ON SOME RECURRENCE TYPE SMARANDACHE SEQUENCES

A.A.K. MAJUMDAR and H. GUNARTO
Ritsumeikan Asia-Pacific University, 1-1 Jumonjibaru, Beppu-shi 874-8577, Oita-ken, Japan.
ABSTRACT. In this paper, we study some properties of ten recurrence type Smarandache
sequences, namely, the Smarandache odd, even, prime product, square product, higher-power
product, permutation, consecutive, reverse, symmetric, and pierced chain sequences.
AMS (l991) Subject Classification: 11 A41, 11 A5!.
1. INTRODUCTION
This paper considers the following ten recurrence type Smarandache sequences.
(l) Smarandache Odd Sequence : The Smarandache odd sequence, denoted by {OS(n)} <Xl n=l,
is defined by (Ashbacher [1])
OS(n)=135 ... (2n-l), n?J. (1.1)
A first few terms of the sequence are
1,13 135,1357,13579,1357911,135791113,13579111315, ....
(2) Smarandache Even Sequence: The Smarandache even sequence, denoted by {ES(n)} 00 n""


is defined by (Ashbacher [1])
ES(n)=24 ... (2n), n2:: 1.
A first few terms of the sequence are
2,24,246,2468,246810,24681012,2468101214, ... ,
of which only the first is a prime number.
(1.2)
(3) Smarandache Prime Product Sequence: Let {Pn}<Xl
n
=l be the (infinite) sequence of primes
in their natural order, so that Pl=2, P2=3, Pi=5, P4=7, P5=11, P6=13, ....
The Smarandache prime product sequence, denoted by {PPS(n)} <Xl
n
",,\, is defined by
(Smarandache [2])
, PPS(n)=PIP2 ... Pn+1, U2::1. (1.3)
(4) Smarandache Square Product Sequences: The Smarandache square product sequence of
the first kind, denoted by {SPSl(n)} oon=l, and the Smarandache square product sequence of
the second kind, denoted by {SPS2(n)} oon'" I, are defined by (Russo [3])
SPS 1(n)=(12)(22) ... (n
2
)+ 1 =(n!)2+ 1, n ~ l  
SPS2(n)=(J2) (22) ... (n2)-1=(n!)2-1, n2::1.
A first few terms of the sequence {SSPI(n)}oon=1 are
SPSl(1)=2, SPSI(2)=5, SPS\(3)=37, SPSl(4)=577, SPSl(5)=14401,
SPSl(6)=518401 =13x39877, SPSl(7)=25401601 01 x251501,
SPSl(8)=1625702401 =17x95629553, SPSl(9)=131681894401,
of which the first five terms are each prime.
A first few terms of the sequence {SPS2(n)}oon=1 are
SPS2(l)=O, SPS2(2)=3, SPS2(3)=35, SPS2(4)=575, SPS2(5)=14399,
(l.4a)
(l.4b)
SPS2(6)=518399, SPS2(7)=25401599, SPS2(8)=1625702399, SPS2(9)=131681894399,
of which, disregarding the first term, the second term is prime, and the remaining terms of
the sequence are all composite numbers (see Theorem 6.3).
92
(5) Smarandache Higher Power Product Sequences : Let m (>3) be a fixed integer. The
Smarandache higher power product sequence of the first kind, denoted by,
{HPPS l(n)} co n=\. and the Smarandache higher power product sequence of the second kind,
denoted by, HPPS2(n)} 00 n=1. are defined by
HPPS I (n)=(1 m)(2m) ... (nm)+ 1 =(n!)m+ 1, n2:1, (l.5a)
HPPS2(n)=(1 m)(2m) ... (nm)-1 :::::(n!)m-l, n2::1. (l.5b)
(6) Smarandache Permutation Sequence: The S marandache permutation sequence, denoted
by {PS(n)}COn=I' is defined by (Dumitrescu and Seleacu [4])
PS(n)=135 ... (2n-l)(2n)(2n-2) ... 42, n:2:1. (1.6)
A first few terms of the sequence are
12, 1342, 135642, 13578642, 13579108642, .. ,.
(7) Smarandache Consecutive Sequence: The Smarandache consecutive sequence, denoted
by {CS(n)}COn=l, is defined by (Dumitrescu and Seleacu [4])
CS(n)=123 ... (n-l)n, n;?:1. (1.7)
A first few terms of the sequence are
1,12,123,1234,12345,123456, ....
(8) Smarandache Reverse Sequence : The Smarandache reverse sequence, denoted by,
{RS(n)} con=l, is defined by (Ashbacher [1])
RS(n)=n(n-l) ... 21, (1.8)
A first few terms of the sequence are
1,21,321,4321,54321,654321, ....
(9) Smarandache Symmetric Sequence: The Smarandache symmetric sequence, denoted by
{SS(n)}CO
n
=l' is defined by (Ashbacher [1])
1,11,121,12321,1234321,123454321,12345654321, ....
Thus,
SS(n)=12 ... (n-2)(n-l)(n-2) ... 21, SS(1)=I, SS(2)=11. (1.9)
(10) Smarandache Chain Sequence : The Smarandache pierced chain sequence,
denoted by   is defined by (Ashbacher [1]) \
101,1010101,10101010101,101010101010101, ... , (1.10)
which is obtained by successively concatenating the string 0101 to the right of the
preceding terms of the sequence, starting with PCS( 1)= 1 0 1.
As has been pointed out by Ashbacher, all the terms of the sequence {PCS(n) }n=l co is
divisible by 101. We thus get from the sequence {PCS(n)}n=loo, on dividing by 101, the
sequence {PCS(n)/l 01 co. The elements of the sequence {PCS(n)/l 01 00 are
1, 10001, 100010001, 1000100010001, ....
Smarandache [5] raised the question How
sequence{PCS(n)/lOI}n=loo are prime?
many terms
(1.11)
of the
In this paper, we consider some of the properties satisfied by these ten Smarandache
sequences in the next ten sections where we derive the recurrence relations as well.
For the Smarandache odd, even, consecutive and symmetric sequences, Ashbacher [1]
raised the question: Are there any Fibonacci or Lucas numbers in these sequences?
We recall that the sequence of Fibonacci numbers, {F(n)} n=1 00, and the sequence of
Lucas numbers {L(n)}n=IC(), are defined by (Ashbacher [1])
F(O)=O, F(1)=I; F(n+2)=F(n+ l)+F(n), n;?:O,
L(0)=2, L(1)=I; L(n+2)=L(n+ l)+L(n), n2::0,
93
( 1.12)
(1.13)
Based on computer search for Fibonacci and Lucas numbers, Ashbacher conjectures
that there are no Fibonacci or Lucas numbers in any of the Smarandache odd, even,
consecutive and symmetric sequences (except for the trivial cases). This paper confirms the
conjectures of Ashbacher. We prove further that none of the Smarandache prime product and
reverse sequences contain Fibonacci or Lucas numbers (except for the trivial cases).
For the Smarandache even, prime product, permutation and square product sequences,
the question is : Are there any perfect powers in each of these sequences? We have a partial
answer for the first of these sequences, while for each of the remaining sequences, we prove
that no number can be expressed as a perfect power. We also prove that no number of the
Smarandache higher power product sequences is square of a natural number.
For the Smarandache odd, prime product, consecutive, reverse and symmetric
sequences, the question is : How many primes are there in each of these sequences? For the
Smarandache even sequence, the question is : How many elements of the sequence are twice
a prime? These questions still remain open.
In the subsequent analysis, we would need the following result.
Lemma 1.1 : 31(10m+lOn+l) for all integers  
Proof: We consider the following three possible cases separately:
(1) m=n=O. In this case, the result is clearly true.
(2) m=O, 1. Here,
1 Om+ 1 On+ 1 =1 On+2=(1 On -1 )+3,
and so the result is true, since 311 On-l =9(1 + 10+ 10
2
+ ... + lOn-I).
(3) 1, 1. In this case, writing
1 Om+ 1 On+ 1 =(1 Om-1)+(1 On -1)+3,
we see the validity of the result. 0
2. SMARANDACHE ODD SEQUENCE {OS(n)} (X) no: I
The Smarandache odd sequence is the sequence of numbers fanned by repeatedly
concatenating the odd positive integers, and the n-th term of the sequence is given by (1.1).
For any   OS(n+l) can be expressed in terms ofOS(n) as follows:  
OS(n+1)=135 ... (2n-1)(2n+l)
OSOS(n)+(2n+ 1) for some integer 1. (2.1)
More precisely,
s=number of digits in (2n+ 1).
Thus, for example, OS( 5)=( 1 O)OS( 4)+7, while, OS( 6)=( 1 02)OS( 5)+ 11.
By repeated application of (2.1), we get
OS(n+3)=10
s
OS(n+2)+(2n+5) for some integer
1 Os[ 1 ot OS(n+ 1 )+(2n+ 3)]+(2n+5) for some integer t21 (2.2a)
=10s+t[10
U
OS(n)+(2n+ 1)]+(2n+3)10s+(2n+5) for some integer   (2.2b)
so that
OS(n+ 3)=1 Os+t+uOS(n)+(2n+ 1) 1 Os+t+(2n+ 3) lOs +(2n+5),
where
Lemma 2.1 : 31 OS(n) if and only if31 OS(n+3).
Proof: For any s, t with   by Lemma 1.1,
31 [(2n+ 1) 1 Os+t+(2n+ 3) 1 OS +(2n+5)]=(2n+ 1)( 1 Os+t+ 1 Os+ 1)+(1 OS+2).
The result is now evident from (2.3). 0
94
(2.3)
From the expression ofOS(n+3) given in (2.2), we see that, for all n2::1,
OS(n+3)=10s+t OS(n+l)+ (2n+3)(2n+5)
=10
s
+
t
+
u
OS(n)+ (2n+l)(2n+3)(2n+5).
The following result has been proved by Ashbacher [1].
Lemma 2.2: 31 OS(n) if and only if 31 n. In particular, 3 I OS(3n) for all n2::1.
In fact, it can be proved that 9jOS(3n) for all n:2::1.
We now prove the following result.
Lemma 2.3: 5 I OS( 5 n+ 3) for all n2::0.
Proof: From (2.1), for any arbitrary but fixed n2::0,
OS(Sn+3)=10
s
OS(5n+2)+(lOn+5) for some integer s2::1.
The r.h.s. is clearly divisible by 5, and hence 51 OS(5n+3).
Since n is arbitrary, the lemma is established. 0
Ashbacher [1] devised a. computer program which was then run for all numbers from
135 up through OS(2999)=135 ... 29972999, and based on the findings, he conjectures that
(except for the trivial case ofn=l, for which OS(l)=l=F(l)=L(1» there are no numbers in the
Smarandache odd sequence that are also Fibonacci (or, Lucas) numbers. In Theorem 2.1 and
Theorem 2.2, we prove the conjectures of Ashbacher in the affirmative. The proof of the
theorems relies on the following results.
Lemma 2.4: For any n2::1, OS(n +1»10 OS(n).
Proof: From (2.1), for any n2:: 1,
OS(n+ 1)= 1 OS OS( n)+(2n+ 1» 1 OS OS(n» 1 0 OS(n),
where 52::1 is an integer. We thus get the desired inequality. 0
CoroLLary 2.1 : For any n2::1, OS(n+2)-OS(n»9[OS(n+ l)+OS(n)].
Proof: From Lemma 2.4,
OS(n+ 1)-OS(n»9 OS(n) for all n2::1. (2.4)
Now, using the inequality (2.4), we get
OS(n+2)-;OS(n)=[OS(n+2)-OS(n+ l)]+[OS(n+ 1)-OS(n)]>9[OS(n+ l)+OS(n)],
which establishes the lemma. 0
Theorem 2.1 : (Except for n=1,2 for which OS(1)=1=F(1)=F(2), OS(2)=13=F(7» there are
no numbers in the Smarandache odd sequence that are also Fibonacci numbers.
Proof: Using Corollary 2.1, we see that, for all n ~ 1  
OS(n+2)-OS(n»9[OS(n+ l)+OS(n)]>OS(n+ 1). (2.5)
Thus, no numbers of the Smarandache odd sequence satisfy the recurrence relation (2.10)
satisfied by the Fibonacci numbers. 0
By similar reasoning, we have the following result.
Theorem 2.2 : (Except for n=l for which OS(1)=1 =L(2» there are no numbers in the
Smarandache odd sequence that are Lucas numbers.
Searching, for primes in the Smarandache odd sequence (using UBASIC program),
Ashbacher [1] found that among the first 21 elements of the sequence, only OS(2), OS(lO)
and OS(16) are primes. Marimutha [6] conjectures that there are infinitely many primes in the
Smarandache odd sequence, but the conjecture still remains to be resolved.
In order to search for primes in the Smarandache odd sequence, by virtue of
Lemma 2.2 and Lemma 2.3, it is sufficient to check the terms of the forms OS(3n±1), n ~ l  
where neither 3n+ 1 nor 3n-1 is of the form Sk+ 3 for some integer k2::1,
95
3. SMARANDACHE EVEN SEQUENCE  
The Smarandache even sequence, whose n-th term is given by (1.2), is the sequence of
numbers formed by repeatedly concatenating the even positive integers.
We note that, for any n;;::: 1,
ES(n+ 1 )=24 ... (2n)(2n+2)
OS ES(n)+(2n+2) for some integer (3.1)
More precisely,
s=number of digits in (2n+2).
Thus, for example, ES(4)=2468=10 ES(3)+8, while, ES(5)=246810=10
2
ES(4)+10.
From (3.1), the following result follows readily.
Lemma 3.1: For any ES(n+1»10 ES(n).
U sing Lemma 3.1, we can prove that
ES(n+2)-ES(n»9[ES(n+ l)+ES(n)] for all n2:1. (3.2)
The po of is similar to that given in establishing the inequality (2.1) and is omitted here.
so that
By repeated application of (3.1), we see that, for any 1,
ES(n+2)=10t ES(n+l)+(2n+4) for some integer t21
=1 ot[ IOu ES(n)+(2n+2)]+(2n+4) for some integer u2:1
Ou+t ES(n)+(2n+2) 1 d+(2n+4),
ES(n+ 3)=1 OS ES(n+2)+(2n+6) for some integer
=10$[1 ot ES(n+ 1)+(2n+4)]+(2n+6)
=1 Os+t+uES(n)+(2n+2)1 Os+t+(2n+2) 1 OS+(2n+6),
for some integers s, t and u with
From (3.3), we see that
ES( n+ 3)= 1 05+t ES(n+ 1 )+(2n+4 )(2ri+6)
=1 Os+t+u ES(n)+(2n+2)(2n+4)(2n+6).
Using (3.3), we can prove the following result.
Lemma 3.2: If31 ES(n) for some n2:1, then 31 ES(n+3), and conversely.
Lemma 3.3 : For all rEI, 31 ES(3n).
(3.3)
Proof: The proof is by inductiori on n. Since ES(3)=246 is divisible by 3, the lemma is true
for n= 1. We now assume that the result is true for some n, that is, 3 1 ES(3n) for some n.
Now, by Lemma 3.2, together with the induction hypothesis, we see that
ES(3n+3)=ES(3(n+I» is divisible by 3. Thus the result is true for n+l. 0
Corollary 3.1 : For all n21, 31 ES(3n-l).
Proof: Let t;l (2:1) be any arbitrary but fixed integer. From (3.1),
ES(3n)=10
s
ES(3n-l)+(6n) for some integer S21.
Now, by Lemma 3.2, 3\ ES(3n). Therefore, 3 must also divide ES(3n-1).
Since n is arbitrary, the lemma is proved. 0
Corollary 3.2 : For any n;;:::l, 31 ES(3n + 1).
Proof: Let n (2:1) be any arbitrary but fixed integer. From (3.1),
ES(3n+1)=10sES(3n)+(6n+2) for some integer 82:1.
Since 31 ES(3n), but 3 does not divide (6n+2), the result follows. 0
96
Lemma 3.4: 41 ES(2n) for all
Proof: Since 41 ES(2)==24 and 41 ES(4)=2468, we see that the result is true for n=I,2. Now,
from (3.1), for
ES(2n)= lOs ES(2n-1 )+(4 n),
where s is the number of digits in (4n). Clearly, for all Thus, 4110
s
and we get
the desired result. 0
Corollary 3.3 : For any 41 ES(2n+ 1).
Proof: Clearly the result is true for n=O, since ES(l is not divisible by 4. For from
(3.1 ),
ES(2n+ 1)= 1 OS ES(2n)+( 4n+ 2) for some integer s?:: 1.
By Lemma 3.4, 41 ES(2n). Since 41 (4n+2), the result follows. 0
Lemma 3.5: For all 10 I ES(Sn).
Proof: For any arbitrary but fixed n?::l, from (3.1),
ES(Sn)=10
s
ES(Sn-1)+(10n) for some integer
The result is now evident from the above expression ofES(Sn). 0
Corollary 3.4 : 20IES(lOn) for all 1.
Proof: follows by virtue of Lemma 3.4 and Lemma 3.5.0
Based on the computer findings with numbers up through
ES(1499)=2468 ... 29962998, Ashbacher [1] conjectures that (except for the case of
ES(1 )=2=F(3)=L(0» there are no nun1bers in the Smarandache even sequence that are also
Fibonacci (or, Lucas) numbers. The following two theorems establish the validity of
Ashbacher's conjectures. The proofs of the theorems make use of the inequality (3.2) and are
similar to those used in proving Theorem 2.1. We thus omit the proof here.
Theorem 3.1 : (Except for ES(1)=2=F(3» there are no numbers in the Smarandache even
sequence that are Fibonacci numbers.
Theorem 3.2 : (Except for ES(1)=2=L(O» there are no numbers in the Smarandache even
sequence that are Lucas numbers.
Ashbacher [1] raised the question: Are there any perfect powers in ES(n)? The
following theorem gives a partial answer to the question.
Theorem 3.3 : None of the terms of the subsequence {ES(2n-l)}oon=1 is a perfect square or
higher power of an integer (> 1).
Proof: Let, for some 1,
, ES(n)=24 ... (2n) for some integer x> 1.
Now, since ES(n) is even for all x must be even. Let x==2y for some integer Then,
ES(n)=(2y)2=4y2,
which shows that 41 ES(n).
Now, ifn is odd of the form 2k-l, by Corollary 3.3, ES(2k-l) is not divisible by
4, and hence numbers of the form ES(2k-I), k?::l, can not be perfect squares. By same
reasoning, none of tenus ES(2n-l), 1, can be expressed as a cube or higher powers of
an integer. 0
Remark 3.1 : It can be seen that, if n is of the form kx 10s+4 or kx 10s+6, where k  
and s (;?:1) are integers, then ES(n) cannot be a perfect square (and hence, cannot be any even
power of a natural number). The proof is as follows: If
ES(n)=x
2
for some integer x> 1,
(*)
then x must be an even integer. The following table gives the possible trailing digits of x and
the corresponding trailing digits of x
2
: .
97
Trailing digit ofx
Trailing digit of x
2
2
4
6
8
4
6
6
4
Since the trailing digit of ES(kx 10
5
+4) is 8 for all admissible values of k and s, it follows that
the representation of ES(kx 10
5
+4) in the fonn (*) is not possible. By similar reasoning, if n is
of the form n=kx 10
5
+6, then ES(n)=ES(kx 10
5
+6) with the trailing digit of 2, cannot be
expressed as a perfect square (and hence, any even power of a natural number). Thus, it
remains to consider the cases when n is one of the forms (1) n=kxlO
s
, (2) n=kx10s+2,
(3) n=kxlOs+8 (where, in all the three cases, k (1:s;k:S;9) and s   are integers). Smith [7]
conjectures that none of the terms of the sequence {ES(n)} oon;1 is a perfect power.
4. SMARANDACHE PRlME PRODUCT SEQUENCE {PPS(n)}OOn=l
The n-th term, PPS(n), of the Smarandache prime product sequence is given by (1.3).
The following lemma gives a recurrence relation in connection with the sequence.
Lemma 4.1: PPS(n+l)=Pn+1 PPS(n)-(Pn+!-l) for all
Proof: By definition,
PPS(n+ 1)=PIP2 ., 'PnPn+l+ 1 =(PIP2. ··Pn+ l)Pn+I-Pn+l+ 1,
which now gives the desired relationship. 0
From Lemma 4.1, we get
Corollary 4.1: PPS(n+ l)-PPS(n)=[PPS(n)-l](Pn+l-l) for all
Lemma 4.2 : (1) PPS(n)«Pnt-
1
for all n24, (2) PPS(n)<(Pn)"-2 for all
(3) PPS(n)<(Pn)"-3 for all 0, (4) PPS(n)<(Pn+l)n-1 for all
(5) PPS(n)<(Pn+I)"-2 for all (6) PPS(n)<(Pn+lt-
3
for all
Proof: We prove parts (3) and (6) only, the proof ofllie other parts is similar.
To prove part (3) of the lemma, we note that the result is true for n=lO, since
PPS(lO)=646969323 1 «PI0
7
=29
7
=17249876309.
Now, assuming the validity of the result for some integer k   and using Lemma 4.1, we
see that,
PPS(k+l)=Pk+1 PPS(k}-(Pk+l- l ) <Pk+I PPS(k)
<Pk+l(Pk)n-3 (by the induction hypothesis)
«Pk+ I )(Pk+ ! )"-3 =(Pk+ I )"-2,
where the last inequality follows from the fact that the sequence of primes, {Pn} con=t, is
strictly increasing in n (21). Thus, the result is true for k+ 1 as well.
To prove part (6) of the lemma, we note that the result is true for n=9, since
PPS(9)=223092871 <(P1O)6=29
6
=594823321.
Now to appeal to the ,principle of induction, we assume that the result is true for some integer
k   Then using Lemma 4.1, together with the induction hypothesis, we get
PPS(k+ l)=Pk+1 PPS(k)-(Pk+l-l)<Pk+l PPS(k)<Pk+J(Pk+l)k-3=(Pk+l)k-2.
Thus the result is true for k+ 1.
All these complete the proof by induction. 0
Lemma 4.3 : Each of PPS(1), PPS(2), PPS(3), PPS(4) and PPS(5) is prime, and for
PPS(n) has at most n-4 prime factors, counting mUltiplicities.
9a
Proof: Clearly PPS(l)=3, PPS(2)=7, PPS(3)=31, PPS(4)=211, PPS(S)=231 1 are all primes.
Also, since
PPS(6)=30031 =S9x509, PPS(7)=Sl 051 9x97x277, PPS(8)=9699691 =34 7x27953,
we see that the lemma is true for 6.$n.$8.
Now, if p is a prime factor of PPS(n), then p2Pn+l. Therefore, if for some n2::9, PPS(n)
has n-3 (or more) prime factors (counted with multiplicity), then    
contradicting part (6) of Lemma 4.2.
Hence the lemma is established. 0
Lemma 4.3 above improves the earlier results (Prakash [8], and Majumdar [9]).
The following lemma improves a previous result (Majumdar [10]).
Lemma 4.4 : For any and k21, PPS(n) and PPS(n+k) can have at most k-l number of
prime factors (counting multiplicities) in common.
Proof: For any and
PPS (n+k )-P P S( n)=p IP2· .. Pn(Pn+ I Pn+2 ... Pn+k-1).
( 4.1 )
If P is a common prime factor of PPS(n) and PPS(n+k), since p2Pn+k, it follows from (4.1)
that pI (Pn+IPn+2···Pn+k-l). Now ifPPS(n) and PPS(n+k) have k(or more) prime factors in
common, then the product of these common prime factors is greater than (Pn+k)k, which can
not divide Pn+lPn+2.·· Pn+k-I «Pn+k)k.
This contradiction proves the lemma. 0
Corollary 4.2 : For any integers n (21) and k (21), if all the prime factors ofpn+lPn+2"'Pn+k-I
are less than pn+k, then PPS(n) and PPS(n+k) are relatively prime.
Proof: If p is any common prime factor of PPS(n) and PPS(n+k), then pl( pn+lPn+2·. 'Pn+k-l).
Also, such P>Pn+k, contradicting the hypothesis of the corollary. Thus, if all the common
prime factors ofPPS(n) and PPS(n+k) are less than pn+k, then (PPS(n),PPS(n+k)=l. 0
The following result has been proved by others (Prakash [8] and Majumdar [10]).
Here we give a simpler proof.
Theorem 4.1: For any n2I, PPS(n) is never a square or higher power of an integer (> 1).
Proof: Clearly, none of PPS(1), PPS(2), PPS(3), PPS( 4) and PPS(S) can be expressed as
powers of integers (by Lemma 4.3).
Now, if let for some n26,
PPS(n)=x
E
for some integers x (>3), i (22).
(*)
Without loss of generality, we may assume that e is a prime (if ,£ is a composite number,
lettinge=pr where p is prime, we have PPS(n)=(xrl=NP, where N=xr). By Lemma 4.3,
and soe cannot be greater than Pn-5 (i2Pn-4 => i>n-4, since Pn>n for all n2:::1). Hence,e must
be one of the primes PI, P2, ... , Pn-5.A1so, since PPS(n) is odd, x must be odd. Let x=2y+lfor
some integer y>O. Then, from (*),
PIP2'''Pn=(2y+ l)c-I
i
i
=(2y)E+( )(2y)t-I+ ... +( ) (2y).
(**)
1
,e-l
If i=2, we see from (**), 41 PIP2 ... Pn, which is absurd. On the other hand, for f2:::3, since
f 1 PIP2"'Pn, it follows from (**) that fly, and consequently, f
2
1 PIP2"'Pn, which is impossible.
Hence, the representation of PPS(n) in the form (*) is not possible. 0
Using Corollary 4.1 and the fact that PPS(n+ l)-PPS(n»O, we get
PPS( n+2)-PPS(n)=[PPS(n+ 2)-PPS(n+ 1 )]+[PPS(n+ 1 )-PPS(n)]
>[PPS(n+ 1)-1 ](Pn+2-I)
>2[PPS(n+ I)-I] for all n21.
99
Hence,
PPS(n+2)-PPS(n»PPS(n+ 1) for all (4.2)
The inequality (4.2) shows that no elements of the Smarandache prime product
sequence satisfy the recurrence relation for Fibonacci (or, Lucas) numbers. This leads to the
following theorem.
Theorem 4.2 : There are no numbers in the Smarandache prime product sequence that are
Fibonacci (or Lucas) numbers (except for the trivial cases of PPS(l)=3=F(4)=L(2),
PPS(2)=7=L( 4 )).
5. SMARANDACHE SQUARE PRODUCT SEQUENCES {SPSI(n)}COn=t, {SPS2(n)f"n;1
The n-th terms, SPS, (n) and SPSz(n), are given in (1.4a) and (lAb) respectively.
In Theorem 5.1, we prove that, for any n2:I, neither OfSPSl(n) and SPS2(n) is a square of an
integer (> 1). To prove the theorem, we need the following results.
Lemma 5.1: The only non-negative integer solution of the Diophantine equation x2-y2=1 is
x=l, y=0.
Proof: The given Diophantine equation is equivalent to (x-y)(x+Y)=I' where both x-y and
x+y are integers. Therefore, the only two possibilities are
(1) x-Y=I=x+y, (2) -l=x+y,
the first of which gives the desired non-negative solution. 0
Corollary 5.1: Let N (> 1) be a fixed number. Then,
(1) The Diphantine equation x
2
-N=1 has no (positive) integer solution x,
(2) The Diophantine equation N-y2=1 has no (positive) integer solution y.
Theorem 5.1: For any none of SPS I(n) and SPS2(n) is a square of an integer (> I).
Proof: If possible, let
SPS I (n )=( n !)2+ 1 =x
2
for some integers 1, x> 1.
But, by Corollary 5.1(1), this Diophantine equation has no integer solution x.
Again, if
SPS2(n)=(n !)2-1=y2 for some integers y>l,
then, by Corollary 5.1 (2), this Diophantine equation has no integer solution y.
All these complete the proof of the theorem. 0
In Theorem 5.2, we prove a stronger result, for which we need the results below.
Lemma 5.2 : Let m   be a fixed integer. Then, the only non-negative integer solution of
the Diophantine equation x
2
+ 1 =ym is x=O, y=l.
Proof: For m=2, the result follows from Lemma 5.1. So, it is sufficient to consider the case
when m>2. However, we note that it is sufficient to consider the case when m is odd; if m is
even, say, m=2q for some integer q> I, then rewriting the given Diophantine equation as
(yQ)2_x2=1, we see that, by Lemma 5.1, the only non-negative integer solution is yq:::::l, x=O,
that is x=O, :y=l, as required.
So, let m be odd, say, m=2q+ 1 for some integer 1. Then, the given Diophantine
equation can be written as
x2==y2Q+I_l =(y_l)(y2
Q
+
y
2
Q
-'+ ... + 1). (***)
From (***), we see that x=O if and only ify=l, since y2
q
+y2
q
-I+ ... + 1>0.
Now, ifx:;t:O, from (***), the only two possibilities are
(1) y-l=x, y2
q
+
y
2
q
-l+ ... +
1
=x.
But then y=x+l, and we are led to the equation (x+l/
Q
+(x+li
Q
-
I
+ ... +(x+li+2=O, which is
impossible.
100
(2) y-1 =1, y2
Q
+
y
2
q
-I+ ... + 1
Then, y=2 together "vith the equation
x 2=2 2q+ 1-1. ( 5 .1 )
But the equation (5.1) has no integer solution x (> 1). To prove this, we first note that any
integer x satisfying (5.1) must be odd. Now rewriting (5.1) in the following equivalent form
(x-1 )(x+ 1 )=2(2q-1 )(2
q
+ 1),
we see that the l.h.s. is divisible by 4, while the r.h.s. is not divisible by 4 since both 2
q
:-1 and
2
q
+ 1 are odd.
Thus, if x:;t:O, then we reach to a contradiction in either of the above cases. This
contradiction establishes the lemma. 0
Corollary 5.2 : Let m   and N (>0) be two fixed integers. Then, the Diophantine equation
N
2
+ 1 =ym has no integer solution y.
Corollary 5.3 : Let m (;:::2) and N (> 1) be two fixed integers. Then, the Diophantine equation
x
2
+ I =N
m
has no (positive) integer solution x. .
Lemma 5.3 : Let m   be a fixed integer. Then, the only non-negative integer solutions of
the Diophantine equation x
2
_ym=1 are ( 1) x=l, y=0; (2) x=3, y=2, m=3.
Proof: For m=2, the lemma reduces to Lemma 5.1. So we consider the case when
From the given Diophantine equation, we see that, y=O if and only if x=±l, giving the
only non-negative integer solution x=l, y=O. To see if the given Diophantine equation has
any non-zero integer solution, we assume that x:;t:l.
If m is even, say, m=2q for some integer q?!l, then x2_ym=;x2_(yQ)2=1, which has no
integer solution y for any x> 1 (by Corollary 5.1(2».
Next, let m be odd, say, m=2q+ 1 for some integer Then, x2_y2Q+I=1, that is,
(x-1)(x+ 1)=y2
Q
+l.
We now consider the following cases that may arise :
( 1) x-1=1, x+l=y2
Q
+1.
Here, x=2 together with the equation y2
q
+l=3, which has no integer solution y.
(2) x-I =y, x+ 1 =y2
q
.
Rewriting the second in the equivalent form (yq-l )(yQ+ 1 )=x, we see that (yq+ 1) Ix.
But this contradicts the first equation x=y+ 1 if q> 1, since for q> 1, yq+ l>y+ 1 =x.
If q=l, then
(y-l )(y+ 1 )=x => y-l = 1, y+ 1 =x,
so that y=2, x=3, m=3, which is a solution of the given Diophantine equation.
(3) x-I =yt for some integer t with 2::::;t:S;q, q?!2 (so that x+ 1 =y2
q
-t+l).
In this case, we have
2x=yt[ 1 +y2(Q-t)+
1
].
Since x does not divide y, it follqws that
1 +y2(Q-t)+ I =Cx for some integer C;?: 1.
Thus,
2x=y\Cx) => C/=2.
If C=2, then y= 1, and the resulting equation x
2
=2 has no integer solution. On the other hand,
if C:;t::2, the equation Cyt=2 has no integer solution. Thus, case (3) cannot occur.
All these complete the proof of the lemma. 0
Corollary 5.4 : The only non-negative integer solution of the Diophantine equation x
2
_ y3=1
is x=3, y=2. -
Corollary 5.5 : Let m (>3) be a fixed integer. Then, the Diophantine equation x2_ym=1 has
x= 1, y=0 as its only non-negative integer solution.
101
Corollary 5.6 : Let ill (>3) and N (>0) be two fixed integers. Then, the Diophantine equation
x2-N
m
=1 has no integer solution x.
Corollary 5.7: Let m   and N (> 1) be two fixed integers withN:;t:3. Then, the Diophantine
equation N
2
_ym=1 has no integer solution.
We are now in a position to prove the following theorem.
Theorem 5.2 : For any none of the SPSt(n) and SPS2(n) is a cube or higher power of an
integer (> 1).
Proof: is by contradiction. Let, for some integer n21 ,
SPS
1
(n):=;(n!)2+1=ym for some integers y>I, m2:3.
By Corollary 5.2, the above equation has no integer solution y.
Again, if for some integer n21 ,
SPS
2
(n)==(n!)2 -1 =zs for some integer z21, s23,
we have contradiction to Corollary 5.7. D
The following result gives the recurrence relations satisfied by SPSI(n) and SPS
2
(n).
Lemma 5.4 : For all n;;:::l,
(1) SPSt(n+ l)=(n+ 1iSPS
1
(n)-n(n+2),
(2) SPS
2
(n+ 1 )=(n+ 1 /SPS
2
(n)+n(n+ 2).
Proof: The proof is for part (1) only. Since
SPS1(n+ 1 )=[(n+ 1 )!]2+ 1 =(n+ li[(n!)2+ I]-(n+ 1 )2+ 1,
the result follows. D
Lemma 5.5 : For all n21,
(1) SPS
1
(n+2)-SPSI(n» SPS t(n+ 1),
(2) SPS2(n+2)-SPS2(n»SPS2(n+ 1).
Proof: Using Lemma 5.4, it is straightforward to prove that
SPS 1 (n+2)-SPS 1 (n)=SPS
2
(n+2)-SPS
2
(n)=(n!)2 [(n+ 1 )\n+2/-1].
Some algebraic manipulations give the desired inequalities. D
Lemma 5.5 can be used to prove the following results.
Theorem 5.3 : (Except for the trivial cases, SPSl(l)=2=F(3)=L(0), SPSJ(2)=5=F(5» there are
no numbers of the Smarandache square product sequence of the first kind that are Fibonacci
(or Lucas) numbers.
Theorem 5.4 : (Except for the trivial cases, SPS
2
(l)=0=F(0), SPS2(2)=3=F(4)=L(2» there are
no numbers of the Smarandache square product sequence of the . second kind that are
Fibonacci ( or Lucas) numbers.
The question raised by )acobescu [11] is : How many terms of the sequence
{SPS1(n)}oon=1 are prime?
The following theorem, due to Le [12], gives a partial answer to the above question.
Theorem 5.5 : If n (>2) is an even integer such that 2n+ 1 is prime, then SPSI(n) is not a
prime.
Russo [3] gives tables of values of SPSJ(n) and SPS
2
(n) for 1:$;n:$;20. Based on
computer results, Russo [3] conjectures that each of the sequences {SPSI(n)} oon=l and
{SPS2(n)} 00 n"'-l only a finite number of primes.
6. SMARANDACHE HIGHER POWER PRODUCT SEQUENCES
{HPPS I(n)} 00 n=l, {HPPS2(n)} oon=1
The n-th terms of the Smarandache higher power product sequences are given in (1.5). The
following lemma gives the recurrence relation satisfied by HPPS I (n) and HPPS
2
(n).
102
Lemma 6.1 : For all n;?:l,
(1) HPPS I(n+ l)=(n+ 1 )mHPPS \ (n)-[(n+ l)m+ 1],
(2) HPPS
2
(n+ l)=(n+ 1)mHPPS
2
(n)+[(n+ l)m+ 1].
Theorem 6.1: For any integer n;?:l, none ofHPPPS1(n) and HPPS2(n) is a square of an integer
(> 1).
Proof: If possible, let
HPPS [Cn):=Cn!)m+ 1 =x
2
for some integer x> 1.
This leads to the Diophantine equation x2-Cn!)m=1, which has no integer solution x, by virtue
of Corollary 5.6 (for m>3). Thus, if m>3, HPPS1(n) cannot be a square of a natural number
(> 1) for any n;?: 1.
Next, let, for some integer n;?:2 (HPPS2(1)=O)
HPPS2(n)=(n!)m -1 =y2 for some integer y;?:l.
Then, we have the Diophantine equation y2+ 1 =(n!)m, and by Corollary 5.3, it has no integer
solution y. Thus, HPPS
2
(n) cannot be a square of an integer (> 1) for any n;?:l. 0
The following two theorems are due to Le [13,14].
Theorem 6.2: If m is not a number of the fonn 2
c
for some f;;:::l, then the sequence
{HPPS1(n)}COn=1 contains only one prime, namely, HPPPS
1
(1)=2.
Theorem 6.3: If both m and 2
m
-1 are primes, then the sequence {HPPS
2
(n)} co contains
only one prime, HPPS2(2)= 2
m
; otherwise, the sequence does not contain any prime.
Remark 6.1 : We have defined the Smarandache higher power product sequences under the
restriction that m> 3, and under such restriction, as has been proved in Theorem 6.1, none of
HPPS1(n) and HPPS2(n) is a square of an integer (>1) for any n;?:l. However, ifm=3, the
situation is a little bit different : For any n;?:l, HPPS
2
(n)=(n!)3 -1 still cannot be a perfect
square of an integer (?1), by virtue of Corollary 5.3, but since HPPS,(n)=(n!i+1, we see that
HPPSl(2)=(2!)3+1=3 ,that is, HPPS
1
(2) is a perfect square. However, this is the only term of
the sequence {SPPS1(n)}COn=1 that can be express'ed as a perfect square.
7. SMARANDACHE PERMUTATION SEQUENCE {PS(n)}COn=1
For the Smarandache permutation sequence, given in (1.6), the question raised (Dumitrescu
and Seleacu [4]) is : Is there any perfect power among these numbers?
Smarandache conjectures that there are none. In Theorem 7.1, we prove the
conjecture in the affirmative. To prove the theorem, we need the follqwing results.
Lemma 7.1 : For n;?:2, PS(n) is of the form 2(2k+ 1) for some integer k> 1.
Proof: Since for n;?:2,
PS(n)= 135 ... (2n-1 )(2n)(2n-2) ... 42, (7.1)
we see that PS(n) is even and after division by 2, the last digit of the quotient is 1. 0
An immediate consequence of the above lemma is the following.
Corollary : For   2
c
I PS(n) if and only if f=1.
Theorem 7.1: For   PS(n) is not a perfect power.
Proof: The result is clearly true for n=l, since PS(1)=3x2
2
is not a perfect power. The proof
for the case n;?:2 is by contradiction.
Let, for some integer  
PS(n)=x
c
fOLsome integers x> 1, i;?:2.
Since PS(n) is even, so is x. Let x=2y for some integer y> 1. Then,
PS(n)=(2y)=2c yE,
which shows that 2
c
I PS(n), contradicting Corollary 7.1. 0
103
To get more insight into the numbers of the Smaradache permutation sequence, we
define a new sequence, called the reverse even sequence, and denoted by {RES(n)} oon=l, as
follows:
RES(n)=(2n)(2n-2) .. .42, n;;:: 1. (7.2)
A first few terms of the sequence are
2, 42, 642, 8642, 108642, 12108642, ....
We note that, for all n;;:: 1 ,
RES(n+ 1)=(2n+2)(2n)(2n-2) ... 42
=(2n+2)10
s
+RES(n) for some integer s;;::n, (7.3)
where, more precisely,
s=number of digits in RES(n).
Thus, for example,
RES( 4)=8x 10
3
+RES(3), RES(5)=1 Ox 10
4
+RES(4), RES(6)=12x 10
6
+RES(5).
Lemma 7.2 : For all n;;::l, 41 [RES(n+1)-RES(n)].
Proof: Since from (7.3),
RES(n+l}-RES(n)=(2n+2)lOs for some integer s  
. the result follows. 0
Lemma 7.3 : The numbers of the reverse even sequence are of the fonn 2(2k+ 1) for some
integer k2:0.
Proof: The proof is by induction on n. The result is true for . So, we assume that the
result is true for some n, that is,
RES(n)=2(2k+ 1) for some integer k;;::O.
But, by virtue of Lemma 7.2,
RES(n+ 1}-RES(n)=4k' for some integer k'>O,
which, together with the induction hypothesis, gives,
RES(n+ 1)=4k'+RES(n)=4(k+k')+2.
Thus, the result is true for n+ 1 as well,· completing the proof. 0
Lemma 7.4: 31 RES(3n) if and only if31 RES(3n-1).
Proof: Since,
RES(3n)=(6n)1 OS+RES(3n-l) for some integer s;;:::n,
the result, follows. 0
By repeated application of (7.3), we get successively
RES(n+3)=(2n+6)lOs+RES(n+2) for some integer s;;::n+2
=(2n+6)10s+(2n+4)10t+RES(n+l) for some integer t;;:::n+l
=(2n+6) 1 OS+(2n+4) 1 Ot+(2n+2) 1 OU+RES(n) for some integer (7.4)
so that,
RES( ri+ 3 }-RES( n)=(2n+6) 1 OS +(2n+4) 1 Ot+(2n+ 2) IOu,
where 1.
Lemma 7.5: 3 1 [RES(n+ 3}--RES(n)] for all n2:: 1.
Proof: is evident from (7.5), since
31 (2n+6) 1 OS+(2n+4) 1 Ot+(2n+2) 1 OU
OU[(2n+6)( 1 1 1 )-2( 1 0
104
(7.5)
Corollary 7.2 : 3 1 RES(3n) for all n21.
Proof: The result is true for n==1, since RES(3)=642 is divisible by 3. Now, assuming the
validity of the result for n, so that 31 RES(3n), we get, from Lemma 7.5,
31 RES(3n+3)=RES(3(n+1», so that the result is true for n+1 as well.
This completes the proof by induction. D
Corollary 7.3 : 31 RES(3n-l) for all n21.
Proof: follows from Lemma 7.4, together with Corollary 7.2.0
Corollary 7.4: For any n2::0, 31 RES(3n+l).
Proof: Clearly, the result is true for n=O. For n21, from (7.3),
RES(3n+ 1 )=( 6n+ 2) 1 as +RES(3n) for some integer s23n.
Now, 31 RES(3n) (by Corollary 7.2) but 31 (6n+2). Hence the result. D
Using (7.4), we that, for all n2::1,
RES (n+2)-RES(n)
=[RES (n+2)-RES (n+ 1 )]+[RES(n+ 1 )-RES(n)]
=[(2n+4)1 Ot-1JRES(n+ 1)+[(2n+2)1 OU -1]RES(n), (7.6)
where t and u are integers with t>U2o+ 1.
From (7.6), we get the following result.
Lemma 7.6 : RES (n+2)-RES (n»RES(n+ 1) for all n2::1.
PS(n), given by (7.1), can now be expressed in terms of OS(n) and RES(n) as
follows: For any n21,
PS(n)=10
s
OS(n)+RES(n) for some integer (7.7)
where, more precisely,
s=number of digits in RES(n).
From (7.7), we observe that, for n22, (since 41 10s for s2n2::2), PS(n) is of the form
4k+2 for some integer k>l, since by Lemma 7.3, RES(n) is of the same form. This provides
an alternative proof of Lemma 7.1.
Lemma 7.7: 31 PS(3n) for all n21.
Proof: follows by virt)le of Lemma 2.2 and Corollary 7.2, since
PS(3n)=10
s
OS(3n)+RES(3n) for some integer s23n. D
Lemma 7.8: 31 PS(n) if and only if 31 PS(n+3).
Proof: follows by virtue of Lemma 1 and Lemma 7.5. 0
Lemma 7.9 : 31 PS(3n-2) for all n2::1. '
Proof: Since 31 PS(l)=12, the result is true for n=1. To prove by induction, we assume that
the result is true for some n, that is, 31 PS(3n-2). But, then, by Lemma 7.8, 31 PS(3n-l),
showing that the result is true for n+ 1 as well.
Lemma 7.10: For all n21, PS(n+2)-PS(n»PS(n+l).
Proof: Since
,PS(n+2)=10
s
OS(n+2)+RES(n+2) for some integer 820+2,
PS(n+ 1)=10
t
OS(n+ l)+RES(n+ 1) for some integer t2::n+ 1,
PS(n)='10
u
OS(n)+RES(n) for some integer u2n,
where s>t>u, we see that
PS(n+2)-PS(n)=[ 1 OS OS(n+2)-10
u
OS(n)]+[RES(n+2)-RES(n)]
> 1 OS[OS(n+ 2 )-OS( n)]+ [RES (n+ 2)-RES( n)]
> 1 ot OS(n+ 1 )+RES(n+ 1 )=PS(n+ 1),
where the last inequality follows by virtue of (2.4), Lemma 7.6 and the fact that 10s>10
t
. 0
105
Lemma 7.10 can be used to prove the following result.
Theorem 7.1 : There are no numbers in the Smarandache permutation sequence that are
Fibonacci (or, Lucas) numbers.
Remark 7.1 : The result given in Theorem 7.l has also been proved by Le [15]. Note that
PS(2)=1342=11x122, PS(3)=135642=111x1222, PS(4)=1357S642=1111x12222,
as has been pointed out by Zhang [16]. However, such a representation of PS(n) is not valid
for Thus, the theorem of Zhang [16] holds true only for (and not for 1:::;n:::;9).
S. SMARANDACHE CONSECUTIVE SEQUENCE {CS(n)}UJ
n
=!
The Smarandache consecutive sequence is obtained by repeatedly concatenating the positive
integers, and the n-th tern of the sequence is given by (1.7).
Since
CS(n+1)=123 ... (n-1)n(n+l),  
we see that, for all n21,
CS(n+ 1 lOs CS(n)+(n+ 1) for some integer   CS(l)=l.
More precisely,
s==number of digits in (n+ 1).
Thus, for example, CS(9)=10 CS(S)+9, CS(l0)=10
2
CS(9)+10.
From (S.l), we get the following result :
Lemma 8.1 : For all   CS(n+ 1)-CS(n»9 CS(n).
Thus,
Using Lemma 8.l, we get, following the proof of (2.1),
CS(n+2)-CS(n»9[CS(n+ l)+CS(n)] for all n2:1.
CS(n+2)-CS(n»CS(n+ 1),
(8.1)
(8.2)
(8.3)
Based on computer search for Fibonacci (and Lucas) numbers from 12 up through
CS(2999)=123 ... 29982999, Asbacher [1] conjectures that (except for the trivial case,
CS(1)=l=F(l)=L(l» there are no Fibonacci (and Lucas) numbers in the Smarandache
consecutive sequence. The following theorem confirms the conjectures of Ashbacher.
Theorem 8.1 : There are no Fibonacci (and Lucas) numbers in the Smarandache consecutive
sequence (except for the trivial cases ofCS(l)=1=F(1)=F(2)=L(l), CS(3)=123=L(lO».
Proof: is evident from (8.3). 0
Remark 8.1 : As has been pointed out by Ashbacher [1], CS(3) is a Lucas number. However,
CS(3 ):;t:CS(2)+CS( 1).
Lemma 8.2: Let 31 n. Then, 31 CS(n) if and only if31 CS(n-I).
Proof: follows readily from (8.1). 0
By repeated application of (S.I), we get,
'CS(n+3)=10s CS(n+2)+(n+3) for some integer
'=10s[IOt CS(n+1)+(n+2)]+(n+3) for some integer t2:1
=1 Os+t[ 1 Ou CS(n)+(n+ 1 )]+(n+ 2) 1 OS +(n+ 3) for some integer
Os+t+u CS(n)+(n+ 1)1 Os+t+(n+2) 1 OS+(n+3), (S.4)
where s:?:t:?:u2: 1.
Lemma 8.3 : 31 CS(n) if and only if 31 CS(n+ 3) .
. Proof: follows from (S.4), since
31[(n+ 1) 1 Os+t+(n+2)1 OS+(n+ 3)]=[(n+ 1)(1 Os+t+ 1 Os+ 1 )+(1 OS+2)]. 0
106
Lemma 8.4: 31 CS(3n) for all n;;:::l.
Proof: The proof is by induction on n. The result is clearly true for n=l, since 31 CS(3)=123.
So, we assume that the result is true for some n, that is, we assume that 3 1 CS(3n) for some n.
But then, by Lemma 8.4, 31 CS(3n+ 3)=CS(3(n+ 1»), showing that the result is true for n+ 1 as
well, completing induction. 0
Corollary 8.1 : 3 I CS(3n-l) for all n;;::: 1.
Proof: From (8.1), for n2::1,
CS(3n)=10s CS(3n-1)+(3n) for some integer s;;:::l.
Since, by Lemma 8.4, 3ICS(3n), the result follows. 0
Corollary 8.2 : 31 CS(3n+ 1) for all n;;:::O.
Proof: For n=O, CS(l)=I is not divisible by 3. For n2::1, from (8.1),
CS(3n+ 1)=1 OS CS(3n)+(3n+ 1),
where, by Lemma 8.4, 31 CS(3n). Since 31 (3n+ 1), we get desired the result. 0
Lemma 8.5: For any n;;:::I, 51 CS(5n).
Proof: Forn2::I, from (8.1),
CS(5n)=10
s
CS(5n-1)+(5n) for some integer
Clearly, the r.h.s. is divisible by 5. Hence, 51 CS(5n). 0
F or the Smarandache consecutive sequence, the question is : How many tenns of the
sequence are prime? Fleuren [17J gives a table of prime factors of CS(n) for n=I(1)200,
which shows that none of these numbers is prime. In the Editorial Note following the paper
of Stephan [18], it is mentioned that, using a supercomputer, no prime has been found in the
first 3,072 terms of the Smarandache consecutive sequence. This gives rise to the conjecture
that there is no prime in the Smarandache consecutive sequence. This conjecture still remains
to be resolved. We note that, in order to check for prime numbers in the Smarandache
consecutive sequence, it is sufficient to check the terms of the form CS(3n+ 1), n2::1, where
3n+ 1 is odd and is not divisible by 5.
9. SMARANDACHE REVERSE SEQUENCE {RS(n)}CXln=l
The Smarandache reverse sequence is the sequence of numbers fanned by concatenating the
increasing integers on the left side, starting with RS( 1)= 1. The n-th term of the sequence is
given by-(1.8).
Since,
RS(n+ 1 )=(n+ l)n(n-l) ... 21, n2::1,
we see that, for all, n;;::: 1,
RS(n+I)=(n+1)10
s
+RS(n) for some integer sm (with RS(1)=l) (9.1)
More precisely,
s=number of digits in RS(n).
Thus, for example,
RS(9)=9x 10
8
+ RS(8), RS( 1 0)= lOx 10
9
+ RS(9), RS( 11)= 11 x 10
11
+ RS( 10).
Lemma 9.1 : For all n2::1, 41 [RS(n+l)-RS(n)], 10 I [RS(n+l)-RS(n)].
Proof: For all n;;:::l, from (9.1),
RS(n+I)-RS(n)=(n+l)lOs (with s2::n),
where the r.h.s. is divisible by both 4 and 10.0
107
Corollary 9.1 : For all n2:2, the terms of {RS(n)} C() n=l are of the fonn 4k+ l.
Proof: The proof is by induction of n. For n=2, the result is clearly true (RS(2)=21 =4x5+ 1).
So, we assume the validity of the result for n, that is, we assume that
RS(n)=4k+ 1 for integer k2:l.
Now, by Lemma 9.1 and the induction hypothesis,
RS(n+ 1)=RS(n)+4k'=4(k+k')+ 1 for some integer k'2:1 ,
showing that the result is true for n+ 1 as well. 0
Lemma 9.2 : Let 3 1 n for some n (2:2). Then, 31 RS(n) if and only if 31 RS(n-l).
Proof: follows immediately from (9.1). 0
By repeated application of (9.1), we get, for all n2:1,
RS(n+3)=(n+3)10
s
+RS(n+2) for some integer s2:n+2
=:(n+3)1 OS+(n+2)1 Ot+RS(n+ 1) for some integer tzn+ 1
=(n+3)10s+(n+2)10t+(n+1)10u+RS(n) for some integer u2:n, (9.2)
where s>t>u. Thus,
RS(n+3)=1 OU[(n+3)10
S
-
u
+(n+2)1 Ot-u+(n+ l)]+RS(n). (9.3)
Lemma 9.3: 31 [RS(n+3)-RS(n)] for all n2:l.
Proof: is immediate from (9.3). 0
A consequence of Lemma 9.3 is the following.
Corollary 9.2 : 3 I RS(3n) if and only if 3 1 RS(n+ 3).
Using Corollary 9.2, the following result can be established by.induction on n.
Corollary 9.3 : 3 / RS(3n) for all n2:1.
Corollary 9.4 : 31 RS(3n-l) for all n2: 1.
Proof: follows from Corollary 9.3, together with Lemma 9.2.0
Lemma 9.4: 31 RS(3n+ 1) for all n2:0.
Proof: The result is true for n=O. For 021, by (9.1),
RS(3n+ 1)=(3n+ 1)10
s
+RS(3n).
This gives the desired result, since 3/ RS(3n) but 31 (3n+ 1). 0
The following ,result, due to Alexander [19], gives an explicit expression for RS(n) :
i-I
L (l +tlog jJ)
n j=l
Lemma 9.5: For all n2:1, RS(n)=1+I i*10
In Theorem 9.1, we prove that (except for the trivial cases of
RS(1)=1=F(1)=F(2)=L(l), RS(2)=21=F(8», the Smarandache reverse sequence contains no
Fibonacci and Lucas numbers. For the proof of the theorem, we need the following results.
Lemma 9.6 : For all n2:1, RS(n+ 1»2RS(n).
Proof: Using (9.1), we see that
, RS(n+l)=(n+l)10s+RS(n»2RS(n) if and only if RS(n)«n+l) 1 Os,
which is true since,RS(n) is an s-digit number while lOS is an (s+l)-digit number. 0
Corollary 9.5 : For all n2:1, RS(n+2)-RS(n»RS(n+ 1).
Proof: Using (9.2), we have
RS(n+2)-RS(n)=[RS(n+2)-RS(n+ 1)]+[RS(n+ l)-RS(n)]
=[(n+2)1 ot_(n+ 1)10
u
]+2[RS(n+ I)-RS(n)]
>2[RS(n+ 1)-RS(n)]
>RS(n+ 1), by Lemma 9.6.
This gives the desired inequality. 0
108
Theorem 9.1: There are no numbers in the Smarandache reverse sequence that are Fibonacci
or Lucas numbers (except for the cases of n= 1,2).
Proof: follows from Corollary 9.5. D
For the Smarandache reverse sequence, the question is : How many terms of the sequence are
prime? By Corollary 9.2 and Corollary 9.3, in searching for primes, it is sufficient to consider
the terms of the sequence of the fonn RS(3n+ 1), where n> 1. In the Editorial Note following
the paper of Stephan [18], it is mentioned that searching for prime in the first 2,739 terms of
the Smarandache reverse sequence revealed that only RS(82) is prime. This led to the
conjecture that RS(82) is the only prime in the Smarandache reverse sequence. However, the
conjecture still remains to be resolved. Fleuren [17] presents a table giving prime factors of
RS(n) for n=I(1)200, except for the cases n=82,136, 139,169.
10. SMARANDACHE SYMMETRIC SEQUENCE {SS(n)}aJ
n
=l
The n-th term, SS(n), of the Smarandache symmetric sequence is given by (1.9).
The numbers in the Smarandache symmetric sequence can be expressed in tenns of the
numbers of the Smarandache consecutive sequence and the Smarandache reverse sequence as
follows: For all
SS(n)=10
s
CS(n-l)+RS(n-2) for some integer (10.1)
with SS(1)=l, SS(2)=11, where more precisely,
s=number of digits in RS(n-2).
Thus, for example, SS(3)=10 CS(2)+RS(1), SS(4)=10
2
CS(3)+RS(2).
Lemma 10.1 : 31 SS(3n+ 1) for all
Proof: Let n   be any arbitrary but fixed number. Then, from (l0.1),
SS(3n+1)=10
s
CS(3n)+RS(3n-1).
Now, by Lemma 8.4,31 CS(3n), and by Corollary 9.4, 31 RS(3n-1). Therefore, 31 SS(3n+1).
Since n is the lemma is proved. D
Lemma 10.2: For any (1) 3 {SS(3n), (2) 3 {SS(3n+2).
Proof : Using (10.1), we see that
SS(3n)=l Os CS(3n-l)+RS(3n-2),
By Corollary 8.1, 31 CS(3n-1), and by Lemma 9.4, 3 {RS(3n-2). Hence, CS(3n) cannot be
divisible. by 3.
Again, since
SS(3n+2)=10
s
CS(3n+ 1 )+RS(3n), 1,
and since 3 {CS(3n+ 1) (by Corollary 8.2) and 31 RS(3n) (by Corollary 9.3), it follows that
SS(3n+2) is not divisible by 3. D
Using (8.3) and Corollary 9.5, we can prove the following lemma. The proof is
similar to that used in proving Lemma 7.10, and is omitted here.
Lemma 10.3 : For all SS(n+2)-SS(n»SS(n+l).
By virtue of the inequality in Lemma 10.3
1
we have the following.
Theoreltl10.1 : (Except for the trivial cases, SS(1)=l=F(I)=L(l), SS(2)=II=L(5», there are
no members of the Smarandache symmetric sequence that are Fibonacci (or, Lucas) numbers.
The following lemma gives the expressionofSS(n+l)-SS(n) in terms ofCS(n)-CS(n-1).
Lemma 10.4: SS(n+1)-SS(n)=10s+t[CS(n)-CS(n-2)] for all n;::::3, where
s=number of digits in RS(n-2), s+t=number of digits in RS(n-I).
109
Proof: By (10.1), for
so that
But,
SS(n)=10s CS(n-l)+RS(n-2), SS(n+ 1)=1 Os+t CS(n)+RS(n-I),
SS(n+ 1)-SS(n)=lOS[l ot CS(n)-CS(n-1)J+[RS(n-1)-RS(n-2)]
OS[ 1 OtCS(n)-CS(n-1 )+(n-l)] (by(9.1 ). (****)
{
I,
t= =number of digits in (n-1).
m+l, if (for all  
Therefore, by (8.1)
CS(n-1)=10t CS(n-2)+(n-1),
and finally, plugging this expression in (****), we get the desired result. 0
We observe that SS(2)= 11 is prime; the next eight terms of the Smarandache
symmetric sequence are composite numbers and squares :
SS(3)=121 =112, SSe 4)=12321 =(3x37i=111
2
,
SS(5)=1234321=(llxlO1)2=1111
2
, SS(6)=123454321=(41 x271/=11111
2
,
SS(7)=12345654321 =(3x7x 11 x 13x37/=111111
2
,
SS(8)=1234567654321=(239x4649/=1111111
2
,
SS(9)=123456787654321=(11xl010101i=11111111
2
,
SS(1 0)=12345678987654321 =(9x37x333667)2=(l11 x 1001001/=111111111
2
.
For the Smarandache symmetric sequence, the question is : How many terms of the
sequence are prime? The question still remains to be answered.
11. SMARANDACHE PIERCED CHAIN SEQUENCE {PCS(n)} n=1 co
In this section, we give answer to the question posed by Smarandache [5] by showing that,
starting from the second term, all the successive terms of the sequence {PCS(n)/1 01 }n=lco,
given by (1.11), are composite numbers. This is done in Theorem 11.1 below.
We first observe that the elements of the Smarandache pierced chain sequence, {PCS(n)}n=loo,
satisfy the following recurrence relation :
PCS(n+l)=104 PCS(n)+101, PCS(l)=101. (11.1)
Lemma 11.1 : The elements of the seguence {PCS(n)}n=l
oo
are
101,101(104+1),101(108+104+1),101(1012+108+104+1), ... ,
and in general,
PCS(n)=101[10
4
(n-l)+10
4
(n-2)+ ... +104+
1
], (11.2)
Proof: The proof of (11.2) is by induction on n. The result is clearly true for n=l. So, we
assume that the result is true for some n.
Now, from (11.1) together with the induction hypothesis, we see that
PCS(ri+l)=10
4
PCS(n)+101
= 1 04[ 1 0 1 (1 04(n-1)+ 1 04(n-2)+ ... + 10
4
+ 1 )]+ 101
01 (1 0
4
°+ 1 04(n-I)+ ... + 10
4
+ 1),
which shows that the result is true for n+ 1. 0
It has been mentioned in Ashbacher [1] that PCS(n) is divisible by 101 for all and
Lemma 11.1 shows that this is indeed the case. Another consequence of Lemma 11.1 is the
following corollary.
110
Corollary 11.1 : The elements of the sequence {PCS(n)/lOl }n=lco are
1, x+l, x
2
+x+l, x
3
+x
2
+x+l, "',
and in general,
PCS(n)1101=x
n
-
1
+x
n
-
2
+ ... +I, (11.3)
where X= 10
4
. .
Theorem 11.1 : For all PCS(n)1101 is a composite number.
Proof: The result is true for n=2. In fact, the result is true if n is even as shown below: If n
  is even, let n=2m for some integer m   Then, from (11.3),
PCS(2m)/l 01 =x2m-l+x2m-2+ ... +x+ 1
=x
2m
-\x+ 1)+ ... +(x+ 1)
=(x+ 1 )(x2m-2+x2m-4+ ... + 1)
that is, PCS(2m)/l 0 1 =(1 0
4
+ 1)[ 1 08(m-I)+ 1 08(m-2)+ ... + 1], (11.4)
which shows that PCS(2m)/1 0 1 is a composite number for alLm  
Next, we consider the case when n is prime, say n=p, where p   is a prime. In this case,
from (11.3),
PCS(p)/1 0 1 =x
p
-
1
+x
p
-
2
+ ... + 1 =(x
P
-1 )!(x-l).
Let y=I02 (so that X=y2). Then,
PCS(p) x
P
-1 y2
p
-1 (yP -1 )(yP+ 1)
101 x-I (y+ l)(y-l)
{(y_l)(yP-'+yP-2+ ... + I)} {(y+ 1 )(yp-l_
y
p-2+ ... + I)}
=----------------------------------
(y+ 1 )(y-l)
=(yP-l_yP-2+
y
p
-3_ ... + 1)(yp-l+yP-2+
y
p
-3+ ... + 1)
that is, PCS(p)/1 0 1 =[ 1 02(p-1)_1 02(p-2)+ 1 02(p-3)+ ... + 1][ 1 02(p-l)+ 1 02(p - 2) + ... + 1], (11.5)
so that SPC(p)/1 0 1 is 'l composite number for each prime p (23).
Finally, we consider the case when n is odd but composite. Then, letting n=pr where p is
the largest prime factor of nand r (22) is an integer, we see that
PCS(n)!IOl =PCS(pr)11 01
=xpr-l+xpr-2+ ... + 1
=xp(r-I)(xp-l+xp-2+ ... + I)+xp(r-2\xp-l+xp-2+ ... + 1)+ ...
+(x
p
-
1
+X
p
-
2
+ ... + 1)
=(x
P
-
1
+X
p
-
2
+ ... + 1 )[x
P
(r-I)+x
p
(r-2)+ ... + I)
that is, PCS(n)110I=[I0
4
(P-I)+10
4
(P-2)+ ... +I][I0
4p
(r-J)+10 p(r-2)+ ... +1], (11.6)
and hence, PCS(n)/l01=PCS(pr)/l01 is also a composite number.
All these complete the proof of the theorem. 0
Remark 1i.1 : The Smarandache pierced chain sequence has been studied by Le [20] and
Kashihara [21] as-well. Following different approaches, they have proved by contradiction
that for PCS(n)!I 0 1 is not prime. In Theorem 11.1, we have proved the same result by
actually finding out the factors of PCS(n)11 0 1 for all n22. Kashihara [21] raises the question:
Is the sequence PCS(n)1l01 square-free for From (11.4), (11.5) and (11.6), we see that
the answer to the question of Kashihara is yes.
111
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The present work was done under a research grant form the Ritsumeikan Center for Asia-
Pacific Studies of the Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University. The authors gratefully
acknowledge the financial support.
REFERENCES
[1] Ashbacher, Charles. (1998) Pluckings from the Tree of Smarandache Sequences and
Functions. American Research Press, Lupton, AZ, USA.
[2] Smarandache, F. (1996) Collected Papers-Volume II. Tempus publishing House,
Bucharest, Romania.
[3] Russo, F. (2000) "Some Results about Four Smarandache U-Product Sequences",
Smarandache Notions Journal, 11, pp. 42-49.
[4] Dumitrescu, D. and V. Seleacu. (1994) Some Notions and Questions in Number Theory.
Erhus University Press, Glendale.
[5] Smarandache, F. (1990) Only Problems, Not Solutions! Xiquan Publishing House,
Phoenix, Chicago.
[6] Marimutha H. (1997) "Smarandache Concatenated Type Sequences". Bulletin of Pure
and Applied Sciences, E16, pp. 225-226.
[7] Smith S. (2000) "A Set of Conjectures on Smarandache Sequences". Smarandache
Notions Journal, 11, pp. 86-92.
[8] Prakash, K. (1990) "A Sequence Free from Powers', Mathematical Spectrum, 22(3),
pp.92--93.
[9] Majumdar, A.A.K. (1996/7) "A Note on a Sequence Free from Powers". Mathematical
Spectrum, 29(2), pp. 41 (Letters to the Editor). Also, Mathematical Spectrum, 30(1),
pp. 21 (Letters to the Editor).
[10] Majumdar, A.A.K. (1998) "A Note on the Smarandache Prime Product Sequence".
Smarandache_Notions Journal, 9, pp. 137-142.
[11] Iacobescu F. (1997) "Smarandache Partition Type Sequences". Bulletin of Pure and
Applied Sciences, E16, pp. 237-240.
[12] Le M. (1998) "Pfimes in the Smarandache Square Product Sequence". Smarandache
Notions Journal, 9, pp. 133.
[13J LeM. (2001) "The Primes in the Smarandache Power Product Sequences of the First
Kind". Smarandache Notions Journal, 12, pp. 230-231.
[14 J Le M. (2001) "The Primes in the Smarandache Power Product Sequences of the Second
Kind". Smarandache Notions Journal, 12, pp. 228-229.
[15] Le M. (1999) "Perfect Powers in the Smarandache Permutation Sequence",
Smarandache Notions Journal, 10, pp. 148-149.
[16] Zhang W. (2002) "On the Permutation Sequence and Its Some Properties".
Smarandache Notions Journal, 13, pp. 153-154.
[17] Fleuren, M. (1999) "Smarandache Factors and Reverse Factors". Smarandache Notions
Journal, 10, pp. 5-38.
[18] Stephan R. W. (1998) "Factors and Primes in Two Smarandache Sequences".
Smarandache Notions Journal, 9, pp. 4-10.
[19] Alexander S. (2001) "A Note on Smarandache Reverse Sequence", Smarandache
Notions Journal, 12, pp. 250.
[20J Le M. (1999) "On Primes in the Smarandache Pierced Chain Sequence", Smarandache
Notions Journal, 10, pp. 154-155.
[21] ~ a s h i h a r a   K. (1996) Comments and Topics on Smarandache Notions and Problems.
Erhus University Press, AZ, U.S.A.
112

Related Interests


is defined by (Ashbacher [1])
ES(n)=24 ... (2n), n2:: 1.
A first few terms of the sequence are
2,24,246,2468,246810,24681012,2468101214, ... ,
of which only the first is a prime number.
(1.2)
(3) Smarandache Prime Product Sequence: Let {Pn}<Xl
n
=l be the (infinite) sequence of primes
in their natural order, so that Pl=2, P2=3, Pi=5, P4=7, P5=11, P6=13, ....
The Smarandache prime product sequence, denoted by {PPS(n)} <Xl
n
",,\, is defined by
(Smarandache [2])
, PPS(n)=PIP2 ... Pn+1, U2::1. (1.3)
(4) Smarandache Square Product Sequences: The Smarandache square product sequence of
the first kind, denoted by {SPSl(n)} oon=l, and the Smarandache square product sequence of
the second kind, denoted by {SPS2(n)} oon'" I, are defined by (Russo [3])
SPS 1(n)=(12)(22) ... (n
2
)+ 1 =(n!)2+ 1, n ~ l  
SPS2(n)=(J2) (22) ... (n2)-1=(n!)2-1, n2::1.
A first few terms of the sequence {SSPI(n)}oon=1 are
SPSl(1)=2, SPSI(2)=5, SPS\(3)=37, SPSl(4)=577, SPSl(5)=14401,
SPSl(6)=518401 =13x39877, SPSl(7)=25401601 01 x251501,
SPSl(8)=1625702401 =17x95629553, SPSl(9)=131681894401,
of which the first five terms are each prime.
A first few terms of the sequence {SPS2(n)}oon=1 are
SPS2(l)=O, SPS2(2)=3, SPS2(3)=35, SPS2(4)=575, SPS2(5)=14399,
(l.4a)
(l.4b)
SPS2(6)=518399, SPS2(7)=25401599, SPS2(8)=1625702399, SPS2(9)=131681894399,
of which, disregarding the first term, the second term is prime, and the remaining terms of
the sequence are all composite numbers (see Theorem 6.3).
92
(5) Smarandache Higher Power Product Sequences : Let m (>3) be a fixed integer. The
Smarandache higher power product sequence of the first kind, denoted by,
{HPPS l(n)} co n=\. and the Smarandache higher power product sequence of the second kind,
denoted by, HPPS2(n)} 00 n=1. are defined by
HPPS I (n)=(1 m)(2m) ... (nm)+ 1 =(n!)m+ 1, n2:1, (l.5a)
HPPS2(n)=(1 m)(2m) ... (nm)-1 :::::(n!)m-l, n2::1. (l.5b)
(6) Smarandache Permutation Sequence: The S marandache permutation sequence, denoted
by {PS(n)}COn=I' is defined by (Dumitrescu and Seleacu [4])
PS(n)=135 ... (2n-l)(2n)(2n-2) ... 42, n:2:1. (1.6)
A first few terms of the sequence are
12, 1342, 135642, 13578642, 13579108642, .. ,.
(7) Smarandache Consecutive Sequence: The Smarandache consecutive sequence, denoted
by {CS(n)}COn=l, is defined by (Dumitrescu and Seleacu [4])
CS(n)=123 ... (n-l)n, n;?:1. (1.7)
A first few terms of the sequence are
1,12,123,1234,12345,123456, ....
(8) Smarandache Reverse Sequence : The Smarandache reverse sequence, denoted by,
{RS(n)} con=l, is defined by (Ashbacher [1])
RS(n)=n(n-l) ... 21, (1.8)
A first few terms of the sequence are
1,21,321,4321,54321,654321, ....
(9) Smarandache Symmetric Sequence: The Smarandache symmetric sequence, denoted by
{SS(n)}CO
n
=l' is defined by (Ashbacher [1])
1,11,121,12321,1234321,123454321,12345654321, ....
Thus,
SS(n)=12 ... (n-2)(n-l)(n-2) ... 21, SS(1)=I, SS(2)=11. (1.9)
(10) Smarandache Chain Sequence : The Smarandache pierced chain sequence,
denoted by   is defined by (Ashbacher [1]) \
101,1010101,10101010101,101010101010101, ... , (1.10)
which is obtained by successively concatenating the string 0101 to the right of the
preceding terms of the sequence, starting with PCS( 1)= 1 0 1.
As has been pointed out by Ashbacher, all the terms of the sequence {PCS(n) }n=l co is
divisible by 101. We thus get from the sequence {PCS(n)}n=loo, on dividing by 101, the
sequence {PCS(n)/l 01 co. The elements of the sequence {PCS(n)/l 01 00 are
1, 10001, 100010001, 1000100010001, ....
Smarandache [5] raised the question How
sequence{PCS(n)/lOI}n=loo are prime?
many terms
(1.11)
of the
In this paper, we consider some of the properties satisfied by these ten Smarandache
sequences in the next ten sections where we derive the recurrence relations as well.
For the Smarandache odd, even, consecutive and symmetric sequences, Ashbacher [1]
raised the question: Are there any Fibonacci or Lucas numbers in these sequences?
We recall that the sequence of Fibonacci numbers, {F(n)} n=1 00, and the sequence of
Lucas numbers {L(n)}n=IC(), are defined by (Ashbacher [1])
F(O)=O, F(1)=I; F(n+2)=F(n+ l)+F(n), n;?:O,
L(0)=2, L(1)=I; L(n+2)=L(n+ l)+L(n), n2::0,
93
( 1.12)
(1.13)
Based on computer search for Fibonacci and Lucas numbers, Ashbacher conjectures
that there are no Fibonacci or Lucas numbers in any of the Smarandache odd, even,
consecutive and symmetric sequences (except for the trivial cases). This paper confirms the
conjectures of Ashbacher. We prove further that none of the Smarandache prime product and
reverse sequences contain Fibonacci or Lucas numbers (except for the trivial cases).
For the Smarandache even, prime product, permutation and square product sequences,
the question is : Are there any perfect powers in each of these sequences? We have a partial
answer for the first of these sequences, while for each of the remaining sequences, we prove
that no number can be expressed as a perfect power. We also prove that no number of the
Smarandache higher power product sequences is square of a natural number.
For the Smarandache odd, prime product, consecutive, reverse and symmetric
sequences, the question is : How many primes are there in each of these sequences? For the
Smarandache even sequence, the question is : How many elements of the sequence are twice
a prime? These questions still remain open.
In the subsequent analysis, we would need the following result.
Lemma 1.1 : 31(10m+lOn+l) for all integers  
Proof: We consider the following three possible cases separately:
(1) m=n=O. In this case, the result is clearly true.
(2) m=O, 1. Here,
1 Om+ 1 On+ 1 =1 On+2=(1 On -1 )+3,
and so the result is true, since 311 On-l =9(1 + 10+ 10
2
+ ... + lOn-I).
(3) 1, 1. In this case, writing
1 Om+ 1 On+ 1 =(1 Om-1)+(1 On -1)+3,
we see the validity of the result. 0
2. SMARANDACHE ODD SEQUENCE {OS(n)} (X) no: I
The Smarandache odd sequence is the sequence of numbers fanned by repeatedly
concatenating the odd positive integers, and the n-th term of the sequence is given by (1.1).
For any   OS(n+l) can be expressed in terms ofOS(n) as follows:  
OS(n+1)=135 ... (2n-1)(2n+l)
OSOS(n)+(2n+ 1) for some integer 1. (2.1)
More precisely,
s=number of digits in (2n+ 1).
Thus, for example, OS( 5)=( 1 O)OS( 4)+7, while, OS( 6)=( 1 02)OS( 5)+ 11.
By repeated application of (2.1), we get
OS(n+3)=10
s
OS(n+2)+(2n+5) for some integer
1 Os[ 1 ot OS(n+ 1 )+(2n+ 3)]+(2n+5) for some integer t21 (2.2a)
=10s+t[10
U
OS(n)+(2n+ 1)]+(2n+3)10s+(2n+5) for some integer   (2.2b)
so that
OS(n+ 3)=1 Os+t+uOS(n)+(2n+ 1) 1 Os+t+(2n+ 3) lOs +(2n+5),
where
Lemma 2.1 : 31 OS(n) if and only if31 OS(n+3).
Proof: For any s, t with   by Lemma 1.1,
31 [(2n+ 1) 1 Os+t+(2n+ 3) 1 OS +(2n+5)]=(2n+ 1)( 1 Os+t+ 1 Os+ 1)+(1 OS+2).
The result is now evident from (2.3). 0
94
(2.3)
From the expression ofOS(n+3) given in (2.2), we see that, for all n2::1,
OS(n+3)=10s+t OS(n+l)+ (2n+3)(2n+5)
=10
s
+
t
+
u
OS(n)+ (2n+l)(2n+3)(2n+5).
The following result has been proved by Ashbacher [1].
Lemma 2.2: 31 OS(n) if and only if 31 n. In particular, 3 I OS(3n) for all n2::1.
In fact, it can be proved that 9jOS(3n) for all n:2::1.
We now prove the following result.
Lemma 2.3: 5 I OS( 5 n+ 3) for all n2::0.
Proof: From (2.1), for any arbitrary but fixed n2::0,
OS(Sn+3)=10
s
OS(5n+2)+(lOn+5) for some integer s2::1.
The r.h.s. is clearly divisible by 5, and hence 51 OS(5n+3).
Since n is arbitrary, the lemma is established. 0
Ashbacher [1] devised a. computer program which was then run for all numbers from
135 up through OS(2999)=135 ... 29972999, and based on the findings, he conjectures that
(except for the trivial case ofn=l, for which OS(l)=l=F(l)=L(1» there are no numbers in the
Smarandache odd sequence that are also Fibonacci (or, Lucas) numbers. In Theorem 2.1 and
Theorem 2.2, we prove the conjectures of Ashbacher in the affirmative. The proof of the
theorems relies on the following results.
Lemma 2.4: For any n2::1, OS(n +1»10 OS(n).
Proof: From (2.1), for any n2:: 1,
OS(n+ 1)= 1 OS OS( n)+(2n+ 1» 1 OS OS(n» 1 0 OS(n),
where 52::1 is an integer. We thus get the desired inequality. 0
CoroLLary 2.1 : For any n2::1, OS(n+2)-OS(n»9[OS(n+ l)+OS(n)].
Proof: From Lemma 2.4,
OS(n+ 1)-OS(n»9 OS(n) for all n2::1. (2.4)
Now, using the inequality (2.4), we get
OS(n+2)-;OS(n)=[OS(n+2)-OS(n+ l)]+[OS(n+ 1)-OS(n)]>9[OS(n+ l)+OS(n)],
which establishes the lemma. 0
Theorem 2.1 : (Except for n=1,2 for which OS(1)=1=F(1)=F(2), OS(2)=13=F(7» there are
no numbers in the Smarandache odd sequence that are also Fibonacci numbers.
Proof: Using Corollary 2.1, we see that, for all n ~ 1  
OS(n+2)-OS(n»9[OS(n+ l)+OS(n)]>OS(n+ 1). (2.5)
Thus, no numbers of the Smarandache odd sequence satisfy the recurrence relation (2.10)
satisfied by the Fibonacci numbers. 0
By similar reasoning, we have the following result.
Theorem 2.2 : (Except for n=l for which OS(1)=1 =L(2» there are no numbers in the
Smarandache odd sequence that are Lucas numbers.
Searching, for primes in the Smarandache odd sequence (using UBASIC program),
Ashbacher [1] found that among the first 21 elements of the sequence, only OS(2), OS(lO)
and OS(16) are primes. Marimutha [6] conjectures that there are infinitely many primes in the
Smarandache odd sequence, but the conjecture still remains to be resolved.
In order to search for primes in the Smarandache odd sequence, by virtue of
Lemma 2.2 and Lemma 2.3, it is sufficient to check the terms of the forms OS(3n±1), n ~ l  
where neither 3n+ 1 nor 3n-1 is of the form Sk+ 3 for some integer k2::1,
95
3. SMARANDACHE EVEN SEQUENCE  
The Smarandache even sequence, whose n-th term is given by (1.2), is the sequence of
numbers formed by repeatedly concatenating the even positive integers.
We note that, for any n;;::: 1,
ES(n+ 1 )=24 ... (2n)(2n+2)
OS ES(n)+(2n+2) for some integer (3.1)
More precisely,
s=number of digits in (2n+2).
Thus, for example, ES(4)=2468=10 ES(3)+8, while, ES(5)=246810=10
2
ES(4)+10.
From (3.1), the following result follows readily.
Lemma 3.1: For any ES(n+1»10 ES(n).
U sing Lemma 3.1, we can prove that
ES(n+2)-ES(n»9[ES(n+ l)+ES(n)] for all n2:1. (3.2)
The po of is similar to that given in establishing the inequality (2.1) and is omitted here.
so that
By repeated application of (3.1), we see that, for any 1,
ES(n+2)=10t ES(n+l)+(2n+4) for some integer t21
=1 ot[ IOu ES(n)+(2n+2)]+(2n+4) for some integer u2:1
Ou+t ES(n)+(2n+2) 1 d+(2n+4),
ES(n+ 3)=1 OS ES(n+2)+(2n+6) for some integer
=10$[1 ot ES(n+ 1)+(2n+4)]+(2n+6)
=1 Os+t+uES(n)+(2n+2)1 Os+t+(2n+2) 1 OS+(2n+6),
for some integers s, t and u with
From (3.3), we see that
ES( n+ 3)= 1 05+t ES(n+ 1 )+(2n+4 )(2ri+6)
=1 Os+t+u ES(n)+(2n+2)(2n+4)(2n+6).
Using (3.3), we can prove the following result.
Lemma 3.2: If31 ES(n) for some n2:1, then 31 ES(n+3), and conversely.
Lemma 3.3 : For all rEI, 31 ES(3n).
(3.3)
Proof: The proof is by inductiori on n. Since ES(3)=246 is divisible by 3, the lemma is true
for n= 1. We now assume that the result is true for some n, that is, 3 1 ES(3n) for some n.
Now, by Lemma 3.2, together with the induction hypothesis, we see that
ES(3n+3)=ES(3(n+I» is divisible by 3. Thus the result is true for n+l. 0
Corollary 3.1 : For all n21, 31 ES(3n-l).
Proof: Let t;l (2:1) be any arbitrary but fixed integer. From (3.1),
ES(3n)=10
s
ES(3n-l)+(6n) for some integer S21.
Now, by Lemma 3.2, 3\ ES(3n). Therefore, 3 must also divide ES(3n-1).
Since n is arbitrary, the lemma is proved. 0
Corollary 3.2 : For any n;;:::l, 31 ES(3n + 1).
Proof: Let n (2:1) be any arbitrary but fixed integer. From (3.1),
ES(3n+1)=10sES(3n)+(6n+2) for some integer 82:1.
Since 31 ES(3n), but 3 does not divide (6n+2), the result follows. 0
96
Lemma 3.4: 41 ES(2n) for all
Proof: Since 41 ES(2)==24 and 41 ES(4)=2468, we see that the result is true for n=I,2. Now,
from (3.1), for
ES(2n)= lOs ES(2n-1 )+(4 n),
where s is the number of digits in (4n). Clearly, for all Thus, 4110
s
and we get
the desired result. 0
Corollary 3.3 : For any 41 ES(2n+ 1).
Proof: Clearly the result is true for n=O, since ES(l is not divisible by 4. For from
(3.1 ),
ES(2n+ 1)= 1 OS ES(2n)+( 4n+ 2) for some integer s?:: 1.
By Lemma 3.4, 41 ES(2n). Since 41 (4n+2), the result follows. 0
Lemma 3.5: For all 10 I ES(Sn).
Proof: For any arbitrary but fixed n?::l, from (3.1),
ES(Sn)=10
s
ES(Sn-1)+(10n) for some integer
The result is now evident from the above expression ofES(Sn). 0
Corollary 3.4 : 20IES(lOn) for all 1.
Proof: follows by virtue of Lemma 3.4 and Lemma 3.5.0
Based on the computer findings with numbers up through
ES(1499)=2468 ... 29962998, Ashbacher [1] conjectures that (except for the case of
ES(1 )=2=F(3)=L(0» there are no nun1bers in the Smarandache even sequence that are also
Fibonacci (or, Lucas) numbers. The following two theorems establish the validity of
Ashbacher's conjectures. The proofs of the theorems make use of the inequality (3.2) and are
similar to those used in proving Theorem 2.1. We thus omit the proof here.
Theorem 3.1 : (Except for ES(1)=2=F(3» there are no numbers in the Smarandache even
sequence that are Fibonacci numbers.
Theorem 3.2 : (Except for ES(1)=2=L(O» there are no numbers in the Smarandache even
sequence that are Lucas numbers.
Ashbacher [1] raised the question: Are there any perfect powers in ES(n)? The
following theorem gives a partial answer to the question.
Theorem 3.3 : None of the terms of the subsequence {ES(2n-l)}oon=1 is a perfect square or
higher power of an integer (> 1).
Proof: Let, for some 1,
, ES(n)=24 ... (2n) for some integer x> 1.
Now, since ES(n) is even for all x must be even. Let x==2y for some integer Then,
ES(n)=(2y)2=4y2,
which shows that 41 ES(n).
Now, ifn is odd of the form 2k-l, by Corollary 3.3, ES(2k-l) is not divisible by
4, and hence numbers of the form ES(2k-I), k?::l, can not be perfect squares. By same
reasoning, none of tenus ES(2n-l), 1, can be expressed as a cube or higher powers of
an integer. 0
Remark 3.1 : It can be seen that, if n is of the form kx 10s+4 or kx 10s+6, where k  
and s (;?:1) are integers, then ES(n) cannot be a perfect square (and hence, cannot be any even
power of a natural number). The proof is as follows: If
ES(n)=x
2
for some integer x> 1,
(*)
then x must be an even integer. The following table gives the possible trailing digits of x and
the corresponding trailing digits of x
2
: .
97
Trailing digit ofx
Trailing digit of x
2
2
4
6
8
4
6
6
4
Since the trailing digit of ES(kx 10
5
+4) is 8 for all admissible values of k and s, it follows that
the representation of ES(kx 10
5
+4) in the fonn (*) is not possible. By similar reasoning, if n is
of the form n=kx 10
5
+6, then ES(n)=ES(kx 10
5
+6) with the trailing digit of 2, cannot be
expressed as a perfect square (and hence, any even power of a natural number). Thus, it
remains to consider the cases when n is one of the forms (1) n=kxlO
s
, (2) n=kx10s+2,
(3) n=kxlOs+8 (where, in all the three cases, k (1:s;k:S;9) and s   are integers). Smith [7]
conjectures that none of the terms of the sequence {ES(n)} oon;1 is a perfect power.
4. SMARANDACHE PRlME PRODUCT SEQUENCE {PPS(n)}OOn=l
The n-th term, PPS(n), of the Smarandache prime product sequence is given by (1.3).
The following lemma gives a recurrence relation in connection with the sequence.
Lemma 4.1: PPS(n+l)=Pn+1 PPS(n)-(Pn+!-l) for all
Proof: By definition,
PPS(n+ 1)=PIP2 ., 'PnPn+l+ 1 =(PIP2. ··Pn+ l)Pn+I-Pn+l+ 1,
which now gives the desired relationship. 0
From Lemma 4.1, we get
Corollary 4.1: PPS(n+ l)-PPS(n)=[PPS(n)-l](Pn+l-l) for all
Lemma 4.2 : (1) PPS(n)«Pnt-
1
for all n24, (2) PPS(n)<(Pn)"-2 for all
(3) PPS(n)<(Pn)"-3 for all 0, (4) PPS(n)<(Pn+l)n-1 for all
(5) PPS(n)<(Pn+I)"-2 for all (6) PPS(n)<(Pn+lt-
3
for all
Proof: We prove parts (3) and (6) only, the proof ofllie other parts is similar.
To prove part (3) of the lemma, we note that the result is true for n=lO, since
PPS(lO)=646969323 1 «PI0
7
=29
7
=17249876309.
Now, assuming the validity of the result for some integer k   and using Lemma 4.1, we
see that,
PPS(k+l)=Pk+1 PPS(k}-(Pk+l- l ) <Pk+I PPS(k)
<Pk+l(Pk)n-3 (by the induction hypothesis)
«Pk+ I )(Pk+ ! )"-3 =(Pk+ I )"-2,
where the last inequality follows from the fact that the sequence of primes, {Pn} con=t, is
strictly increasing in n (21). Thus, the result is true for k+ 1 as well.
To prove part (6) of the lemma, we note that the result is true for n=9, since
PPS(9)=223092871 <(P1O)6=29
6
=594823321.
Now to appeal to the ,principle of induction, we assume that the result is true for some integer
k   Then using Lemma 4.1, together with the induction hypothesis, we get
PPS(k+ l)=Pk+1 PPS(k)-(Pk+l-l)<Pk+l PPS(k)<Pk+J(Pk+l)k-3=(Pk+l)k-2.
Thus the result is true for k+ 1.
All these complete the proof by induction. 0
Lemma 4.3 : Each of PPS(1), PPS(2), PPS(3), PPS(4) and PPS(5) is prime, and for
PPS(n) has at most n-4 prime factors, counting mUltiplicities.
9a
Proof: Clearly PPS(l)=3, PPS(2)=7, PPS(3)=31, PPS(4)=211, PPS(S)=231 1 are all primes.
Also, since
PPS(6)=30031 =S9x509, PPS(7)=Sl 051 9x97x277, PPS(8)=9699691 =34 7x27953,
we see that the lemma is true for 6.$n.$8.
Now, if p is a prime factor of PPS(n), then p2Pn+l. Therefore, if for some n2::9, PPS(n)
has n-3 (or more) prime factors (counted with multiplicity), then    
contradicting part (6) of Lemma 4.2.
Hence the lemma is established. 0
Lemma 4.3 above improves the earlier results (Prakash [8], and Majumdar [9]).
The following lemma improves a previous result (Majumdar [10]).
Lemma 4.4 : For any and k21, PPS(n) and PPS(n+k) can have at most k-l number of
prime factors (counting multiplicities) in common.
Proof: For any and
PPS (n+k )-P P S( n)=p IP2· .. Pn(Pn+ I Pn+2 ... Pn+k-1).
( 4.1 )
If P is a common prime factor of PPS(n) and PPS(n+k), since p2Pn+k, it follows from (4.1)
that pI (Pn+IPn+2···Pn+k-l). Now ifPPS(n) and PPS(n+k) have k(or more) prime factors in
common, then the product of these common prime factors is greater than (Pn+k)k, which can
not divide Pn+lPn+2.·· Pn+k-I «Pn+k)k.
This contradiction proves the lemma. 0
Corollary 4.2 : For any integers n (21) and k (21), if all the prime factors ofpn+lPn+2"'Pn+k-I
are less than pn+k, then PPS(n) and PPS(n+k) are relatively prime.
Proof: If p is any common prime factor of PPS(n) and PPS(n+k), then pl( pn+lPn+2·. 'Pn+k-l).
Also, such P>Pn+k, contradicting the hypothesis of the corollary. Thus, if all the common
prime factors ofPPS(n) and PPS(n+k) are less than pn+k, then (PPS(n),PPS(n+k)=l. 0
The following result has been proved by others (Prakash [8] and Majumdar [10]).
Here we give a simpler proof.
Theorem 4.1: For any n2I, PPS(n) is never a square or higher power of an integer (> 1).
Proof: Clearly, none of PPS(1), PPS(2), PPS(3), PPS( 4) and PPS(S) can be expressed as
powers of integers (by Lemma 4.3).
Now, if let for some n26,
PPS(n)=x
E
for some integers x (>3), i (22).
(*)
Without loss of generality, we may assume that e is a prime (if ,£ is a composite number,
lettinge=pr where p is prime, we have PPS(n)=(xrl=NP, where N=xr). By Lemma 4.3,
and soe cannot be greater than Pn-5 (i2Pn-4 => i>n-4, since Pn>n for all n2:::1). Hence,e must
be one of the primes PI, P2, ... , Pn-5.A1so, since PPS(n) is odd, x must be odd. Let x=2y+lfor
some integer y>O. Then, from (*),
PIP2'''Pn=(2y+ l)c-I
i
i
=(2y)E+( )(2y)t-I+ ... +( ) (2y).
(**)
1
,e-l
If i=2, we see from (**), 41 PIP2 ... Pn, which is absurd. On the other hand, for f2:::3, since
f 1 PIP2"'Pn, it follows from (**) that fly, and consequently, f
2
1 PIP2"'Pn, which is impossible.
Hence, the representation of PPS(n) in the form (*) is not possible. 0
Using Corollary 4.1 and the fact that PPS(n+ l)-PPS(n»O, we get
PPS( n+2)-PPS(n)=[PPS(n+ 2)-PPS(n+ 1 )]+[PPS(n+ 1 )-PPS(n)]
>[PPS(n+ 1)-1 ](Pn+2-I)
>2[PPS(n+ I)-I] for all n21.
99
Hence,
PPS(n+2)-PPS(n»PPS(n+ 1) for all (4.2)
The inequality (4.2) shows that no elements of the Smarandache prime product
sequence satisfy the recurrence relation for Fibonacci (or, Lucas) numbers. This leads to the
following theorem.
Theorem 4.2 : There are no numbers in the Smarandache prime product sequence that are
Fibonacci (or Lucas) numbers (except for the trivial cases of PPS(l)=3=F(4)=L(2),
PPS(2)=7=L( 4 )).
5. SMARANDACHE SQUARE PRODUCT SEQUENCES {SPSI(n)}COn=t, {SPS2(n)f"n;1
The n-th terms, SPS, (n) and SPSz(n), are given in (1.4a) and (lAb) respectively.
In Theorem 5.1, we prove that, for any n2:I, neither OfSPSl(n) and SPS2(n) is a square of an
integer (> 1). To prove the theorem, we need the following results.
Lemma 5.1: The only non-negative integer solution of the Diophantine equation x2-y2=1 is
x=l, y=0.
Proof: The given Diophantine equation is equivalent to (x-y)(x+Y)=I' where both x-y and
x+y are integers. Therefore, the only two possibilities are
(1) x-Y=I=x+y, (2) -l=x+y,
the first of which gives the desired non-negative solution. 0
Corollary 5.1: Let N (> 1) be a fixed number. Then,
(1) The Diphantine equation x
2
-N=1 has no (positive) integer solution x,
(2) The Diophantine equation N-y2=1 has no (positive) integer solution y.
Theorem 5.1: For any none of SPS I(n) and SPS2(n) is a square of an integer (> I).
Proof: If possible, let
SPS I (n )=( n !)2+ 1 =x
2
for some integers 1, x> 1.
But, by Corollary 5.1(1), this Diophantine equation has no integer solution x.
Again, if
SPS2(n)=(n !)2-1=y2 for some integers y>l,
then, by Corollary 5.1 (2), this Diophantine equation has no integer solution y.
All these complete the proof of the theorem. 0
In Theorem 5.2, we prove a stronger result, for which we need the results below.
Lemma 5.2 : Let m   be a fixed integer. Then, the only non-negative integer solution of
the Diophantine equation x
2
+ 1 =ym is x=O, y=l.
Proof: For m=2, the result follows from Lemma 5.1. So, it is sufficient to consider the case
when m>2. However, we note that it is sufficient to consider the case when m is odd; if m is
even, say, m=2q for some integer q> I, then rewriting the given Diophantine equation as
(yQ)2_x2=1, we see that, by Lemma 5.1, the only non-negative integer solution is yq:::::l, x=O,
that is x=O, :y=l, as required.
So, let m be odd, say, m=2q+ 1 for some integer 1. Then, the given Diophantine
equation can be written as
x2==y2Q+I_l =(y_l)(y2
Q
+
y
2
Q
-'+ ... + 1). (***)
From (***), we see that x=O if and only ify=l, since y2
q
+y2
q
-I+ ... + 1>0.
Now, ifx:;t:O, from (***), the only two possibilities are
(1) y-l=x, y2
q
+
y
2
q
-l+ ... +
1
=x.
But then y=x+l, and we are led to the equation (x+l/
Q
+(x+li
Q
-
I
+ ... +(x+li+2=O, which is
impossible.
100
(2) y-1 =1, y2
Q
+
y
2
q
-I+ ... + 1
Then, y=2 together "vith the equation
x 2=2 2q+ 1-1. ( 5 .1 )
But the equation (5.1) has no integer solution x (> 1). To prove this, we first note that any
integer x satisfying (5.1) must be odd. Now rewriting (5.1) in the following equivalent form
(x-1 )(x+ 1 )=2(2q-1 )(2
q
+ 1),
we see that the l.h.s. is divisible by 4, while the r.h.s. is not divisible by 4 since both 2
q
:-1 and
2
q
+ 1 are odd.
Thus, if x:;t:O, then we reach to a contradiction in either of the above cases. This
contradiction establishes the lemma. 0
Corollary 5.2 : Let m   and N (>0) be two fixed integers. Then, the Diophantine equation
N
2
+ 1 =ym has no integer solution y.
Corollary 5.3 : Let m (;:::2) and N (> 1) be two fixed integers. Then, the Diophantine equation
x
2
+ I =N
m
has no (positive) integer solution x. .
Lemma 5.3 : Let m   be a fixed integer. Then, the only non-negative integer solutions of
the Diophantine equation x
2
_ym=1 are ( 1) x=l, y=0; (2) x=3, y=2, m=3.
Proof: For m=2, the lemma reduces to Lemma 5.1. So we consider the case when
From the given Diophantine equation, we see that, y=O if and only if x=±l, giving the
only non-negative integer solution x=l, y=O. To see if the given Diophantine equation has
any non-zero integer solution, we assume that x:;t:l.
If m is even, say, m=2q for some integer q?!l, then x2_ym=;x2_(yQ)2=1, which has no
integer solution y for any x> 1 (by Corollary 5.1(2».
Next, let m be odd, say, m=2q+ 1 for some integer Then, x2_y2Q+I=1, that is,
(x-1)(x+ 1)=y2
Q
+l.
We now consider the following cases that may arise :
( 1) x-1=1, x+l=y2
Q
+1.
Here, x=2 together with the equation y2
q
+l=3, which has no integer solution y.
(2) x-I =y, x+ 1 =y2
q
.
Rewriting the second in the equivalent form (yq-l )(yQ+ 1 )=x, we see that (yq+ 1) Ix.
But this contradicts the first equation x=y+ 1 if q> 1, since for q> 1, yq+ l>y+ 1 =x.
If q=l, then
(y-l )(y+ 1 )=x => y-l = 1, y+ 1 =x,
so that y=2, x=3, m=3, which is a solution of the given Diophantine equation.
(3) x-I =yt for some integer t with 2::::;t:S;q, q?!2 (so that x+ 1 =y2
q
-t+l).
In this case, we have
2x=yt[ 1 +y2(Q-t)+
1
].
Since x does not divide y, it follqws that
1 +y2(Q-t)+ I =Cx for some integer C;?: 1.
Thus,
2x=y\Cx) => C/=2.
If C=2, then y= 1, and the resulting equation x
2
=2 has no integer solution. On the other hand,
if C:;t::2, the equation Cyt=2 has no integer solution. Thus, case (3) cannot occur.
All these complete the proof of the lemma. 0
Corollary 5.4 : The only non-negative integer solution of the Diophantine equation x
2
_ y3=1
is x=3, y=2. -
Corollary 5.5 : Let m (>3) be a fixed integer. Then, the Diophantine equation x2_ym=1 has
x= 1, y=0 as its only non-negative integer solution.
101
Corollary 5.6 : Let ill (>3) and N (>0) be two fixed integers. Then, the Diophantine equation
x2-N
m
=1 has no integer solution x.
Corollary 5.7: Let m   and N (> 1) be two fixed integers withN:;t:3. Then, the Diophantine
equation N
2
_ym=1 has no integer solution.
We are now in a position to prove the following theorem.
Theorem 5.2 : For any none of the SPSt(n) and SPS2(n) is a cube or higher power of an
integer (> 1).
Proof: is by contradiction. Let, for some integer n21 ,
SPS
1
(n):=;(n!)2+1=ym for some integers y>I, m2:3.
By Corollary 5.2, the above equation has no integer solution y.
Again, if for some integer n21 ,
SPS
2
(n)==(n!)2 -1 =zs for some integer z21, s23,
we have contradiction to Corollary 5.7. D
The following result gives the recurrence relations satisfied by SPSI(n) and SPS
2
(n).
Lemma 5.4 : For all n;;:::l,
(1) SPSt(n+ l)=(n+ 1iSPS
1
(n)-n(n+2),
(2) SPS
2
(n+ 1 )=(n+ 1 /SPS
2
(n)+n(n+ 2).
Proof: The proof is for part (1) only. Since
SPS1(n+ 1 )=[(n+ 1 )!]2+ 1 =(n+ li[(n!)2+ I]-(n+ 1 )2+ 1,
the result follows. D
Lemma 5.5 : For all n21,
(1) SPS
1
(n+2)-SPSI(n» SPS t(n+ 1),
(2) SPS2(n+2)-SPS2(n»SPS2(n+ 1).
Proof: Using Lemma 5.4, it is straightforward to prove that
SPS 1 (n+2)-SPS 1 (n)=SPS
2
(n+2)-SPS
2
(n)=(n!)2 [(n+ 1 )\n+2/-1].
Some algebraic manipulations give the desired inequalities. D
Lemma 5.5 can be used to prove the following results.
Theorem 5.3 : (Except for the trivial cases, SPSl(l)=2=F(3)=L(0), SPSJ(2)=5=F(5» there are
no numbers of the Smarandache square product sequence of the first kind that are Fibonacci
(or Lucas) numbers.
Theorem 5.4 : (Except for the trivial cases, SPS
2
(l)=0=F(0), SPS2(2)=3=F(4)=L(2» there are
no numbers of the Smarandache square product sequence of the . second kind that are
Fibonacci ( or Lucas) numbers.
The question raised by )acobescu [11] is : How many terms of the sequence
{SPS1(n)}oon=1 are prime?
The following theorem, due to Le [12], gives a partial answer to the above question.
Theorem 5.5 : If n (>2) is an even integer such that 2n+ 1 is prime, then SPSI(n) is not a
prime.
Russo [3] gives tables of values of SPSJ(n) and SPS
2
(n) for 1:$;n:$;20. Based on
computer results, Russo [3] conjectures that each of the sequences {SPSI(n)} oon=l and
{SPS2(n)} 00 n"'-l only a finite number of primes.
6. SMARANDACHE HIGHER POWER PRODUCT SEQUENCES
{HPPS I(n)} 00 n=l, {HPPS2(n)} oon=1
The n-th terms of the Smarandache higher power product sequences are given in (1.5). The
following lemma gives the recurrence relation satisfied by HPPS I (n) and HPPS
2
(n).
102
Lemma 6.1 : For all n;?:l,
(1) HPPS I(n+ l)=(n+ 1 )mHPPS \ (n)-[(n+ l)m+ 1],
(2) HPPS
2
(n+ l)=(n+ 1)mHPPS
2
(n)+[(n+ l)m+ 1].
Theorem 6.1: For any integer n;?:l, none ofHPPPS1(n) and HPPS2(n) is a square of an integer
(> 1).
Proof: If possible, let
HPPS [Cn):=Cn!)m+ 1 =x
2
for some integer x> 1.
This leads to the Diophantine equation x2-Cn!)m=1, which has no integer solution x, by virtue
of Corollary 5.6 (for m>3). Thus, if m>3, HPPS1(n) cannot be a square of a natural number
(> 1) for any n;?: 1.
Next, let, for some integer n;?:2 (HPPS2(1)=O)
HPPS2(n)=(n!)m -1 =y2 for some integer y;?:l.
Then, we have the Diophantine equation y2+ 1 =(n!)m, and by Corollary 5.3, it has no integer
solution y. Thus, HPPS
2
(n) cannot be a square of an integer (> 1) for any n;?:l. 0
The following two theorems are due to Le [13,14].
Theorem 6.2: If m is not a number of the fonn 2
c
for some f;;:::l, then the sequence
{HPPS1(n)}COn=1 contains only one prime, namely, HPPPS
1
(1)=2.
Theorem 6.3: If both m and 2
m
-1 are primes, then the sequence {HPPS
2
(n)} co contains
only one prime, HPPS2(2)= 2
m
; otherwise, the sequence does not contain any prime.
Remark 6.1 : We have defined the Smarandache higher power product sequences under the
restriction that m> 3, and under such restriction, as has been proved in Theorem 6.1, none of
HPPS1(n) and HPPS2(n) is a square of an integer (>1) for any n;?:l. However, ifm=3, the
situation is a little bit different : For any n;?:l, HPPS
2
(n)=(n!)3 -1 still cannot be a perfect
square of an integer (?1), by virtue of Corollary 5.3, but since HPPS,(n)=(n!i+1, we see that
HPPSl(2)=(2!)3+1=3 ,that is, HPPS
1
(2) is a perfect square. However, this is the only term of
the sequence {SPPS1(n)}COn=1 that can be express'ed as a perfect square.
7. SMARANDACHE PERMUTATION SEQUENCE {PS(n)}COn=1
For the Smarandache permutation sequence, given in (1.6), the question raised (Dumitrescu
and Seleacu [4]) is : Is there any perfect power among these numbers?
Smarandache conjectures that there are none. In Theorem 7.1, we prove the
conjecture in the affirmative. To prove the theorem, we need the follqwing results.
Lemma 7.1 : For n;?:2, PS(n) is of the form 2(2k+ 1) for some integer k> 1.
Proof: Since for n;?:2,
PS(n)= 135 ... (2n-1 )(2n)(2n-2) ... 42, (7.1)
we see that PS(n) is even and after division by 2, the last digit of the quotient is 1. 0
An immediate consequence of the above lemma is the following.
Corollary : For   2
c
I PS(n) if and only if f=1.
Theorem 7.1: For   PS(n) is not a perfect power.
Proof: The result is clearly true for n=l, since PS(1)=3x2
2
is not a perfect power. The proof
for the case n;?:2 is by contradiction.
Let, for some integer  
PS(n)=x
c
fOLsome integers x> 1, i;?:2.
Since PS(n) is even, so is x. Let x=2y for some integer y> 1. Then,
PS(n)=(2y)=2c yE,
which shows that 2
c
I PS(n), contradicting Corollary 7.1. 0
103
To get more insight into the numbers of the Smaradache permutation sequence, we
define a new sequence, called the reverse even sequence, and denoted by {RES(n)} oon=l, as
follows:
RES(n)=(2n)(2n-2) .. .42, n;;:: 1. (7.2)
A first few terms of the sequence are
2, 42, 642, 8642, 108642, 12108642, ....
We note that, for all n;;:: 1 ,
RES(n+ 1)=(2n+2)(2n)(2n-2) ... 42
=(2n+2)10
s
+RES(n) for some integer s;;::n, (7.3)
where, more precisely,
s=number of digits in RES(n).
Thus, for example,
RES( 4)=8x 10
3
+RES(3), RES(5)=1 Ox 10
4
+RES(4), RES(6)=12x 10
6
+RES(5).
Lemma 7.2 : For all n;;::l, 41 [RES(n+1)-RES(n)].
Proof: Since from (7.3),
RES(n+l}-RES(n)=(2n+2)lOs for some integer s  
. the result follows. 0
Lemma 7.3 : The numbers of the reverse even sequence are of the fonn 2(2k+ 1) for some
integer k2:0.
Proof: The proof is by induction on n. The result is true for . So, we assume that the
result is true for some n, that is,
RES(n)=2(2k+ 1) for some integer k;;::O.
But, by virtue of Lemma 7.2,
RES(n+ 1}-RES(n)=4k' for some integer k'>O,
which, together with the induction hypothesis, gives,
RES(n+ 1)=4k'+RES(n)=4(k+k')+2.
Thus, the result is true for n+ 1 as well,· completing the proof. 0
Lemma 7.4: 31 RES(3n) if and only if31 RES(3n-1).
Proof: Since,
RES(3n)=(6n)1 OS+RES(3n-l) for some integer s;;:::n,
the result, follows. 0
By repeated application of (7.3), we get successively
RES(n+3)=(2n+6)lOs+RES(n+2) for some integer s;;::n+2
=(2n+6)10s+(2n+4)10t+RES(n+l) for some integer t;;:::n+l
=(2n+6) 1 OS+(2n+4) 1 Ot+(2n+2) 1 OU+RES(n) for some integer (7.4)
so that,
RES( ri+ 3 }-RES( n)=(2n+6) 1 OS +(2n+4) 1 Ot+(2n+ 2) IOu,
where 1.
Lemma 7.5: 3 1 [RES(n+ 3}--RES(n)] for all n2:: 1.
Proof: is evident from (7.5), since
31 (2n+6) 1 OS+(2n+4) 1 Ot+(2n+2) 1 OU
OU[(2n+6)( 1 1 1 )-2( 1 0
104
(7.5)
Corollary 7.2 : 3 1 RES(3n) for all n21.
Proof: The result is true for n==1, since RES(3)=642 is divisible by 3. Now, assuming the
validity of the result for n, so that 31 RES(3n), we get, from Lemma 7.5,
31 RES(3n+3)=RES(3(n+1», so that the result is true for n+1 as well.
This completes the proof by induction. D
Corollary 7.3 : 31 RES(3n-l) for all n21.
Proof: follows from Lemma 7.4, together with Corollary 7.2.0
Corollary 7.4: For any n2::0, 31 RES(3n+l).
Proof: Clearly, the result is true for n=O. For n21, from (7.3),
RES(3n+ 1 )=( 6n+ 2) 1 as +RES(3n) for some integer s23n.
Now, 31 RES(3n) (by Corollary 7.2) but 31 (6n+2). Hence the result. D
Using (7.4), we that, for all n2::1,
RES (n+2)-RES(n)
=[RES (n+2)-RES (n+ 1 )]+[RES(n+ 1 )-RES(n)]
=[(2n+4)1 Ot-1JRES(n+ 1)+[(2n+2)1 OU -1]RES(n), (7.6)
where t and u are integers with t>U2o+ 1.
From (7.6), we get the following result.
Lemma 7.6 : RES (n+2)-RES (n»RES(n+ 1) for all n2::1.
PS(n), given by (7.1), can now be expressed in terms of OS(n) and RES(n) as
follows: For any n21,
PS(n)=10
s
OS(n)+RES(n) for some integer (7.7)
where, more precisely,
s=number of digits in RES(n).
From (7.7), we observe that, for n22, (since 41 10s for s2n2::2), PS(n) is of the form
4k+2 for some integer k>l, since by Lemma 7.3, RES(n) is of the same form. This provides
an alternative proof of Lemma 7.1.
Lemma 7.7: 31 PS(3n) for all n21.
Proof: follows by virt)le of Lemma 2.2 and Corollary 7.2, since
PS(3n)=10
s
OS(3n)+RES(3n) for some integer s23n. D
Lemma 7.8: 31 PS(n) if and only if 31 PS(n+3).
Proof: follows by virtue of Lemma 1 and Lemma 7.5. 0
Lemma 7.9 : 31 PS(3n-2) for all n2::1. '
Proof: Since 31 PS(l)=12, the result is true for n=1. To prove by induction, we assume that
the result is true for some n, that is, 31 PS(3n-2). But, then, by Lemma 7.8, 31 PS(3n-l),
showing that the result is true for n+ 1 as well.
Lemma 7.10: For all n21, PS(n+2)-PS(n»PS(n+l).
Proof: Since
,PS(n+2)=10
s
OS(n+2)+RES(n+2) for some integer 820+2,
PS(n+ 1)=10
t
OS(n+ l)+RES(n+ 1) for some integer t2::n+ 1,
PS(n)='10
u
OS(n)+RES(n) for some integer u2n,
where s>t>u, we see that
PS(n+2)-PS(n)=[ 1 OS OS(n+2)-10
u
OS(n)]+[RES(n+2)-RES(n)]
> 1 OS[OS(n+ 2 )-OS( n)]+ [RES (n+ 2)-RES( n)]
> 1 ot OS(n+ 1 )+RES(n+ 1 )=PS(n+ 1),
where the last inequality follows by virtue of (2.4), Lemma 7.6 and the fact that 10s>10
t
. 0
105
Lemma 7.10 can be used to prove the following result.
Theorem 7.1 : There are no numbers in the Smarandache permutation sequence that are
Fibonacci (or, Lucas) numbers.
Remark 7.1 : The result given in Theorem 7.l has also been proved by Le [15]. Note that
PS(2)=1342=11x122, PS(3)=135642=111x1222, PS(4)=1357S642=1111x12222,
as has been pointed out by Zhang [16]. However, such a representation of PS(n) is not valid
for Thus, the theorem of Zhang [16] holds true only for (and not for 1:::;n:::;9).
S. SMARANDACHE CONSECUTIVE SEQUENCE {CS(n)}UJ
n
=!
The Smarandache consecutive sequence is obtained by repeatedly concatenating the positive
integers, and the n-th tern of the sequence is given by (1.7).
Since
CS(n+1)=123 ... (n-1)n(n+l),  
we see that, for all n21,
CS(n+ 1 lOs CS(n)+(n+ 1) for some integer   CS(l)=l.
More precisely,
s==number of digits in (n+ 1).
Thus, for example, CS(9)=10 CS(S)+9, CS(l0)=10
2
CS(9)+10.
From (S.l), we get the following result :
Lemma 8.1 : For all   CS(n+ 1)-CS(n»9 CS(n).
Thus,
Using Lemma 8.l, we get, following the proof of (2.1),
CS(n+2)-CS(n»9[CS(n+ l)+CS(n)] for all n2:1.
CS(n+2)-CS(n»CS(n+ 1),
(8.1)
(8.2)
(8.3)
Based on computer search for Fibonacci (and Lucas) numbers from 12 up through
CS(2999)=123 ... 29982999, Asbacher [1] conjectures that (except for the trivial case,
CS(1)=l=F(l)=L(l» there are no Fibonacci (and Lucas) numbers in the Smarandache
consecutive sequence. The following theorem confirms the conjectures of Ashbacher.
Theorem 8.1 : There are no Fibonacci (and Lucas) numbers in the Smarandache consecutive
sequence (except for the trivial cases ofCS(l)=1=F(1)=F(2)=L(l), CS(3)=123=L(lO».
Proof: is evident from (8.3). 0
Remark 8.1 : As has been pointed out by Ashbacher [1], CS(3) is a Lucas number. However,
CS(3 ):;t:CS(2)+CS( 1).
Lemma 8.2: Let 31 n. Then, 31 CS(n) if and only if31 CS(n-I).
Proof: follows readily from (8.1). 0
By repeated application of (S.I), we get,
'CS(n+3)=10s CS(n+2)+(n+3) for some integer
'=10s[IOt CS(n+1)+(n+2)]+(n+3) for some integer t2:1
=1 Os+t[ 1 Ou CS(n)+(n+ 1 )]+(n+ 2) 1 OS +(n+ 3) for some integer
Os+t+u CS(n)+(n+ 1)1 Os+t+(n+2) 1 OS+(n+3), (S.4)
where s:?:t:?:u2: 1.
Lemma 8.3 : 31 CS(n) if and only if 31 CS(n+ 3) .
. Proof: follows from (S.4), since
31[(n+ 1) 1 Os+t+(n+2)1 OS+(n+ 3)]=[(n+ 1)(1 Os+t+ 1 Os+ 1 )+(1 OS+2)]. 0
106
Lemma 8.4: 31 CS(3n) for all n;;:::l.
Proof: The proof is by induction on n. The result is clearly true for n=l, since 31 CS(3)=123.
So, we assume that the result is true for some n, that is, we assume that 3 1 CS(3n) for some n.
But then, by Lemma 8.4, 31 CS(3n+ 3)=CS(3(n+ 1»), showing that the result is true for n+ 1 as
well, completing induction. 0
Corollary 8.1 : 3 I CS(3n-l) for all n;;::: 1.
Proof: From (8.1), for n2::1,
CS(3n)=10s CS(3n-1)+(3n) for some integer s;;:::l.
Since, by Lemma 8.4, 3ICS(3n), the result follows. 0
Corollary 8.2 : 31 CS(3n+ 1) for all n;;:::O.
Proof: For n=O, CS(l)=I is not divisible by 3. For n2::1, from (8.1),
CS(3n+ 1)=1 OS CS(3n)+(3n+ 1),
where, by Lemma 8.4, 31 CS(3n). Since 31 (3n+ 1), we get desired the result. 0
Lemma 8.5: For any n;;:::I, 51 CS(5n).
Proof: Forn2::I, from (8.1),
CS(5n)=10
s
CS(5n-1)+(5n) for some integer
Clearly, the r.h.s. is divisible by 5. Hence, 51 CS(5n). 0
F or the Smarandache consecutive sequence, the question is : How many tenns of the
sequence are prime? Fleuren [17J gives a table of prime factors of CS(n) for n=I(1)200,
which shows that none of these numbers is prime. In the Editorial Note following the paper
of Stephan [18], it is mentioned that, using a supercomputer, no prime has been found in the
first 3,072 terms of the Smarandache consecutive sequence. This gives rise to the conjecture
that there is no prime in the Smarandache consecutive sequence. This conjecture still remains
to be resolved. We note that, in order to check for prime numbers in the Smarandache
consecutive sequence, it is sufficient to check the terms of the form CS(3n+ 1), n2::1, where
3n+ 1 is odd and is not divisible by 5.
9. SMARANDACHE REVERSE SEQUENCE {RS(n)}CXln=l
The Smarandache reverse sequence is the sequence of numbers fanned by concatenating the
increasing integers on the left side, starting with RS( 1)= 1. The n-th term of the sequence is
given by-(1.8).
Since,
RS(n+ 1 )=(n+ l)n(n-l) ... 21, n2::1,
we see that, for all, n;;::: 1,
RS(n+I)=(n+1)10
s
+RS(n) for some integer sm (with RS(1)=l) (9.1)
More precisely,
s=number of digits in RS(n).
Thus, for example,
RS(9)=9x 10
8
+ RS(8), RS( 1 0)= lOx 10
9
+ RS(9), RS( 11)= 11 x 10
11
+ RS( 10).
Lemma 9.1 : For all n2::1, 41 [RS(n+l)-RS(n)], 10 I [RS(n+l)-RS(n)].
Proof: For all n;;:::l, from (9.1),
RS(n+I)-RS(n)=(n+l)lOs (with s2::n),
where the r.h.s. is divisible by both 4 and 10.0
107
Corollary 9.1 : For all n2:2, the terms of {RS(n)} C() n=l are of the fonn 4k+ l.
Proof: The proof is by induction of n. For n=2, the result is clearly true (RS(2)=21 =4x5+ 1).
So, we assume the validity of the result for n, that is, we assume that
RS(n)=4k+ 1 for integer k2:l.
Now, by Lemma 9.1 and the induction hypothesis,
RS(n+ 1)=RS(n)+4k'=4(k+k')+ 1 for some integer k'2:1 ,
showing that the result is true for n+ 1 as well. 0
Lemma 9.2 : Let 3 1 n for some n (2:2). Then, 31 RS(n) if and only if 31 RS(n-l).
Proof: follows immediately from (9.1). 0
By repeated application of (9.1), we get, for all n2:1,
RS(n+3)=(n+3)10
s
+RS(n+2) for some integer s2:n+2
=:(n+3)1 OS+(n+2)1 Ot+RS(n+ 1) for some integer tzn+ 1
=(n+3)10s+(n+2)10t+(n+1)10u+RS(n) for some integer u2:n, (9.2)
where s>t>u. Thus,
RS(n+3)=1 OU[(n+3)10
S
-
u
+(n+2)1 Ot-u+(n+ l)]+RS(n). (9.3)
Lemma 9.3: 31 [RS(n+3)-RS(n)] for all n2:l.
Proof: is immediate from (9.3). 0
A consequence of Lemma 9.3 is the following.
Corollary 9.2 : 3 I RS(3n) if and only if 3 1 RS(n+ 3).
Using Corollary 9.2, the following result can be established by.induction on n.
Corollary 9.3 : 3 / RS(3n) for all n2:1.
Corollary 9.4 : 31 RS(3n-l) for all n2: 1.
Proof: follows from Corollary 9.3, together with Lemma 9.2.0
Lemma 9.4: 31 RS(3n+ 1) for all n2:0.
Proof: The result is true for n=O. For 021, by (9.1),
RS(3n+ 1)=(3n+ 1)10
s
+RS(3n).
This gives the desired result, since 3/ RS(3n) but 31 (3n+ 1). 0
The following ,result, due to Alexander [19], gives an explicit expression for RS(n) :
i-I
L (l +tlog jJ)
n j=l
Lemma 9.5: For all n2:1, RS(n)=1+I i*10
In Theorem 9.1, we prove that (except for the trivial cases of
RS(1)=1=F(1)=F(2)=L(l), RS(2)=21=F(8», the Smarandache reverse sequence contains no
Fibonacci and Lucas numbers. For the proof of the theorem, we need the following results.
Lemma 9.6 : For all n2:1, RS(n+ 1»2RS(n).
Proof: Using (9.1), we see that
, RS(n+l)=(n+l)10s+RS(n»2RS(n) if and only if RS(n)«n+l) 1 Os,
which is true since,RS(n) is an s-digit number while lOS is an (s+l)-digit number. 0
Corollary 9.5 : For all n2:1, RS(n+2)-RS(n»RS(n+ 1).
Proof: Using (9.2), we have
RS(n+2)-RS(n)=[RS(n+2)-RS(n+ 1)]+[RS(n+ l)-RS(n)]
=[(n+2)1 ot_(n+ 1)10
u
]+2[RS(n+ I)-RS(n)]
>2[RS(n+ 1)-RS(n)]
>RS(n+ 1), by Lemma 9.6.
This gives the desired inequality. 0
108
Theorem 9.1: There are no numbers in the Smarandache reverse sequence that are Fibonacci
or Lucas numbers (except for the cases of n= 1,2).
Proof: follows from Corollary 9.5. D
For the Smarandache reverse sequence, the question is : How many terms of the sequence are
prime? By Corollary 9.2 and Corollary 9.3, in searching for primes, it is sufficient to consider
the terms of the sequence of the fonn RS(3n+ 1), where n> 1. In the Editorial Note following
the paper of Stephan [18], it is mentioned that searching for prime in the first 2,739 terms of
the Smarandache reverse sequence revealed that only RS(82) is prime. This led to the
conjecture that RS(82) is the only prime in the Smarandache reverse sequence. However, the
conjecture still remains to be resolved. Fleuren [17] presents a table giving prime factors of
RS(n) for n=I(1)200, except for the cases n=82,136, 139,169.
10. SMARANDACHE SYMMETRIC SEQUENCE {SS(n)}aJ
n
=l
The n-th term, SS(n), of the Smarandache symmetric sequence is given by (1.9).
The numbers in the Smarandache symmetric sequence can be expressed in tenns of the
numbers of the Smarandache consecutive sequence and the Smarandache reverse sequence as
follows: For all
SS(n)=10
s
CS(n-l)+RS(n-2) for some integer (10.1)
with SS(1)=l, SS(2)=11, where more precisely,
s=number of digits in RS(n-2).
Thus, for example, SS(3)=10 CS(2)+RS(1), SS(4)=10
2
CS(3)+RS(2).
Lemma 10.1 : 31 SS(3n+ 1) for all
Proof: Let n   be any arbitrary but fixed number. Then, from (l0.1),
SS(3n+1)=10
s
CS(3n)+RS(3n-1).
Now, by Lemma 8.4,31 CS(3n), and by Corollary 9.4, 31 RS(3n-1). Therefore, 31 SS(3n+1).
Since n is the lemma is proved. D
Lemma 10.2: For any (1) 3 {SS(3n), (2) 3 {SS(3n+2).
Proof : Using (10.1), we see that
SS(3n)=l Os CS(3n-l)+RS(3n-2),
By Corollary 8.1, 31 CS(3n-1), and by Lemma 9.4, 3 {RS(3n-2). Hence, CS(3n) cannot be
divisible. by 3.
Again, since
SS(3n+2)=10
s
CS(3n+ 1 )+RS(3n), 1,
and since 3 {CS(3n+ 1) (by Corollary 8.2) and 31 RS(3n) (by Corollary 9.3), it follows that
SS(3n+2) is not divisible by 3. D
Using (8.3) and Corollary 9.5, we can prove the following lemma. The proof is
similar to that used in proving Lemma 7.10, and is omitted here.
Lemma 10.3 : For all SS(n+2)-SS(n»SS(n+l).
By virtue of the inequality in Lemma 10.3
1
we have the following.
Theoreltl10.1 : (Except for the trivial cases, SS(1)=l=F(I)=L(l), SS(2)=II=L(5», there are
no members of the Smarandache symmetric sequence that are Fibonacci (or, Lucas) numbers.
The following lemma gives the expressionofSS(n+l)-SS(n) in terms ofCS(n)-CS(n-1).
Lemma 10.4: SS(n+1)-SS(n)=10s+t[CS(n)-CS(n-2)] for all n;::::3, where
s=number of digits in RS(n-2), s+t=number of digits in RS(n-I).
109
Proof: By (10.1), for
so that
But,
SS(n)=10s CS(n-l)+RS(n-2), SS(n+ 1)=1 Os+t CS(n)+RS(n-I),
SS(n+ 1)-SS(n)=lOS[l ot CS(n)-CS(n-1)J+[RS(n-1)-RS(n-2)]
OS[ 1 OtCS(n)-CS(n-1 )+(n-l)] (by(9.1 ). (****)
{
I,
t= =number of digits in (n-1).
m+l, if (for all  
Therefore, by (8.1)
CS(n-1)=10t CS(n-2)+(n-1),
and finally, plugging this expression in (****), we get the desired result. 0
We observe that SS(2)= 11 is prime; the next eight terms of the Smarandache
symmetric sequence are composite numbers and squares :
SS(3)=121 =112, SSe 4)=12321 =(3x37i=111
2
,
SS(5)=1234321=(llxlO1)2=1111
2
, SS(6)=123454321=(41 x271/=11111
2
,
SS(7)=12345654321 =(3x7x 11 x 13x37/=111111
2
,
SS(8)=1234567654321=(239x4649/=1111111
2
,
SS(9)=123456787654321=(11xl010101i=11111111
2
,
SS(1 0)=12345678987654321 =(9x37x333667)2=(l11 x 1001001/=111111111
2
.
For the Smarandache symmetric sequence, the question is : How many terms of the
sequence are prime? The question still remains to be answered.
11. SMARANDACHE PIERCED CHAIN SEQUENCE {PCS(n)} n=1 co
In this section, we give answer to the question posed by Smarandache [5] by showing that,
starting from the second term, all the successive terms of the sequence {PCS(n)/1 01 }n=lco,
given by (1.11), are composite numbers. This is done in Theorem 11.1 below.
We first observe that the elements of the Smarandache pierced chain sequence, {PCS(n)}n=loo,
satisfy the following recurrence relation :
PCS(n+l)=104 PCS(n)+101, PCS(l)=101. (11.1)
Lemma 11.1 : The elements of the seguence {PCS(n)}n=l
oo
are
101,101(104+1),101(108+104+1),101(1012+108+104+1), ... ,
and in general,
PCS(n)=101[10
4
(n-l)+10
4
(n-2)+ ... +104+
1
], (11.2)
Proof: The proof of (11.2) is by induction on n. The result is clearly true for n=l. So, we
assume that the result is true for some n.
Now, from (11.1) together with the induction hypothesis, we see that
PCS(ri+l)=10
4
PCS(n)+101
= 1 04[ 1 0 1 (1 04(n-1)+ 1 04(n-2)+ ... + 10
4
+ 1 )]+ 101
01 (1 0
4
°+ 1 04(n-I)+ ... + 10
4
+ 1),
which shows that the result is true for n+ 1. 0
It has been mentioned in Ashbacher [1] that PCS(n) is divisible by 101 for all and
Lemma 11.1 shows that this is indeed the case. Another consequence of Lemma 11.1 is the
following corollary.
110
Corollary 11.1 : The elements of the sequence {PCS(n)/lOl }n=lco are
1, x+l, x
2
+x+l, x
3
+x
2
+x+l, "',
and in general,
PCS(n)1101=x
n
-
1
+x
n
-
2
+ ... +I, (11.3)
where X= 10
4
. .
Theorem 11.1 : For all PCS(n)1101 is a composite number.
Proof: The result is true for n=2. In fact, the result is true if n is even as shown below: If n
  is even, let n=2m for some integer m   Then, from (11.3),
PCS(2m)/l 01 =x2m-l+x2m-2+ ... +x+ 1
=x
2m
-\x+ 1)+ ... +(x+ 1)
=(x+ 1 )(x2m-2+x2m-4+ ... + 1)
that is, PCS(2m)/l 0 1 =(1 0
4
+ 1)[ 1 08(m-I)+ 1 08(m-2)+ ... + 1], (11.4)
which shows that PCS(2m)/1 0 1 is a composite number for alLm  
Next, we consider the case when n is prime, say n=p, where p   is a prime. In this case,
from (11.3),
PCS(p)/1 0 1 =x
p
-
1
+x
p
-
2
+ ... + 1 =(x
P
-1 )!(x-l).
Let y=I02 (so that X=y2). Then,
PCS(p) x
P
-1 y2
p
-1 (yP -1 )(yP+ 1)
101 x-I (y+ l)(y-l)
{(y_l)(yP-'+yP-2+ ... + I)} {(y+ 1 )(yp-l_
y
p-2+ ... + I)}
=----------------------------------
(y+ 1 )(y-l)
=(yP-l_yP-2+
y
p
-3_ ... + 1)(yp-l+yP-2+
y
p
-3+ ... + 1)
that is, PCS(p)/1 0 1 =[ 1 02(p-1)_1 02(p-2)+ 1 02(p-3)+ ... + 1][ 1 02(p-l)+ 1 02(p - 2) + ... + 1], (11.5)
so that SPC(p)/1 0 1 is 'l composite number for each prime p (23).
Finally, we consider the case when n is odd but composite. Then, letting n=pr where p is
the largest prime factor of nand r (22) is an integer, we see that
PCS(n)!IOl =PCS(pr)11 01
=xpr-l+xpr-2+ ... + 1
=xp(r-I)(xp-l+xp-2+ ... + I)+xp(r-2\xp-l+xp-2+ ... + 1)+ ...
+(x
p
-
1
+X
p
-
2
+ ... + 1)
=(x
P
-
1
+X
p
-
2
+ ... + 1 )[x
P
(r-I)+x
p
(r-2)+ ... + I)
that is, PCS(n)110I=[I0
4
(P-I)+10
4
(P-2)+ ... +I][I0
4p
(r-J)+10 p(r-2)+ ... +1], (11.6)
and hence, PCS(n)/l01=PCS(pr)/l01 is also a composite number.
All these complete the proof of the theorem. 0
Remark 1i.1 : The Smarandache pierced chain sequence has been studied by Le [20] and
Kashihara [21] as-well. Following different approaches, they have proved by contradiction
that for PCS(n)!I 0 1 is not prime. In Theorem 11.1, we have proved the same result by
actually finding out the factors of PCS(n)11 0 1 for all n22. Kashihara [21] raises the question:
Is the sequence PCS(n)1l01 square-free for From (11.4), (11.5) and (11.6), we see that
the answer to the question of Kashihara is yes.
111
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The present work was done under a research grant form the Ritsumeikan Center for Asia-
Pacific Studies of the Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University. The authors gratefully
acknowledge the financial support.
REFERENCES
[1] Ashbacher, Charles. (1998) Pluckings from the Tree of Smarandache Sequences and
Functions. American Research Press, Lupton, AZ, USA.
[2] Smarandache, F. (1996) Collected Papers-Volume II. Tempus publishing House,
Bucharest, Romania.
[3] Russo, F. (2000) "Some Results about Four Smarandache U-Product Sequences",
Smarandache Notions Journal, 11, pp. 42-49.
[4] Dumitrescu, D. and V. Seleacu. (1994) Some Notions and Questions in Number Theory.
Erhus University Press, Glendale.
[5] Smarandache, F. (1990) Only Problems, Not Solutions! Xiquan Publishing House,
Phoenix, Chicago.
[6] Marimutha H. (1997) "Smarandache Concatenated Type Sequences". Bulletin of Pure
and Applied Sciences, E16, pp. 225-226.
[7] Smith S. (2000) "A Set of Conjectures on Smarandache Sequences". Smarandache
Notions Journal, 11, pp. 86-92.
[8] Prakash, K. (1990) "A Sequence Free from Powers', Mathematical Spectrum, 22(3),
pp.92--93.
[9] Majumdar, A.A.K. (1996/7) "A Note on a Sequence Free from Powers". Mathematical
Spectrum, 29(2), pp. 41 (Letters to the Editor). Also, Mathematical Spectrum, 30(1),
pp. 21 (Letters to the Editor).
[10] Majumdar, A.A.K. (1998) "A Note on the Smarandache Prime Product Sequence".
Smarandache_Notions Journal, 9, pp. 137-142.
[11] Iacobescu F. (1997) "Smarandache Partition Type Sequences". Bulletin of Pure and
Applied Sciences, E16, pp. 237-240.
[12] Le M. (1998) "Pfimes in the Smarandache Square Product Sequence". Smarandache
Notions Journal, 9, pp. 133.
[13J LeM. (2001) "The Primes in the Smarandache Power Product Sequences of the First
Kind". Smarandache Notions Journal, 12, pp. 230-231.
[14 J Le M. (2001) "The Primes in the Smarandache Power Product Sequences of the Second
Kind". Smarandache Notions Journal, 12, pp. 228-229.
[15] Le M. (1999) "Perfect Powers in the Smarandache Permutation Sequence",
Smarandache Notions Journal, 10, pp. 148-149.
[16] Zhang W. (2002) "On the Permutation Sequence and Its Some Properties".
Smarandache Notions Journal, 13, pp. 153-154.
[17] Fleuren, M. (1999) "Smarandache Factors and Reverse Factors". Smarandache Notions
Journal, 10, pp. 5-38.
[18] Stephan R. W. (1998) "Factors and Primes in Two Smarandache Sequences".
Smarandache Notions Journal, 9, pp. 4-10.
[19] Alexander S. (2001) "A Note on Smarandache Reverse Sequence", Smarandache
Notions Journal, 12, pp. 250.
[20J Le M. (1999) "On Primes in the Smarandache Pierced Chain Sequence", Smarandache
Notions Journal, 10, pp. 154-155.
[21] ~ a s h i h a r a   K. (1996) Comments and Topics on Smarandache Notions and Problems.
Erhus University Press, AZ, U.S.A.
112

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