
DIVE OPERATORS
BLUE WATER DIVERS &
WATERSPORTS
divebermuda.com
DIVE BERMUDA
bermudascuba.com
FANTASEA DIVING
&WATERSPORTS
fantasea.bm
TRIANGLE DIVING
trianglediving.com
Average water temp 75 degrees F >> What to wear 3mm in late spring to early fall;
5mm in early spring and late fall; 7mm/drysuit in winter >> Average viz 60-200 feet
>> When to go mid-March to December >> For more info sportdiver.com/bermuda
DIVERS GUIDE TO BERMUDA
dive guides here have affectionately
nicknamed themselves “swim-
through junkies” or “tunnel rats.”
Case in point: the Virginia
Merchant. One of the only parts left
of this vessel is the anchor — divers
search for the camouflaged arti-
fact, then move on to play among a
maze of nearby swim-throughs, fol-
lowing oversize sand paths through
reefs teeming with marine life.
X Marks the Spot
W
hen D-Day arrives, I set up
on the boat departing from
Triangle Diving. There’s a buzz in
the air from the mix of on-island
dive operators, staff and regulars.
The camera table is piled high with
cupcakes from staffer’s girlfriends,
homemade cookies and even a fruit
plate. Thermoses are filled with
hot chocolate. We’re pretty much
set. The plan: We’ll take the boat
out to the coordinates the group
has pinpointed as the spot of the
Roanoke’s long-lost hideaway, and
we dive in — cameras and video
gear ready to capture the ship as it
dramatically comes into view. An
epic experience awaits us.
Then it happens: About an
hour out, we hear what every
diver dreads — the captain calls
the dive. He’s been working for
Dive Bermuda for 20 years, so we
respect his judgment. The morn-
ing’s conditions are too rough for
us to hit our mark. Disappointed
but not deterred, the captain
steers us in the direction of a more
suitable dive site.
For us, it’s Cathedral. As I spot a
spinning school of horse-eye jacks,
I approach the site’s namesake.
The reef’s domelike structure is
perforated with skylighted shafts
that open up to rays of sunlight.
It might not be a new discovery
on the dive map, but it’s clear
why Cathedral is a favorite. The
dramatic ambience proves to be
the perfect consolation prize.
Back on board, the energy is
still surprisingly high. It’s almost
as though we’re glad we didn’t
find the Roanoke. Lucky for us, it’s
not going anywhere. In Bermuda
there’s always another wreck to
find, another treasure to dream
about, another dive to be explored.
And on Mary Celestia, they still
haven’t accounted for all that wine.
Swizzle Inn &
Swagger Out
On your way to
the airport stop in
at the Swizzle Inn
for one of
Bermuda’s
unofficial
national drinks,
the Rum Swizzle.
A mix of rums
and juices give this
potent cocktail its
catchy name.
swizzleinn.com
The reef is
perforated with
skylighted
shafts of
sunlight.
The manicured grass
of Bermuda’s plenti-
ful golf courses is a
topside allure for visi-
tors to Bermuda; this
one is at Rosewood
Tucker’s Point.
Special thanks to the
Bermuda Tourism Author-
it y (gotobermuda.com),
Blue Water Divers & Water-
sports (divebermuda.com),
Dive Bermuda (bermudascuba.com),
Fantasea Diving & Watersports
( fantasea.bm), Triangle Diving
(trianglediving.com), Elbow Beach
Bermuda ( elbowbeachbermuda
.com), Rosewood Tucker’s Point
(rosewoodhotels.com/en/tuckers-point-
bermuda) and Pompano Beach Club
(pompanobeachclub.com).
SD
05/14
60 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
BROUGHT TO
YOU BY:
World’s Best ...
Off-the-grid
itineraries elevate
the spirit of
dive exploration
BY BROOKE MORTON
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 61
M/V BILIKIKI
SOLOMON ISLANDS
“We’re the only ones here,” says managing
director Sam Leeson of M/V Bilikiki, the sole
live-aboard based in the Solomon Islands.
This nation east of Papua New Guinea is
home to people who still rely on canoes,
not motorboats, for transportation. A phone
signal wasn’t available until 2011. Underwa-
ter, the remoteness translates into schools
of jacks and barracuda so thick, they seem
to swallow a diver inside. Corals face little
adversity. Divers with their eyes trained on
the macro menagerie will find pygmy sea-
horses, ghost pipefish, mandarinfish and all
the other curiosities that neighboring — and
better known — Papua New Guinea boasts.
bilikiki.com
2
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M/V NAUTILUS EXPLORER
CLIPPERTON ATOLL
The question rolls right off the backs of the
M/V Nautilus Explorer crew. “Wouldn’t it be
easier to run a trip to Socorro?” Easier, yes,
says owner Mike Lever. But easy isn’t how
adventures begin. The Clipperton Atoll
lies 650 miles from Acapulco, Mexico — a
two-night steam. “It’s so far off the beaten
path, it’s ridiculous,” says Lever, who spent
12 years reading up on the island’s crazed,
enslaving lighthouse keeper and the illicit
base the U.S. built during World War II. As for
what you’ll find in the water on this 15-night
itinerary, it’s hard to say. One thing is certain:
You’ll witness green morays writhe from the
sea to devour land crabs. The walls aren’t
thoroughly mapped yet, which adds to the
island’s expeditionary allure. Out where so
few people set foot, this itinerary evokes the
era of early scuba explorers.
nautilusexplorer.com
1
FREE INFORMATION
62 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
ATLANTIC, CARIBBEAN AND
LATIN AMERICA
1. Barefoot CayResort
Roatan- Luxury boutique resort
with beachfront bungalows & villas,
gourmet dining, spa. 5-Star IDC Center
Barefoot Divers. 17
2. BuddyDiveResort &Belmar
Oceanfront Apts.
Bonaire - experience an unspoiled
natural paradise offering spectacular
sunsets, gentle breezes and crystal-
clear turquoise waters. 73
3. CaradonnaDiveAdventures
Bonaire - Divers consider Bonaire to
be one of the most spectacular dive
destinations in the world. 11
4. CoCoViewResort
The most returned to dive resort in
the world! The best in boat and unlim-
ited shore diving. 17
5. DeepBlueResort
Utila – Oceanfront dedicated dive
resort with unlimited shore diving,
Utila, undiscovered jewel of the Carib-
bean. 17
6. DiveProvo
Providenciales, Turks & Caicos -
Tropical scuba diving at its best.
Novice through experienced divers
welcome. 71
7. DonFoster’sDiveCayman
With our fleet of dive boats, friendly
staff, service and instruction, divers
keep coming back for more. 68
8. HondurasInstituteof Tourism
Honduras offers reefs, beaches,
natural adventures, colonial cities
including the Maya ruins of Copan
and the Bay Islands. 17
9. IndepthWatersports
Grand Cayman - Adventure diving on
one-of-a-kind converted Navy Seal
RIB; expert training from resort to CCR
trimix. 22
10. Oasis Divers
Turks and Caicos - Small groups of
divers are taken on our four dive
boats to the spectacular dive sights
surrounding Grand Turk. 71
11. PalaceResorts
The all-inclusive Cozumel Palace is
the ultimate destination for scuba div-
ing on the Palancar coral reef. 3
12. PalmettoBayPlantation
Dive the world’s 2nd largest coral reef
and enjoy our secluded beach and
private villas. 17
13. PhoceaMexico
Mayan Riviera’s PADI CDC/DSAT
Training & Dive Resort to: Cenotes,
Cozumel, Local Reefs, Whalesharks,
Bull Sharks, & Sailfish. 10
14. PlazaBeachResort Bonaire
The resort that has all. PADI 5-star
IDC, beach, spacious villas and great
restaurants. 71
15. RedSail SportsGrandCayman
the largest dive & watersports
operator with locations across Grand
Cayman delivering excellence in
service since 1987. 68
16.SouthernCrossClub
Little Cayman - A small, very comfort-
able, award-winning resort with
world-famous diving and sport fish-
ing in Little Cayman. 65
17. Sunset HouseResort &Sunset
Divers
Grand Cayman - Beautifully renovat-
ed rooms, walking distance to George
Town, meal packages, new dive shop,
Cathy Church Photo. 61
900 All in Atlantic, Caribbean
andLatinAmericaCategory
UNITED STATES
18. FloridaKeysandKeyWest
The 120 miles of beautiful islands that
you can drive to just off the coast of
Southern Florida. 29
CAMPS/EVENTS
19. KidsSeaCamp
ScubaVacationsfortheWholeFamily:
Bonaire; GrandCayman; LittleCay-
man; Palau; Utila, BayIslands&Yap. 70
20. Project AWAREFoundation
Protect our ocean planet - one dive at
a time with Project AWARE. 69
21. PADI eCard
Visit your local PADI Dive Center or
Resort or order your eCard online at
padi.com 66
904All inCamps/Events
Category
INSTRUCTION/TRAINING
22. DAN
Leading dive safety through research,
education, emergency assistance and
insurance programs for 30 years. 15
23. PADI CONED
Continue your education with PADI
Advanced Open Water, Rescue Diver
and Enriched Air Diver. 33
24. PADI eLearning®
Learn to dive - anytime, anywhere
with PADI eLearning®. 64
25. PADI Social Media
Follow PADI on Facebook, Twitter,
You Tube and other social media
channels. 14
26. TheOceanCorporation
Offering commercial diver training,
under water welding, ROVs and NDT
weld inspector training since 1969. 75
905. All inInstruction/Training
Category
LIVE-ABOARDS
27. AggressorFleet &Dancer
Fleet
The largest fleet of live-aboards in the
world serving 15 yachts. Providing
professional service for 25+ years. 9
28. AquaCat Cruises
Weeklong All Inclusive Luxury Live-
aboard Diving Adventure Cruises
Depart Nassau, Bahamas to the
Exuma Cays. 71
29. FourSeasonsExplorer
A floating PADI 5-Star Dive Centre
with Nitrox, the 11-berth live-aboard
sails to virgin dive sites for an incom-
parable experience. 16
30. MikeBall DiveExpeditions
Australia’s leading liveabroad dive
company. Multi-day expeditions to
the Great Barrier Reef & Coral Sea. 70
Visit www.sportdiver.com/freeinfo for DIRECT ACCESS to each Advertiser’s website and free information T HE OF F I C I AL P UB L I C AT I ON OF T HE PAD I D I VI NG S OC I E T Y
Sport Diver
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 63
31. Truk Odyssey
Dive with Odyssey to see the ghost
fleet of Truk Lagoon. 71
905All inLive-aboards
PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO
32. BackscatterEast &West
Underwater Video and Photo
Backscatter East & West now has 2
locations and the most experienced
staff to serve your underwater imag-
ing needs. 70
33. Ikelite
Manufacturer of underwater camera
housings, strobes, mounting arms
and flashlights. 76
34. PolarProFilters
Designed specifically for the Scuba
Diving market, Polar Pro Filters in-
stantly improve under water video
colors for GoPro® cameras. 61
35. Sealife
Underwater cameras and accessories
to help you explore the underwater
world. 26, 27
36. Ultralight Control Systems
Manufacturers of trays and arms for
your cameras, lights and strobes for
digital, video or film. 73
908. All inPhotography/Video
SCUBA ACCESSORIES
37. PADI Gear
all-newWomen’sCollection-Designed
justforher. Finditatpadi.com2
38. CitizenWatchCompanyof
America
Discover Citizen’s outstanding
collection of dive watches and dive
computers, including the incompa-
rable Cyber Aqualand Nx. 5. 5
SCUBA EQUIPMENT
39. Aeris
Aeris products are recognized for
smart design, outstanding perfor-
mance, user-friendly features, and
intuitive operation. 21
40. BauerCompressors, Inc.
Manufacturer of high-pressure
breathing air systems and air purifica-
tion systems, including air storage
systems. 13
41. Cressi
A company close to its Italian sea-
loving heritage providing superior
designs for discriminating divers. 7
42. Mares
Full line diving manufacturer of inno-
vative and technologically advanced
dive gear. 23
43. Tilos
Professional diving gear company
with extensive line of stylish innova-
tive products at exceptional value. 65
910. All ScubaEquipment
EDITORIALLY FEATURED
151. Cressi 8, 30
152. Sherwood 28
153. Tusa 30
154. SCUBAPRO 30
155. Aeris 31
156. Suunto 31
157. Mares 31
158. Sherwood 32
159. SUBGEAR 32
160. Atomic Aquatics 32
161. Aqua Lung 58
162. Ikelite 58
World’s Best Dives
S/Y CUAN LAW
ST. MAARTEN
“To give you an idea of the water’s clarity,
from the dinghy, we saw flying gurnards
on the sand 100 feet below,” says Duncan
Muirhead of diving Sombrero — a speck
of land that’s part of Anguilla and is the
northernmost islet in the Lesser Antilles. It’s
just one of the potential stops on the April
“Down Island” cruise aboard the S/Y Cuan
Law, a luxury sailing trimarin live-aboard
owned by Muirhead and his wife Annie,
which typically operates in the British
Virgin Islands. The charter departs from St.
Maarten, and the itinerary — which varies
from eight to 12 nights — also includes Saba,
a volcanic island south of St. Maarten.
It’s a route not often traveled, except by
humpbacks, which often pass between the
boat and shore.
cuanlaw.com
3
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 65
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M/V FEBRINA
PAPUA NEW GUINEA
Booking a cabin on a dive live-aboard to
soak up local culture is like checking into
Canyon Ranch for the desserts — nobody
does it. That is, unless they’re bound for
the M/V FeBrina’s July trips to Papua New
Guinea’s mask festival, held on the island
of Rabaul. The eight-night trip starts at the
Walindi Plantation Resort, the land-based
half of the operation, located on New Britain
Island. The trek includes regularly visited
sites such as Fathers Reef, where schools
of barracuda, jacks and pinjalo snapper
are common. Rabaul is a hot spot for rare
and unusual macro life, such as Flabellina
nudibranchs, warty frogfish, mandarinfish
and more. The grand finale is a high-energy
celebration where local tribes come to com-
pete both with their artful wares and dances.
For those booked on the return itinerary
back to Walindi, it’s just the beginning.
walindi.com
4
M/V NATIONAL
GEOGRAPHIC ORION
SPICE ISLANDS, INDONESIA
“We won’t be going to any known dive sites,”
says Michelle Graves, Lindblad Expeditions’
expedition development manager of
the 15-day itinerary that departs the
northwestern tip of Kimberley, Australia, for
Indonesia’s Spice Islands this August. The
newly outfitted M/V National Geographic
Orion will travel to three places that few
people visit: the oceanic atolls of Rowley
Shoals Marine Park, East Timor, and a
remote stretch of Indonesia that includes
Komodo and Larantuka.
expeditions.com
5
World’s Best Dives
M/V POLAR PIONEER
ANTARCTICA
It’s the most challenging — and
expensive — continent to check off
your must-dive list. Antarctica’s limit-
ing factors add up to a still largely
untouched beauty: mountains of
brilliant-white ice and turquoise
water. The wildlife is spectacular, and
Gentoo penguins, leopard and crab-
eater seals, and humpback, orca,
and minke whales still approach
divers largely without fear. You’ll be
captivated by every animal interac-
tion, but during your first in-water
seal encounter, you’ll never forget
the electricity of the moment. Come
prepared: The unique 11-day journey
aboard the M/V Polar Pioneer is
designed for those who already
possess ice-diving gear and skills.
diveadventures.com
6
M/V SPOILSPORT
CORAL SEA, AUSTRALIA
It’s what coral reefs would look like
if human beings had never existed:
The wall known as Deep Sea Arcade
looks like a coral factory. The vibrant
marine-life diversity here is enough
to challenge Pantone to a color-off.
This Coral Sea site is the focus of the
M/V Spoilsport’s exploratory trip, a
seven-night itinerary departing Cairns,
Australia, bound beyond the continen-
tal shelf for the plummeting walls of
Holmes, Osprey and Bougainville reefs.
You’ll need serious diving creden-
tials to participate: The trip is aimed
toward attracting technical divers and
researchers, including nighttime semi-
nars on deep diving, but the payoff is a
first-hand experience of a region that
few will ever dive.
mikeball.com
7
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M/V DAMAI II
INDONESIA TO YAP
Alberto Reija Garcia, owner of the M/V Damai II,
has no idea what divers will see on the 16-day
expedition from Indonesia to Yap departing June 14
— that’s why he invited a local marine biologist. “He’ll
tell us what we are seeing,” says Garcia, “and how
the atolls evolve as we progress.” When pressed,
Garcia admits he expects to see quite a lot of pelagic
action, such as sharks, and gardens of soft corals.
Beyond that, he anticipates the surprise. “Exploring
like this — it’s the next step in diving.”
dive-damai.com
8
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 67
See for yourself
Cayman’s magical underwater
World with Don Foster’s Dive.
• Located on the water,
just minutes from
Georgetown
• Daily boat dives
• Spectacular shore diving
• Kittiwake
• Excellent dive
package rates
• Caymans longest
standing dive shop
218 South Church St. • Georgetown
345-949-5679 • 345-945-5132 • email: dfd@candw.ky
www.donfosters.com
© Bone Dry Photo
68 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
S/Y INDO SIREN
INDONESIA
Don’t worry: Learning to pronounce the
island names is included in the itinerary.
Every November, the S/Y Indo Siren departs
for the 14-night Banda Sea Discovery trip
through Indonesia’s lesser-known dive
destinations: Serbete, Gunungapi, the Lu-
cipara Islands, Misool and more. Out there,
odd and unusual is the everyday. The Pantar
Strait is home to bearded scorpionfish,
leaffish and sea apples, a psychedelic-
colored variety of sea cucumber. Though
is the region is a muck wonderland of tiny
creatures, it is also the cruising grounds
of big pelagics like mola mola, humphead
wrasse, mantas and eagle rays.
sirenfleet.com
10
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M/V CARIB DANCER
BAHAMAS
For Capt. Dennis Gautreau, September
can’t come soon enough: That’s when he’ll
pilot the M/V Carib Dancer to San Salvador,
Conception Island, Staniel Cay and other
Out Islands not part of the Bahamas-based
live-aboard’s regular itinerary. “Where we’re
going, the walls have more swim-throughs,
more tunnels and more canyons,” Gautreau
says. The 10-night special trip — a first for the
100-foot, 14-passenger Carib Dancer — is also
the chance to explore the isolated beaches,
grottoes, caverns, and caves of islands
inhabited not by people, but iguanas and
swimming pigs.
aggressor.com; dancerfleet.com
9
Listings
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 69
*Dive operations listed in bold are recognized as a
PADI Five Star Dive Center or Resort Facility.
BERMUDA
Blue Water Divers & Watersports*
divebermuda.com
Dive Bermuda*
bermudascuba.com
Fantasea Diving & Watersports
fantasea.bm
Triangle Diving*
trianglediving.com
DIVE UNTIL YOU DROP
AUSTRALIA
Mike Ball Dive Expeditions*
mikeball.com
BALI
AquaMarine Diving*
aquamarinediving.com
BONAIRE
Buddy Beach and Dive Resort*
buddydive.com
CHUUK LAGOON, MICRONESIA
Odyssey Adventures
trukodyssey.com
GRAND CAYMAN
Divetech*
cobaltcoast.com; divetech.com
MARSA ALAM, EGYPT
Emperor Divers
emperordivers.com
ROATAN, BAY ISLANDS, HONDURAS
CoCo View Resort
cocoviewresort.com
SIPADAN AND MABUL, MALAYSIA
Sipadan Water Village Resort*
swvresort.com
TURKS AND CAICOS
Aggressor Fleet
aggressor.com
WORLD’S BEST DIVE: LIVE-ABOARDS
M/V Bilikiki
bilikiki.com
M/V Carib Dancer
aggressor.com; dancerfleet.com
M/V Damai II
dive-damai.com
M/V FeBrina
walindi.com
M/V National Geographic Orion
expeditions.com
M/V Nautilus Explorer
nautilusexplorer.com
M/V Spoilsport
mikeball.com
M/V Polar Pioneer
diveadventures.com
S/Y Cuan Law
bvidiving.com
S/Y Indo Siren
sirenfleet.com
Take the Pledge:
projectaware.org/10Tips
© Project AWARE Foundation 2014
Be the
Change
DROP
ByTerryWard
M
aybe you’re one of those divers who feels better underwater,
any water, like you should have been born with gills instead
of lungs. Perhaps you want dive-shop-stamped proof of your 200-plus
plunges. Or maybe you simply love the ritual of filling out that dive
book and watching it grow fatter with experiences, trip after trip — hey,
we’re not judging. Here are some of the world’s best
places for squeezing the most out of every dive day.
DIVE
DROP
until you
These9dive-crazydestinations will leave
youwishingfor extrapages inyour divelog
1
2
3
4
Liberty
5
6
7
8
9


Maybeyou’reone
of thosedivers
whoshould
havebeenborn
withgills.
Bermuda:
X
B
ermudaisn’t just fordivers. Couplescome
here for its pink-sand beaches and Ber-
muda “moon gates”: Asian-influenced
gardengates said to bring luck to lovers. Golfers
flyin, woods andirons intow, for resorts likethe
Rosewood Tucker’s Point hotel. Catering to all
par levels, somerefer tothecourseas “golf porn”
—which explains the devoted repeat clientele.
(NewYorkers canleave LaGuardia Airport and
be onthe greenintwo hours.)
Bermuda’s western position in the central
NorthAtlantic brings stormyseas that are large-
ly responsible for its storiedwrecks. Thankfully
so: Bermudians value and take pride in their
rainfall. As early as the 1600s, houses were built
with white limestone filters on their roofs that
deposit rainwater into tanks under the homes.
Even today, after a good rain, you hear locals
happily say, “My tank is full.” Bermuda was
eco-friendly before there was evena name for it.
Those life-giving storms have been good for
divers too. Along withBermuda’s almost record-
breaking number of wrecks —300plus —storms
are still rearranging the underwater landscape
here. Each one brings a glimmer of hope that
the next dive might be the one that reveals that
still-unfound treasure — a silver Spanish dol-
lar or doubloonwaiting tomake anappearance,
ending a century or more inhiding.
On this visit, I’m told the operators we’re
diving with — Dive Bermuda, FantaSea Diving
& Watersports, and Triangle Diving — are just
beginning their hunt to uncover the location of
the long-lost Roanoke.
In 1864, the 218-foot-long steam-packet
Thenext divemight be
the one that reveals that
still-unfoundtreasure
—asilverSpanish
dollarordoubloon.
Treasure Revealed
“Yougotoheavenif youwant,
I’ll stayhereinBermuda.”
all of whomtook inspirationfromstories of these shores dating back tothe 1500s.
MarkTwainwasn’t evenadiver, but hesuccumbedtoBermuda’s allure,
along withauthors andartists fromWilliamShakespeare toGeorgia O’Keeffe,
MARKETPLACE
70 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
CAYMAN ISLANDS
DIVETECH &COBALT COASTRESORT,
GRAND CAYMAN
Book June or August for fifth night, one
meal plan day & Nitrox FREE. Kids 25% *off.
All Inclusive option available year round. 2
Locations for unlimited shore diving. Check
in early, shore dive before dinner! Personalized
service and owner operated. Away from the
hustle & bustle, yet only 15 minutes from town.
Waiting on island for your call at 1-877-946-5656
or check www.cobaltcoast.com or divetech.com
To advertise call:
407- 571- 4743
SPONSORS:
UTILA
June 14-21
Laguna Beach Resort
June 21-28
Caribbean Pearl II
YAP
June 28-July 5
Manta Ray Bay and Yap
Divers
PALAU
July 5-12
Sam’s Tours and
Palau Royal Resort
GRAND CAYMAN
July 12-19 & July 19-26
Cobalt Coast Resort
& DiveTech
LITTLE CAYMAN
July 26-Aug 2nd
Southern Cross Club
BONAIRE
Aug 2-9
Buddy Dive Resort
ST. LUCIA
Aug 9-16
Anse Chastanet
kids@kidsseacamp.com 803-419-2556
www.familydivers.com
Coming Soon:
FIJI, AUSTRALIA,
FLORIDA & ROATAN
USA West HQ
+1 831-645-1082
USA East
+1 603-432-1997
BACKSCATTER.COM BACKSCATTER.COM
We Dive, Shoot and Service Everything We Sell
Free Lifetime Tech Support!
We Dive, Shoot and Service Everything We Sell
Free Lifetime Tech Support!
FROM POINT & SHOOT
TO PROFESSIONAL
MAGAZINES JUST $5.50 EACH!
1-800-879-0478
?
MISSING YOUR
FAVORITE ISSUE OF
Shipping Charges: U.S…$1.00 each,
Canada $2.00, Foreign $3.00
Same day order processing. Please allow 1-2 weeks for delivery.
Canadian and other foreign orders send U.S. funds only,
Visa or MasterCard. Florida residents add 6% sales tax.
For U.S. Orders Only: 1-800-879-0478
Canada and Foreign: 1-386-447-2382
Hours: Monday – Friday 8:30am – 5pm EST
MARKETPLACE
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 71
Toll Free 1-800-766-6016
www.plazabeachresortbonaire.com
Plaza Beach Resort Bonaire – the only resort on Bonaire that offers an All Inclusive package.
Packages from $1,110 pp/dbl for a 7 night ALL-INCLUSIVE stay.
PRICE INCLUDES:
• All meals, buffet style with theme nights and live cooking stations
• Daytime snacks • Unlimited drinks (*premium brands & other restrictions apply)
• Daytime activities and evening entertainment
• Use of paddle boards, kayaks, catamarans & snorkeling equipment
• Beach chair & Pool towels • Free WI-FI
• 6 days unlimited shore diving • Round trip airport transfers
• All taxes and service charges (excludes marine park fee)
*Excludes premium brands, starts 4/21/14
Bonaire’s only All-Inclusive resort!
$999
· lrc|udes a|| rea|s,
oeverages & lrarslers
· Free N|lrox
· ur|que ouler reel, s|ar|,
ard lec| d|v|rg
· N|re |uxury su|les
1-800-757-5396
the new way to see
TRUK LAGOON
www.trukodyssey.com
info@trukodyssey.com
Let our US Reservations Office customize your vaca-
tion choosing from a variety of fine accommodations.
Dive West Caicos, French Cay, Northwest Point, Pine
Cay & beyond with our fun, professional staff who will
show you the best of Turks & Caicos scuba diving.
Offering diving as it should be!
DIVE PROVO
800-234-7768
diving@diveprovo.com
www.diveprovo.com
A Diver’s Destination • Small groups and personal
attention • Three dives a day • Out-island dive trips
• Nitrox, whale watching and stingray encounters
• Complete dive and accommodation packages.
OASIS DIVERS
800-892-3995
oasisdiv@tciway.tc
www.oasisdivers.com
TURKS & CAICOS
I SLANDS
MARKETPLACE
72 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
Apple, the Apple Logo, and iTunes are
trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in
the U.S. and other countries. iPad is a
trademark of Apple Inc. App Store is a
service mark of Apple Inc.
Download the FREE
Sport Diver App today
in the App Store.
DIVE IN...
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on the iPad

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PADI Retailer Partner Program
United States
ARI ZONA
Alexander’s Dive Shop Too (Nogales)
520-287-5103 • divetoo.com
Saguaro Scuba (Mesa)
877-837-7637 • www.saguaroscuba.com
CALI FORNI A
Fisheye Scuba (Folsom)
916-850-1145 • www.fisheyescuba.com
COLORADO
A-1 Scuba & Travel Center (Littleton)
800-783-7282 • A1scuba.com
FLORI DA
Crystal Lodge Dive Center (Crystal River)
352-795-6798 • manatee-central.com
Dayo Scuba (Orlando)
407-292-9727 • dayo.com
Discover Diving Center (Port Orange)
386-760-3483 • divefl.com
Dive Locker Of Panama City Beach
(Panama City Beach)
850-230-8006 • divelocker.net
Diver’s Den (Panama City Beach)
850-234-8717 • diversdenpcb.com
Jupiter Dive Center (Jupiter)
561-745-7807 • jupiterdivecenter.com
Key Dives (Islamorada)
305-664-2211 • keydives.com
Pompano Dive Center (Pompano Beach)
954-788-0208 • pompanodivecenter.com
Scubatech of NW Florida (Destin)
850-837-2822 • www.scubatechnwfl.com
Sea Experience (Ft. Lauderdale)
954-770-DIVE (3483) • divefortlauderdale.com
Stuart Dive Shop (Stuart)
772-600-8288 • www.stuartscuba.com
HAWAI I
Lahaina Divers (Lahaina)
808-667-7496 • lahainadivers.com
The Honolulu Scuba Company (Honolulu)
808-220-0577 • honoluluscubacompany.com
I LLI NOI S
Haigh Quarry (Kankakee)
815-939-7797 • haighquarry.com
MI CHI GAN
Sea The World Scuba Center
(Farmington Hills)
248-478-6400 • seatheworld.us
MI SSI SSI PPI
Round Island Divers ( Pascagoula)
228-938-2998 • roundislanddivers.com
MI SSOURI
Bonne Terre Mine/West End Diving (Bridgeton)
888-843-3483 • 2dive.com
NEW J ERSEY
American Diving Supply (Northfield)
609-646-5090 • americandivingsupply.com
The Dive Shop (Cherry Hill)
856-751-0308 • thediveshopnj.com
NEW YORK
Dip ‘N Dive (Buffalo)
716-837-3483 • dipanddive.com
Hampton Dive Center (Riverhead)
631-727-7578 • www.hamptondive.com
Pan Aqua Diving (New York)
212-736-3483 • panaqua.com
Pisces School Of Dive (East Rochester)
585-381-2842 • piscesdivers.com
Seascapes USA (Syosset)
516-433-7757 • seascapesusa.com
Stingray Divers (Brooklyn)
718-384-1280 • stingraydivers.com
NORTH CAROLI NA
Bermuda Triangle Scuba (Asheville)
828-252-8707 • www.24scuba.com
Triad Divers Supply (Highpoint)
336-886-8808 • www.triaddivers.net
PENNSYLVANI A
A Water Odyssey Scuba (Williamsport)
570-326-2091 • awaterodysseyscuba.com
VI RGI NI A
Virginia Scuba (Manassas)
703-369-0098 • www.virginiascuba.com
WASHI NGTON
Seattle Scuba Schools (Seattle)
206-284-2350 • seattlescuba.com
WI SCONSI N
Aqua Center of Green Bay, Inc. (Green Bay)
920-468-8080 • www.aquacntr.com
WASHI NGTON, D. C.
Blue Planet Scuba (Washington, DC)
202-527-9419 • www.blueplanetdc.com
International
BAHAMAS
Stuart Cove’s Dive South Ocean (Nassau)
800-879-9832 • www.stuartcove.com
CANADA
Aqua Plein Air (Quebec)
450-433-1294 • aquapleinair.com
Caribbean Dreams Diving (Calgary)
403-228-5756 • www.caribbeandreams.ca
Langley Diving (Langley)
604-514-8190 • langleydiving.com
CAYMAN I SLANDS
Eden Rock Diving Center (George Town)
345-949-7243 • www.edenrockdive.com
For more info about the PADI Retailer Partner Program,
please call Kelly at 407-571-4743
MARKETPLACE
MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM 73
Please remove
non-paper inserts
(e.g., CD’s, batteries)
before recycling
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05/14
Sport Diver (ISSN 1077-985X) is published 10 times per year (J/F, March, April, May, June, July, Aug., Sept., Oct., N/D) by Bonnier Corp., 460 N. Orlando Ave., Suite 200, Winter Park, FL 32789. Basic rate $19.97 for one year. (Canada residents please add $12 per
year for postage; all other foreign residents please add $24 for postage, U.S. funds only.) Periodicals postage paid at Winter Park, FL, and additional ofces. Contents copyright 2014 by Bonnier Corp. For subscription information or questions, email pdsmember@
emailcustomerservice.com. Contributions: Editorial comments, articles, photography or artwork should be addressed to Editor, Sport Diver, P.O. Box 8500, Winter Park, FL 32790. The editorial staf can also be reached via the Internet by addressing electronic mail
to editor@sportdiver.com. Not responsible for solicited or unsolicited material. Advertisers: UPS and overnight delivery to 460 N. Orlando Ave, Suite 200, Winter Park, FL 32789. Information and media kits are available by calling 407-628-4802. The contents of this
publication, including diving techniques and use of diving equipment, reflect the individual experiences of the writers and are not necessarily the recommended practices of Bonnier Corp. and are not intended for the sole purpose of diving instruction. Individuals
seeking to participate in activities described in this publication should be properly trained and/or certified for such by a qualified professional diving instructor. Diving or use of diving equipment by untrained individuals can lead to serious injury or death. Neither
Bonnier Corp., Sport Diver magazine nor its contributors shall be liable for any mishap claimed to result from use of such material. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Sport Diver magazine, P.O. Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235. CANADA POST:
Publications Mail Agreement Number: 40612608. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: IMEX Global Solutions, P.O. Box 25542, London, ON N6C 6B2. Printed in the USA.
74 MAY 201 4 | S PORTDI VER. COM
VISI T SPORTDIVER.COM/PHOTOS FOR MORE
TI PS FOR UNDERWATER PHOTOGRAPHY
Camera Specs
CAMERA Canon 5D Mark II // HOUSING Aquatica //
HOUSI/ HO/ HOHO// LENS Canon 15mm // STROBES
Sea & Sea YS-D1 // SETTINGS f/7.1, 1/50 sec, ISO 800
Sultry Seal
Photo and text by Ralph Pace
We set out in La Jolla Cove in San Diego to get some photo-ID shots of a group
of sevengill sharks. As I came around the corner, this harbor seal was resting
for a moment, admiring its beautiful kelp kingdom. It glanced back just long
enough for a single frame before swimming off.
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