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APRIL 2–8, 2014
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Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
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Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Police Report . . . . . . . . . . . 6
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Sustainability grant
Money will help fund township
composting program. PAGE 2
By NORA CARNEVALE
The Sun
The Lawrence Township Council
amended the land use ordinance at its
March 18 meeting to address sub-
stance abuse treatment centers, but
not before residents expressed concern
about the potential new use.
The ordinance was first introduced
at the Feb. 18 council meeting. It au-
thorizes an amendment to the land use
ordinance to provide for definitions for
behavioral health-care facilities,
health-care facilities, medical clinics,
office-medical, office-research and de-
NORA CARNEVALE/The Sun
Bakers Basin Road is included in the area affected by the recently passed land use ordinance amendment.
The ordinance has changed the former ‘Limited Industrial 1’ District to a ‘Mixed Use 2’ District to address
behavioral health centers and detoxification centers as a conditional use.
Land use ordinance draws ire
please see RESIDENTS, page 17
By NORA CARNEVALE
The Sun
Lawrence Township is one of
just four municipalities that have
been awarded a Sustainable Jer-
sey Small Grant at the $20,000
level.
The Sustainable Jersey Small
Grants Program is funded by the
PSEG Foundation and is respon-
sible for providing $200,000 to
local governments in the name of
sustainability projects. Sustain-
able Jersey has allocated approxi-
mately $1,375,000 in grants to mu-
nicipalities to assist towns in
making their communities more
environmentally conscious and
livable.
Lawrence Township has spear-
headed a new recycling program
that gives residents the option of
composting organic waste for a
monthly fee and on an optional
basis. Removing organic materi-
als from the waste stream will re-
duce the amount of trash that is
transported to the landfill. The
Environmental Protection
Agency has reported that food
scraps and yard waste account for
20-30 percent of the waste stream.
Composting prevents these mate-
rials from entering landfills and
consequently taking up space and
releasing greenhouse gasses such
as methane, which is 21 times
more potent than carbon dioxide
emissions in the atmosphere.
The contractor in charge of the
program requires 300 households
to sign up for the composting op-
tion before collection can begin.
The fee for joining the program is
$17 per month, which will be
billed quarterly from Central Jer-
sey Waste, and includes the deliv-
ery of a 32-gallon recycle cart.
The grant proceeds will help off-
set costs for the participating
households. The composted mate-
rials will be transported to Wilm-
ington, Del.
The items permitted to be dis-
posed of in the composting cart
include raw food, scraps, cooked
food, meat, bones, paper towels,
pizza boxes, fruit and vegetable
peels, litter box material, coffee
grounds, tea bags, fish, egg shells,
non-Styrofoam egg cartons,
waxed cardboard, oils, fats, but-
ters, brown paper bags, paper
take-out containers, newspapers,
office paper, fruit and nuts,
breads, pasta, grains, liquids and
sauces, houseplants and flower
bouquets, and dairy products.
“This is an encouraging sign
for our new program and should
help us get to our first goal of 300
households. I am thankful and
proud of our volunteers who put
in this effort, not only applying
for the grant, but getting this ini-
tiative off the ground,” Mayor
Cathleen Lewis said in a press re-
lease.
Sustainable Jersey directs its
funding and resources to munici-
palities to aid them in making
progress. The percentage of the
state’s participating municipali-
ties registered to become certified
is at 72.
“The impact that these projects
will make in New Jersey is in-
credible,” Pam Mount, chair of
the Sustainable Jersey Board of
Trustees, said in a press release.
“Aiding towns and Green Teams
to achieve their sustainability
goals by funding green initiatives
will have a ripple effect that will
benefit us all.”
Currently, 67 households out of
the required 300 have signed up
for the composting program. In-
terested residents should contact
the Public Works Department at
(609) 587-1894 or by email at
jbrokofsky@lawrencetwp.com.
2 THE LAWRENCE SUN — APRIL 2–8, 2014
Ostrich Nursery Features Everything for
Grounds and Garden
ith the weather growing
warmer, Spring is now a great
time to take a good look at
your yard and get it into top
shape. Ostrich Nursery in
Robbinsville, which has been
serving the area Ior 34 years,
has all the high quality land-
scaping plants and materials
you need to beautiIy your
surroundings Irom delicate
dwarI trees to sturdy 20-Ioot
shade trees.
Owned and managed by
Ken Dilts, Ostrich Nursery
grows most oI what it sells
right on the premises. Ken
and his wiIe Mary acquired
the 17-acre Iertile Iarmland to
develop a nursery, garden
center, and landscape busi-
ness.
When you visit Ostrich,
you will be impressed by its
vast inventory, which in-
cludes hundreds oI varieties
oI plants, Ilowers, and trees,
especially large shade trees
and evergreens.
Very Iew garden centers
carry trees up to 20 Ieet and
Dilts said customers come
Irom all over to take advan-
tage oI the selection at Os-
trich Nursery.
Ostrich Nursery also Iea-
tures rare and unusual
plants, Japanese maples, to-
piaries, shrubs, perennials,
grasses and a wide array oI
Ilowering plants. Specimen
evergreens include Weeping
White Pines, Deodora Cedars,
Weeping Alaskan Cedars, and
Weeping Blue Cedars.
The Iriendly, knowledge-
able staII at Ostrich will help
with any questions you may
have. Ostrich also oIIers land-
scape design and construction
with proIessional installation.
Ostrich Nursery is located
in Robbinsville, just oII Route
526, on Pond Road, just min-
utes Irom I-295 and I-95.
Business hours are Monday-
Saturday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
Sunday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Call
(609) 426-9114 Ior more in-
Iormation.
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Email us at news@lawrencesun.com
Grant to fund composting program
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Thurs-Fri 7:30am-5pm • Sat 7:30am-2pm
• FLEET SERVICE AVAILABLE
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Offer Expires 4/9/14
If your child will be 5 years old
on or before Oct. 1 and you are a
Lawrence Township resident,
your child is eligible to attend
kindergarten in the Lawrence
Township Public Schools begin-
ning in September.
Registration is easy! Begin on-
line at www.ltps.org, then click
the “Parents” tab and then click
on “Student Registration.”
After you complete the online
registration form, you will be in-
structed to make an appointment
with the district registrar. Your
appointment will be at the Board
of Education administration
building, 2565 Princeton Pike.
Bring the following documents:
student’s original birth certifi-
cate; parent/guardian photo ID;
three acceptable proofs of resi-
dency; child’s current immuniza-
tion record; and proof of recent
physical.
Your child is not registered
until all documents have been
submitted. Please share this in-
formation with friends and neigh-
bors. Contact Teresa Amendola
with questions at tamendola@
ltps.org or (609) 671-5453.
APRIL 2–8, 2014 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 5
1365 Lawrence Road,
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
609-771-6690
FRESH CUT FLOWERS
HOME-GROWN PLANTS
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Howell Farm’s honeybees will
take a break from their busy
schedules on Saturday, April 5
when Bob Hughes stops by for his
annual spring visit.
Hughes, who is a professional
beekeeper, will open the hives to
give the bees a complete health
check, medicate the colony and
make sure that the queens,
drones and worker bees are prop-
erly equipped for the task of man-
ufacturing honey.
Visitors to the farm can watch
the inspection from 1:30 to 2 p.m.
at the hives, and at 2:30 p.m. join
Hughes for an hour-long presen-
tation, "Life of a Bee Colony.” A
children's craft program, "Garden
Stepping Stone,” will be held
from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. Cost is $4
per craft; groups (eight or more)
must pre-register.
Children are invited to help
beekeepers assemble beehives
from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Howell Farm is located on Val-
ley Road, just off Route 29, two
miles south of Lambertville, NJ.
GPS address: 70 Woodens Lane,
Lambertville, NJ 08530. Parking
and admission are free.
Howell Farm is operated and
maintained by the Mercer County
Park Commission.
For more information about
the farm, call (609) 737-3299, or
visit www.howellfarm.org or
www.mercercountyparks.org
Beekeeper to visit Howell Farm April 5
Township kindergarten registration underway
OBITUARIES
The Sun will print obituaries, free of charge.
6 THE LAWRENCE SUN — APRIL 2–8, 2014
1330 Route 206, Suite 211
Skillman, NJ 08558
609-751-0245
The Sun is published weekly by Elauwit
Media LLC, 1330 Route 206, Suite 211,
Skillman, NJ 08558. It is mailed weekly to
select addresses in the 08648 ZIP code.
If you are not on the mailing list, six-month
subscriptions are available for $39.99. PDFs
of the publication are online, free of charge.
For information, please call 609-751-0245.
To submit a news release, please email
news@lawrencesun.com. For advertising
information, call 609-751-0245 or email
advertising@lawrencesun.com. The Sun
welcomes suggestions and comments from
readers – including any information about
errors that may call for a correction to be
printed.
SPEAK UP
The Sun welcomes letters from readers.
Brief and to the point is best, so we look for
letters that are 300 words or fewer. Include
your name, address and phone number. We
do not print anonymous letters. Send letters
to news@lawrencesun.com, via fax at 609-
751-0245, or via the mail. Of course, you can
drop them off at our office, too.
The Lawrence Sun reserves the right to
reprint your letter in any medium – includ-
ing electronically.
Dan McDonough Jr.
CHAIRMAN OF ELAUWIT MEDIA
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
CONTENT EDITOR Kristen Dowd
LAWRENCE EDITOR Nora Carnevale
ART DIRECTOR Stephanie Lippincott
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
PUBLISHER EMERITUS Steve Miller
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer
Tim Ronaldson
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
Joe Eisele
INTERIMPUBLISHER
The following are on file with the
Lawrence Township Police Department.
On March 19 at 1:37 p.m., officers investi-
gated the theft of a stop sign on Lannigan
Road and Princeton Pike. The pole was not
damaged, so the officers were aware it
was a theft. Public works will replace the
sign.
On March 19, a trespassing was reported
at Halo Farm in Lawrence. A 56-year-old
man from Trenton who had formerly been
banned from the property from panhan-
dling was on the premises. The man was
charged with trespassing.
On March 19, a 15-year-old male was
found to be in possession of 1.5 grams of
marijuana at Lawrence High School. Other
students believed that the suspect may
have been in possession of drugs and in-
formed the assistant principal. He was
processed and released to a guardian, and
the case will be heard in family court.
On March 20, at DSW a theft was report-
ed from a vehicle with all four doors un-
locked. A cellphone was missing and val-
ued at $400. The investigation is ongoing.
On March 20, an 18-year-old male from
Trenton was charged with receiving stolen
property and hindering apprehension.
Quakerbridge Mall security recovered a
backpack which was filled with $150 of
stolen merchandise from H&M. Sears loss
prevention officers saw the 18-year-old
male exit Sears in the package pickup area
Upon realizing he had been spotted by loss
prevention, he attempted to hide the back-
pack and flee. The backpack was recov-
ered. Then he returned and asked for his
backpack. He then gave officers a false
name and claimed he had no identifica-
tion. Upon searching the backpack, offi-
cers found his true identity. H&M employ-
police report
please see POLICE, page 14
T
he states of Colorado and
Washington legalized marijua-
na for recreational purposes in
2012. Could New Jersey be next?
State Sen. Nicholas Scutari is hop-
ing that it will. This week, he is sched-
uled to formally present a bill that
would legalize marijuana in the state
and tax it heavily. His bill would be
modeled after those in Washington
and Colorado, which earned $2 million
in the first month of sales last year.
Scutari’s bill plans to tax and regu-
late marijuana much like alcohol, and
he estimates that New Jersey could
earn $100 million per year in revenue
from weed tax.
“Anybody that looks at the facts
knows that the war on marijuana has
been a miserable failure,” Scutari said
in a press release. “We’re not delusion-
al about how simple the effort would
be, but I think from a standpoint of
moving this state and this country for-
ward on its archaic drug laws, I think
it’s a step in the right direction.”
From a purely financial perspective,
legalizing marijuana makes sense.
While $100 million may seem like an
inflated number, it’s probably not out
of the realm of possibility. New Jersey
had 2 million more residents than
Washington as of the 2010 Census and
3.7 million more than Colorado.
Much like alcohol consumption and
gambling, if people are going to par-
take in the practice of smoking mari-
juana, why not reap the benefits of
taxing the substance – while at the
same time avoiding the cost of polic-
ing against it?
From an operational standpoint,
New Jersey has two other states to
model its plan after, plus many other
states in the U.S. that have decriminal-
ized the possession of marijuana for
recreational use. The Garden State has
also already legalized its use for med-
ical purposes.
People are also behind its legaliza-
tion. Lake Research Partners released
a poll last year that said 59 percent of
Jersey voters would support a bill
such as this, and an October Gallup
poll said 58 percent of Americans are
in favor of marijuana legalization.
But then, of course, comes the
curveball – emotion, morality and ex-
ample.
Just because people do it doesn’t
make it right. And just because states
can legalize and tax marijuana doesn’t
mean they should.
What example does legalizing mari-
juana set for our children? How far
will we go just to make, or save, a
buck? Or are we just being too prudish
about this weed thing?
in our opinion
Puff, puff, pass ... on lower taxes?
Should New Jersey give green light to legal marijuana? It’s an interesting case
Your thoughts
Should New Jersey legalize and tax
marijuana for recreational purposes? Or
would it be doing too much for the
allmighty dollar? Share your thoughts
through a letter to the editor.
Expires 4/30/14
Expires 4/30/14
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Any purchase of $12 or more
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LA
LA
WEDNESDAY APRIL 2
Knitting circle: 7 p.m. at the
Lawrence Branch Library. Knit-
ters who already know the basics
are invited to drop in to socialize
with other knitters and work on a
project of their choice. Experi-
enced knitter Ann Garwig will be
available to assist individuals.
Registration is suggested. Con-
tact: Lawrence Programs at 609-
989-6920 or lawprogs@mcl.org.
Lawrence Township Open Space
Advisory Committee meeting:
7:30 p.m. on the first Wednesday
of the month. Visit
www.lawrencetwp.com for more
information.
THURSDAY APRIL 3
Crochet corner: Needle crafters
who already know the basic cro-
chet stitches are invited to drop
in to socialize and work on a proj-
ect of their choice. Experienced
needle crafter Margaret Woo will
be available to assist individuals.
Registration is suggested. Con-
tact: Lawrence Programs at 609-
989-6920 or lawprogs@mcl.org.
Hutchins Gallery Opening Recep-
tion: 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the
Lawrenceville School’s Gruss
Center of Visual Arts Hutchins
Gallery, 2500 Main Street. “Sur-
face and Space” exhibit opening
reception. "Surface and Space,"
an exhibition of works by artist
Shellie Jacobson, will be on dis-
play in the Lawrenceville School's
Gruss Center of Visual Arts. The
opening reception is free and
open to the public.
Lawrence Township Recreation
Advisory Committee meeting:
7:30 p.m. on the first Thursday of
the month. Visit www.lawrence
twp.com for more information.
FRIDAY APRIL 4
Story time: Ages 2 to 5 years. 11
a.m. at the Lawrence Branch
Library. Story-time and craft for
ages 2-5 with a caregiver. No reg-
istration required.
Mediation circle: Slow down and
join Reference Librarian Ann Kerr
and reduce stress, using medita-
tion. Registration is suggested.
Contact: Lawrence Programs at
609-989-6920 or
lawprogs@mcl.org.
SATURDAY APRIL 5
Lawrenceville Elementary School
PTO Casino Night: 7 p.m. at ETS
campus, 660 Rosedale Road in
Princeton. Casino Night and Auc-
tion will be an exciting evening of
food and fun complete with live
and silent auctions. The event is
open to the public and members
of the community are encour-
aged to attend. For more infor-
mation, and to buy tickets visit
www.lawrencevillepto.com.
SUNDAY APRIL 6
Roast Beef Dinner and Bake Sale: 1
p.m. to 6 p.m. for the Ladies Aux-
iliary of American Legion Post
414 at the American Legion Post
414. 100 Berwyn Place,
Lawrenceville. Tickets are $11 for
adults, $8 for dinner and $5 for
children 10 and younger. Delivery
is available to seniors at 3 p.m.
for orders in by 2 p.m. Call 609-
771-4143 for more information.
Presbyterian Church of
Lawrenceville: Traditional wor-
ship service at 10 a.m. Preschool
Sunday school at 9:45 a.m. Sun-
day school (kindergarten through
fifth) at 11 a.m. Worship in a New
Key at 5 p.m. 2688 Main St.,
Lawrenceville.
Lawrence Road Presbyterian
Church: Sunday worship 8:30
and 11 a.m. Air conditioned and
wheelchair accessible. 1039
Lawrence Road, Lawrenceville.
The Church of Saint Ann: Roman
Catholic mass at 7:30, 9:30 and 11
a.m. and at 12:30 p.m. 1253
Lawrenceville Road,
Lawrenceville.
Hope Presbyterian Church (PCA):
Traditional worship service at
CALENDAR PAGE 8 APRIL 2–8, 2014
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We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
LIQUOR
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MALIBU COCONUT.........................21.99....750ML
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We reserve the right to limit quantities. Not responsible for
typographical errors. In case of errors, the lowest price allowed
by NJ State law will apply. Products while supplies last. Artwork does
not necessarily represent items on sale. Prices good through May 6, 2014.
Sunday
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MON-WEDS
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Thurs-Sat
9am-9pm
please see CALENDAR, page 13
10 THE LAWRENCE SUN — APRIL 2–8, 2014
11 Millbrook Lane
RECENTLY
SOLD HOMES
Sold: $225,100
Real estate tax: $6,861 / 2013
Approximate Square Footage: 1,890
This split-level home on a quarter-acre lot
has four bedrooms and one full and one
half bathrooms. Features include hard-
wood flooring, spacious kitchen, wall-to-
wall carpeting, one-car garage, public
water and public sewer.
109 Review Ave.
Sold: $257,000
Real estate tax: $6,716 / 2013
Approximate Square Footage: 2,016
This two-story colonial has three bed-
rooms and one full and one half bath-
rooms. Features include hardwood floor-
ing, gas fireplace, updated eat-in kitchen,
new wall-to-wall carpeting, full basement
and one-car garage.
Hop To It!
Make Your Easter Brunch
Reservations Now!
Ce|ebrate Easter with Brunch at Chauncey
Sunday, Apri| 20th
Let Chef John Shirley tantalize your taste buds with
a fabulous brunch to include: five entree selections,
carving sand omelet stations, composed salads,
soup, fruit, cmoked salmon board, fresh breads,
fabulous desserts & more!
ADULTS $39.95 ++
CHILDREN (5-12 years old) $19.95 ++
CHILDREN (4 years old and under) Complimentary
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APRIL 2–8, 2014 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 11
*0% APR with payment
in full in 36 mos.
Free tree seedlings will be
available to area residents as part
of the New Jersey Tree Recovery
Campaign. This program helps
communities replace trees dam-
aged or destroyed by Superstorm
Sandy.
From 1 to 3 p.m. on Saturday,
April 12, residents will be able to
pick up tree seedlings at Colonial
Lake Park at the Lake Court park-
ing lot in Lawrence Township.
Seedlings, available on a first-
come, first-served basis, also
come with instructions on how to
store, care for and plant them.
The guides help residents choose
the right place on a property to
plant a tree while keeping in
mind the tree’s full-grown size in
the future. Residents should
plant the seedlings within two
days after pick-up to prevent the
roots from drying out.
The goal of the Tree Recovery
Campaign is to distribute more
than 500,000 tree seedlings to New
Jersey residents over the course
of the next five years. It is a joint
effort between the Township of
Lawrence, the New Jersey State
Forestry Services Community
Forestry Program, the State For-
est Nursery, New Jersey Soil Con-
servation Districts, Sustainable
Jersey and the Arbor Day Foun-
dation. Arbor Day Foundation,
FedEx and BJ’s Wholesale Club
provide financial support for the
program.
When properly planted and
maintained, trees are assets to a
community. They improve the vi-
sual appeal of a neighborhood or
business district, increase prop-
erty values, reduce home cooling
costs, remove air pollutants and
provide wildlife habitat, among
many other benefits.
Please contact Andrew Link
with any questions at (609) 844-
7087 or alink@lawrencetwp.com.
Free tree seedlings
to be offered on April 12
ALL TYPES OF CONSTRUCTION!
• Additions • Kitchens • Basements • Decks • Hardwood
• Siding • Doors • Windows
Over 40 Years of Experience!
NJ Lic # 13VH00235600
CALL 609-820-6672 TODAY!
APRIL 2–8, 2014 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 13
Coupon must be presented at time of purchase.
*Additional parts & labor in excess of one hour will
be billed at our scheduled rates. One coupon per
customer / per household. Expires 4/30/14.
Coupon must be presented at time of purchase.
Not accepted at time of installation. Not valid with
any other discounts, repairs or prior purchases.
One coupon per customer / per household.
Coupon has no cash value. Expires 4/30/14 .
Coupon must be presented at time of purchase. Not accepted at time of
installation. Not valid with any other discounts, repairs or prior purchases.
One coupon per customer / per household.
Coupon has no cash value. Expires 4/30/14.
94
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160 LawrenceviIIe-Pennington Rd · LawrenceviIIe
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(Sundaes, Mix-Ins, Milk Shakes & Floats)
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100% Fruit Smoothies &
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With this coupon. Expires 5-31-14.
IRLL
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12 DELICIOUS FLAVORS
10:30 a.m. Sunday. Preschool
through adult Sunday School at
9:15 a.m., with childcare available.
Wheelchair accessible. 140
Denow Road, Lawrenceville. Visit
www.hopechurch-nj.org.
Harvest Chapel of Lawrenceville:
Coffee and hospitality at 9:15 a.m.
Adult Sunday school at 9:45 a.m.
Worship service at 10:30 a.m.
Kids ministry for ages 5 through
12 during service. 64 Phillips Ave.,
Lawrenceville.
MONDAY APRIL 7
Lawrence Township Planning
Board meeting: 7:30 p.m. on the
first and third Monday of the
month. Visit www.lawrencetwp.
com for more information.
TUESDAY APRIL 8
Lawrence Township Public Safety
Committee meeting: 7:30 p.m.
on the second Tuesday of the
month. Visit www.lawrencetwp.
com for more information.
Lawrence Township Growth and
Redevelopment Committee
meeting: 7:30 p.m. on the second
Tuesday of the month. Visit
www.lawrencetwp.com for more
information.
CALENDAR
CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
BIRTHS
Did you or someone you
know recently welcome a baby
into the family? Send us your
birth announcement and we
will print it, free of charge.
OBITUARIES
The Sun will print obituaries,
free of charge.
14 THE LAWRENCE SUN — APRIL 2–8, 2014
• Save money and make money • Very simple
• Huge demand • Residual revenue
• Save money and make money • Very simple
• Huge demand • Residual revenue
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cannot be applied to prescription copay or price. Medicare, Medicaid,
state, federal or any publically funded program prescriptions are
not eligible. See Pharmacist for details. Additional restrictions apply.
Expires 4/30/14.
Refill your prescriptions online at www.penlarpharmacy.com

ees identified him and his case
will be heard in municipal court.
On March 20, an officer
stopped a vehicle for failure to
maintain a lane and use a turn
signal on Brunswick Circle. The
driver had watery, red eyes and a
strong odor of alcohol was ema-
nating from the vehicle. After
failed field sobriety tests, the 33-
year-old man from Robbinsville
was taken into custody for DUI,
and charged with having an open
container in the vehicle, failure to
keep right, failing to signal before
turning and reckless driving.
On March 22, Quakerbridge
Mall security called LTPD for a
man openly carrying a firearm in
a holster. The 22-year-old male
from Wilmington, Del. was in pos-
session of a BB gun, which is
unauthorized in New Jersey.
There were no injuries, and the
gun was not loaded. He was taken
to Mercer County Correctional
Center and charged with unlaw-
ful possession of a weapon.
On March 24, a theft was re-
ported at Nelson Tree Service on
Carter Road and Rosedale Road.
Seven tree-trimming trucks were
entered and pried open. Three
chainsaws, one still blower, a set
of climbing spikes, and a tree
trimming saddle with tools were
stolen, valued at $2,300. The doors
were also damaged at a cost of
$1,400. There are no suspects at
this time but the investigation is
ongoing.
POLICE
Continued from page 6
police report
OBITUARIES
The Sun will print obituaries,
free of charge.
Mercer County Park Lake may
be frozen over, still as sure as the
date changes each day summer
will come and so will Paddle for
Pink Dragon Boat Festival, New
Jersey’s largest community Drag-
on Boat Festival hosted by the
Machestic Dragons, New Jersey’s
first breast cancer survivor’s
dragon boat team. Paddle for
Pink celebrates the eighth an-
niversary of the race and festival
with fun on and off the water of
beautiful Mercer Lake. Saturday,
June 21, is the date to remember,
the location is the Finish Tower
Field Area lakeside. Each year
the event has grown in participa-
tion and support. PFP is known to
provide an exciting day for pad-
dlers and spectators alike.
Community participation
makes this festival special. Last
year, 50 teams competed in the ex-
citing races and the Machestic
Dragons invite you to form a
team to compete in this fundrais-
ing event. Twenty paddlers make
up a dragon boat team and race
against other teams in their divi-
sion. Teams of educators, neigh-
bors and friends, students, busi-
ness-sponsored teams, semi-pro-
fessionals and teams compiled of
all women make up this potpour-
ri of fun lovers that will compete
for medals and bragging rights
while helping to support charita-
ble causes. In 2013, eight breast
cancer survivor teams paddled
for pink from the tri-state region
and raced in their division. Regis-
ter a team early to take advantage
of the discounted registration
cost.
Early bird registration fee for
PFP is $850 until April 30. After-
wards the registration cost is
$950. Not enough paddlers for a
team? Register as a group or indi-
vidual and we will match you
with a team. See our website for
details. All registered teams may
schedule one practice on the
water with coaching and equip-
ment provided by the Machestics.
The festival benefits local fami-
lies affected by breast cancer, this
years beneficiaries are, BCRC,
Breast Cancer Resource Center of
Princeton, where there is never a
charge for services provided to
breast cancer patients and sur-
vivors, along with The Cancer In-
stitute of NJ at Robert Wood
Johnson in New Brunswick.
The Machestic Dragons wel-
come volunteer hands-on support
from organizations and individu-
als as well as donations to make
this festival fruitful. Machestics’
invite you to visit www.maches-
ticdragons.org to get a better un-
derstanding of what the Maches-
tic Dragons represent, or call
Annie @ (609) 291-0779.
All Registration information
for Paddle for Pink is at www.pad-
dleforpink.org, the site will be
available on or before March 21,
2014 or call (609) 448-2100 (mes-
sages only).
APRIL 2–8, 2014 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 15

Joe Radice
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PEASANT PRICES.
Machestic Dragons to host Paddle
for Pink Dragon Boat Festival June 21
Please recycle this newspaper.
16 THE LAWRENCE SUN — APRIL 2–8, 2014
For those seeking to get off
their couches and jump into
something “colorful” this spring,
a class at the YWCA Princeton
might just be the answer. Regis-
tration is now open for more than
200 spring classes – some educa-
tional, some physical, and some
just plain fun. Most classes begin
March 24 and run through mid-
June.
For the public school children
who have their upcoming spring
break, the YWCA is running a
day camp from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
providing peace of mind for
working parents. Children will
indulge in swimming, coopera-
tive games, arts and crafts, and
other activities.
Recognized as a leader in
aquatics and grooming genera-
tions of lifeguards, the YWCA
has offered American Red Cross
Learn-to-Swim, Lifeguarding and
Water Safety Instruction classes
for decades. Lifeguard training is
great for teens considering sum-
mer work at camps, public pools
or the beach and the course be-
gins March 20.
Each level of the Learn-to-
Swim program includes training
in basic water safety and helping
others in an emergency, in addi-
tion to stroke development. With
an indoor year-round heated pool,
there is an opportunity to develop
critical swim skills before the
summer season. Swim classes are
offered at both its Princeton facil-
ity and at West Windsor-Plains-
boro High School North.
“It is important for everyone,
whatever their age, to have water
skills, and before summer is the
time to acquire them,” said Diane
Hasili, YWCA Princeton
spokesperson. “Our commitment
to providing swim skills in a safe,
nurturing environment has em-
powered thousands of swimmers
over many decades. We have a
wide range of programming for
different ages and skill levels.
Children as young as 4 months
can enroll in the Waterbabies
classes. Parent/Toddler classes
provide young ones with a trust-
ed partner and adults can enroll
in adult swim skill classes, water
exercise. Or, consumers can
choose a pay as you go ‘lap swim’
option.”
Free GED and Citizen Prep
classes are available to the public
and have proven successful since
their launch. The Breast Cancer
Resource Center, open year-
round, has a number of valuable
support groups and wellness
classes available for those
living with and through breast
cancer.
Those seeking to enhance their
work skills for whom English is
not their first language or are re-
cent immigrants might have in-
terest in a brand new class –
American Business Culture. The
course examines on-the-job cus-
toms and courtesies, advanced re-
sume writing, overcoming cultur-
al and organizational differences,
handling criticism, moving up
the ladder, and how to adapt to
different business practices. Em-
ployees may also arrange for em-
ployee group participation.
“Common Sense Parenting” is
also open to the public at no
charge. The course will be held
weekly between May 1 and June
12, and is designed to provide a
variety of techniques and tools to
parents of toddlers and young
children. A complimentary par-
enting book and child-care will be
provided. Space is limited and
pre-registration is required.
Dance, crafts, sewing for chil-
dren, watercolor, book groups
and adaptive programs are also
offered. Martial arts for kids and
adults include aikido, Brazilian
jiu jitsu, tae kwon do and judo.
The programs are open to all lev-
els and all ages.
For a complete list of classes
and upcoming community
events, visit YWCA Princeton, 59
Paul Robeson Place, or www.yw-
caprinceton.org. To register or
speak with a program director for
more information, call (609) 497-
2100 ext. 0. General membership
is open to all men, women, chil-
dren, families and college stu-
dents regardless of their resi-
dence. Each year, the YWCA pro-
vides more than $500,000 in finan-
cial assistance through its Pearl
Bates Scholarship Fund or other
programs.
YWCA Princeton to offer more than 200 spring classes
Send us your Lawrence news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
an interesting video? Drop us an email at news@lawrencesun.com.
Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the editor at 609-751-0245.
APRIL 2–8, 2014 – THE LAWRENCE SUN 17
Bttgt//eIæuw.It/stuyvesæmtBumt
Located a short distance from Albany, NY, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures offers custom tailored
packages and accommodations for serious and casual hunters alike. All of our packages include a
full hunting excursion, licensed guide, field dressing, as well as all meals and accommodations at
our newly remodeled lodge - Stuyvesant Manor; the former estate of Hollywood Icon Sidney Poitier -
which is also licensed as a bed and breakfast.
Whether you're looking for a short getaway, a corporate retreat, a camping weekend or even a seminar
with guest speakers and instructors, Stuyvesant Outdoor Adventures is a perfect spot.
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FALL AND 8PRINO
Turkey, WhitetaiI Deer
(archery, rifIe, muzzIeIoader),
Pheaaant (fieId and tower),
Coyote, Rabbit and WaterfowI
FBOm WHITBTAIL DBBB AND WILD T0BHBY TO
PHBASANTS, WATBBFOWL AND mOBB.
The Lawrenceville Elementary
School, in cooperation with the
Community Blood Council of
New Jersey, will hold its bi-annu-
al blood drive on Thursday, April
10 from 2:30 to 7:30 p.m.
The CBCNJ Blood Mobile will
be parked outside the main en-
trance of LES located at 40
Craven Lane in Lawrenceville.
One pint saves up to three lives
and takes less than 10 minutes to
give. For every pint received,
CBCNJ will donate $10 toward
maintaining the award-winning
student garden at LES. If you can-
not attend on April 10, please con-
sider donating at the CBCNJ lo-
cated at 1410 Parkside Ave. in
Ewing Township. Be sure to men-
tion the LES Blood Drive.
For more information or to
make an appointment to donate,
please contact LES school nurse
Karen Sine at (609) 671-5573 or
ksine@ltps.org.
Blood drive planned April 10
velopment, residential medical
detoxification centers and urgent
care centers. The amendment
will rename the “Limited Indus-
trial 1 District” to a “Mixed Use 2
District.”
The amendment stemmed from
a recommendation in the zoning
board’s 2013 annual report. After
several years of review, the board
decided that further discussion
was necessary regarding medical
uses, such as residential detoxifi-
cation.
Township Manager Richard
Krawczun explained that the land
use ordinance is a “living docu-
ment that needs to be amended
due to the changing needs of the
township and society.” For exam-
ple, Krawczun cited the recent
change to the zoning ordinance
that added the permission of con-
venience stores and gas stations
to be located on the same proper-
ty.
The amendment allows the
new uses along Lawrence Station
Road, east of Brunswick
Pike/Route 1 and south or west of
I-295. Any new uses must include
a minimum lot size of three
acres, and the number of patients
is limited to 50 people.
The Mixed-Use-2 zone will not
eliminate any uses included in
the prior Limited Industrial-1
zone, which includes houses of
worship, garden centers, agricul-
ture, wholesale distribution and
warehouses, light manufactur-
ing, animal kennels, general con-
tractors, landscape contractors
and residential uses.
At the public hearing, resi-
dents expressed discontent with
the possibility of a detoxification
center.
“Every time there is new devel-
opment, it becomes a flood prob-
lem for us,” Dan O’Connell, a resi-
dent of Bakers Basin Road, said.
Olympia Perry, a resident in a
neighborhood behind Bakers
Basin Road, felt her sense of safe-
ty was in jeopardy with the possi-
bility of a detoxification center
and that “it is not a suitable area
for population increase.”
Mayor Cathleen Lewis empha-
sized that there is not currently a
proposal for a facility, and if one
arises, it will need to go before the
planning board for approval.
“We do not want that door
opened,” Perry said.
After the approval of the
amendment, Councilman
Stephen Brame said in response
to questions of safety, “a detoxifi-
cation center is very different
than a rehabilitation center you
all have fathomed concerns
from.”
The amendment adopted by the
council said the new use is suit-
able due to its proximity to high-
ways, distance from residential
neighborhoods in which 24-hour
operation would have a substan-
tial impact and the availability of
public water and sewers.
RESIDENTS
Continued from page 1
Residents unhappy with
detoxification center plan
1-800-281-2573 1-800-281-2573
Business
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classified
T HE L AWR E N C E S U N
APRIL 2-8, 2014 PAGE 18
W H A T Y O U N E E D T O K N O W
All ads are based on a 5 line ad, 15-18 characters per line. • Additional lines: $9, Bold/Reverse Type: $9 • Add color to any box ad for $20. • Deadline: Wednesday - 5pm for the following week.
All classified ads must be prepaid. • Your Classified ad will run in all 4 of The Sun newspapers each week! • Be sure to check your ad the first day it appears.
We will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion, so call us immediately with any errors in your ad. • No refunds are given, only advertising credit.
L I NE
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H O W T O C O N T A C T U S
Call us: 609-751-0245 or email us: classifieds@elauwitmedia.com
Hopewell Sun • Lawrence Sun
Montgomery Sun • Princeton Sun
BOX
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$
25per week List a text-only ad for your yard
sale, job posting or merchandise.
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CLASSIFIED APRIL 2-8, 2014 - THE LAWRENCE SUN 19
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Special Classified offers available.
Don’t delay! Call today!
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4461 Route 9 North, Howell, NJ
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in the form of a discount, where the applicable amounts are deducted from subtotal and paid. Subject to
change or terminate without notice, see store for complete details.

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