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Digital Professional Standards Framework Areas of Activity

A.1 Find, remix, and reuse existing digital artefacts in teaching resources A.2 Create a multimedia digital artefact for teaching and learning text/image/video/audio etc. A.3 Present material in digital format or use digital tools to create resources e.g. presentation or handout A.4 Create an effective online learning environment (using VLE or social media platform) A.5 Create a participatory collaborative online community to support learning and teaching (using VLE or social media platform) A.6 Design and implement digital assessment or task (summative or formative, individual or group) A.7 Create and manage e-portfolios and similar systems, either for yourself or your students A.8 Design mechanisms and strategies to search, pull in, discover, filter, manage and curate digital information, for yourself or your students

Core Knowledge
K.1 Nature and potential of the digital as distinct medium and culture, rather than simply digitised material K.2 Issues raised by the impact of the digital on your discipline epistemology, theory and practice K.3 Awareness of literacies of the digital diverse genres, terminology, social conventions, norms, practices etc. K. 4 Awareness of trends, developments and affordances in digital technology to enable you to select appropriate tools K.5 Familiarity with common hardware and accessories, software user interface conventions and strategies for self-directed support K. 6 Knowledge of ethical, legal, privacy and safety issues K. 7 Openness and networking in scholarship and education K. 8 Storage, maintenance and preservation of digital artefacts and data K. 9 Understanding and use of metadata and algorithms K.10 Building an effective and appropriate digital identity and presence online K.11 Digital evaluation methods, data analysis and altmetrics K.12 Awareness of integration with other systems, both institutional and learners devices K.13 Appropriate understanding of, and ability to edit or write code

Digital Professional Values


V.1 Confidence and self-reliance V.2 Agility and adaptability V.3 Thinking creatively about affordances and adapting tools for new purposes V.4 Active participation as both producer and user and encourage this in learners V.5 Commitment to openness in scholarship and education V.6 Pedagogy-driven and -underpinned use of digital technology in teaching and learning, and authentic alignment to the curriculum V.7 Commitment to ensuring diversity of access and approaches to learning with digital technology, and awareness of digital divides V.8 Acknowledgement of how digital technology impacts on and influences learning, both formal and informal, and critical open-mindedness towards emerging practices of students and staff V.9 Consideration of how digital technologies challenge your own teaching and learning practices, and inspire innovation V.10 Commitment to ethical and legal use of digital platforms and information V.11 Commitment to ensuring high quality, robust and thoroughly tested user / learner experiences

When considering incorporating a new technology enhanced learning activity into your teaching and learning, select your chosen project type from the Areas of Activity and identify which of the Core Knowledge areas you might need to develop. Values should be included throughout.

1 What do you want to do? Areas of Activity:


A.1 Find, remix, and reuse existing digital artefacts in teaching resources There is a wealth of open education resources and other useful material on the internet with which you can enhance your teaching, from embedding an image or video in a presentation or VLE, to altering and editing open education materials to suit your own curriculum. A.2 Create a multimedia digital artefact for teaching and learning text/image/video/audio etc. You may wish to create your own videos, podcasts, infographics etc. as a learning resource specifically for your students A.3 Present material in digital format or use digital tools to create resources e.g. presentation or handout You may want to learn how to use digital tools to create presentations such as Powerpoint or Prezi, or to create handouts which present information in more complex ways than just word-processed text or printed slides A.4 Create an effective online learning environment (using the VLE or social media platform) To support your students beyond the classroom, you might want to create an online area which contains all the resources they will need, from uploaded course documents to specially created multimedia-rich webpages. A.5 Create a participatory collaborative online community to support learning and teaching (VLE or social media platform) You might want to create an online space where students can discuss, create and share ideas and resources, such as a wiki, social network or discussion forum. A.6 Design and implement digital assessment or task (summative or formative, individual or group) You may wish to explore e-assessment as an alternative to traditional formats. A.7 Create and manage e-portfolios and similar systems, either for yourself or your students To enhance employability, online portfolios can be an effective way to create an online presence which collates your achievements, using existing platforms such as LinkedIn or adapting other platforms for this purpose within the institutions IT systems A.8 Design mechanisms and strategies to search, pull in, discover, filter, manage and curate digital information, for yourself or your students Information literacy is a key graduate attribute in a digital age, and you may want your students (or yourself) to learn tools and techniques to stay up to date as part of their studies, in addition to traditional search techniques

4.2 What do you need to know? Core Knowledge


K.1 Nature and potential of the digital as distinct medium and culture, rather than simply digitised material . You may wish to understand how to really exploit the full potential of digital technologies, rather than simply replicating traditional teaching methods in digitised form. For example, this could be making use of the VLE as more than simply a repository for handouts. K.2 Issues raised by the impact of the digital on your discipline epistemology, theory and practice Digital technologies have impacted on all our disciplines to some extent, changing what we do and how we do it, for example, Digital Humanities (see the activities of CoDE- our Cultures of the Digital Economy research institute). Your student partner will not be from your own Faculty, but can help you think about how your practice and ways of thinking about your subject may need to develop to be a cutting edge practitioner in the digital age and keep your curriculum up to date. K.3 Awareness of literacies of the digital different genres, terminology, social conventions, values, norms, practices, etc. The internet has brought with it new ways of communicating, which have their own genres such as blogs; social conventions to conform to, such as good netiquette; and values, such as open practice (see K.7). K. 4 Awareness of trends, developments and affordances in digital technology to enable you to select appropriate tools Understanding the latest developments and trends will help you to keep up to date and be aware of new tools and their possible uses in education. K.5 Familiarity with common hardware and accessories, software user interface conventions and strategies for self-directed support Knowledge of common hardware, such as computers, mobile devices and classroom technologies and their accessories, and the visual conventions such as menus, icons etc. which you need to use software, will help you to learn to use new devices, platforms and programs. K. 6 Knowledge of ethical, legal, privacy and safety issues This includes data protection, copyright, security and privacy for you and your students K. 7 Openness and networking in scholarship and education The internet allows us to share our resources freely with others. The Open Education movement makes use of Creative Commons licences and a variety of ways to make your work available. You may need to understand the benefits of open practice, and the degree which is appropriate for you. K. 8 Storage, maintenance and preservation of digital artefacts and data Decisions about where and how to store digital artefacts need to be made, to ensure that they are maintained, appropriately available and do not breach data protection or intellectual property. K. 9 Understanding and use of metadata and algorithms Making good use of metadata to tag digital work allows people to find it easily (including yourself and your students), and an understanding of algorithms enables you to create, manipulate and interpret searches or recommendations so you or your students get the results you want, whether you use Google or the library catalogue. K.10 Building an effective and appropriate digital identity and presence online Everything you do online leaves a digital footprint visible to others. Knowing how to create the professional identity you and your students want, manage your traces online (including those made about you by others) and increase or reduce their visibility is a key skill for all in the digital age. K.11 Digital evaluation methods, data analysis and altmetrics To help evaluate whether your digital activity is effective, you need some understanding of what kind of data you can gather, how to do this, and what it means.

K.12 Awareness of integration with other systems, both institutional and learners devices The university has various systems such as the VLE, e:Vision, Turnitin etc. Students too have their own systems, using different devices, operating systems, browsers and specialist software (such as screen readers for the visually impaired, Firefox or Safari, Mac or Windows). Understanding how your digital activity works within these will help your teaching be more accessible. K.13 Appropriate understanding of and ability to edit or write code e.g. HTML To make small edits and additions to a VLE site, blog or website, such as embed a video, webpart or widget, you often need some basic understanding of HTML code.

4.3 What do you need to develop and explore? Digital Professional Values
V.1 Confidence and self-reliance Many new digital technologies are designed to be intuitive to use, meaning that we must develop strategies for our own learning, rather than rely on formal training. V.2 Agility and adaptability Digital technologies develop fast, meaning that we must be prepared to change our ways of working and take on new tools and new functions, and even change the way we teach (see V. 8 and 9) V.3 Thinking creatively about affordances This means imaginative and creative uses for technologies including and beyond what they were originally designed to do, especially using social media as a learning technology. V.4 Participation as both producer and user and encourage this in learners Web2.0 enables us to create and broadcast digital content as well as just passively consuming it, and we can exploit this to encourage more active participatory learning. V.5 Commitment to openness in scholarship and learning Openness, whether Open Access in research or Open Education and sharing of teaching resources, is a movement which is gaining momentum as traditional publication and education models are disrupted, and can feel as if it runs quite counter to traditional academic attitudes. V.6 Pedagogy-driven and underpinned use of digital technology in teaching and learning, and authentic alignment to the curriculum Ensuring that using digital technology in teaching and learning has a genuine pedagogic purpose, and is not used just for the sake of it. V.7 Commitment to diversity of access and approaches to learning with digital technology, and awareness of digital divides. Students are entitled to their own preferences about using digital technologies in learning, especially if using public social media platforms or their own devices. We cannot assume that all students will have the same advanced digital literacy, and we must ensure that students who do not have or who have not previously had access to technology and who do not have the same level of skill are not disadvantaged. We must also ensure that our digital teaching and learning resources are accessible to those with disabilities. V.8 Acknowledgement of how digital technology impacts on and influences learning, both formal and informal, and critical open-mindedness towards emerging practices of students Students have access to a range of resources and tools beyond those which we provide, and this is changing the way we teach and learn. We should think constructively about the possible value of these new, non-traditional ways of working, and seek to improve our students and our own use of them productively, instead of banning them or refusing to engage.

V.9 Consideration of how digital technologies challenge your own teaching and learning practices, and inspire innovation Digital technologies may challenge the traditional way of teaching and learning, and we must be open to responding positively to change, so that our curricula and teaching methods stay relevant and efficient, and indeed innovative. This may include strategies such as flipping the classroom. V.10 Commitment to ethical and legal use of digital platforms and information It is vital that we not only understand these issues (K 6) but that we are actively committed to and take responsibility for ensuring that our and our students use of digital technology conforms is ethical and does not breach legal frameworks such as copyright, intellectual property or data protection. V.11 Commitment to ensuring high quality, robust and thoroughly tested user / learner experiences Technology-enhanced learning should be thoroughly scoped and tested to make sure that it is reliable and easy to use for learners.