You are on page 1of 4

Why patient treated by Digoxin, Ramipril, and Warfarin ? How the pharmacology of those drugs? a.

Digoxin It is used to control ventricular rate in atrial fibrillation and in the management of congestive heart failure with atrial fibrillation. Its use in congestive heart failure and sinus rhythm is less certain. The margin between toxic and therapeutic doses is small. Pharmacology 1. Indication For the treatment and management of congestive cardiac insufficiency, arrhythmias and heart failure. 2. Pharmacodinamics Digoxin, a cardiac glycoside similar to digitoxin, is used to treat congestive heart failure and supraventricular arrhythmias due to reentry mechanisms, and to control ventricular rate in the treatment of chronic atrial fibrillation. 3. Mechanism of action Digoxin inhibits the Na-K-ATPase membrane pump, resulting in an increase in intracellular sodium. The sodium calcium exchanger (NCX)in turn tries to extrude the sodium and in so doing, pumps in more calcium. Increased intracellular concentrations of calcium may promote activation of contractile proteins (e.g., actin, myosin). Digoxin also acts on the electrical activity of the heart, increasing the slope of phase 4 depolarization, shortening the action potential duration, and decreasing the maximal diastolic potential. 4. Absorbtion Absorption of digoxin from the elixir pediatric formulation has been demonstrated to be 70% to 85% complete (90% to 100% from the capsules, and 60% to 80% for tablets). 5. Metabolism Hepatic (but not dependent upon the cytochrome P-450 system). The end metabolites, which include 3 b-digoxigenin, 3-keto-digoxigenin, and their glucuronide and sulfate conjugates, are polar in nature and are postulated to be formed via hydrolysis, oxidation, and conjugation. b. Ramipril Ramipril is a prodrug belonging to the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor class of medications. It is metabolized to ramiprilat in the liver and, to a lesser extent, kidneys. Ramiprilat is a potent, competitive inhibitor ofACE, the enzyme responsible for the conversion of angiotensin I (ATI) to angiotensin II (ATII). ATII regulates blood pressure and is a key component of the reninangiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Ramipril may be used in the treatment of hypertension, congestive heart failure, nephropathy, and to reduce the rate of death, myocardial infarction and stroke in individuals at high risk of cardiovascular events.

Pharmacology 1. Indication For the management of mild to severe hypertension. May be used to reduce cardiovascular mortality following myocardial infarction in hemodynamically stable individuals who develop clinical signs of congestive heart failure within a few days following myocardial infarction. To reduce the rate of death, myocardial infarction and stroke in individuals at high risk of cardiovascular events. May be used to slow the progression of renal disease in individuals with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and microalubinuria or overt nephropathy. 2. Pharmacodinamics Ramipril is an ACE inhibitor similar to benazepril, fosinopril and quinapril. It is an inactive prodrug that is converted to ramiprilat in the liver, the main site of activation, and kidneys. Ramiprilat confers blood pressure lowing effects by antagonizing the effect of the RAAS. The RAAS is a homeostatic mechanism for regulating hemodynamics, water and electrolyte balance. During sympathetic stimulation or when renal blood pressure or blood flow is reduced, renin is released from the granular cells of the juxtaglomerular apparatus in the kidneys. In the blood stream, renin cleaves circulating angiotensinogen to ATI, which is subsequently cleaved to ATII by ACE. ATII increases blood pressure using a number of mechanisms. First, it stimulates the secretion of aldosterone from the adrenal cortex. Aldosterone travels to the distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and collecting tubule of nephrons where it increases sodium and water reabsorption by increasing the number of sodium channels and sodium-potassium ATPases on cell membranes. Second, ATII stimulates the secretion of vasopressin (also known as antidiuretic hormone or ADH) from the posterior pituitary gland. ADH stimulates further water reabsorption from the kidneys via insertion of aquaporin-2 channels on the apical surface of cells of the DCT and collecting tubules. Third, ATII increases blood pressure through direct arterial vasoconstriction. Stimulation of the Type 1 ATII receptor on vascular smooth muscle cells leads to a cascade of events resulting in myocyte contraction and vasoconstriction. In addition to these major effects, ATII induces the thirst response via stimulation of hypothalamic neurons. ACE inhibitors inhibit the rapid conversion of ATI to ATII and antagonize RAAS-induced increases in blood pressure. ACE (also known as kininase II) is also involved in the enzymatic deactivation of bradykinin, a vasodilator. Inhibiting the deactivation of bradykinin increases bradykinin levels and may sustain the effects of ramiprilat by causing increased vasodilation and decreased blood pressure. 3. Mechanism of action There are two isoforms of ACE: the somatic isoform, which exists as a glycoprotein comprised of a single polypeptide chain of 1277; and the testicular isoform, which has a lower molecular mass and is thought to play a role in sperm maturation and binding of sperm to the oviduct epithelium. Somatic ACE has two functionally active domains, N and C, which arise from tandem gene duplication.

Although the two domains have high sequence similarity, they play distinct physiological roles. The C-domain is predominantly involved in blood pressure regulation while the N-domain plays a role in hematopoietic stem cell differentiation and proliferation. ACE inhibitors bind to and inhibit the activity of both domains, but have much greater affinity for and inhibitory activity against the C-domain. Ramiprilat, the principle active metabolite of ramipril, competes with ATI for binding to ACE and inhibits and enzymatic proteolysis of ATI to ATII. Decreasing ATII levels in the body decreases blood pressure by inhibiting the pressor effects of ATII as described in the Pharmacology section above. Ramipril also causes an increase in plasma renin activity likely due to a loss of feedback inhibition mediated by ATII on the release of renin and/or stimulation of reflex mechanisms via baroreceptors. 4. Absorbtion The extent of absorption is at least 50-60%. Food decreases the rate of absorption from the GI tract without affecting the extent of absorption. The absolute bioavailabilities of ramipril and ramiprilat were 28% and 44%, respectively, when oral administration was compared to intravenous administration. 5. Metabolism Hepatic metabolism accounts for 75% of total ramipril metabolism. 25% of hepatic metabolism produces the active metabolite ramiprilat via liver esterase enzymes. 100% of renal metabolism converts ramipril to ramiprilat. Other metabolites, diketopiperazine ester, the diketopiperazine acid, and the glucuronides of ramipril and ramiprilat, are inactive. c. Warfarin Warfarin is an anticoagulant drug normally used to prevent blood clot formation as well as migration. Although originally marketed as a pesticide (d-Con, Rodex, among others), Warfarin has since become the most frequently prescribed oral anticoagulant in North America. Warfarin has several properties that should be noted when used medicinally, including its ability to cross the placental barrier during pregnancy which can result in fetal bleeding, spontaneous abortion, preterm birth, stillbirth, and neonatal death. Additional adverse effects such as necrosis, purple toe syndrome, osteoporosis, valve and artery calcification, and drug interactions have also been documented with warfarin use. Warfarin does not actually affect blood viscosity, rather, it inhibits vitamin-k dependent synthesis of biologically active forms of various clotting factors in addition to several regulatory factors. Pharmacology 1. Indication For the treatment of retinal vascular occlusion, pulmonary embolism, cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation and flutter, cerebral embolism, transient cerebral ischaemia, arterial embolism and thrombosis. 2. Pharmacodinamics

Warfarin, a coumarin anticoagulant, is a racemic mixture of two active isomers. It is used in the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic disease including venous thrombosis, thromboembolism, and pulmonary embolism as well as for the prevention of ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). 3. Mechanism of action Warfarin inhibits vitamin K reductase, resulting in depletion of the reduced form of vitamin K (vitamin KH2). As vitamin K is a cofactor for the carboxylation of glutamate residues on the N-terminal regions of vitamin K-dependent proteins, this limits the gamma-carboxylation and subsequent activation of the vitamin Kdependent coagulant proteins. The synthesis of vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors II, VII, IX, and X and anticoagulant proteins C and S is inhibited. Depression of three of the four vitamin K-dependent coagulation factors (factors II, VII, and X) results in decreased prothrombin levels and a decrease in the amount of thrombin generated and bound to fibrin. This reduces the thrombogenicity of clots. 4. Absorbtion Rapidly absorbed following oral administration with considerable interindividual variations. Also absorbed percutaneously 5. Metabolism Metabolized stereo- and regio-selectively by hepatic microsomal enzymes. Swarfarin is predominantly metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 to yield the 6- and 7-hydroxylated metabolites. R-warfarin is metabolized by CYP1A1, 1A2, and 3A4 to yield 6-, 8-, and 10-hydroxylated metabolites. Hydroxylated metabolites may be further conjugated prior to excretion into bile and urine. UGT1A1 appears to be responsible for producing the 6-O-glucuronide of warfarin, with a possibly contribution from UGT1A10. Five UGT1As may be involved in the formation of 7-O-glucuronide warfarin. S-warfarin has higher potency than R-warfarin and genetic polymorphisms in CYP2C9 may dramatically decrease clearance of and increase toxicity of the medication.