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27 March 3 April 2014
Vol 20 Issue 12
Ride Em Cowgirl
Rider, biologist, and Gon Coastal author
Sue Benech Field pens poetry when
not on horseback, p. 36
On Course
Montecito Country Club renovations
finally on par and seeing green, to the
tune of $40 million, p. 12
In The Books
Pulitzer Prize winner Bill Dedman, author
of Empty Mansions, lends voice to
David Myricks archives, p. 26

THIS WEEK IN MONTECITO, P. 11 CALENDAR OF EVENTS, P. 42 OPEN HOUSES, P. 45
The Voice of the Village
S SINCE 1995 S
Coffee, tea, or Oprah Chai?
Montecitos most famous
resident is namesake of new
brew coming to a Starbucks
near you, p. 6
Multipurpose Common food-service facility, outdoor bowl area, new storage sheds, realigned
ball fields, expanded media center, area for interior physical education, new parking lot, and more
included in long-term transformation of Montecito Union School (stories begin on pages 11 & 12)
MINEARDS
MISCELLANY
DESAL-VATION
Forget about state water and overpriced Twin Tunnels; Montecitos
future is desalination. Israel, a parched desert for the most part, already
produces more water than it knows what to do with. (story begins on p.5)
photo: Carlsbad Desalination Project (courtesy of Poseidon Water)
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 2 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 3
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27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 4 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
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5 Drought Defense
In his latest editorial, water authority Bob Hazard rolls out the barrels of insight,
number crunching, and advice; as always, hold the salt
6 Montecito Miscellany
Get ready for Oprah Chai; GMAs Josh Elliott seeks $8 million; teacher Leon
Lewandowski and Random Acts of Kindness; musician Timothy Chooi requires
two; Music Academy of the West to honor Marilyn Horne; name contest; Selberts
soire with Wynton Marsalis; name rings a Bell at the Granada; conductor Heiichiro
Ohyamas anniversary; West Side Story; celebrating nonprots; St. Patricks party
8 Letters to the Editor
Saving the Hosmer Adobe; SB Youth Ensemble Theatre; a Gorgeous caption correction;
reap versus rake; tips and tricks; the Left isnt necessarily right; Nancy Giffords
gratitude; buckets and basins during the drought
10 Village Beat
Fire Protection District Board of Directors adopts Ordinance 2014-01; Montecito
Country Club renovations are on course; Nest doctors are in the house on Chapala
Street
11 This Week
Hank Pitchers work at Maritime Museum; The New Yorker group discussion; all
about colon cancer at Goleta hospital; MBAR to meet March 31; SB Public Library
Systems Adult Literacy Program seeks volunteers; Montecito Association meets April
1, no fooling; MUS board to convene April 2; explore SB trails via a free slideshow;
Sandcastle Music Together at library; Marjorie Luke Theater hosts Seniors Have Talent;
tea dance, free dance;
Tide Guide
Handy chart to assist readers in determining when to take that walk or run on the beach
14 Seen Around Town
Laguna Blanca School observes its 80 years with an 80 Days theme; Sansum Clinic
teams with SB Historical Museum to publish Noticias; clinic welcomes Dr. Julie Ann
Freischlag to town
21 Notes from Downtown
Attracting women is no sweat for Jim Alexander, who is so excited about a new
university study he might never stop dancing
23 Seniority
Vicki Johnson expounds on identity theft and all types of fraud during Unity Shoppe
luncheon
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
Garden Gossip
When it comes to the water shortage, Lisa Cullen explains theres mulch to do about
your landscape before summer rolls around.
26 Coming & Going
Author Bill Dedman is on track with David Myricks archives for fundraiser at Montecito
Country Club; SB Youth Ensemble Theatre members to sing at Heres The Scoop gala April 12
Movie Guide
Latest lms, times, theaters, and addresses: theyre all here, as they are every week
32 Our Town
El Montecito Early School kids connect with grandparents during a concert earlier this month
34 On Entertainment
The transformations of Metamorphoses move into the New Vic; Edward Giron plays
around in Carpinteria; Shen Yun culture on display at the Granada
35 Your Westmont
A lecture examines the effectiveness of mathematical algorithms April 3; an actor from Fruitvale
Station joins a screening April 3; and Pirates of Penzance swipes three national awards
36 Trail Talk
Lynn Kirst follows the productive path of cowgirl Sue Benech Field, who waxes poetic
about her rst book, Gon Coastal, and late husband A.J. Field
38 Sheriffs Blotter
Vehicle break-in and stolen purse; Summerlands case of the stolen quarters,
laundromat-style; one hiker killed, another injured on Cold Springs Trail
40 Public Notices
42 Calendar of Events
April Verch on the Ojai perch; Lit Moon over Denmark; Deepak Chopra at the
Arlington; Freda Kelly documentary at Marjorie Luke; Trinity Backstage hosts Dana
Cooper; Mannish Boys at Carrillo Rec Center; Breaking Backwards with Soul Street;
all that jazz at SOhO; John Hodgman, the minor celebrity; All-Star Comedy Night at
the Jewish Community Center; Garrison Keillor chats up the Granada
45 Real Estate
Michael Phillips feels the current Heat Index and compares its numbers to a year ago;
sales of Montecito single-family houses have slipped considerably
93108 Open House Directory
Homes and condos currently for sale and open for inspection in and near Montecito
46 Classied Advertising
Our very own Craigslist of classied ads, in which sellers offer everything from
summer rentals to estate sales
47 Local Business Directory
Smart business owners place business cards here so readers know where to look when
they need what those businesses offer
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 5 The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary. Vince Lombardi
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Drought Defense
by Bob Hazard
Mr. Hazard is an Associate Editor of this paper and a former president of
Birnam Wood Golf Club
Is Desalination the Right Choice for
Montecito? (Part II)
L
ast week, we looked at cost considerations and technological advances
that make desalination a viable source of reliable water in drought-prone
California. To continue the evaluation of desalination as a source of water
for Montecito, it is useful to investigate the desal experiences of others.
For clarification on the following use of Acre Feet (AF), you should know that
one AF of water (enough water to cover one acre with water 12 inches in depth)
equals 325,851 gallons. In Santa Barbara, average usage is 130 gallons a day or
3,900 gallons of water per month. In Montecito, with its lush foliage and larger
lots, the average is closer to 290 gallons per day or 8,700 gallons a month. So,
on that basis, an AF of water should supply about 37 Montecito households per
month. You can take it from there.
Need Water? Check with the Israelis
Without rainfall or significant groundwater, Israel has had to rely on reduc-
ing the cost of separating salt from seawater. In the last 10 years, Israel has
transformed itself from a parched desert into a land of water surplus. The first
major desalination plant opened in Israel in Ashkelon in 2005. It was a 50-50
joint venture between IDE (Israel Chemicals and the Delek Group) and Frances
Veolia Group. Since then, three more desal plants have come online and more
are planned. Today, desal plants in Israel produce 600 million cubic meters of
water per year (486,400 AF), or more than half of Israels total freshwater needs.
In addition, Israel treats and recycles more than 80% of household wastewa-
ter, the highest recapture rate in the world. It has also developed computerized
leak detection systems and sophisticated drip irrigation. An estimated 25 to
30% of the worlds water production is wasted because of leaks in distribution,
according to TaKaDu, an Israeli company that developed the technology that
minimizes leaking.
California Experience
In areas of low regulatory and reasonable permitting costs such as South
Padre Island in Texas and Tampa, Florida costs of desalinated water are
estimated to be as low as $700 to $1,400 per AF. In California, with expensive
energy costs and higher regulatory barriers, desalinated seawater costs climb to
at least $1,500 per AF.
There are some 17 desalination plants either open or proposed along the
California coast, including the currently mothballed Santa Barbara desalina-
tion plant that we explored last week. Here are some of the more significant
California coastal desalination projects:
City of Oxnard
Oxnard, just south of Ventura on the 101, is a city of 200,000 residents. The
area is famed for its avocados, strawberries, and lima beans. Normally, 50% of
Oxnard water is supplied by the State Water Project from Northern California,
25% from regional groundwater, and 25% from local groundwater. Lately, state
water has become unreliable in a time of drought, and well water is at risk from
seawater pollution as aquifers are depleted by excessive use.
It is rather embarrassing that the City of Oxnard has had the foresight, the
intelligence, the will, and the wallet to use desalination to turn brackish well
water into potable drinking water, and recycled wastewater into irrigation
water, while Montecito, Summerland, Carpinteria, Goleta, and Santa Barbara
keep hoping for the proverbial 40 days and 40 nights of needed rain.
The Oxnard desalination effort, known as GREAT (Groundwater Recovery
Enhancement And Treatment) was launched in 1999 and opened in 2008. It
encompasses multiple water strategies including conservation, reduced reli-
ance on imported supplies, brackish groundwater desalination, wastewater
recycling, groundwater injection, and restoration of local wetlands.
Initially funded by a $20-million federal grant, Oxnards state-of-the-art water
desalination plant has used a mix of federal, state, and local funding to open its
cavernous building on a water campus that fills one city block. Groundwater
from brackish wells is pumped through reverse-osmosis (RO) filters to produce
7.5 million gallons a day (8,400 AF per year) of desalinated drinking water. As
more racks of RO filters are added, plant capacity can be expanded to 15 million
gallons per day (producing 16,800 AF per year), if and when necessary.
DROUGHT Page 274
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 6 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
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I find myself smiling
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Cara
If looking for a good cosmetic
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almost everyone I know says to
go to Dr Mark Weiser. I am so
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me and his sta are like family.
The added comfort and care
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Sue Maloney
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What is Your Dream Smile?
For some, its the Hollywood-style perfection that graces the covers of magazines. For others, its a more natural smile that reflects confidence from
having whiter, brighter and straighter teeth. Whatever your interpretation of your dream smile is, Dr Weiser can help. An LVI trained preferred dentist
and a member of the Extreme Makeover: Extreme Team, Dr Weiser designs beautiful smiles every day!
Your cosmetic options include:
Customized porcelain veneers made by world famous lab technicians
Zoom in office teeth whitening
Invisalign, the clear braces
Safe removal of mercury fillings
Laser dentistry for optimizing gum health
Mark T. Weiser D.D.S.
805. 899. 3600 1511 State Street www. boutique- dental. com
Aesthetic & Family Dentistry
I find myself smiling
more than I ever have
and I am so grateful!
Thank you Dr. Weiser.
Cara
If looking for a good cosmetic
dentist in Santa Barbara
almost everyone I know says to
go to Dr Mark Weiser. I am so
grateful for what he has done for
me and his sta are like family.
The added comfort and care
provided are just a bonus!
Changing Lives....One Smile at a time
Sue Maloney
805.899.3600 1511 State Street www.santabarbaradds.com
What is Your Dream Smile?
For some, its the Hollywood-style perfection that graces the covers of magazines. For others, its a more natural smile that reflects confidence from
having whiter, brighter and straighter teeth. Whatever your interpretation of your dream smile is, Dr Weiser can help. An LVI trained preferred dentist
and a member of the Extreme Makeover: Extreme Team, Dr Weiser designs beautiful smiles every day!
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Customized porcelain veneers made by world famous lab technicians
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Laser dentistry for optimizing gum health
Mark T. Weiser D.D.S.
805. 899. 3600 1511 State Street www. boutique- dental. com
Aesthetic & Family Dentistry
I find myself smiling
more than I ever have
and I am so grateful!
Thank you Dr. Weiser.
Cara
If looking for a good cosmetic
dentist in Santa Barbara
almost everyone I know says to
go to Dr Mark Weiser. I am so
grateful for what he has done for
me and his sta are like family.
The added comfort and care
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Oprahs Tea Party
Monte ito
Miscellany
by Richard Mineards
Richard covered the Royal Family for Britains Daily Mirror and Daily Mail before moving to New York
to write for Rupert Murdochs newly launched Star magazine in 1978; Richard later wrote for New York
magazines Intelligencer. He continues to make regular appearances on CBS, ABC, and CNN, and
moved to Montecito six years ago.
MISCELLANY Page 184
T
V talk show titan Oprah
Winfrey is turning over a new
leaf!
Next month she launches her own
eponymous beverage in Starbucks.
Montecitos most famous resident
appeared at the coffee giants annual
shareholder meeting in Seattle last
week with CEO Howard Schultz to
announce Oprah Chai, which contains
a bold fusion of cinnamon, ginger,
cardamom, cloves, black tea, and roo-
ibos, which will be available in both
latte and loose-tea formats.
There is no word on how much the
drink costs, but currently Starbucks
signature chai tea sells for $2.45.
Proceeds from the sales of the Oprah
Chai will go toward her youth educa-
tion charities.
I love tea, says Oprah, 60. My
daily tea ritual is a vital part of my
morning. Savory and spicy chai, with
its deep flavor, has long been a favor-
ite of mine.
When Howard Schultz invited me
to come into the Starbucks tasting
Oprah to launch her own brand of tea at
Starbucks
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accommodations and roundtrip transpacic air required.
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If you have something you think Montecito should know about, or wish to respond to something
you read in the Journal, we want to hear from you. Please send all such correspondence to:
Montecito Journal, Letters to the Editor, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA.
93108. You can also FAX such mail to: (805) 969-6654, or E-mail to jim@montecitojournal.net
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

On Saving History
I
was reading a recent issue of the
Montecito Journal (MJ # 20/10) at
Pierre Lafond last week, when a
friend wandered by and noticed the
cover photo that features the Hosmer
Adobe on San Ysidro Road. My friend
pointed out some interesting and
well-founded reasons for the preser-
vation of this historic structure that
was built in 1830, has been a land-
marked site since 1994, and is listed as
Santa Barbara County Landmark #34.
What my friend brought to light is
that the current owners of the prop-
erty wish to demolish the existing
structure and fabricate a replica. So I
decided to take the short walk down
San Ysidro and have a look at the
property myself, which is adjacent to
the parking area for Upper Manning
Park. What I saw was a small adobe
structure swathed in blue tarpaulin, a
majestic Moreton Bay Fig Tree, and a
water tower that looked to be under-
going some reconstructive work.
What I saw made me curious for more
information on the property, and what
future it might have.
I asked my friend if there might be
more information to be provided on
the adobe, and in due course, more
was revealed:
If the adobe is in a condition to
be rehabilitated, there is a hearing
scheduled on April 22 by the Board
of Supervisors, provided the own-
ers do not wish to restore the struc-
ture. There are proven methods of
restoration that must be considered,
because as anyone with a classic car
knows preservation is always better
than a rebuild.
Now, Im no expert on the subject of
adobe construction, or the politics of
land-marked sights, but after reading
Hattie Beresfords revealing historical
article inside the Montecito Journal, I
am convinced that every effort should
be made to rehabilitate this import-
ant historical landmark to its original
state. It should not be torn down, but
instead restored.
Michael Edwards
Montecito
(Editors note: We, too, believe the
Hosmer Adobe can and should be pre-
served via restoration. J.B.)
Small Kids, Big Dreams
I cannot thank you enough for
MJs generous coverage of our Santa
Barbara Youth Ensemble Theatre
(SBYET) event with Ivan Reitman
(Coming & Going MJ # 20/11).
You and Richard Mineards have been
steadfast champions for the work
that we do with these amazing kids:
from your cover story of their Polo
Club appearances singing The Star
Spangled Banner to their two glori-
ous stints this year singing for Oprah,
to highlighting all their efforts for
the last eight years onstage at the
Lobero. It is my honor to serve the
Santa Barbara community in this way
and your faith in me means more than
you could possibly know.
This year, SBYET is geared up for
its greatest challenge to date. We will
have 50-plus children between the
ages of eight and 15 performing Les
Misrables. Ivan Reitmans passionate
endorsement is so powerful and such
a great boost of confidence for these
courageous kids.
Montecito standouts include
Ava Morouse and Elise Guerrand-
Hermes as Cosette, Ryan Slater
as Gavroche, Jack Morouse and
Matthew Goldsholl as Javert, Leora
Wasserman as Young Cosette, and
Dawson Fuss as the Bishop, in addi-
tion to a stellar ensemble of young
talent from Santa Barbara and Los
Angeles.
With last Saturdays Reitman Event,
SBYET a California non-profit
semi-professional theatre ensemble
is poised to create an endowment that
(Back row) Blake Brundy, Ivan Reitman, Rickie
Lee Benedetto; (middle row) Grace Blankenhorn,
Elise Guerrand-Hermes, Cole Evers; (in front) Holly
Hadsall (photo: Kelly Kirlin)
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 9 The harder I work, the luckier I get. Samuel Goldwyn
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Don Gragg 805.453.0518 License #951784
LETTERS Page 204
will secure the future of this vital artis-
tic, educational institution for gen-
erations of talented California youth
to come. Funds raised will provide
scholarships and underwrite atten-
dance to our shows for children from
under-served communities, in addi-
tion to financing an administrative
staff including a head of development,
marketing director, grant writers, and
an administrative director to run this
unique theatre company.
After eight years of fostering artistic
excellence in local youth, SBYET has
big dreams of a lasting future. Your
unwavering support over these eight
magical years has been a significant
aid to our cause.
We are eternally grateful.
Janet Adderely
The Students of SBYET
(Editors note: One correction wed like
to make is that we called the event a
Cheerleading Sunday, when it actually
should have been called a Cheerleading
Saturday, as it happened on a Saturday
afternoon. My excuse? It was a busy
weekend. J.B.)
Gorgeous Goof
Hello Gorgeous Models were
thrilled to be featured in the Montecito
Journal (MJ # 20/10) in a story about
the Hautebox event at the Biltmore.
However, the photo used featured
a photo of another woman, not me,
Shannon Loar-Cot, agent and
owner of Hello Gorgeous Models. I
was told when I called the Journal
that I should send you the correct
photo so you might publish a cor-
rection in the next issue. I would
greatly appreciate it.
Have a gorgeous weekend.
Thank you,
Shannon Loar-Cot
Montecito
Reap Dont Rake
I read Lisa Cullens column about
mulching around plants (Garden
Gossip, MJ 20/9 & 20/10). Im a
gardener and in the last month I have
stopped raking up leaves; rather, I
blow them into planter beds to add to
the mix.
This past Thursday, I was working
in Montecito and the gardeners next
door were raking up the leaves in the
driveway and those that had blown
into the raised beds. I thought it was
ironic that you are advising people to
add mulch, while the gardeners are in
effect removing it.
Dan Seibert
Santa Barbara
Timely & Digital
I enjoyed Lisa Cullens The Time is
Now article (MJ # 20/10). There are
lots of good tips and tricks that we are
going to implement.
I was curious if you have a digital
copy of this article? It is much easier
for me to share with our landscaper,
wife, contractor, [et al] if I can search
and send digitally.
Your thoughts?
Tom Tolles
Santa Barbara
(Editors note: If you wait a week,
you can always access an article by
going on to montecitojournal.net where
the current issue is posted, generally
within days of its print publication.
J.B.)
(from left) Hello Gorgeous models are: Meg Johnson, Janelle ODair, Rachel Hallet, agent and owner of
Hello Gorgeous Models Shannon Loar-Cot, Natalya Asadullina, Lawren Cappelletti, Jessica Feltman, and
Maya Louis
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 10 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
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Board Adopts Ordinance
Village Beat
by Kelly Mahan


VILLAGE BEAT Page 124
A
t its board meeting on Monday,
March 24, the Montecito Fire
Protection District (MFPD)
Board of Directors unanimously
adopted Ordinance 2014-01, which is
an updated Fire Protection Plan for
Montecito.
The plan, which was last revised
in 2010, outlines the districts pol-
icies for building and remodeling
structures in Montecito. The plan is
intended to supplement the districts
adoption of the current version of
the California Fire Code, including
amendments to the California Fire
Code, Building Code, and Residential
Code. The 50-page document outlines
requirements pertaining to roofing,
vegetation management, access, water
supply and storage for fire protection,
and also goes over enforcement, pen-
alties, and findings.
The entire ordinance will be pub-
lished in next weeks Montecito Journal.
Last week, the district held a scop-
ing meeting for public input for the
Draft Environmental Impact Report
(DEIR) for Fire Station 3. Dozens of
residents turned out to give input on
the project, which has been the topic
of many community discussions over
the last five years.
Earlier this year, the consulting firm
AMEC Environment & Infrastructure,
Inc., began preparing the new EIR for
the project. The firm offered to revise
the report last September, follow-
ing a mandate from Superior Court
Judge Thomas Anderle, who ruled
against the district in a lawsuit with
Montecito Agricultural Foundation,
which claimed the original EIR was
flawed.
For years, MFPD has maintained
that the eastern portion of Montecito
is underserved when it comes to fire
protection, and residences there are
outside of the five-minute response
time to which the district adheres.
Sheffield Drive, East Valley Road and
Romero Canyon Road were identified
to be in the general desirable area to
build a third fire station, and in 2005
the board began looking for a suitable
site. In 2010, a property located on the
2500 block of East Valley Road, a 2.55-
acre portion of the Palmer Jackson
Ranch, was identified as the best
option.
The project would include a main
fire station (living quarters, admin-
istrative offices), a smaller support
building, and a reserve apparatus car-
port. The structures would be con-
sistent in size and architecture with
typical Montecito residential struc-
tures, said fire chief Chip Hickman.
The MFPD board will likely enter into
Montecito Fire
Protection
District con-
tinues its fire
prevention
campaign
with sched-
uled chipping
in various
neighbor-
hoods
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 11 By working faithfully 8 hours a day, you may eventually get to be boss and work 12 hours a day. Robert Frost
reach their goals, including improving
job skills, communicating more clearly, or
learning how to help their own children
do homework. The librarys program
has offered no-cost, one-to-one, exibly
scheduled tutoring at all library branches
for more than a quarter of a century,
and has helped thousands of local adults
improve their life skills.
Tutors are asked to make a six-month
commitment to tutoring. The next nine-hour
training course runs on April 1, 2, 8, and
9, from 10:15 am to 12:30 pm. All four
sessions are required.
Where: Townley Room at the Central
Library, 40 East Anapamu Street
Info: 805-564-5619 or literacy@sbplibrary.
org

Montecito Association Land Use
Committee Meeting
The Montecito Association is committed
to preserving, protecting, and enhancing
the semi-rural residential character of
Montecito; today the Land Use Committee
reviews upcoming projects.
When: 4 pm
Where: Montecito Hall,
1469 East Valley Road
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2
MUS Board Special Meeting
When: 4 pm to 6 pm
Where: Montecito Union School,
385 San Ysidro Road
Info: 969-3249
THURSDAY, APRIL 3
Music Together
Sandcastle Music Together provides
45 minutes of songs, rhythmic rhymes,
movement, and instrument play at
Montecito Library
When: 10:30 am
THURSDAY, MARCH 27
Discussion Group
A group gathers to discuss The New Yorker
When: 7:30 to 9 pm
Where: Montecito Library,
1469 East Valley Road
FRIDAY, MARCH 28
Five One-Act Plays
Connected brings together a number
of directors and different casts of
actors presenting ve one-act plays by
playwright/actor Ed Giron.
Directors include Joseph Beck,
Robert Sanchez, Jerry Oshinsky,
Ivy Vahanian, and Ghislaine
Sopher-Phillips, and the cast includes
George Coe, Mila Wizel, Josh
Lampert, Aden Hailu, Morris
Danhi, Julie Allen, and Erika
Leachman.
When: Friday, March 28, and Saturday,
March 29, at 8 pm; Sunday, March 30,
at 2 pm; Friday, April 4, and Saturday,
April 5, at 8 pm; Sunday, April 6, at 2
pm
Where: Plaza Playhouse Theater,
4916 Carpinteria Avenue
Cost: $17 General Admission; $13
for seniors and students with valid
identication
SATURDAY, MARCH 29
Colon Cancer Screening
The community is invited to ask doctors
questions about colon cancer screening
and risk.
When: 9 to 11 am
Where: Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital,
5333 Hollister Avenue
Info: 855-247-9355
MONDAY, MARCH 31
MBAR Meeting
Montecito Board of Architectural Review
seeks to ensure that new projects are
harmonious with the unique physical
characteristics and character of Montecito.
When: 3 pm
Where: Country Engineering Building,
Planning Commission Hearing Room,
123 E. Anapamu
TUESDAY, APRIL 1
Adult Literacy Program
The Santa Barbara Public Library Systems
Adult Literacy Program seeks volunteer
tutors to help local adults improve their
own lives. Tutors make a difference by
helping individuals improve their reading,
writing, math, or English language skills.
Free library tutoring helps adult learners
(If you have a Montecito event, or an event that concerns Montecito,
please e-mail kelly@montecitojournal.net or call (805) 565-1860)
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2
Exploring the Santa Barbara Backcountry
A free slideshow about our trails with Q & A with James
Wapotich. Ever-changing, the Santa Barbara backcountry
is a place of surprising diversity and rich scenery, and most
of it is within a couple hours of Santa Barbara. Slideshow
will include images from the San Rafael and Dick Smith
Wildernesses, as well as trails closer to home. Wapotich is an
experienced backpacker and has hiked many of the trails in
our local backcountry; he is a Volunteer Wilderness Ranger
with the Forest Service and the author of Trail Quest, the weekly hiking column in
the Santa Barbara News-Press.
When: 7 pm Where: Karpeles Manuscript Library, 21 West Anapamu Street
Info: 729-4250
THURSDAY, MARCH 27
Art Exhibit at Maritime Museum
The Light at Point Conception is a
selection of museum quality prints of
original paintings by Hank Pitcher
that focus on his 40-year fascination with
the land and sea near this legendary
lighthouse.
This exhibit includes prints of the
lighthouse over the past 30 years. These works are reproductions of paintings
primarily held in private collections, many of which have never been exhibited. A
limited number of select prints will be available for purchase in support of the Santa
Barbara Maritime Museum.
When: 5:30 pm to 7 pm
Where: 113 Harbor Way
Info: 962-8404
This Week
Montecito
in and around
Montecito Tide Guide
Day Low Hgt High Hgt Low Hgt High Hgt Low Hgt
Thurs, Mar 27 1:39 AM 1.2 7:44 AM 5.3 02:18 PM -0.6 08:40 PM 4.8
Fri, Mar 28 2:29 AM 0.6 8:35 AM 5.4 02:56 PM -0.6 09:14 PM 5.2
Sat, Mar 29 3:15 AM 0 9:23 AM 5.4 03:33 PM -0.4 09:48 PM 5.6
Sun, Mar 30 3:59 AM -0.4 10:09 AM 5.2 04:08 PM -0.1 010:22 PM 5.7
Mon, Mar 31 4:43 AM -0.5 10:54 AM 4.9 04:43 PM 0.3 010:56 PM 5.7
Tues, Apr 1 5:27 AM -0.5 11:40 AM 4.4 05:17 PM 0.8 011:31 PM 5.6
Wed, Apr 2 6:12 AM -0.3 12:29 PM 3.9 05:51 PM 1.4
Thurs, Apr 3 12:07 AM 5.3 7:01 AM 0 01:25 PM 3.4 06:26 PM 1.9
Fri, Apr 4 12:45 AM 4.9 7:58 AM 0.3 02:38 PM 3.1 07:07 PM 2.4

Where: 1469 East Valley Road
Info: www.sandcastlemusictogether.com
SATURDAY, APRIL 5
Seniors Have Talent
Talented seniors in our community will be
strutting their stuff on stage at the Seniors
Have Talent variety show. This two-hour
extravaganza features talented singers,
dancers, musicians, and magicians in our
community, aged 50+. Last year the multi-
generational extravaganza was a sold-out
success.
Directed by renowned playwright Rod
Lathim and emceed by radio personality
Catherine Remak, the show promises to
entertain the audience showcasing the talent
and energy of Santa Barbara seniors.
The Seniors Have Talent show is a
fundraiser for the Center for Successful
Aging (CSA) and proceeds support the
organizations services to the elderly in
Santa Barbara, which include daily phone
calls, in-home visits, and senior peer
counseling sessions. All of CSAs services
are provided free of charge, so the show
is a signicant event that enables CSA to
continue serving seniors in our community.
This year the Center for Successful Aging will
honor Natalie Myerson, awarding her the
nonprots rst Spirit of Successful Aging
award. Myerson is a 94-year-young local
philanthropist who went on safari at age 89
and mastered the Hebrew language at 90.
When: 2 pm to 4 pm
Where: Marjorie Luke Theater,
721 East Cota Street
Tickets: $20 for adults, $10 for children
Info: www.seniors-have-talent.org

SUNDAY, APRIL 6
Tea Dance
The City of Santa Barbara donates use of
the ballroom and volunteers provide music
and refreshments for this ongoing, free
dance event.
Ballroom dance music including the Waltz,
Tango, Viennese Waltz, Slow Fox Trot,
Quick Step, and rhythm dances such as
the Cha Cha, Rumba, Swing, Mambo, and
Bolero are played, among other music.
Participants can hone their dancing skills or
learn new techniques.
The Santa Barbara Ballroom Tea Dance
is held on the rst Sunday of every month
at the Carrillo Rec Center. No partner
necessary, but if you can nd one, bring
him or her along!
When: 2 pm to 5 pm
Where: 100 East Carrillo Street
Info: 897-2519
Cost: free MJ
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 12 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
We Pay Top Prices For Your Well-Stored Fine Wines
FINE WINE MERCHANT
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VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 10)
VILLAGE BEAT Page 384
more negotiations with the Jackson
family, who did not extend the option
to buy the property, which expired
December 31, 2013.
Carolee Krieger, who spoke on
behalf of many of her neighbors at the
scoping meeting, said, We believe
it is important to have Fire Station
Three. We agree, and we would like to
see it built. Wed like to give the fire-
men the opportunity to do what they
do best, and what they have asked for
is a fire station down there.
Montecito resident Gerry Spence
had similar sentiments: Somebody
told me, and I know this isnt what
its about, but somebody told me that
there was an objection because they
would have to listen to a fire truck
come in and out; noises that would be
concerning to them. If were going to
put it on that level, let me suggest to
you that we dont want to ever listen to
the weeping of a mother who has lost
her child burned in a house. Or to lis-
ten to the child weeping who has lost
her mother because they didnt get to
an ambulance in time. Those are the
sounds that we dont want to hear.
Other speakers agreed and spoke
in support of the project, citing public
safety, property safety, and insurance
coverage.
An additional formal public-review
period for the DEIR will be publicly
noticed upon the release of the DEIR.
For more information, visit www.
montecitofire.com.
MFPD continues its Fire Prevention
Clean-up; residents are invited to
stack vegetation on their streets up
to two weeks before scheduled chip-
ping. Last year, the district was able to
remove 450 tons of flammable vegeta-
tion with this program.
Properly stacked vegetation will
have the cut end facing the street.
Leaves, succulents, agave, pine nee-
dles, and palm fronds cannot be
chipped; property owners are respon-
sible for the proper disposal of these
materials. The following dates are ten-
tative and subject to change:
March 31 - April 4: West Mountain
Drive, Coyote, and Banana Road
April 7 - April 10: Arcady, Knapp,
Cowles, Barker Pass, Cottage, El
Rancho, and Sky View
April 14 - April 18: Sierra Vista,
Nicholas, Ridge View, Canyon View,
Sycamore Vista, Calle Elegante, Calle
Hermosa, Crest View, and Ranchito
Vista
April 28 - May 2: East Mountain
Drive, Irvine Brook Tree, Oak Creek
Canyon, Ashley, and Ayala
May 5 - May 9: Chelham, Dawlish,
Stoddard, Cloydon Circle, and Paso
Robles
May 12 - May 16: Pepper Hill, Alston,
Woodley, Glenview, Camino Viejo,
Dulzura, and Alcala Lane
May 27 - May 30: Hot Springs, Para
Grande, Tejas Lane, and East Valley
June 2 - June 6: Hodges, El Bosque,
Hodges, Bolero, Periwinkle, Juan
Crespi, El Dorado, Live Oak, and
Randall Lane
For more information on these
projects, contact Jeff Saley or Kerry
Kellogg at (805) 969-7762.
Country Club Update
After more than four years of
delays, renovation plans for Montecito
Country Club are once again moving
forward. Last month, club members
were invited to hear a presentation
on the planned improvements for the
club, which is expected to be closed
for one year while construction takes
place.
In September 2009, the Santa Barbara
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 13
P
L
E
A
S
E

V
I
S
I
T

O
U
R

N
E
W
L
Y

E
X
P
A
N
D
E
D

B
I
L
T
M
O
R
E

S
T
O
R
E
.

P
L
E
A
S
E

V
I
S
I
T

O
U
R

N
E
W
L
Y

E
X
P
A
N
D
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.

1155 COAST VILLAGE ROAD I 805.969.0442 I WWW.SILVERHORN.COM
FOUR SEASONS BILTMORE HOTEL I 805.969.3167 I MONTECITO, CA 93108
1155 COAST VILLAGE ROAD I 805.969.0442 I WWW.SILVERHORN.COM
FOUR SEASONS BILTMORE HOTEL I 805.969.3167 I MONTECITO, CA 93108
LISA LOIACONO
Montecito Coast Village Road Brokerage
CalBRE#: 1428913 | 805.452.2799
lisa.loiacono@sothebyshomes.com
sothebyshomes.com/santabarbara
NRT LLC Top 3% of Sales
Associates Nationwide in 2013
MONTECITO | 5bd/5ba | $4,475,000 | Web#: 0113743
Panoramic ocean and mountain views from this magnifcent estate on
approximately 25 acres with 4 bedrooms, guest house and artist studio.
MONTECITO HILLTOP HIDEAWAY
MICHAEL CALCAGNO & NANCY HAMILTON
BRE#:1499736 | 805.896.0876 | michael.calcagno@sothebyshomes.com
BRE#:1129919 | 805.451.4442 | nancy.hamilton@sothebyshomes.com
SANTA BARBARA BROKERAGE | 1436 State Street | Santa Barbara, CA 93101
T: 805.963.1391 | F: 805.966.3622 | sothebyshomes.com/santabarbara
Operated by Sothebys International Realty, Inc.
Sothebys International Realty and the Sothebys International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sothebys International Realty, Inc.
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 14 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 2014
HARRYS PLAZA CAF 4-6 PM
Learn about the All-Inclusive Regent Experience and
Extraordinary Travel Opportunities in 2014 & 2015
Santa Barbara Travel Bureau cordially invites you to a
special presentation on award-winning Regent Seven Seas Cruises
Harrys Plaza Caf April 1, 2014
3313-B State Street, Santa Barbara
Limited Space Please contact Corinne to RSVP
Chart@sbtravel.com or 805-969-7746
F O R MO R E
INFORMATION
Lori Willis 805.967.1266 x 118
Director of Admission
lwillis@bishopdiego.org
Bishop Diego High School
*
4000 La Colina Rd.
*
Santa Barbara
*
(805) 967-1266
*
www.bishopdiego.org
B
ishop
D
iego
garcia
High School
BISHOP DIEGO
HAS IT ALL
Still shopping for the
right high school?
Rolling Admission for the Class of 2018
has begun. Limited spaces available.
Prospective families are invited to drop in to see if Bishop is the right ft for their student
between 8:00 am and 4:00 pm on Wednesday, April 2, 2014.
Opportunities still exist to have a student Shadow Day. Please contact Lori Willis, Director of Admission for details.
Seen Around Town
by Lynda Millner
Around the World in 80 Days
W
hat better way to celebrate
80 years than a theme of
Around The World In
80 Days? Thats how old Laguna
Blanca School is, and that was the
theme of their auction and black-tie
gala. Co-chairs and Laguna parents
Amal Zeini and Michelle Branch
were inspired by the Frenchman Jules
Vernes classic adventure novel.
We didnt have to go to Albuquerque
for the hot-air balloon festival. Part of
the ballroom at the Bacara Resort had
a bright red one at its center. It was
stunning. One of the guests even came
as a balloon I dont know about the
hot air. The main dining room was
equally stunning, with the walls hung
with old maps printed on cloth.
Sean Kelly kept the bids coming
as the live auction took the audience
around the world with Bali Beachfront,
Chelsea Football at Stamford Bridge,
Exploration and Rejuvenation in Chile
Around The
World In 80
Days co-chairs
Michelle Branch
and Amal Zeini
with Dawn
ODonnell, Julie
Hemingway,
and dcor
chair Nanette
Giordano
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 15
Grand Opening
1213 Coast Village Road,
Santa Barbara, CA 93108
Is Pleased to Announce
We Are Open
Join Us
Friday, April 4 10am - 7pm &
Saturday, April 5 10am - 5pm
Featuring trunk shows with
Alex Sepkus and Mark Patterson
Special 10% off ~ April 4th & 5th
Enter to win Our Grand Prize
Diamond by the yard necklace
and other prizes
refreshments & small bites
1213 Coast Village Road, Santa Barbara
For more information: 805-969-6362
info@gasparjewelers.com
1213 Coast Village Road, Santa Barbara
For more information: 805-969-6362 info@gasparjewelers.com
Enter to win Our Grand Prize
Diamond by the yard Necklace
Platinum prize
Gif bag by COS BAR
DRE# 00493760
Coldwell Banker Proudly Congratulates
Steve Slavin
For the largest home sale this year in the City of
Santa Barbara and his outstanding representation
of one of our most important period homes.
805-886-3428
www.SantaBarbaraLuxuryHomes.com
steve@steveslavin.com
SEEN Page 164
Ms Millner is the author
of The Magic Makeover,
Tricks for Looking Thinner,
Younger and More
Confident Instantly. If
you have an event that
belongs in this column,
you are invited to call
Lynda at 969-6164.
and Peru, a canal cruise in France,
or the Armangiri resort in Utah.
There was spring break in Vail, the
Manhattan Club in New York City,
Catalina Island, Sonoma, Kauai, and
Isla Navidad in Mexico.
Among the guests was Rob
Hereford, who will be head of school
beginning this summer, Tracy and
Michael Bollag, Alison and Geoff
Michal
Bollag, Irene
Fruchtbaum,
Leonard
Homenuik,
and Marina
Stephens at the
Laguna Blanca
gala
Laguna Blanca board chair Tom Pickett, head of
upper school Tyler Hodges, and head of school
Richard Marricino
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 16 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
Rusack, Stephanie and Dewey
Nicks, Missy and Bob Fuladi, Jeffrey
Branch, Hani Zeini, and Alan and
Tanya Thicke.
Laguna Blanca School is a K-12
educational college preparatory day
school. As head of school Tom Pickett
says, We balance outstanding aca-
demics, the arts, athletics, and a com-
munity that celebrates the dignity and
worth of each individual. You can
read all about it on lagunablanca.org.
Books and Bust
Sansum Clinic partnered with the
Santa Barbara Historical Museum
(SBHM) to publish the latest issue
of Noticias, titled Sansum Clinic A
Legacy of Medical Innovation, and
written by historian Erin Graffy with
Sansum Clinic physician Erno Daniel,
M.D., Ph.D. Noticias is a journal pub-
lished twice a year and devoted to the
study of the history of Santa Barbara
County.
At the reception and book signing,
Erin told the audience how times have
changed regarding what is healthy. A
local physician, Samuel Brinkerhoff, in
practice during the 1860s, touted that
the fumes from the offshore oil seep-
ages in the Santa Barbara Channel had
medicinal properties and would be
good for respiratory ailments. When
people did in fact feel better, they
believed it worked even though it was
no doubt due to the climate.
Erin went on to say what a remark-
able group of 50 women who started
Cottage Hospital in 1891 even though
the community was quite small, with
a population of only 5,000. The envi-
sioned cottages were too expensive,
so one large building took their place;
the name stuck. In 1896, Cottage had
one of the first X-ray machines.
In 1920, Dr. Sansum arrived at the
Potter Metabolic Clinic. He was par-
ticularly interested in diabetes, which
was considered a death sentence.
Insulin use had been developed in
Canada, but Dr. Sansum was the first
to produce and use it in the United
States. I talk about Dr. Sansum every
time I give a docent tour of Casa
SEEN (Continued from page 15)
The three
Burtness broth-
ers, Bob, Bill,
and George,
at the unveil-
ing of their
statue of Dr.
Sansum at the
Santa Barbara
Historical
Museum
The two Noticias authors, Dr. Erno Daniel and Erin
Graffy, at the SBHM lecture and reception
Dr. Ron Latimer with visiting professor Dr. Julie
Ann Freischlag at her lecture
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27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 17 Work is a necessary evil to be avoided. Mark Twain
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Shop for treasures from the nest
estates in Montecito and Hope Ranch
del Herrero. The Casa was built by
George Steedman, who was in Santa
Barbara to visit his diabetic brother
being treated by Dr. Sansum in the
early 1920s. The doctor died just after
World War II.
The tale of the bust being unveiled
at this event at the SBHM was told
to me by board member George
Burtness and piqued my curiosity.
His father, Hildahl Burtness, M.D.,
was a physician at Sansum for 53
years and worked with Dr. Sansum
from 1930 to 1948. Dr. Burtness always
wanted a bronze bust of the founder
Dr. Sansum for the clinic. As George
said, My father commissioned such
a work, but it was never cast and he
passed away in 1983. His three sons,
Bob, Bill and George, finally granted
their fathers wish. The stately bust
has been placed on permanent display
at the Sansum Clinics multi-specialty
site at 317 W. Pueblo Street.
To read all about it Noticias are for
sale at the SBHM at 136 De la Guerra
Street for $8.95.
Visiting Professor
This is the third year, through the
efforts of Ron Latimer, M.D., that
Sansum Clinic has invited an expert
in the medical field to visit Santa
Barbara and share knowledge with
our local doctors. This year Julie Ann
Freischlag, M.D., is the visiting pro-
fessor and her specialty is vascular
surgery.
Dr. Kurt Ransohoff welcomed
guests to the lecture Dr. Freischlag was
to give in the Burtness Auditorium at
Cottage Hospital Cottage being the
premier sponsor among many other
supporters. He joked, We knew each
other long ago, but she looks way
more like we did than I do. Judith
has just taken over a new position
as Vice Chancellor of Human Health
Services and Dean of UC Davis School
of Medicine, UC Davis Health System.
Her credential listing is about the size
of a book.
Dr. Latimer told us that Judith was
born in the small town of Decatur,
Illinois. Her grandfathers advice,
Youll probably have a lot of people
telling you, you cant. Dont listen
to them. As Ron said, Judith is the
Little Train That Could and did. I think
I can, I think I can.
Judiths speech was titled Leading
Through Times of Change: Principles
of Leadership. She should know,
since she has led throughout her
career. As she said, Leaders need to
be in real time not wishing things
were like they were 20 years ago. Its
always good to hang out with young
people. Lead by example. As Ralph
Waldo Emerson said, What you do
speaks so loud, I cannot hear what
you say.
Freischlag told the story of a doctor
she knew who had a liver transplant.
When asked what was the worst
part, he replied, In the hospital, no
one touched me or held my hand.
Something for doctors and health care
people to remember. Judith is still an
active surgeon, even though she is in
administration.
Judith remarked she has usually
taken the road less-traveled. Her fond-
est memory of a compliment regard-
ing leadership was when someone
said, You made things better. She
said she was going to take the spirit
of Santa Barbara back to UC Davis.
Then it was time for liquid spirits here
at a reception for everyone across the
street in Sansum Clinics Nadel lobby.
Some of those attending were
Beverlie Latimer, Vicki Hazard, Julie
Nadel (the lobby is named for she
and her husband), Bobbie and Eddie
Rosenblatt, Victoria Riskin, Maryan
Schall, Julie McGovern, Nancy
Ransohoff, Dr. Karl Kassity and wife,
and Julie and Beth Vos. MJ
Co-chairs of the Sansum Clinic Womens Council
Bobbie Rosenblatt and Julie Nadel who arranged
two receptions one at SBHM and the other for
the Sansum event. The bust of Dr. Sansum is
above.
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 18 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
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MISCELLANY (Continued from page 6)
room and create my own tea blend,
I thought that sounded like such a
unique opportunity and fun to the
tenth power.
To share my favorite things with
the rest of the world and support
youth education at the same time is
truly the perfect blend.
The Oprah Chai will be available in
the U.S. and Canada from the end of
April.
Oprah personally developed the
tea with leading teaologist, Naoko
Tsunoda, from Teavana. It marks the
first time she has lent her name to a
brand.
I think we got it right, she says.
Starbucks acquired the specialty-tea
company in 2012 in a move to expand
beyond the coffee market and become
a multi-product company.
Schultz says he wants to make tea
as popular as hes helped make coffee
in America.
Partnering with Oprah in the cre-
ation of this distinctive and remark-
able tea is a strong step forward in
accomplishing this objective, while
also giving back in a meaningful
way through the Oprah Winfrey
Leadership Academy Foundation.
I am personally humbled to work
with such an inspirational leader and
visionary who shares so many of our
core values and beliefs....
Going for Green
Its crunch time for ABC and Good
Morning America anchor Josh Elliott
as the clock ticks down on his contract
expiration.
The former UCSB student, who was
an editor on the Daily Nexus, is now
making about $1.2 million a year, but
is demanding $8 million annually to
stay.
Josh, 42, has just four weeks left
on his contract and the two sides are
deadlocked over cash, reports New
York Post Page Six editor Emily Post.
Meanwhile, he is also in talks with
NBC to possibly jump ship and take
on a role covering both news and
sports at 30 Rock.
Josh knows he is integral to the
success of GMA and wants a huge
pay increase to stay. He wants $8
million, while ABC is offering $4 mil-
lion. Joshs background is sports. He
started at ESPN, so his agents at the
Creative Artists Agency have been
actively talking to NBC about a part-
news, part-sports role, like a younger
Bob Costas.
Josh only has four weeks left on his
contract, and theres a lot of talk about
how CAA has dragged the negotia-
tions out. ABC wants Josh to stay. He
is a very talented broadcaster, but $8
million is too much. He isnt bigger
than GMA.
Joshs GMA co-star, Lara Spencer,
is believed to be ready to sign a new
contract after much more straightfor-
ward negotiations between ABC and
her agent, Jon Rosen.
It is believed Josh may have upped
his salary ambitions after popular
co-host Robin Roberts last year inked
a long-term deal worth around $14
million a year.
Josh is in a strong position because
he knows how crucial he is to the
success of GMA. He joined the show
in April 2011, and a year later GMA
broke the rival Today shows 16-year
winning streak.
An ABC spokesman says: Josh is a
real star. We never comment on con-
tract negotiations, but we expect him
to have a long and terrific career with
the network.
Caring is Contagious
Santa Barbara teacher Leon
Lewandowski believes he can make
the world a better place, one kind act
a day for a month.
Last year Leon, who works at
Franklin Elementary School, chal-
lenged himself to try to do at least one
Random Act of Kindness a day for the
month of April.
He posted it on Facebook, then cre-
ated a page for others to join him. It
was a success and now hes hoping to
get even more to join him and his 400
Negotiations down to the wire with ABC and Good
Morning America co-host Josh Elliott, a former
UCSB student
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27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 19 It is the working man who is the happy man. Ben Franklin
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MISCELLANY Page 224
members this year.
I want this thing to grow, to be the
next Movember, says Leon. When
people are the recipients of RAoK,
their entire demeanor changes and
they tend to want to pass it on to
someone else.
Last year Leon and his nine-year-
old daughter, Maya, gave out cold
drinks on the side of the road on a
hot Sunday. He and his wife, Mary,
passed out flowers to strangers on
State Street. The family paid for park-
ing at Knotts Berry Farm for the car
behind them.
At the Santa Barbara Fair and
Expo, they paid for kettle corn for
the next people who intended to buy.
They helped the homeless, mowed
their neighbors lawns and surprised
friends and co-workers with baked
treats.
The best RAoK are the ones you
do for strangers, for folks who dont
know you and least expect it, says
Leon.
The Facebook page is an important
component of the month because it
gives people a place to come and get
ideas, post their own RAoK, and feel
inspired to go back out and do it again
the next day.
It was Easter Sunday, recounts
Leon, and I had gone to my local
drug store to buy a few items. It was
raining that day and outside the store,
huddled below the overhang trying
to stay dry, were three young people,
including two males. They had wild
hair and tattoos, and one of the guys
had a nose piercing with what looked
to be a clothes hanger dangling from
his nostrils.
As I shopped, I got to thinking
about these kids. I dont know if they
were homeless or not, but I do know
they were young and out in the rain
on Easter Sunday instead of home
with their families. I purchased three
peanut butter-chocolate treats, and
when I came out I told the trio the
Easter Bunny hadnt been able to find
them this morning, so he gave me
these candies to deliver to them.
The smiles and surprised looks on
their faces were unforgettable. Thank
you so much, God bless you, were
the reactions from these pierced tat-
tooed kids. It wasnt much I did, but I
felt good. It was unexpected and kind.
I decided I wanted to challenge
myself to see if I could do that each
day for the next month, one Random
Act of Kindness for thirty days.
Leon is hoping his campaign will
grow and everyone will know it start-
ed in Santa Barbara. He has even
asked Montecito resident and TV talk
show host Ellen DeGeneres to partic-
ipate.
Anyone can be kind for thirty
days, adds Leon. When you do,
it makes your outlook in your fel-
low humans better the other eleven
months of the year. It feels good to
make others feel good.
If anyone is interested in joining the
campaign and challenging themselves
for a month, he or she can just type
in April Random Acts of Kindness
Month on Facebook and ask to join...
Sticky String Situation
It was certainly a concerted effort
when Canadian violin soloist, Timothy
Chooi, 20, snapped a string on his $3
million 1729 Guarneri del Gesu violin
performing Max Bruchs Concerto
No. 1 in G minor with the Santa
Barbara Symphony at the Granadas
matinee concert.
It was right in the middle of the
second movement, his E string,
recounts symphony director David
Grossman. Conductor Nir Kabaretti
noticed instantly, as it made a strange
sound. He stopped the orchestra with
a soft gesture of his baton, as if the
score actually called for it.
Tim looked at the guest concert-
master, Clayton Haslop, who imme-
diately traded violins with him. Then
he gave Tims violin to his assistant,
Marisa Sorajja, and took hers. She
then left the stage with it to put on a
new string.
Nir quietly told the orchestra
where to re-start and they continued
playing the second movement from
about where they left off.
David says it is normal for violinists
to have extra strings with them, so if
the soloists dressing room had been
closer to the stage she could have gone
to Tims case and taken one of his own
strings. But she went directly to her
Santa Barbara teacher Leon Lewandowski launch-
es Random Acts of Kindness campaign
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 20 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
LETTERS (Continued from page 9)
Publisher Timothy Lennon Buckley
Editor Kelly Mahan Managing Editor James Luksic Design/Production Trent Watanabe
Associate Editor Bob Hazard Associate Publisher Robert Shafer
Advertising Manager/Sales Susan Brooks Advertising Specialist Tanis Nelson Office Manager / Ad Sales
Christine Merrick Proofreading Helen Buckley Arts/Entertainment/Calendar/Music Steven Libowitz
Books Shelly Lowenkopf Columns Ward Connerly, Erin Graffy, Scott Craig, Julia Rodgers
Gossip Thedim Fiste, Richard Mineards History Hattie Beresford Humor Jim Alexander, Ernie Witham,
Grace Rachow Photography/Our Town Joanne A. Calitri Society Lynda Millner
Travel Jerry Dunn Sportsman Dr. John Burk Trail Talk Lynn P. Kirst
Medical Advice Dr. Gary Bradley, Dr. Anthony Allina Legal Advice Robert Ornstein
Published by Montecito Journal Inc., James Buckley, President
PRINTED BY NPCP INC., SANTA BARBARA, CA
Montecito Journal is compiled, compounded, calibrated, cogitated over, and coughed up every Wednesday
by an exacting agglomeration of excitable (and often exemplary) expert edifiers at 1206 Coast Village
Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108.
How to reach us: Editorial: (805) 565-1860; Sue Brooks: ext. 4; Christine Merrick: ext. 3; Classied: ext. 3;
FAX: (805) 969-6654; Letters to Editor: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito,
CA 93108; E-MAIL: news@montecitojournal.net
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No More Pretense
The most recent episode of
President Obama on the TV show
Ellen speaks for itself; there is no
longer any pretense: the broad main-
stream media and popular culture
is lock, stock n barrel invested
heavily in Barack Obama and the
ideological agenda spewed forth by
the Democrat National Committee.
Heavily invested implies that the
media and its practitioners have as
much to gain or lose from the rising
or falling fortunes of Obama and
liberal socialism as Obama and the
Democrat Party do.
Whatever print and broadcast
journalists learned in college as the
ideals of an honored profession has
been cast aside completely. Theres
no longer even any shame or embar-
rassment about being in the tank
with the people they are supposedly
covering on behalf of their listen-
ers and readers. Asking the tough
questions of those in power that the
little people arent in the position
to ask personally, or demonstrating
the slightest degree of skepticism or
cynicism about the shortcomings of
these leaders programs, is apparent-
ly no longer their job.
The discipline felt by the practi-
tioners who inhabit these journalism
positions is exercised not by the read-
ing or viewing public they are sup-
posedly serving, but by others in their
own line of work and by the very
people they are expected to cover in
the course of their business day.
Print and broadcast media person-
nel have chosen to answer only to the
pressure of fellow journalists and to
the gatekeepers of the Lefts agenda.
To a majority of the American pub-
lic, Ellen DeGeneres comes off as an
adoring sycophant in her moment in
the spotlight with the President of
the United States.
Barack Obama even admits what
hes engaging in is a lobbying tour
to sell the sale on a product the
American people have voiced buy-
ers remorse about even before
the Democrats were able to take
advantage of a coincidence of cir-
cumstances favorable to them that
comes along politically maybe twice
a century.
The president anticipates the
warm-puppy treatment when he
sits down next to or across from
these moderators or journalists,
and these moderators or journalists
would be persona non grata among
their peers and the Democrat Party
were they to treat Obama as they
would an effective spokesperson for
the Republican Party, such as Ted
Cruz, Sarah Palin, Rush Limbaugh,
or even Bill OReilly.
Could you imagine what Ellens
colleagues in the revolutionary
movement would say if Ellen sucked
up to Ann Coulter on national tele-
vision?
But, then again, maybe Ellens cho-
sen strategy would be to give Ann
Coulter the Obama treatment,
because Ann Coulter could chew
on and spit out Ellen DeGeneres
during TVs high tea hour, both with
regards to style and wit, and certain-
ly on matters of policy.
With that in mind, Ellen would
never risk having a same-age, fellow
female celebrity millionaire on her
show that she would have to suck
up to in order to simply survive the
interview intact.
The medias free-fall contin-
ues unabated, dragging whatever
respect it still has with the public
into the sewage pit.
David S McCalmont
Santa Barbara
(Editors note: Weve been under no illu-
sion about the close relationship many if
not most in the show-business community
have developed with the Democrat Party
and particularly with this administration.
It has become difficult to even watch some
shows HBOs Girls for example, which
I like very much but cringe when its writ-
er-creator Lena Dunham takes easy and
rather puerile potshots at viewers with
more conservative political leanings than
she has. The real blow, however, came
when Jimmy Fallon a uniquely talent-
ed guy fawned over Michelle Obama
during his first week on the air as the
new host of The Tonight Show, thereby
telegraphing to all where his political
sympathies lie. As pleased as I was upon
learning that hed be taking over The
Tonight Show, I have yet to watch it. I
guess we libertarians and non-Democrats
arent worth paying attention to. Since
there are plenty of alternatives to watch,
I suppose it is no great loss, but still...
J.B.)
MJ Writers Rule
On behalf of the Arts Fund Santa
Barbara, we wanted to thank your
paper for your loyal coverage of our
exhibitions. Joanne Calitri has made
considerable effort in interviewing
the artists and curators in order to
write insightful reviews. She takes
extra time to photograph, not only the
openings, but also the actual installa-
tions of individual works. This kind
of in-depth consideration means so
much to the artists, and we appreciate
your shining a light on the efforts of
our organization. Richard Mineards,
Priscilla, and Lynda Millner have
also been amazing in taking the time
to cover our openings; without their
efforts much of what we do would go
unnoticed. Your paper serves such an
important role in our non-profit com-
munity here. Thank you and your
hard-working staff for that!
Nancy Gifford
Vice President, Board of Trustees
Arts Fund Santa Barbara
Bucket List
About the water shortage: Some
months ago, I put a basin in my kitch-
en sink. We all run the tap when clean-
ing vegetables or waiting for the water
to heat up. I have been astonished at
just how much water I was saving. I
put the water in a bucket, water the
plants and fill the birdbath. Im repaid
by song from the birds, and even the
crows strut their stuff in thanks.
So, think about putting a basin in
your kitchen sink. This drought is
serious.
Christina Allison
Montecito MJ
TNS FINANCIAL SVCS
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Santa Barbara resident since 1963
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27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 21 Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work. Thomas Edison
SPONSORED BY THE WESTMONT FOUNDATION
From Main Street to Wall Street:
The Amazing Effectiveness of
Mathematical Algorithms
Russell Howell
Westmont Professor of Mathematics and
Kathleen Smith Professor of Natural and Behavioral Sciences
5:30 p.m., Thursday, April 3, 2014
University Club, 1332 Santa Barbara Street
Free and open to the public. For information, call 565-6051.
Could a mathematical algorithm possibly earn $1 billion?
It did for Sergey Brin and Larry Page, co-founders of Google.
Their algorithm for determining page ranks on a search engine
changed the Web and how we use it. But thats just the tip
of the proverbial iceberg. Mathematical theories are used
today in applications that defy belief. Russell Howell will
gear his talk for a non-mathematical audience and will show
how many ideas in mathematics have produced practical
and often invisibleeffects on our day-to-day activities,
such as using credit cards in a secure way or booking
airline reservations. He will also explore briefly a deep question:
Why are mathematical theories, which are generated primarily
out of aesthetic criteria, so successful in their applicability to the physical world?
ONE ON ONE
Fitness Event
Saturday, April 5, 2014
1011am
1809 E. Cabrillo Blvd., Suite B
Montecito, CA 93108
$75 per person
One on One Fitness is sponsoring an event to raise funds for
Santa Barbara Rape Crisis Center.
Come prepared to get a great workout and have a blast doing it. The
class will include functional training: TRX, kettle bells, Krank Cycle,
mat Pilates, cardio blast and much more. New this yearYoga!
All proceeds will go directly to Santa Barbara Rape Crisis Center.
For reservations or more information,
please contact Linda Robertson at 969-9107.
If you are unable to attend,
please consider a donation to SBRCC.
THANK YOU!

n.o.t.e.s. from downtown
by Jim Alexander
The Sweat Smell of Success
Whats that smell? If its
sweat, its all good
according to a University
of Pennsylvania study
that has thrown its
weight behind Jim
Alexanders perspiration
and armpits. In turn, he
will dance in crowded
nightclubs more often, but dont ever expect
him to work for Lindsay Lohan.
U
nder the category of Good
things come to the hapless
who wait, comes a university
study thats sure to change the world
especially for men unlucky enough
to be classified in my peer group, usu-
ally identified as the M&Ms, or the
Mediocre Majority. We may not have
George Clooneys amatory good looks,
Bill Gates sexy bank account, or even
RuPauls collection of shoes, but at last
we have an abundance of something
every woman desires: B.O.
Ranking right up there with Jonas
Salks development of a polio vaccine,
and Sir Walter Disneys discovery of
Orlando, biologists at the University
of Pennsylvania have discovered that
male perspiration has a surprisingly
beneficial effect on women. According
to researchers, male sweat reduc-
es stress in females, brightens their
moods, and induces relaxation. This
may explain why my wife Lora is hap-
pier than a squirrel with a McDonalds
French fry, when shes not nodding off.
As far as this writer is concerned, the
only thing that could be better news
is if researchers were to discover that
droopy eyelids make women want to
bake cookies.
In the study, researchers collected
samples from the underarms of men
who refrained from using deodorants
for four weeks a job that must rank
right up there with sperm bank jani-
tor. The underarm extracts were then
blended (like a B.O. margarita) and
applied to the upper lips of women a
job that must rank right up there with
being Lindsay Lohans personal assis-
tant. The findings suggested something
in the perspiration not only relaxed
and brightened womens moods, it
also facilitated the emergence of sexu-
al feelings. No wonder Loras always
trying to drag me onto a sweaty dance
floor. Further analyses also showed a
rise in levels of reproductive luteiniz-
ing. I have no idea what that means,
but I think it has something to do with
dry cleaning.
There was a time in my life when
this news wouldve been more wel-
comed than a Get-Out-of-Going-to-
the-Symphony card. I remember when
facilitating the emergence of sexu-
al feelings in a female (this usually
involved at least a two-drink mini-
mum) was not only number one on my
list, it was one through four. However,
I have evolved into a mature, cere-
bral male (translation: old and prosaic).
Nowadays, the top four things on my
wish-list are locating a trustworthy
mechanic, stumbling on a good ortho-
pedic surgeon, finding a way to retire
on $649 a month, and discovering a
computer geek who accepts Medicare.
The women in the study never sus-
pected they had mens sweat under
their noses. They believed they were
helping to test perfume and floor wax.
Seriously?
Hey, Beverly, is that a new perfume
youre wearing?
Yes, its called NBA Locker Room.
Like it?
I love it. It smells just like my hus-
band when hes waxing my kitchen
floor.
Wanting to experience the studys
results for myself, I tried wiping a
mixture of my sweat and lemon Mop
& Glow under Loras nose, and it did
indeed affect her mood: my cast comes
off in six weeks.
The study concluded that if the active
agent in male perspiration could be
isolated, it should lead to new fertility
therapies, treatments for premenstrual
syndrome, and, if I may add, a dras-
tic increase in sauna sales. I have no
doubt that Bristol-Meyers and Johnson
& Johnson will be extremely interest-
ed in this study, and will soon have
drugstore shelves lined with Bubbas
Feel Good Underarm Extract, and
Uncle Billys B.O.dy Soap (smell like a
muskox, but feel calm as a heifer).
As if all this sweet sweat talk wasnt
good enough news, there are two
more exciting announcements on the
scientific horizon. Within a year, the
University of Gilroy is planning to
release the results of a study asserting
that garlic breath in men increases
female I.Q. by 50 points, and in our
own backyard, its been rumored that
Westmont is researching a theory that
beer-induced flatulence may be a sign
of elevated spirituality.
Boy, if those two fine institutions can
substantiate these theories, Ill need to
take three showers a day and get a tat-
too of Justin Bieber on my chest to keep
the women away. MJ
According to researchers, male sweat
reduces stress in females, brightens
their moods, and induces relaxation.
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 22 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
MISCELLANY Page 304
MISCELLANY (Continued from page 19)
case just offstage and used one of hers.
It took Marisa about three minutes
to take her string and Tims violin to
Nirs close-by dressing room where
it was light and take off the remnants
of the broken string and replace it
with a new one and tuned the violin.
She then walked discreetly back on
stage, while the second movement
was still going on, and retook her
chair next to the concertmaster. She
played on Tims violin till the end of
the movement. When it ended, the
three of them swapped instruments.
Tim played the third movement, the
finale, on his own priceless violin with
the new string.
Some audience members asked
if we rehearsed this, it looked so
smooth, adds David. But, no, this is
simply a protocol that musicians learn
early on. So everyone just knew what
to do and did it coolly and profession-
ally. This could really have rattled a
young soloist, but it didnt faze Tim a
bit. Another testament to his solidity
and confidence.
The last time this happened was 22
years ago, when Itzhak Perlman per-
formed with the symphony. Ironically,
it was the same work!
Made for Marilyn
The Music Academy of the Wests
67th annual summer festival, which
starts on June 16 for eight weeks,
promises to be a cracker, with the
highlight being a specially re-worked
version of Georges Bizets Carmen,
to honor legendary mezzo soprano
and longtime director of the voice
program Marilyn Horne, who just
celebrated her 80th birthday with a
special concert at New Yorks legend-
ary Carnegie Hall.
Marilyn, who attended the academy
summer school in 1953, is particularly
associated with the popular opera,
having sung the lead role many times
over her long and illustrious career.
The work, which will have an 1800s
Gold Rush theme, is being conduct-
ed by James Gaffigan and will fea-
ture, for the first time, dancers from
the State Street Ballet.
We cant think of a nicer way to
honor such a great singer and her long
connections with the academy, pres-
ident Scott Reed told 295 academy
council members at a special concert
at Hahn Hall, before which he out-
lined the schedule for the forthcom-
ing summer event that has attracted
140 fellows 78 men and 62 women
including 37 students from the
world-famous, 109-year-old Juilliard
School at New Yorks Lincoln Center.
Soprano Simone Osborne and flut-
ist Ridge Davis performed, along
with pianist Natasha Kislenko, in
works by Strauss, Bartok, and Borne.
This years festival is being spon-
sored by Montecito Bank & Trust,
which has signed up for the next three
years, the academys largest corporate
donation in its history.
Among the guests were Lee Luria,
Robert Weinman, Jean Mitchell,
Seymour and Shirley Lehrer, Lorna
Hodges, Bill Ramsay, Vicki Myers,
Beverlie Latimer, Betsy Northrop,
Muriel Zimmerman, Terry and Pam
Valeski, Jerry and Helene Beaver,
Joanne St. John, Carole Halstead,
Barbara Marx, Ray Robins, Dwight
Coffin, Eve Bernstein, and Judy
Smith...
Whats in a Name?
Dozens of you have written in
with ideas for naming the new 14,000
square-foot development of 11 stores
in the Upper Village.
The competition closes on March 31,
so do get any last-minute submissions
in by then, sending them to my atten-
tion, marked Naming Contest, at the
Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village
Road, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108.
Michael Gunner, son of develop-
er Richard Gunner, publisher Tim
Buckley and I will put our heads
together to decide the winner, who will
receive a 2012 magnum of Margerum
MG, donated by winemaker-restaura-
teur Doug Margerum.
The presentation of the prize will
be photographed and appear in the
column in due course...
Soire at the Selberts
Jim and Patricia Selbert opened the
doors of their splendiferous Montecito
manse to host a UCSB Arts & Lectures
soire with Wynton Marsalis and
his Lincoln Center Orchestra to raise
funds for education and outreach pro-
grams.
A large tent was erected next to the
house for the orchestras performance
when longtime supporters Timothy
and Audrey Fisher announced a
$500,000 donation toward the $20 mil-
lion endowment fund, on top of the
$750,000 gift by Michael and Anne
Towbes announced earlier this month,
bringing the total to $12.3 million half-
way through the five-year campaign.
During the orchestras three-day
residency in Our Eden by the Beach
under the Arts & Lectures banner,
five music clinics were hosted for
marching bands from Santa Barbara,
Dos Pueblos, SB Junior High and San
Marcos high schools, and 2,000 stu-
dents attended a performance at the
Arlington Theatre co-presented by the
Childrens Creative Project.
Among the too-too tony types lis-
tening to the big band sound were
A&L Miller McCune director Celesta
Billeci, Dan and Meg Burnham,
Arnold and Jim Bellowe, Michael
and Nancy Gifford, Marcy Carsey,
Richard and Annette Caleel, Carla
Hahn, Nir Kabaretti, Jim Sokolove,
Robert Weinman, Mike and Anne
Towbes, Harry and Judi Weisbart,
Craig and Kristen Springer,
Ralph and Melissa Iannelli, Larry
Koppelman and Richard and Luci
Janssen...
CAMA Concert
Top violinist Joshua Bell and
Timothy Chooi keeps his cool as violin string
snaps Timothy Fisher and Wynton Marsalis at the UCSB
Arts & Lectures bash (photo Isaac Hernandez)
Music Academy of
the West perform-
ers: Ridge Davis,
flutist; Natasha
Kislenko, pia-
nist; Scott Reed,
MAW executive
director; and
Simone Osborne,
soprano (photo by
Priscilla)
Event hosts
Patricia and
James Selbert
with Wynton
Marsalis and
the Selberts
son, Stefan
(photo by Isaac
Hernandez)
James
Selbert, Anne
and Mike
Towbes,
and Richard
Janssen
(photo Isaac
Hernandez)
Trio Nostalgia
Mariachi Group,
Jon Bishop, MAW
vice president;
Connie Frank and
Evan Thompson
(photo by
Priscilla)
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 23 Work is the curse of the drinking classes. Oscar Wilde
And Mulch, Mulch More
Garden Gossip by Lisa Cullen
An avid organic gardener, Lisa co-owns Montecito Landscape with her husband, Chris Cullen.
Garden Gossip radio show can be heard Friday and Saturday from 11am to 12 pm on KZSB
AM1290. She can be reached at lisacullen@montecitolandscape.com or 969-3984
N
ews of Montecitos water
shortage is everywhere and
though you may be tired of
hearing about it, this is no light issue.
The challenge becomes how to com-
municate the urgency of the situation
without creating a doom and gloom
atmosphere. That said, here we are
again, talking about how to conserve
water.
As one of the easiest and most
important steps you can take to pre-
pare your landscape for the dry sum-
mer months ahead, mulching meth-
ods and information bear repeating.
The recent warm weather makes it
even more imperative to get mulch on
the ground right away.
Bare earth loses water through
evaporation and is less able to absorb
irrigation or rainfall. Perhaps you have
seen bare soil that wont absorb the
water you apply, water beads up and
runs off. This wastes water and is a
waste of time. The answer is to mulch.
Mulching not only allows soil to take
up the water you give it and reduces
evaporation, but also reduces water
needs, and in some cases can eliminate
the need for irrigation all together.
The application of mulch also protects
a plants root system. When exposed to
the elements (heat and cold) the tiny
feeder roots of plants become stressed
and die. Mulch will keep a plants roots
cooler in the summer and warmer in the
winter, thus reducing stress.
There are many other benefits to
mulching, including the fact that
mulches increase soil fertility, repel
insects, reduce susceptibility to pests
and pathogens, and suppress weeds.
Apply mulch as thickly as feasible,
but dont bury the crown of the plant
or tree (thats the part right next to the
trunk). Mulch needs to be replenished
about twice a year, so if you have
room, its a good idea to have a pile
on demand.
Types of Mulches
and Resources
Mulch is recycled plant material.
Both Santa Barbara County (805-681-
4981) and Marborg Industries (805-963-
1852) take green waste (dropped off
by your gardeners), grind it up and
provide this product free to custom-
er pick-up. They will deliver for a
fee. The downside to these types of
mulches is that they are fresh (not
composted), and are best when used
in orchards or others that arent close
to the house.
Frequently, tree companies have
chips left over from jobs, and those
chips are normally free with free
delivery if the company is looking for
a place to dump. Anything but palm
tree waste works well. And it smells
good! Great for use anywhere. There
are lots of tree companies in town, and
they all have chips.
Agri-chip 132 Garden Street, in Santa
Barbara (805-962-7005) makes a large
variety of mulches that are of higher
quality than free mulches. Another
added benefit is the company doesnt
have the weed contamination that can
occur from non-composted mulches.
They do cost more, but when you are
mulching areas closer to the house it is
worth the expense.
All the other landscape supply com-
panies in town carry mulches and
deliver: Agri-Turf (805-569-2257), All
Around Landscape Supply (805-684-
3115), Pro Garden (805-965-4619).
For more information about mulch-
ing, visit www.lessismore.org/materi
als/76-county-mulch-program.
Until next time, fill your garden
with joy (and mulch). MJ
DIVORCE
Thinking about divorce? Want a
fair resolution without conict?
Tired of the legal hassle?
I can help. I can work with you or
both of you to get it done quickly
and ensure your privacy.
I am a retired Family Law Judge
pro-term and a Family law Attorney
with over 30 years experience.
Mediation or Representation
RICHARD DOLWIG
Attorney at Law
for brochure call: 637-7993
J
ARROTT & CO.
R E A L E S T A T E I N V E S T M E N T S
SPECIALIZING IN
1031 TAX-DEFERRED
EXCHANGES
AND
TRIPLE NET LEASED
INVESTMENT PROPERTIES
WITH NATIONAL TENANTS
CALL
Len Jarrott, MBA, CCIM
805-569-5999
http://www.jarrott.com
MANAGEMENT FREE
Education Is Best Defense Against
Financial Exploitation
SENIORITY by Patti Teel
Patti Teel is the commu-
nity representative for
Senior Helpers, providers
of care and comfort at a
moments notice. She is
also host of the Senior
Helpers online video
show. www.santabar
baraseniors.com. E-mail:
patti@pattiteel.com.
O
n March 11, the Unity Shoppe
held a luncheon to honor
and thank more than 100 of
their volunteers. The luncheon was
sponsored by the Volentine Family
Foundation, Pacific Western Bank,
and American Riviera Bank. The guest
speaker was Senior Deputy District
Attorney Vicki Johnson, who spoke
to the Unity Shoppe volunteers about
avoiding financial exploitation. She
discussed identity theft, telemarketing
fraud, mail and Internet fraud, mort-
gage fraud, investment fraud, and
caregiver fraud.
Johnson says that these types of
crimes are hard to prosecute and
that education is the best defense.
According to a 2011 Met Life Study,
elder financial abuse is the crime of
the 21st century with seniors los-
ing more than $2.9 billion annually
to investment fraud. The National
Center on Elder Abuse and the U.S.
Census reports that only 1 in 25
cases of elder abuse is reported in
California. Brad Parks, division chief
for Adult Services of Santa Barbara
County estimates that they receive
about 60 reports each month alleg-
ing elder abuse, and a large percent-
age of those reports involve financial
exploitation.
At a rate of 25:1, it suggests that
each month in Santa Barbara County
there are 1,500 incidents of elder
abuse and only 60 cases get report-
ed. Authorities also report that most
seniors are embarrassed by having
trusted a cheater, and thus are too
ashamed to report the crime. Thus,
seniors are ideal victims for con-art-
ists who relentlessly try to steal their
money.
Since most criminals who perpe-
trate financial exploitation are not
apprehended, the best response is to
teach people how to protect them-
selves. People of all ages can be taken
in by scams, but senior citizens (age
65 and over) are particularly vulner-
able. It may be that people become
more trusting as they grow older or
simply that older adults grew up in
a time when people were taught to
be polite.
For instance, hanging up on people
can seem rude. If you have trou-
ble hanging up on telemarketers,
Johnson suggests keeping a script by
the phone that says, I do not do busi-
ness over the telephone. Please put
me on your Do Not Call list. Then
hang up immediately. She stresses
this is not being rude. It protects you
from unwanted and perhaps fraudu-
lent intrusions. If someone calls you
back after you hang up, or if they are
harassing or rude, she advises saying:
We dont have a good connection.
Call me back on my other line. The
number is (805) 568-2442. That is the
DAs Fraud Line.
Seniors as victims can be rich or
poor in fact, many are living on
Social Security or pensions, so being
robbed by scam artists can be finan-
cially devastating.
Johnson shared the following
resources:
NATIONAL
DO NOT CALL REGISTRY
To reduce phone calls, sign up for
Do Not Call. Exceptions include char-
ities, politicians, and companies with
whom you already have an estab-
lished relationship. The call is free and
there is no charge for signing up.
Call 1 (888) 382-1222 or visit www.
donotcall.gov
CREDIT CARD OFFER
OPT OUT LINE
Stop credit card offers and unwant-
ed calls from credit reporting agen-
cies marketing lists. The call is free
and there is no charge for this service.
Call 1 (888) 567-8688 or visit www.
optoutprescreen.com.
BUSINESS AND CHARITY
RELIABILITY REPORTS
To receive a reliability report on a
business or charity before buying or
giving, contact the Better Business
Bureau (BBB).
Call the Santa Barbara BBB at (805)
963-8657 or visit www.bbb.org.
For charities, visit www.give.org
and www.charitynavigator.org.
If you need assistance in reporting a
crime, or if youre interested in having
Vicki Johnson speak to your organi-
zation, contact: Vicki Johnson, Elder
Advocacy and Outreach Program.
Fraud reporting line: 805-568-2442
Vicki Johnson alerts the community
about scams targeting seniors in our area
each week on the Young at Heart Radio
Show, which airs on KTMS 990 at 5:30
pm on Saturday and Sunday. www.youn
gatheartradio.com MJ
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 24 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
wi nter | spr i ng 2011/12
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27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 25 Laziness may appear attractive, but work gives satisfaction. Anne Frank
V
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The Montecito Journal Glossy Edition is mailed to every home in Montecito, Hope Ranch and
Malibu. An additional 4,000 copies are delivered to news racks, high-end hotels, shopping
centers and resorts throughout Southern California: Pacic Palisades, Santa Monica, Beverly Hills,
Brentwood and other desirable enclaves.
For advertising rates call 805.565.1860
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 26 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
FAIRVIEW
225 N. Fai rvi ew - Gol eta
FIESTA 5
916 Stat e St reet - S. B.
CAMINO REAL
CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE
Hollister & Storke - GOLETA
NON-STOP (PG-13)
Fri & Sun & Thu - No Show!
Sat & Mon-Wed:
2:45 5:15 7:45
Arnold Schwarzenegger
SABOTAGE (R)
Fri-Sun - 1:20 4:00 6:40 9:15
Mon-Thu - 2:00 4:50 7:30
Disneys (PG)
MUPPETS MOST WANTED
Fri-Sun - 1:00 3:50 6:10 8:50
Mon-Thu - 1:40 4:20 7:00
DreamWorks Animation (PG)
MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN
2D: Fri-Sun - 1:10 3:40 6:30
Mon-Thu - 2:15 4:40
Liam Neeson
NON-STOP (PG-13)
Fri-Sun- 9:00 Mon-Thu- 7:15
Russell Crowe is
NOAH (PG-13)
12:30 1:45 3:40 5:00
6:50 8:15 9:55
Playing on 2 Screens
CESAR CHAVEZ (PG-13)
Fri-Wed - 1:00 3:30 6:30 9:10
Thu - 1:00 3:30 6:30
DIVERGENT (PG-13)
Fri-Wed -
12:40 2:10 3:50 5:20
7:00 8:30 10:10
Thu - 12:40 2:10 3:50
5:20 7:00 10:10
Playing on 2 Screens
300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE
2D: Fri-Wed - (R)
2:00 4:40 7:10 9:45
Thu - 2:00 4:40
Starts Thursday - April 3:
CAPTAIN AMERICA:
THE WINTER SOLDIER
3D: 8:45 (PG-13)
2D: 8:00 & 9:30
NOAH (PG-13)
Fri-Sun -
12:40 2:15 3:30 4:30
6:30 7:45 9:15
Mon-Thu -
2:15 3:30 4:30 6:35 7:45
Playing on 2 Screens
THE GRAND
BUDAPEST HOTEL (R)
Fri-Sun -
1:00 2:00 3:50 5:20
6:45 8:00 9:40
Mon-Thu -
2:00 3:50 5:20 6:45 8:00
Playing on 2 Screens
PLAZA DE ORO
371 Hi t chcock Way - S. B.
ON MY WAY (NR)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 7:45
Sat/Sun - 2:00 4:50 7:45
TIMS VERMEER (PG-13)
Fri & Mon/Tue & Thu - 7:30
Sat/Sun - 2:20 5:15 7:30
Wed - Does Not Play!
Wednesday - April 2 - 7:30 (NR)
NYMPHOMANIAC: VOL 1
RIVIERA
2044 Alameda Padre Serra - S.B.
BAD WORDS (R)
Fri-Sun - 12:45 3:00 5:15
7:30 9:45
Mon-Thu - 3:00 5:15 7:30
DIVERGENT (PG-13)
Fri-Sun -
12:10 1:30 3:15 4:40
6:20 7:50 9:35
Mon-Wed -
1:30 3:15 4:40 6:20 7:50
Thu - 1:30 3:15 4:40 7:50
Playing on 2 Screens
NEED FOR SPEED (PG-13)
2D: Fri-Sun - 1:00 6:30
Mon-Thu - 4:30
300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE
2D: Fri-Sun - 4:00 9:25 (R)
Mon-Wed - 2:00 7:40
Thu - 2:00
Starts Thursday - April 3:
CAPTAIN AMERICA:
THE WINTER SOLDIER
3D: 8:00 2D: 8:30 (PG-13)
METRO 4
618 Stat e St reet - S. B.
SABOTAGE (R)
Fri-Sun - 12:45 3:30 6:40 9:15
Mon-Thu - 2:40 5:20 8:00
CESAR CHAVEZ (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:40 4:20 7:00 9:30
Mon-Thu - 2:10 5:00 7:40
MUPPETS MOST WANTED (PG)
Fri-Sun - 12:10 2:30 5:20 7:40
Mon-Thu - 2:00 4:40 7:20
MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN
2D: Fri/Sat - (PG)
12:00 2:50 5:10 8:00
Sun - 12:00 2:50 5:10
Mon-Thu - 2:20 4:50 7:30
GODS NOT DEAD (PG)
Fri-Sun - 1:00 3:40 6:20 9:00
Mon-Thu - 2:30 5:10 7:50
Academy Award Winner!
THE GREAT BEAUTY (NR)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 4:30 7:45
Sat/Sun - 1:15 4:30 7:45
PASEO NUEVO
8 W. De La Guerra Pl. - S.B.
Denotes SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT Restrictions
877-789-MOVIE www.metrotheatres.com
ARLINGTON
1317 State Street - 963-4408
SBIFF
and
Metropolitan
Theatres Corp.
present....
PLAZA DE ORO
Wednesdays - 7:30
April 2 - NYMPHOMANIAC: VOL. 1 (NR)
April 9 - NYMPHOMANIAC: VOL. 2 (NR)
April 16 - ERNEST & CELESTINE (PG)
April 23 - ENEMY (R)
Show your SBIFF I.D. for discounted admission price
Courtyard Bar Open
Saturday Only - 5:00 - 8:00
Information Listed for Friday, March 28 thru Thursday, April 3
FAIRVIEW
225 N. Fai rvi ew - Gol eta
FIESTA 5
916 Stat e St reet - S. B.
CAMINO REAL
CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE
Hollister & Storke - GOLETA
NON-STOP (PG-13)
Fri & Sun & Thu - No Show!
Sat & Mon-Wed:
2:45 5:15 7:45
Arnold Schwarzenegger
SABOTAGE (R)
Fri-Sun - 1:20 4:00 6:40 9:15
Mon-Thu - 2:00 4:50 7:30
Disneys (PG)
MUPPETS MOST WANTED
Fri-Sun - 1:00 3:50 6:10 8:50
Mon-Thu - 1:40 4:20 7:00
DreamWorks Animation (PG)
MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN
2D: Fri-Sun - 1:10 3:40 6:30
Mon-Thu - 2:15 4:40
Liam Neeson
NON-STOP (PG-13)
Fri-Sun- 9:00 Mon-Thu- 7:15
Russell Crowe is
NOAH (PG-13)
12:30 1:45 3:40 5:00
6:50 8:15 9:55
Playing on 2 Screens
CESAR CHAVEZ (PG-13)
Fri-Wed - 1:00 3:30 6:30 9:10
Thu - 1:00 3:30 6:30
DIVERGENT (PG-13)
Fri-Wed -
12:40 2:10 3:50 5:20
7:00 8:30 10:10
Thu - 12:40 2:10 3:50
5:20 7:00 10:10
Playing on 2 Screens
300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE
2D: Fri-Wed - (R)
2:00 4:40 7:10 9:45
Thu - 2:00 4:40
Starts Thursday - April 3:
CAPTAIN AMERICA:
THE WINTER SOLDIER
3D: 8:45 (PG-13)
2D: 8:00 & 9:30
NOAH (PG-13)
Fri-Sun -
12:40 2:15 3:30 4:30
6:30 7:45 9:15
Mon-Thu -
2:15 3:30 4:30 6:35 7:45
Playing on 2 Screens
THE GRAND
BUDAPEST HOTEL (R)
Fri-Sun -
1:00 2:00 3:50 5:20
6:45 8:00 9:40
Mon-Thu -
2:00 3:50 5:20 6:45 8:00
Playing on 2 Screens
PLAZA DE ORO
371 Hi t chcock Way - S. B.
ON MY WAY (NR)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 7:45
Sat/Sun - 2:00 4:50 7:45
TIMS VERMEER (PG-13)
Fri & Mon/Tue & Thu - 7:30
Sat/Sun - 2:20 5:15 7:30
Wed - Does Not Play!
Wednesday - April 2 - 7:30 (NR)
NYMPHOMANIAC: VOL 1
RIVIERA
2044 Alameda Padre Serra - S.B.
BAD WORDS (R)
Fri-Sun - 12:45 3:00 5:15
7:30 9:45
Mon-Thu - 3:00 5:15 7:30
DIVERGENT (PG-13)
Fri-Sun -
12:10 1:30 3:15 4:40
6:20 7:50 9:35
Mon-Wed -
1:30 3:15 4:40 6:20 7:50
Thu - 1:30 3:15 4:40 7:50
Playing on 2 Screens
NEED FOR SPEED (PG-13)
2D: Fri-Sun - 1:00 6:30
Mon-Thu - 4:30
300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE
2D: Fri-Sun - 4:00 9:25 (R)
Mon-Wed - 2:00 7:40
Thu - 2:00
Starts Thursday - April 3:
CAPTAIN AMERICA:
THE WINTER SOLDIER
3D: 8:00 2D: 8:30 (PG-13)
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David Myricks Archives
H
e passed away at the age
of 93 nearly two and a half
years ago (on September 24,
2011), but David Myricks devotion
to things Montecito have and will
continue to live well past even the
memory of David. His two seminal
tomes: Montecito And Santa Barbara;
From Farms to Estates (Volume I) and
The Days of the Great Estates (Volume
II) paint detailed and delicious por-
traits of this area as it transformed
itself from an agricultural outback to
the vacation home of Americas most-
ly Midwestern corporate chieftains.
In addition to his vast collection of
Montecito historical items and pho-
tos David collected and neatly filed
every edition of Montecito Journal he
had also compiled an extensive cat-
alog of railroad memorabilia, based
upon his other published works on
Americas railroads, particularly rail-
roads in the West and Southwest.
The entire collection of historical
records and artifacts has been put
together under the auspices of a group
calling itself the Montecito Archives.
And, in order to introduce itself to the
rest of Montecito, the Archives will
be holding its first fundraising event,
scheduled for the Montecito Country
Club (which boasts an excellent view
of Bellosguardo) on Friday, May 9.
Featured will be a talk by Pulitzer
Prize recipient Bill Dedman, author of
Empty Mansions, The Mysterious Life of
Huguette Clark and the Spending of a Great
American Fortune. One of those Empty
Mansions Mr. Dedman has written
about is, of course, Bellosguardo, the
grand oceanfront estate just west of
Santa Barbara Cemetery that sat empty
and virtually unused for more than 50
years. David Myricks archives were
extensively mined by Mr. Dedman
for details about the Clark estate. The
Andre Clark Bird Refuge was donat-
ed to the City of Santa Barbara and
named after Huguettes sister, who
died at a young age.
Barbara Doran, who currently works
at Kathryne Designs on Coast Village
Road and who grew up on the estate
(her father was the groundskeeper),
will recount some of the events of her
life there. Harpist Jeanne Martin will
be on hand to play songs from 1920
through the 1940s, music that Huguette
Clark was likely to have enjoyed when
she was living in Bellosguardo.
Every ticket holder will be entered
into a raffle and the winner will become
owner of an original oil painting of
Bellosguardo, done by Kim Snyder and
Dorene White. David Myricks books,
Volume I and II, will also be for sale.
A General Admission ticket will cost
$35 for the talk; there will be a limited
number of $100 VIP tickets that will
include a reception and photo oppor-
tunity with Mr. Dedman, along with
a hardbound copy of Empty Mansions
signed by the author. Admission to
the event is limited to 200, so its
advisable to book it early. The VIP
reception is scheduled for 4 pm and
the lecture is to begin at 5 pm. For
reservations and more information,
please call Dana Newquist at 637-8641
or online: sbdana@aol.com.
Event sponsors include: Montecito
Journal, Montecito Country Club,
Rusack Vineyards, Segway of
Santa Barbara, Firestone Vineyards,
Kathryne Designs, and Porch.
A Scoops Scoop
Heres The Scoop gelato and sorbet
shop owner Ellie Patterson has just
confirmed that Santa Barbara Youth
Ensemble Theatre (SBYET) founder
Janet Adderley and her young sing-
ers will perform during Heres the
Scoops 10th Anniversary celebration,
scheduled for Saturday, April 12. They
will perform, beginning at 2:30 pm,
on the patio at 1187 Coast Village
Road and will sing songs from the
musical play Les Misrables, SBYETs
upcoming production to be held at the
Lobero one weekend only on May 31
and again on June 1.
Immediately following Janet
Adderleys Les Misrables performers
on April 12, sleight-of-hand magical
wizard Doug Hoover, beginning at 4
pm, will amuse and amaze you and
your family. Doug is sure to keep all
entranced, promises Ms Patterson,
who adds, Ive seen him perform and
he is terrific. MJ
Pulitzer Prize winner and Empty Mansions author
Bill Dedman returns to the Santa Barbara area to
deliver a talk at Montecito Country Club; his sub-
ject is a Tour of Bellosguardo, the Clark Estate
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 27 The pay is good, and I can walk to work. John F. Kennedy
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Brackish water desalination takes less energy than seawater desalination
because of lower salinity. A slanted roof, covered in solar panels, provides for
low-cost energy harvesting. Brine from the desal plant is used to enhance wet-
lands.
A $50-million Advanced Water Purification Facility uses desalination of tradi-
tionally treated wastewater to produce landscaping irrigation, industrial water
and agricultural irrigation water. The cost of the wastewater treatment and its
$13-million delivery pipeline system is $1,680 per AF, dropping to $1,191 per AF
when more capacity is added.
City of Morro Bay Desalination
Morro Bay is a coastal community on Highway 1 above San Luis Obispo. The
town has 10,234 residents, similar in size to Montecito. The Morro Bay desali-
nation plant first opened in 1995. It included both desalination from offshore
seawater wells near the Embarcadero and brackish groundwater desalination
from the citys Morro Basin wells. The plant was first permitted as a tempo-
rary emergency facility back in 1992. It was used for a short time before being
mothballed when rains returned, similar to the desalination experience in Santa
Barbara.
In 2009, the desal plant was reopened at a cost of roughly $3 million, partially
funded with a $600,000 grant from Prop 84 for the California Department of
Public Health as a supplemental supply of potable drinking water during peri-
ods when state water was cut back or shut off. The total cost for the production
of desalinated seawater in Morro Bay was $1,400 per AF in 2009, while the cost
of desalinated brackish groundwater was $900 per AF.
Because desalination capacity was substantially increased at the time of
reactivation, the Coastal Commission now questions the legality of the original
Morro Bay permits without a new environmental impact report (EIR).
Carmel Area Wastewater District

The City of Carmels $35-million desalination plant converts wastewater rath-
er than seawater to deliver Title 22 irrigation water to seven Pebble Beach golf
links. This saves some 800 AF of drinking water per year previously used for
irrigation before 2009, when reclaimed wastewater was dumped into the ocean.
Monterey Project
Faced with a State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) reduction in
the pumping of water from the Carmel River, the Monterey Peninsula seeks
a multi-source solution to its water woes: desalination, aquifer storage, and
recovery and groundwater replenishment with built-in redundancy.
The Monterey Peninsula Water Supply Project desalination plant, with its
slant-intake wells, will be sized at 10,750 AF per year (9.6 million gallons per
day) and is expected to be completed in the 3rd quarter of 2018. A new advanced
wastewater treatment plant will also be constructed as part of the water mix.
Privately owned California American Water has selected CDM Contractors, a
subsidiary of CDM Smith, which has experience with 35 international desalina-
tion projects, including seven in California, to design and build the $320 million
Monterey Peninsula water-supply project, including the $86 million desal plant.
Bay Area Plant
A desal plant near Concord, in the East Bay area of San Francisco, will serve
every major water agency in the Bay area. It is tentatively targeted to open in
2020 to produce 22,500 AF (20 million gallons per day) of potable water. The
plant will sit in Millard Slough outside Bay Point and draw delta water flowing
into Suisun Bay. So far, a consortium of water agencies has spent $2.5 million in
mostly state grant money on the development of the desal plant plan.
Carlsbad Project
A desalination plant in Carlsbad, 35 miles north of San Diego, is being built
to supply San Diego County with some 56,000 AF of water per year (50 million
gallons per day). When fully operational in 2016, it will become the largest sea-
water desalination plant in the Western Hemisphere.
Poseidon Resources Corporation, a privately held company based in Stamford,
Connecticut, began talks with water agencies in San Diego County in 1998. The
$954 million cost is being financed with $781 million in tax-exempt construction
bonds, with the balance coming from private investors who anticipate a return
of 12-13%. The project is creating 2,300 jobs during construction by Kiewit
Infrastructure West and J. F. Shea Construction, and will support 575 jobs in
ongoing operations, according to the Carlsbad operator, IDE Technologies,
which has designed, built, and currently operates some of the worlds largest
desalination and water treatment facilities.
San Diego County water agencies negotiated 30-year water purchase
DROUGHT Page 314
DROUGHT (Continued from page 5)
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 28 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 29 Without work, all life goes rotten. But when work is soulless, life stifles and dies. Albert Camus
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 30 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
KEEPING
HOPE ALIVE
37th Annual Good Friday Breakfast
Dr. Gayle Beebe, Keynote Speaker
April 18, 7:00 - 8:45 am
Fess Parkers DoubleTree Resort
Enjoy an inspirational morning of praise, music and
community fellowship with Dr. Gayle Beebe, president of
Westmont College.
Sponsor a table or reserve seats at ciymca.org or call,
687.7720, ext 257. Advance purchase required.
CHANNEL ISLANDS YMCA
Strengthening Santa Barbara and Ventura counties
MISCELLANY (Continued from page 22)
Londons Academy of St. Martin In The
Fields packed the Granada for CAMAs
latest International Series performance.
It was the 46-year-old musicians
second time in our tony town as leader
of the world famous chamber troupe,
founded in 1958 and led for more than
50 years by Sir Neville Mariner.
Bell, on his 1713 Stradivarius, kicked
off the magnificent show with Bachs
popular Violin Concerto No. 2 in
E Major followed by Beethovens
Symphony No. 1 in C Major, a rare-
ly heard piece.
Camille Saint-Saens Introduction
and Rondo Capriccioso and Schuberts
String Quartet in D minor Death
and the Maiden, orchestrated by
Gustav Mahler, completed the show.
It was an evening of major note, with
Bell, as usual, commanding the stage...
Heres to Heiichiro
Over at the Music Academy of the
Wests Hahn Hall, it was time for
Heiichiro Ohyama, who is celebrating
his 30th anniversary as conductor of
the 35-year-old Santa Barbara Chamber
Orchestra, to be in the spotlight.
The performance began with
Richard Strauss Serenade in E-flat
Major and Dvoraks Serenade in D
minor, wrapping with the world pre-
miere of Austrian composer Gernot
Wolfgangs work, written specially
for Heiichiros anniversary.
The 56-year-old Los Angeles resi-
dent, husband of principal bassoonist
Judith Farmer, obviously impressed
the maestro, 66, who played the
jaunty fourth movement again as an
encore.
It was good to see him smiling so
much after three decades at the helm...
Wild for West Side Story
The iconic 1957 West Side Story, cho-
reographed by Jerome Robbins with
music by Leonard Bernstein and lyrics
by Stephen Sondheim, continues to
be high entertainment more than half
a century later.
The show, which originally won
six Tonys and then hit a home run
when it was made into a 1961 film
with Natalie Wood, Rita Moreno and
George Chakiris, garnering 10 Oscars
out of 11 nominations, including
Best Picture, was part of the Theater
Leagues eclectic series at the Granada.
MaryJoanna Grisso as Maria and
Jarrad Biron Green as Tony, on his
first national tour, hit their marks per-
fectly. Music director J. Michael Duff
was the ideal accompaniment to the
famous score.
No wonder both shows were sold
out!...
Celebrating Charities
Montecito Bank & Trusts head-
quarters on State Street was a sea of
blue T-shirts emblazoned with red
hearts when it celebrated the 39th
anniversary of handing out annual
grants awards, honoring ten non-
profit organizations chosen by bank
employees.
Some $15,000 was handed out
by founder and chairman, Michael
Towbes, to a variety of local char-
ities, including the Breast Cancer
Resource Center, Santa Barbara Rape
Crisis Center, the Westminster Free
Clinic, and the Cottage Rehabilitation
Hospital Foundation.
We celebrate the heart and soul of
the community, with our 208 associ-
ates nominating the charities, many
of which I didnt know about, says
Michael. They are the driving force
behind our mission to make our com-
munities better places to live and
work.
Among those at the handout were
Craig Zimmerman, Henry Dubroff,
bank president Janet Garufis busy
training for her forthcoming Paris
marathon next month Silvana Kelly,
Elsa Granados, and Anne and Carrie
Towbes...
St. Paddys Party
Steve and Maggie Wordell got a
head start when they hosted their
annual St. Patricks Day bash at their
Montecito aerie 24 hours early.
Although boiled beef and cabbage
and Guinness were distinctly lacking,
the green-clad guests quaffed cham-
pagne and wine, while digging into
the canaps contributed to the heav-
ing buffet.
They included Leslie Ridley-Tree,
Cheri La Rocque, Jessica Cashman,
Harold Marcuse, David and Rita
Holden, Hiroko Benko, Larry Larson,
Gary Van Deventer, Sue Adams, Joyce
Enright, John and Carol Nelson, and
Bob Kolarczyk...
Sightings: Oscar winner Kevin
Costner dining with friends at the
Coral Casino... Charlie Sheen and
his girlfriend noshing at Roy... Ellen
DeGeneres and Portia De Rossi at
Jenni Kayne in West Hollywood
Pip! Pip!
Readers with tips, sightings and
amusing items for Richards column
should e-mail him at richardmin
eards@verizon.net or send invita-
tions or other correspondence to the
Journal MJ
Violinist
Joshua Bell
excels with
Academy of St.
Martin in The
Fields
Santa Barbara
Chamber
Orchestra con-
ductor Heiichiro
Ohyama cele-
brates his 30th
anniversary in
lively style
Leonard
Bernstein still
shines bright
with West Side
Story
Recipients of anniversary
grant are Herb Tews, CRHF
vice president; with Tyson
Blades, SBMBT, Lailan
McGrath, CHRF board;
Janet Garufis, MB&T
President & CEO; Michael
Towbes, MB&T owner and
founder; recipients Melinda
Staveley and Paul Graziano
of Cottage Rehabilitation
Hospital Foundation (photo
by Priscilla)
John and Carol
Nelson, hosts,
Maggie and Steve
Wordell; Cheri La
Rocque, Erin Graffy
de Garcia, Tom
Mielko, Jim de
Garcia (photo by
Priscilla)
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 31 Work is a necessity for man. Man invented the alarm clock. Pablo Picasso
Diana Paradise
PO Box 30040, Santa Barbara, CA 93130
Email: DianaParadise_@hotmail.com
Portfolio Pages: www.DianaParadise.com
Prices start at $3200 for a 24x36 oil portrait of one person.
arrangements to buy 48,000 AF a year, or some 7% of their potable water
needs, at an expensive price of $2,000 per AF, as a backup supply and insur-
ance against drought. Poseidon bears the burden of financing, construction
and operating the plant; the Water Authority does not pay for any water not
delivered, a distinct advantage over the open-ended capital cost exposure
from cost overruns on the coastal branch of the State Water Project, and its
budget-breaking companion, Governor Jerry Browns proposed Twin Tunnel
Project.
Huntington Beach Desalination
The Huntington Beach Desalination Project is a $900-million privately owned
56,000 AF ( 50 million gallon per day) Poseidon facility located in Orange
County adjacent to the AES Huntington Beach Power Station. Seawater will be
converted into fresh water to sell to water districts to supplement or replace
groundwater. In 2009, Poseidon signed non-binding agreements with more
than a dozen Orange County water districts to buy desalinated water at a cost
of $1,500 per AF, plus another $90 to $140 per AF for conveyance and delivery,
according to the Surfrider Foundation.
In November 2013, the California Coastal Commission, despite plant approv-
al from the Huntington Beach City Council, rejected Poseidons bid to obtain
Coastal Commission permits on the project based on environmental concerns
regarding the intake system design. Poseidon withdrew its request and has
gone back to the drawing board to reassess lengthening its 15-year permit pro-
cess to address its intake and discharge systems.
A Call to Action
The Montecito Water District faces a shortage of both drinking water
and landscaping irrigation water. Its board has become a champion for
an expedited reactivation of the already permitted City of Santa Barbara
desalination plant, which the city sees as unnecessary at this time. The city
desal plant was built in 1992 in nine months; now the city intends to take
two years for a pre-construction engineering analysis to supplement the one
completed in 2009.
The citys no urgency strategy is risky and reckless. Whats needed is to
fast-track the re-opening of the Santa Barbara desal facility. Simultaneously,
the city needs to include Montecito in its efforts to jointly fund and obtain
state and federal grants to upgrade its recycled wastewater system, while
adding reclamation water for landscaping irrigation to Montecitos mix of
options.
Mayor Helene Schneider, Lois Capps, Hannah-Beth Jackson, Das Williams,
Salud Carbajal, Janet Wolf, and Doreen Farr: We urge you, as our elected offi-
cials, to demand that our water districts abandon their local parochialism and
work together to do what others have already done: forge alliances for regional
cooperation and enlist federal, state, and county funding support for an inno-
vative regional solution to our collective water woes.
To do less is simply myopic madness! MJ
DROUGHT (Continued from page 27)
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ELMOs Kids Partner with Seniors
I
am always happy to report on the
El Montecito Early School (ELMO)
kids outreach project, started
by former preschool teacher Meika
McCrindle in 2012 (Meika is now
working in the office with ELMO
school director Suzy Dobreski since
having her baby Elle in 2013). This
year finds the kids partnered with
seniors around town. I was invited to
the Grandparents Day Concert and
Tea on March 7 at the school and had
a chance to talk with Suzy about the
program.
Q: What is this years community out-
reach program about?
A: Each spring, El Montecito Early
School integrates compassion curric-
ulum into the lives of our preschool
children for an enriching, relevant
learning experience that allows for
awareness in the world around us.
In years past, children have learned
about and served Transition House,
Storyteller Childrens Center,
Treasures of Africa Orphanage, and
Rancho Sordo Mudo, a school for deaf
children in Baja. The Seniors in Our
Community outreach is in full swing.
What a considerable service project,
weaving classroom projects that are
shared with seniors in different cen-
ters, hosting seniors in the school, and
preparing for the Grandparents Day
Concert and Tea. The theme is God
Has a Plan for Your Life at Any Age.

Why seniors?
Senior friends and grandparents
are a vital part of our community, as
they allow us to be in touch with our
history, give us much to learn from
through the sharing of their wisdom
and ideas, as well as giving children
an opportunity for inter-generational
relationships. At the culmination of
our outreach, we will have had some
amazing grandparents of Early School
children join us in the classrooms, as
well as citizens of SB and church con-
gregation members.
What have the kids done with the
seniors in the program?
The children made over 250
Valentines and delivered them to the
Friendship Center, Garden Court and
Casa Dorinda as well as church con-
gregation members. We are working
on an art collaboration with Garden
Court downtown. Guest artist Shawn
Monroe will be heading up the chil-
drens art portion at our school.
Resident artists at Garden Court will
be making a large 6-foot by 6-foot tree
in which birds that our children are
making will perch.
And the grandparents tea?
The children have been practic-
ing songs from another era in order
to get ready for this Grandparents
Day Concert and Tea. We have been
fortunate to work with the talented
Mike Eglin has our accompanist. The
children have been involved with the
planning of this special day. They
have decorated, made artwork, and
will be forming a large receiving line
from the parking lot to the sanctuary
to greet guests. The oldest children
will be greeting, ushering, and seat-
ing. The focus is on serving and hon-
oring. After the concert, guests will be
invited into Parish Hall, where they
will be seated at tables and served
tea sandwiches, fruit, and treats by
the children. Jim George is an Early
School grandparent, and he will be
playing special music for us as well.
What projects did the seniors help with
at the school?
Throughout the month of February,
we have hosted senior guests in our
classrooms. We hosted a ballroom
dancer, retired pilot, kindergarten
teacher, musician, war veteran, and
more.
Michelle
Eskandari with
son Enzo, serv-
ing his grand-
parents Mina
and Aladdin
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It all sounds so wonderful. How has it
been working out?
This aspect of the outreach has
gone tremendously well. So much
so, that I am implementing a new
program in the school, which is to
regularly invite senior guests to share
their gifts and enhance our program.
We have more guests lined up for
next week. Additionally exciting is
the partnership with a talented gar-
dener from Garden Court downtown.
Jimmy Jojo will begin working in our
childrens organic garden.
How about the longtime teachers at
ELMO?
Great question! We highlighted
three Early School teachers, Jenny
Slorah, Jackie Gonzalez, and Linda
James. These ladies are seniors in
our community and have affected the
lives of many during their years of
teaching. They truly are master teach-
ers. They are loyal, dedicated, and
women of high regard.
What is the key here for you as school
director?
Personally, Joanne I have grown
tremendously during this outreach.
It has been exciting to watch the chil-
dren, teachers, and families embrace
the gift of older age. I see the need
to educate children in that seniors
can make a vital contribution to soci-
ety. They are anchors in our society
upholding our history. They have a
special story to tell of Gods plan for
their life. It is inspiring. MJ
Longtime El
Montecito
Early School
teachers Jenny
Slorah, Jackie
Gonzalez, and
Linda James
are honored by
school director
Suzy Dobreski
Early School students perform in the church for the Grandparents Day Concert
Early School
parent Ed Song
helps his son
Elijah and kids
put on aprons
to serve seniors
Waterhouse Gallery
La Arcada,
Figueroa & State Street, Santa Barbara 805-962-8885
www.waterhousegallery.com
Colin Campbell Cooper
The Cathedral at Les Martique
36 x 29 Oil Signed lower left circa 1914
29
CELEBRATING YEARS OF FINE ART
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 34 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
E XPERTI S E
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New Digs at New Vic
On Entertainment
by Steven Libowitz
ENTERTAINMENT Page 394
Steven Libowitz has
reported on the arts
and entertainment for
more than 30 years; he
has contributed to the
Montecito Journal for
more than ten years.
T
he Ensemble Theatre Company
(ETC) waited a long time for
its new home at the New Vic
just a block off State Street, and the
company has wasted no time in taking
advantage of the new opportunities
afforded by the bigger venue remod-
eled to fit Ensembles needs in its
inaugural.
Following an expansive production
of Sondheims A Little Night Music
and the multiple quick set changes
of Good People, ETC takes on its big-
gest logistical challenge to date with
Metamorphoses, Mary Zimmermans
adaptation of the classic myths of
Ovid. The work synthesizes ancient
stories of Orpheus and Eurydice,
Narcissus, and others with a contem-
porary approach to create an unusual
theatrical experience that has been
widely praised, including receiving
several Tony Awards and a nomina-
tion for best play.
Nine cast members including
Brian Patrick Monahan, last seen just
last year as Raskolnikov in ETCs
Crime and Punishment, and Santa
Barbara actress E. Bonnie Lewis, the
Ensemble Theatre Company and Metamorphoses
are ready for the New Vic
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 35
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Scott Craig is manager of media relations at
Westmont College
Your Westmont
Howell Examines the Success of Algorithms
by Scott Craig (photos by Brad Elliott)
R
ussell Howell, Kathleen Smith
professor of mathematics at
Westmont, explores the power
and success of the mathematical algo-
rithm in a free, public lecture Thursday,
April 3, at 5:30 pm at University Club,
1332 Santa Barbara Street. No tickets are
required; the limited seating is available
on a first-come, first-served basis. For
more information, please call (805) 565-
6051. The talk, From Main Street to
Wall Street: The Amazing Effectiveness
of Mathematical Algorithms, is part of
Westmont Downtown: Conversations
about Things that Matter, which is spon-
sored by the Westmont Foundation.
Sergey Brin and Larry Page,
co-founders of Google and each with
a new worth of more than $30 billion,
created an algorithm to determine page
ranks on a search engine, changing the
Web and how we use it. But thats
just the tip of the proverbial iceberg,
Howell says. In fact, mathematical
theories are used today in applications
that defy belief.
Howell, who has taught mathemat-
ics at Westmont for 36 years, will gear
his talk for a non-mathematical audi-
ence. He will show how many ideas in
mathematics have produced practical,
and often invisible, effects on our day-
to-day activities, such as using credit
cards in a secure way or booking air-
line reservations. He will also examine
why mathematical theories, which are
generated primarily out of aesthetic
criteria, are so successful in their appli-
cability to the physical world.
He co-edited and contributed to a
book, Mathematics Through the Eyes of
Faith, which examines the connections
between math and faith. He also co-au-
thored the popular textbook Complex
Analysis for Mathematics and Engineering,
which is in its sixth edition.
Actor to Join Fruitvale
Screening
Actor and former professional football
player Trestin George joins a discus-
sion following the screening of Fruitvale
Station on Thursday, April 3, at 7:30
pm in Westmonts Page Multipurpose
Room. The Reel Talk event, sponsored
by the Gaede Institute for the Liberal
Arts and the Office of Campus Life at
Westmont, is free and open to the public.
George stars as Brandon in Fruitvale
Station, a drama centered on the tragic
death of 22-year-old Oscar Grant, who
was gunned down by BART officers on
New Years Day 2009. He will joined
by Brad Berky, director of Westmont in
San Francisco (WSF), who says Georges
visit to WSF last semester included sev-
eral poignant stories about making the
film and the similarities between his life
and that of the main character.
Fruitvale Station won both the Grand
Jury Prize for dramatic feature and
the Audience Award for U.S. dramat-
ic movie at the 2013 Sundance Film
Festival. In February, the Santa Barbara
International Film Festival honored the
films main actor, Michael B. Jordan,
with the Virtuoso Award.
National Praise
for Pirates
Westmonts production of The Pirates
of Penzance won three national awards
from the Kennedy Center American
College Theater Festival (KCACTF).
The John F. Kennedy Center for the
Performing Arts recognized outstand-
ing work from eight regional festivals
held January 7-March 1 across the
United States.
Pirates earned Distinguished
Production of a Musical, Distinguished
Scenography for a Musical for Danila
Korogodsky, and Distinguished
Director of a Musical for John
Blondell, Westmont theater arts pro-
fessor.
Blondell has been invited to
receive his award and participate
in the 46th annual Kennedy Center
American College Theater Festival in
Washington, D.C., April 14-19.
The experience of making the show
was unparalleled, and I am so pleased
that the work of these fabulous young
artists has met with such general
acclaim, he says. This is great news
for our students, our departments and
the college, and I am completely tickled
at this surprising turn of events. MJ
Dr. Russell
Howell explores
algorithms
April 3
Dr. John
Blondell won
KCACTFs
Distinguished
Director of a
Musical
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 36 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
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Cowgirl Poet Rides Herd at Hollister Ranch
Photos and story by Lynn P. Kirst
TRAIL TALK
A museum and
travel profession-
al, community
volunteer, and
lifelong equestri-
enne, Lynn Kirst is
a fourth-generation Californian who grew
up in Montecito; she can often be found
riding or hiking the local trails
W
ith a long braid hanging
down her back and stam-
pede strap snugly tightened
around her chin to keep her hat from
blowing off in the ocean breeze, Sue
Benech Field is clearly the real deal
when it comes to being a working
cowgirl. She can herd cattle, rope and
ride as well as any cowboy, but she
can also scuba dive and tell you as
much about marine mammals as she
can a bawling heifer. Thats because
half of her life is spent in the ocean
as a marine biologist, while the other
half is riding for the brand of the
Hollister Ranch adjacent to the ocean.
In addition to all that, Sue is a nat-
ural-born storyteller who enjoys writ-
ing down the never-ending incidents
of interest that occur on a working
cattle ranch. Then she renders her
anecdotal notes into poems, sever-
al of which were published in her
first book called Gon Coastal. The
title was inspired by a poem with
the same name, which chronicles the
unique experience of herding cattle on
the beach of Hollister Ranch, flanked
by waves and marine wildlife such
as dolphins and whales something
most land-locked cowboys could
never imagine.
Sues book is dedicated to her late
husband, A.J. Field, with love beyond
all measure. A.J. died in January of
2009 from cancer, after having lived a
fascinating life of his own.
I really rushed to get the book
done for him before he died, said
Sue. A.J.s father was an engineer
but he loved ranching, so A.J. grew
up on the 10,000-acre Rancho Pecho,
which adjoined the land where Diablo
Canyon nuclear power plant was
eventually built.
About one quarter of Sues marine
biology work is done for Pacific Gas
& Electric Company, which owns
the Diablo Canyon plant. Since 1973,
PG&E has hired her to monitor marine
mammals such as sea otters and harbor
seals. Sues longevity provides her with
a historical perspective and knowledge
of the coastal region around the con-
troversial power plant that provides
seven percent of Californias annual
electric needs, or enough electricity for
some 2.2 million customers. Her job is
varied, and includes following sea otter
and harbor seal populations, tracking
what they are feeding on, and assess-
ing the effects of public hiking trails on
pupping beaches.
I met A.J. at Rancho Pecho when I
was out there doing sea otter work,
related Sue. He was never a rancher
per se, but he knew how to ride and
rope. He was a civil engineer, a for-
ward thinker, and quite the pioneer
for scientific offshore drilling.
A.J. Field served as president of
Global Marine, Inc., which among
many historic endeavors built the
402-foot-long Glomar Challenger for
In the cover photograph of her book, Sue Benech
Field rides point on a herd of cattle headed down
a beach at Hollister Ranch (photo by Shannon
McCarty)
Field, who is a marine biologist as well as a
cowgirl, enjoys a dip in the ocean with her mare
named Dulce (photo by Kathi Carlson)
As Sue Benech Field rides for the brand of the
Hollister Ranch beef cooperative, she always
keeps an eye out for stray cows as she guides
her buckskin named Ranger over the hillsides
(Mehosh Photography)
Demonstrating that she can rope and ride as well
as any cowboy, Field has become integral to the
success of the Hollister Ranch beef cooperative
(Mehosh Photography)
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 37
SHEN YUN PRESENTS:
UCSB ARTS & LECTURES PRESENTS:
STATE STREET BALLET PRESENTS:
UCSB ARTS & LECTURES PRESENTS:
CELEBRATE FREEDOM PRESENTS:
THE SANTA BARBARA CENTER
FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS PRESENTS:
SHEN YUN
2014
GARRISON
KEILLOR
CARMEN
LES BALLETS
TROCKADERO
CELEBRATE
FREEDOM
EVENT ACT I
SAT
MAR 29
7:30PM
SUN
MAR 30
2PM & 7PM
WED
APR 2
8PM
SAT
APR 5
7:30PM
TUE
APR 8
8PM
SUN
APR 6
3PM
L
IM
IT
E
D
A
V
A
IL
A
B
IL
IT
Y
(stars from the original
Broadway cast of
Jersey Boys)
SPONSORED BY MONTECITO BANK & TRUST
THE
MIDTOWN
MEN
WED
APR 9
8PM
CELEBRATING OUR 90
TH
ANNIVERSARY
3.27.14.MJ.indd 1 3/19/14 11:33 AM
its Deep Sea Drilling Program. This
15-year-long research project contrib-
uted greatly to marine geology and
oceanography studies, drilling for
core samples while mapping the Mid-
Atlantic Ridge between Africa and
South America.
The work done on the Glomar
Challenger helped prove the existence
of plate tectonics as we know them
today, said Sue.
I started riding at Hollister Ranch
because we bought a place here, she
continued. I met John McCarty, who
was running the beef cattle operation,
and he really showed me how to be a
cowgirl. There were many really mem-
orable moments, so when A.J. was
going through his cancer treatments
at Sansum Clinic, I would sit there and
write all this stuff down. The poems
condense those experiences down into
something that not only conveys the
moment, but the moral of the story.
They relate things having to do not
just with the day-to-day operations of
the ranch, but also what we can learn
from the experiences.
Sues best friend, Kathi Carlson,
encouraged her to collect her poems
into a book. Kathis professional back-
ground as a graphic artist, including
working for Patagonia on their cata-
logues, enabled her to design a beauti-
ful book incorporating photographs of
their cattle work on Hollister Ranch.
Kathi now rides for the HR brand
as well, and she and Sue have also
embarked on their own small cow-calf
operation called Te Amo in the Santa
Ynez Valley. Both Sue and Kathi are
also members of The Fillies, an invita-
tional womens trail riding group.
In the years since Sue published
Gon Coastal, she has continued to
write down her ranching experienc-
es while coming to terms with the
loss of A.J. Field, her husband of 20
years. Those stories may also get ren-
dered into poems, but for now Sue
is embarking on the next phase of her
life at Hollister Ranch. That includes
her upcoming marriage to the new
gentleman in her life, getting her
bovine herd through the drought, and
welcoming a new foal from one of her
favorite mares, Dulce.
Its a poetic name, which in Spanish
means sweet. Just like the interest-
ing life of Sue Benech Field.
Mark Your Calendar
Sunday, April 6
Wildling Museum Trail Ride
Hollister Ranch
The Wildling Museum in Solvang
will host its fourth annual benefit trail
ride at the 14,000-acre Hollister Ranch,
providing a rare chance for the pub-
lic to ride the hills and beach of this
private property. No dogs, stallions,
hikers, or bikers will be allowed at this
strictly equestrian event. Limited to 30
riders; ride out at 10 am. Price of $150
per person includes gourmet lunch.
Riders must provide their own horse.
Reservations close April 1. Purchase
tickets by phone at 686-8315, or online
at www.wildlingmuseum.org.
GoN Coastal
Check with your local bookstore for
availability, or send a check (made out
to Sue Benech Field) for $30 (which also
covers shipping and handling) to 65
Hollister Ranch, Gaviota, CA 93117. MJ
Gon Coastal
by Sue Benech Field
No question what us cowboys love, thatd be wide open spaces,
which can be found all cross th globe, an other far away places.
But where I hang my hat is best, though Im not one t boast;
not high plains or Sierra but th California coast.
Where sea foam kisses high bluff tops, steep mountains wet their feet,
driven stock down a sandy beach, th lifestyle cant be beat.
Seals an dolphins flank th herd, dang near within hands reach,
an as we drift th cow/calf pairs, a whale might even breech!
Mornin fog keeps grass green longer, th weathers always mild.
Tho monster crashn winter waves, drives folks here a bit wild.
Staren down endless horizons, seen sunsets flash ogreen,
smelln salt air mixed with seaweed, sure no finer way oben.
Ya could say that Ive gone coastal an it fits me t a tee,
riden herd on mellow livestock, where grasslands meet th sea.
Land-locked cowboys have their vistas, o Mother Natures art,
but none can be as lucky as their coastal counterpart.
Kathi Carlson riding Lady (left) and Sue Benech
Field on Dulce, heading home after a hard day of
work (photo by Kit Boise-Cossart)
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 38 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 12)
Compiled by Kelly Mahan from information supplied by Santa Barbara County
Sheriffs Department
SHERIFFS
BLOTTER
Vehicle Break-in on Hot Springs
Wednesday, 26 February, 1:30 pm Deputy Spears responded to Hot Springs
Road on the report of a theft from a vehicle. The victim stated she had parked
her vehicle on Hot Springs Road at 6:30 that morning. When she returned, she
found the right rear-passenger window was broken. Her purse, which con-
tained credit cards and identification cards, was missing. She called her bank
to cancel her credit cards; they had already been used at several retail stores. A
report was taken.
Quarters Stolen in Summerland
Sunday, 9 March, 7:50 pm Deputy DeOrnellas responded to an apartment
complex on Ortega Hill Road in Summerland. One of the tenants reported that
she had used the communal laundry room earlier in the evening. When she
returned to collect her clothes, she noticed the dryer had been tampered with.
The coin receptacle on the dryer had been stolen. The deputy noticed someone
had pried the coin receptacle off of the machine. Pictures of the crime scene
were taken and a set of fingerprints were lifted off the dryer and submitted to
forensics. A report was taken.
Hiker Killed on Cold Springs Trail
Monday, 17 March, 10:30 am A couple hiking on the lower Cold Springs
Trail called 911 to report seeing a body about 10 to 15 feet off the trail. Sheriffs
deputies and Santa Barbara County Sheriffs Search and Rescue team members
found the decedent. Due to the location of the body, it took Sheriffs Search and
Rescue volunteers several hours to transport the decedent out of the area.
Later in the day, just before 4 pm, several hikers in the upper Cold Springs
Trail area discovered a female hiker and called 911. Sheriffs Search and Rescue
Team members, along with personnel from the Montecito Fire Protection
District, made contact with the victim. She was airlifted to a local hospital by
Santa Barbara County Air Support Unit Copter 3.
The Santa Barbara County Sheriffs Office is investigating the circum-
stances surrounding the death and the rescue of the surviving hiker. Both
incidents are still under investigation, but it appears the young couple, both
in their 20s, went on a hike around 4 pm on March 16, and about 45 minutes
later they fell. The female suffered two broken ankles and a broken wrist.
The male hiker suffered a serious injury to his arm. After a period of time,
the male hiker went to get help and was fatally injured when he fell again
about 20 to 30 feet down a rocky ledge. MJ
Planning Commission approved plans
for a Jack Nicklaus Signature Course
redesign of the clubs golf course.
The $40 million renovation calls for a
significant re-grading of the existing
course, as well as new USGA greens
and tees, rebuilt sand bunkers, natu-
ral landscaping, a net increase of 60
mature trees, a new first tee, and new
locations for hole number 1 and hole
3; the plan will increase the yardage
of the course from 6,200 yards from
the back tees to more than 6,500 yards.
Coinciding with the course remod-
el, a new golf cart building will be
constructed, as well as two new golf
course comfort stations. The pool
will be relocated, and a new lap
pool, whirlpool spa, and childrens
splash pool will also be added. Other
upgrades include improvements to
the exterior and perimeter of the exist-
ing clubhouse, demolition of the exist-
ing maintenance buildings, tennis pro
shop and flammable materials build-
ing, and construction of a new main-
tenance building, new golf pro shop,
new tennis pro shop, and new tennis
courts, according to the approved city
plans. Improvements to the clubhouse
include new locker rooms and loung-
es, new fitness, yoga, and stretch-
ing rooms, and an improved dining
venue.
The original plan was to begin con-
struction on the property in early 2010,
but delays occurred because a separate
application for interior improvements
to the club took longer than expected.
The project does not propose any sub-
stantial changes to existing operations
or Conditional Use Permit limitations
of the MCC, according to the staff
report. Membership is limited to 680
members, and the clubs hours (7 am
to 9:30 pm, everyday), will remain the
same.
The project hit a few snags in 2009
when potentially significant environ-
mental issues, including tree removal
and wetland impacts, were found.
City planners mitigated those impacts
by explaining that the wetlands, as
well as two trees slated to be removed,
were in a degraded condition. The
plan includes habitat restoration, as
well as new-and-improved drainage
and irrigation. Project managers have
said that water usage will be reduced
by 20% with the new irrigation sys-
tem, which will use reclaimed water
on 95% of the property. In addition,
100% of the stormwater runoff that
reaches the site will be treated before
leaving the site through sediment
basis, bioswales, and restored natural
drainages.
Barring further delays at the city
level, it is estimated construction
will begin on the golf course in late
summer, with the clubhouse work to
start in November. During the clo-
sure, which is expected to begin after
Labor Day (September 1), members
will have the opportunity to utilize
other local facilities for golf, fitness,
and activities.
Montecito Country Club is located
at 920 Summit Road in Montecito.
In Business: Nest
Integrative Medicine
Dr. Kristi Wrightson, a board-cer-
tified, licensed naturopathic doctor
and registered dietitian, opened Nest
Integrative Medical Spa on Chapala
Street in Santa Barbara in September
2012. Since then, the doctor and her
team have been providing innovative
and comprehensive medical care to
patients from all over the Central
Coast.
Last week, Dr. Wrightson gave us
a tour of the medical facility, located
on the bottom floor of El Andaluz,
the Moroccan-influenced, mixed-use
building designed by architect Jeff
Shelton. I knew this was the perfect
place for what I wanted to accomplish
in my practice, Wrightson said. The
facility houses treatment rooms and
doctors offices in a serene, spa-like
environment.
The doctor attended Bastyr
University in Washington for her
Naturopathic Doctorate, and then
proceeded to obtain her masters in
nutrition. Having never visited Santa
Barbara before, she began an intern-
ship with Dr. Robert Young in 2008.
I wanted sun! she said about her
move to Santa Barbara. After Dr.
Youngs passing from pancreatic can-
cer in 2009, Dr. Wrightson helped
take care of his patients, until she
decided to open her own practice in
2012. I knew I wanted my practice
to be a nurturing, healing place, with
both traditional western medicine and
naturopathic services, she explained.
Nest offers a complete list of ser-
vices, including annual physicals,
womens health and hormonal thera-
py, nutritional counseling, therapeutic
massage, detox programs, body con-
touring, facial rejuvenation, IV thera-
pies, anti-aging treatments, and more.
Dr. Wrightson and her staff offer
personalized medicine for chronic
issues. We find the cause, the under-
current. My job is to find the under-
lying issue, she said. From there,
patients are given personalized plans
for treatment, which may include
nutritional supplements, herbs, diet
management, and traditional medi-
cations. Its all-encompassing health
care, Dr. Wrightson said.
Recently, Nest has partnered with
Santa Barbaras Salt, the underground
Himalayan salt caves located on State
Street. The two businesses are offering
a 7-day detox program that includes
lymphatic massage, sauna sessions,
and IV therapy, which boosts energy
and immunity, and aids in weight
loss, Dr. Wrightson says. In addi-
tion to a B-12 Happy Hour every
Wednesday from 3 to 5 pm, Nest also
takes part in First Thursday festivities,
offering the community $10 B-12 shots
from 3 pm to 5 pm. The vitamin shots
aid in energy and mental sharpness,
the doctor says.
The doctor is joined by Dr. Mindy
Beck, Dr. John Paulus, nutritional
consultant Carly Neubert, and esthe-
tician Marcela Kieler.
For more information about Nest,
visit www.nestspasb.com. Nest is
located at 523 Chapala Street #2. MJ
Montecito Country Club is expected to close after
Labor Day for a year of construction while the
property is upgraded and renovated
Dr. Kristi Wrightson and Dr. Mindy Beck offer
comprehensive, naturopathic medical care at Nest
Integrative Medical Spa on Chapala Street
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 39
ENTERTAINMENT (Continued from page 34)
ENTERTAINMENT Page 444
co-artistic director of DramaDogs and
Slightly Askew Players making her
ETC debut portray 40 characters in
the work, which is staged as a series
of vignettes set in and around a pool
of water.
Metamorphoses will be directed
by ETCs executive artistic direc-
tor Jonathan Fox, who has want-
ed to mount the work since seeing
it on Broadway a few weeks after
the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.
Original music comes from John
Zalewski, an award-winning sound
designer and composer who has cre-
ated scores and effects for the Los
Angeles Philharmonic, Long Beach
Opera, the Geffen Playhouse, South
Coast Rep, Pasadena Playhouse, and
others. A Michael Jenkinson, a spe-
cialist in theatrical movement who is
familiar to Central Coast audiences
via his decade at PCPA as resident
faculty, choreographer, director and
actor, is choreographing the stylized
staging.
We caught up with Jenkinson who
returns to more traditional musical
theater in directing Oklahoma! at PCPA
this summer to talk about how the
water and movement aid the story-
telling.
Q. How has it been to put together the
staging for this show?
A. Its a real across-the-board col-
laboration, with Jonathans vision
taking the leadership. The process
in choreographing a musical is that
I make it up in the studio with an
assistant, and then we layer it on a
bunch of bodies and they replicate
what we created. But whats won-
derful with this piece is that were
collaborating with the actors, seeing
what their bodies can do, listening to
their suggestions. Its a very different
working environment. I walk in with
some ideas or maybe some physical
images, but then the actors and I and
Jonathan explore what we can do. Its
quite exciting. It feels a lot like dance
theater. That makes for an exciting
piece for the audience because the
movement comes from places you
dont expect.
Mary Zimmermans writing made it
so contemporary and conversational,
that its so easy to latch on to what
these stories are about. We dont have
to work hard to understand. She pur-
posefully made it palatable to our
contemporary ears... so we get to do
all this abstract creative movement on
top of it, because the structure is so
elegant and simple. There arent too
many shiny objects coming at you.
Its a great way to hear these classic
stories... but its not just about move-
ment. Some of the pieces are seden-
tary, with only language. Its been
reviewed by both dance and theater
critics because it lives someplace in
between.
Obviously youre not the writer or
director, but can you get into how the epic
poem has been re-imagined for a theatrical
evening?
Its about getting at the key compo-
nents of the story. And while theres a
poetic quality to the language, its not
ancient poetry, so you can shave a lot
of time with the more direct language.
She keeps the point of the story if not
the beauty of the language, although
her words are very elegant. But its
great for the audience: theyll never
know what to expect with each story,
how its related. It should be quite an
exciting ride.
The water is the most essential element
of the set, and a part of each of the stories.
How has it been working with something
so unusual?
Well, were just starting working
with it today, so I dont know yet.
Right now its all theoretical until
we see what the water does, how
the element affects our storytelling.
Thats one of the things thats made
the whole process so fluid its a big
unknown. Were hoping that it all
works once we get in the pool. We
dont know what will happen, but its
already been a fun creative process.
Can you talk about how the water
shows up in the play?
It represents different elements in
every story. Its the environment, the
space that were in. But its very much
a character in every piece, whether its
a pool or a ship or the space where the
story unfolds. It takes on a role. And
it might mean something different
for each person in the audience. So
sometimes its the ocean, and other
times its simply where metamorpho-
ses transforming takes place.
What, for you, is the audience take-
away?
It focuses on love and the various
ways that plays out in human experi-
ence. How love is kind and kindness
is good. Even in darker parts of the
story, theres the always underlying
theme of love and how we deal with
it. So, I would hope people reflect on
how they love purposefully in their
lives on a daily basis, and its role in
our busy lives. To value the phrase I
love you. Thats been a big lesson for
me as I watch it unfold. And theres
also an opportunity to learn from
these myths, which function as fable
to take away their message, which is
different for each of us depending on
how it resonates. Its not just one per-
sons journey like with a linear play.
Were not using anything from other
productions. We just saw one image
from when Zimmerman directed it,
but we dont know how it came to be
or what came before it or after. So its
all very freshly staged. And it will not
be replicated anywhere else.
(ETCs Metamorphoses plays at the
New Vic, 33 West Victoria Street, March
27-April 13. Tickets cost $43-$75; $20 for
anyone under age 30. Call 965-5400 or
visit www.etcsb.org.)
Giron Trading
Places And Faces
Local theater folks have seen lots
of Edward Giron over the years. He
has acted in numerous productions all
around town, recently most often in
historical pieces, wherein hes played
true life figures such as Sigmund
Freud, Jackson Pollock, J. Robert
Oppenheimer and Richard Nixon.
Giron has also directed quite a few
plays in Santa Barbara, usually for his
own Virtual Productions and/or with
colleague Jerry Oshinkskys DIJO
Productions, for whom hes helmed
Inherit the Wind at Center Stage Theater
and The Persians, western civilizations
oldest surviving play.
But now hes turning to much more
modern work his own.
Giron is taking off the costumes
and largely eschewing the directors
chair with Connected, an evening of
five one-act plays written by Giron
and covering comedic, dramatic,
and serio-comic themes with a com-
mon thread of characters that Giron
described as flawed but recognizable.
What connects everything is that
these are perfectly imperfect charac-
ters or imperfectly perfect thrown
together to try to make the best of the
situations theyre in, he said over the
phone last weekend. Its give us a
chance to think about just how pro-
foundly poignant and funny all of our
relationships in our lives are.
Each of the short works has a differ-
ent approach but almost all came out
of some personal experience, Giron
said.
Slippery Slope, about two guys who
get stuck in their cars in the mud, is
based on an actual incident that hap-
pened to him, for example, while The
Fastest Way to a Womans Heart, a come-
dic examination of a first date with
some written rules, was inspired by a
physician friends post on Facebook.
He asked the question mostly clin-
ically, Giron explained, and all of
these female friends were teasing him
about how to ask girls out and what
he should work.
The One and the Other which pits
two surviving soldiers from oppos-
ing sides, against the elements, each
other, and their duties to their coun-
tries came out of Girons reaction to
conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, he
said. What is a soldiers duty to his
country and to his fellow man? Would
these two solo survivors relate to each
other? Kill each other? Connect? Its
an exploration.
Reservations, which pits a couple
on a dinner date with a twist, takes
the idea of spending forever in the
bathroom literally, taking a look at
compromise and need for companion-
ship, while the cleverly titled memo-
ry play Noel...Coward isnt about the
famous playwright but a guy named
Noel whos a coward, Giron said.
Its about love found, love lost, and
love almost regained.
Giron himself will direct Noel...
Coward, which is the only of the
one-acts besides Slippery Slope that
has been previously produced the
others are all making their premiere
in Connected. But otherwise, Giron
is stepping aside and letting the
other four directors Joseph Beck,
Robert Sanchez, Jerry Oshinsky, Ivy
Vahanian, and Ghislaine Sopher-
Phillips have their way with casting
and other choices.
I just want to sit in the audience,
and enjoy watching them being
produced without my input, he
explained. Ive got plenty of acting
assignments, so I wasnt looking for
a role. I just want to watch, enjoy, and
maybe learn and refine my writing
based on audience reactions to the set
of works.
Indeed, Giron said he hasnt felt
the pull to offer his input to either the
directors or the actors, who include
just a couple of ones he has worked
with as a director or cast-mate while
the rest are all new.
Since Im more of an actor than
anything else, I know what its like
to have the written word delivered to
you. I trust theyll take good care once
Playwright /
actor Ed Giron
and creative
director
Ghislaine
working on
Connected
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 40 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci



CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
BID NO: 5275

Sealed proposals for Bid No. 5275 for the Sanitary Sewer
Cleaning and CCTV Inspection CY Project will be received in
the Purchasing Office, 310 E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara,
California 93101, until 3:00 p.m., Thursday, April 10, 2014, to
be publicly opened and read at that time. Any bidder who
wishes its bid proposal to be considered is responsible for
making certain that its bid proposal is actually delivered to said
Purchasing Office. Bids shall be addressed to the General
Services Manager, Purchasing Office, 310 E. Ortega Street,
Santa Barbara, California, and shall be labeled, Sanitary
Sewer Cleaning and CCTV Inspection CY14, Bid No. 5275".

The work includes all labor, material, supervision, plant and
equipment necessary to complete the following: perform pre-
inspection cleaning and CCTV inspection of approximately 10
miles of sanitary sewer main per NASSCO PACP standards
using POSM software and perform both Tier 1 and Tier 2
manhole inspections per NASSCO MACP standards and per
the specifications. The Engineers estimate is $250,000.

Pursuant to California Public Contract Code Section 3400(c),
the City finds that POSM software, as designated within these
specifications, must be used to match and integrate with the
existing POSM software and database system for
documentation and storage of CCTV video events. No or-
equal substitutions will be accepted for POSM software, which
is designated as City Standard Software No Substitution
Permitted within the specifications.

The specifications for this Project are available electronically at
SantaBarbaraCA.gov/ebidboard. Plan and specification sets
can be obtained from CyberCopy (located at 504 N Milpas St,
cross street Haley) by contacting Alex Gaytan, CyberCopy
Shop Manager, at (805) 884-6155. The Citys contact for this
project is Lisa Arroyo, Supervising Civil Engineer, 805-564-
5486.

In order to be placed on the plan holders list, the Contractor
can register as a document holder for this Project on Ebidboard.
Project Addendum notifications will be issued through
Ebidboard.com. Although Ebidboard will fax and/or email all
notifications once they are provided contact information, bidders
are still responsible for obtaining all addenda from the
Ebidboard website.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of the
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

Per California Civil Code Section 9550, a payment bond in the
amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the
successful bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must
be provided within 10 calendar days from notice of award and
prior to the performance of any work.

The proposal shall be accompanied by a proposal guaranty
bond in the sum of at least 10% of the total amount of the
proposal, or alternatively by a certified or cashiers check
payable to the Owner in the sum of at least 10% of the total
amount of the proposal.

A separate performance bond in the amount of 100% of the bid
total will be required from the successful bidder. The bond
must be provided within 10 calendar days from the notice to
award and prior to the performance of any work.

The City of Santa Barbara hereby notifies all bidders that it will
affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to
this advertisement, minority business enterprises will be
afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this
invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds
of race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, sexual
orientation, political affiliations or beliefs, sex, age, physical
disability, medical condition, marital status or pregnancy as set
forth hereunder.




GENERAL SERVICES MANAGER
CITY OF SANTA BARBARA


William Hornung, C.P.M.

PUBLISHED: March 19 and March 26, 2014
Montecito Journal




PUBLIC NOTICE
City of Santa Barbara

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of
Santa Barbara will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday, April
8, 2014, during the afternoon session of the meeting which
begins at 2:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber, City Hall, 735
Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara. The hearing is to consider
adoption of an ordinance to establish air quality design criteria
for new development of sensitive uses within 250 feet of
Highway 101, to implement existing General Plan Policy ER7.
The intent of the ordinance is to reduce health risks from
highway vehicle exhaust for any future residences, nursing or
retirement homes, schools, or family day care projects located
near the freeway. Project design criteria involve site layouts,
vegetation screening, barriers, and interior air filtration.

This implementing ordinance is within the scope of the 2011
General Plan Update and its Program Environmental Impact
Report. If you challenge the Councils action or environmental
determination in court, you may be limited to raising only those
issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing
described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered
to the City at, or prior to, the public hearing.

You are invited to attend this hearing and address your verbal
comments to the City Council. Written comments are also
welcome up to the time of the hearing, and should be
addressed to the City Council via the City Clerks Office, P.O.
Box 1990, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-1990. Questions may be
directed to Barbara Shelton, Project Planner, at (805) 564-5470
or bshelton@santabarbaraca.gov.

On Thursday, April 3, 2014, an Agenda with all items to be
heard on Tuesday, April 8, 2014, will be available at 735
Anacapa Street and at the Central Library. Agendas and Staff
Reports are also accessible online at www.santabarbaraca.gov;
under Most Popular, click on Council Agenda Packet. Regular
meetings of the Council are broadcast live and rebroadcast on
Wednesdays and Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. and on Saturday at
9:00 a.m. on City TV Channel 18. These meetings can also be
viewed over the Internet at www.santabarbaraca.gov: Point to
Government, point to City Hall, and click on Mayor & City
Council; click on City Council Meetings, City Council Meeting
Videos, and then click on the Video link for the meeting date.

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you
need special assistance to gain access to, comment at, or
participate in this meeting, please contact the City
Administrator's Office at 564-5305 or inquire at the City Clerk's
Office on the day of the meeting. If possible, notification at
least 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the City to make
reasonable arrangements in most cases.


/s/
Susan Tschech, CMC
Deputy City Clerk

PUBLIC NOTICES
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Choices; Choices
College Counseling; Choices
Counseling, 601 East Micheltorena
St #19, Santa Barbara, CA 93103.
Ryan Taylor, Inc., 601 East
Micheltorena St #19, Santa Barbara,
CA 93103. This statement was led
with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on March 21, 2014.
This statement expires ve years
from the date it was led in the Ofce
of the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Adela Bustos. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000857. Published
March 26, April 2, 9, 16, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Boas Network, 78 Seaview Drive,
Santa Barbara, CA 93108. Kohanya
Groff, 78 Seaview Drive, Santa
Barbara, CA 93108. This statement
was led with the County Clerk of
Santa Barbara County on March 18,
2014. This statement expires ve
years from the date it was led in the
Ofce of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000808. Published
March 26, April 2, 9, 16, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business
as: Forever Clean, 7365 Happy
Canyon Road, Santa Ynez, CA
93460. Azucena Guadalupe
Gonzalez, 7365 Happy Canyon
Road, Santa Ynez, CA 93460.
Griselda Palacios, 7351 Happy
Canyon Road, Santa Ynez, CA
93460. This statement was led with
the County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on March 14, 2014. This
statement expires ve years from
the date it was led in the Ofce of
the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000769. Published
March 26, April 2, 9, 16, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Wine Valley Inn; Wine Valley Inn
& Cottages, 1564 Copenhagen
Drive, Solvang, CA 93463. Kabir
Bluestar, LLC, 12644 Lakewood
Blvd, Ste 100, Downey, CA 90242.
This statement was led with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on February 10, 2014. This
statement expires ve years from
the date it was led in the Ofce of
the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Jan Morales. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000383. Published
March 26, April 2, 9, 16, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business
as: Rx Shoe Lab, 545 El Bosque
Rd, Unit H, Montecito, CA 93108.
Dream Up Tomorrow, LLC, 545 El
Bosque Rd, Unit H, Montecito, CA
93108. This statement was led with
the County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on March 10, 2014. This
statement expires ve years from
the date it was led in the Ofce of
the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Adela Bustos. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000710. Published
March 19, 26, April 2, 9, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Apollo Painting & Construction,
27 W. Anapamu Street Ste 329,
Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Dennis
Yeager, 2920 Bramadero Road, Los
Olivos, CA 93441. This statement
was led with the County Clerk of
Santa Barbara County on March 10,
2014. This statement expires ve
years from the date it was led in the

ORDINANCE NO. 5648

AN ORDINANCE OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF
SANTA APPROVING A TEN-YEAR LEASE AGREEMENT
WITH TWO FIVE-YEAR OPTIONS DATED AS OF MARCH 18,
2014, WITH KEVIN BOSS, STEVE MARSH, AND
BEACHROK, INC, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, DOING
BUSINESS AS SHORELINE BEACH CAF, AT AN
AVERAGE INITIAL BASE RENT OF $14,342.06 PER MONTH,
ALLOCATED SEASONALLY, FOR THE 5,095 SQUARE
FOOT RESTAURANT LOCATED AT 801 SHORELINE
DRIVE, EFFECTIVE APRIL 17, 2014.

The above captioned ordinance was adopted at a regular

meeting of the Santa Barbara City Council held on

March 18, 2014.

The publication of this ordinance is made pursuant to the

provisions of Section 512 of the Santa Barbara City Charter as

amended, and the original ordinance in its entirety may be

obtained at the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, Santa Barbara,

California.



(Seal)



/s/
Gwen Peirce, CMC
City Clerk Services Manager

ORDINANCE NO. 5648


STATE OF CALIFORNIA )
)
COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ) ss.
)
CITY OF SANTA BARBARA )


I HEREBY CERTIFY that the foregoing ordinance

was introduced on March 4, 2014, and was adopted by the

Council of the City of Santa Barbara at a meeting held on

March 18, 2014, by the following roll call vote:

AYES: Councilmembers Dale Francisco, Gregg
Hart, Frank Hotchkiss, Cathy Murillo,
Randy Rowse, Bendy White; Mayor
Helene Schneider

NOES: None

ABSENT: None

ABSTENTIONS: None


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereto set my

hand and affixed the official seal of the City of Santa Barbara on

March 19, 2014.



/s/
Susan Tschech, CMC
Deputy City Clerk

I HEREBY APPROVE the foregoing ordinance on

March 19, 2014.



/s/
Helene Schneider
Mayor


27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 41 We work to become, not to acquire. Elbert Hubbard
ORDINANCE NO. 5648

AN ORDINANCE OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF
SANTA APPROVING A TEN-YEAR LEASE AGREEMENT
WITH TWO FIVE-YEAR OPTIONS DATED AS OF MARCH 18,
2014, WITH KEVIN BOSS, STEVE MARSH, AND
BEACHROK, INC, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, DOING
BUSINESS AS SHORELINE BEACH CAF, AT AN
AVERAGE INITIAL BASE RENT OF $14,342.06 PER MONTH,
ALLOCATED SEASONALLY, FOR THE 5,095 SQUARE
FOOT RESTAURANT LOCATED AT 801 SHORELINE
DRIVE, EFFECTIVE APRIL 17, 2014.

The above captioned ordinance was adopted at a regular

meeting of the Santa Barbara City Council held on

March 18, 2014.

The publication of this ordinance is made pursuant to the

provisions of Section 512 of the Santa Barbara City Charter as

amended, and the original ordinance in its entirety may be

obtained at the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, Santa Barbara,

California.



(Seal)



/s/
Gwen Peirce, CMC
City Clerk Services Manager

ORDINANCE NO. 5648


STATE OF CALIFORNIA )
)
COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ) ss.
)
CITY OF SANTA BARBARA )


I HEREBY CERTIFY that the foregoing ordinance

was introduced on March 4, 2014, and was adopted by the

Council of the City of Santa Barbara at a meeting held on

March 18, 2014, by the following roll call vote:

AYES: Councilmembers Dale Francisco, Gregg
Hart, Frank Hotchkiss, Cathy Murillo,
Randy Rowse, Bendy White; Mayor
Helene Schneider

NOES: None

ABSENT: None

ABSTENTIONS: None


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereto set my

hand and affixed the official seal of the City of Santa Barbara on

March 19, 2014.



/s/
Susan Tschech, CMC
Deputy City Clerk

I HEREBY APPROVE the foregoing ordinance on

March 19, 2014.



/s/
Helene Schneider
Mayor


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5311

DUE DATE & TIME: April 17, 2014 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

Conduit Installation for Pedestrian Activated Flashers

A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on April 8,
2014 at 10:00 a.m., at State St. and Pedregosa St.
intersection, Santa Barbara, CA, to discuss the
specifications and field conditions. Milpas St. and Ortega
St. intersection, and Milpas St. and Yanonali St.
intersection will also be visited as part of the pre-bid
meeting.

Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

The City of Santa Barbara requires all contractors to possess a
current valid State of California General A Engineering
License, or a California C-10 Electrical Contractors License
with a California C-31 Traffic Control Contractor OR with a C-31
Traffic Control sub-contractor. The company bidding on this
must possess one of the above mentioned licenses at the time
bids are due and be otherwise deemed qualified to perform the
work specified herein. Bids submitted using the license name
and number of a subcontractor or other person who is not a
principle partner or owner of the company making this bid, will
be rejected as being non-responsive.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Performance Bond in the
amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the
successful bidder for bids. The bond must be provided with ten
(10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to the
performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.


____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: March 26, 2014
General Services Manager Montecito Journal

PUBLIC NOTICES
Ofce of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Adela Bustos. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000712. Published
March 19, 26, April 2, 9, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business
as: Auto Dr., PO Box 5874, Santa
Maria, CA 93456. Scott Stephen,
1435 Bluebird Lane, Santa Maria,
CA 93454. This statement was
led with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on March 12, 2014.
This statement expires ve years
from the date it was led in the Ofce
of the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Dionne Ruiz. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000738. Published
March 19, 26, April 2, 9, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Serendipity Resale
Shop, 2830 De La Vina Street #B,
Santa Barbara, CA 93105. Lynne
LeCourvre, 27 West Anapamu
Street #309, Santa Barbara, CA
93101. This statement was led
with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on March 13,
2014. This statement expires ve
years from the date it was led in
the Ofce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement
on le in my ofce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by
Gabriel Cabello. Original FBN
No. 2014-0000764. Published
March 19, 26, April 2, 9, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Transformative Healing Arts, 27
East Victoria Street, Ste O, Santa
Barbara, CA 93101. Romi Cumes,
1831 Grand Avenue, Santa Barbara,
CA 93101. This statement was
led with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on March 13, 2014.
This statement expires ve years
from the date it was led in the Ofce
of the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Adela Bustos. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000752. Published
March 19, 26, April 2, 9, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Miss Party Mom Event Planning,
121 South Voluntario Street, Santa
Barbara, CA 93103. Kenna Joan
OBrien, 121 South Voluntario Street,
Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This
statement was led with the County
Clerk of Santa Barbara County on
March 5, 2014. This statement expires
ve years from the date it was led in
the Ofce of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000664. Published
March 12, 19, 26, April 2, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Margaret Joan Florals, 3 West
Carrillo, #205, Santa Barbara, CA
93101. Margaret Joan Lloyd, 258
Cloydon Circle, Santa Barbara, CA
93108. This statement was led with
the County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on February 26, 2014. This
statement expires ve years from
the date it was led in the Ofce of
the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000574. Published
March 12, 19, 26, April 2, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business
as: Lilys Nail Lounge of Santa
Barbara; Lilys Nails of Santa
Barbara; Lilys Nail Salon of
Santa Barbara; Santa Barbara
Nail Lounge; Lilys Nail Spa of
Santa Barbara; Santa Barbara
Nail Salon, 1230 State Street,
Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Geoff
Quaglino, 1727 State Street #1,
Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Tri Tuyet
Nga, 1727 State Street #1, Santa
Barbara, CA 93101. This statement
was led with the County Clerk of
Santa Barbara County on March 3,
2014. This statement expires ve
years from the date it was led in the
Ofce of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Gabriel Cabello. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000647. Published
March 12, 19, 26, April 2, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
La Casa de Maria Retreat and
Conference Center, 800 El Bosque
Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108.
Immaculate Heart Community,
5515 Franklin Avenue, Los Angeles,
CA 90028. This statement was led
with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on February 13, 2014. This
statement expires ve years from the
date it was led in the Ofce of the
County Clerk. I hereby certify that this is
a correct copy of the original statement
on le in my ofce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales.
Original FBN No. 2014-0000431.
Published March 5, 12, 19, 26, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
CINEMACAMERA; Harlequins
Theatrical Supply, 17 W. Gutierrez
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
Peter F. Mahar, 109 N. Nopal
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93103.
Sara H. Mahar, 109 N. Nopal Street,
Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This
statement was led with the County
Clerk of Santa Barbara County on
February 19, 2014. This statement
expires ve years from the date it was
led in the Ofce of the County Clerk.
I hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement on
le in my ofce. Joseph E. Holland,
County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales.
Original FBN No. 2014-0000487.
Published March 5, 12, 19, 26, 2014.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Center For Spiritual Renewal,
888 San Ysidro Lane, Santa
Barbara, CA 93108. Immaculate
Heart Community, 5515 Franklin
Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90028.
This statement was led with the
County Clerk of Santa Barbara
County on February 13, 2014. This
statement expires ve years from
the date it was led in the Ofce of
the County Clerk. I hereby certify
that this is a correct copy of the
original statement on le in my ofce.
Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk
(SEAL) by Adela Bustos. Original
FBN No. 2014-0000429. Published
March 5, 12, 19, 26, 2014.
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME: CASE No.
1440208. To all interested parties:
Petitioner Paris Dawn Summer
led a petition with Superior Court of
California, County of Santa Barbara,
for a decree changing name to Paris
Nicole Christiano. The Court
orders that all persons interested in
this matter appear before this court
at the hearing indicated below to
show cause, if any, why the petition
for change of name should not
be granted. Any person objecting
to the name changes described
about must le a written objection
that included the reasons for the
objection at least two court days
before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the
hearing to show cause why the
petition should not be granted. If
no written objection is timely led,
the court may grant the petition
without a hearing. Filed March 17,
2014, by Terri Chavez, Deputy
Clerk. Hearing date: May 7, 2014 at
9:30 am in Dept. 6, 1100 Anacapa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
Published 3/26, 4/2, 4/9, 4/16
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME: CASE No.
1439861. To all interested parties:
Petitioner Alexandra Rogozinsky
led a petition with Superior Court of
California, County of Santa Barbara,
for a decree changing name to Daisy
Alexandra Rogozinsky. The Court
orders that all persons interested in
this matter appear before this court
at the hearing indicated below to
show cause, if any, why the petition
for change of name should not
be granted. Any person objecting
to the name changes described
about must le a written objection
that included the reasons for the
objection at least two court days
before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the
hearing to show cause why the
petition should not be granted. If
no written objection is timely led,
the court may grant the petition
without a hearing. Filed February
21, 2014, by Terri Chavez, Deputy
Clerk. Hearing date: April 9, 2014 at
9:30 am in Dept. 6, 1100 Anacapa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
Published 3/5, 3/12, 3/19, 3/26
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 42 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
THURSDAY, MARCH 27
Moon over Denmark Montecito-
born theater company Lit Moon has
presented its highly stylized truncated
version of Hamlet several times around
town and all over the world since
its inception in 2000, but its been
almost eight years since the 80-minute
mini spectacle last played Santa
Barbara as part of the Lit Moon
World Shakespeare Festival. Now the
companys signature piece which
features just four actors portraying
multiple parts and a gigantic paper set
created by the Czech scenographer
Milon Kalis, as well as a composer-
musician is back for just a three-
night run as Lit Moon preps to
present the work at the International
Shakespeare Festival in Beijing, China,
in the fall. The imaginative version
of the Shakespeare classic utilizes
a convergence of words, action,
space, and music to forge a take on
the tragedy that is simultaneously
smaller and bigger than anything
youve likely seen before. Victoria
Finlayson, Stanley Hoffman,
Jeff Mills and Sara Reynolds, plus
musician James Connolly are the
current players, directed, as always,
by company founder John Blondell.
WHEN: 8 pm today through Saturday
WHERE: Center Stage Theater, 751
Paseo Nuevo, upstairs in the mall
COST: $23 general, $18 students and
seniors INFO: 963-0408 or www.
CenterStageTheater.org
SATURDAY, MARCH 29
Re-Cooper-ating Dana Cooper,
one of those great road-warrior
singer-songwriters who talent and
performances would seem to far
outstrip his popularity, has been one
of the favorites of both the promoters
and audiences at Trinity Backstage,
the long-running originally monthly
coffeehouse held at the downtown
Episcopal Church. So it makes a lot
of sense for Cooper to re-launch the
series in its new guise as a quarterly
event. Fans compare him favorably
to superstars like James Taylor or
Jackson Browne, and critics have
raved about both his impressive array
of tunes and tunings (not to mention
some fancy picking) and compositions
with one writer calling his Whitman-
esque songs of experience... something
that sounds suspiciously like wisdom.
WHEN: 8 pm WHERE: 1500 State
Street COST: $10 INFO: 962-2970 or
www.trinitybackstage.com
Blues Birthday Bash The
Mannish Boys, a Los Angeles-based
rockin blues band, put on a memorable
show for the Santa Barbara Blues
Society a few years back. Now its lead
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Note to readers: This entertainment calendar is a subjective sampling of arts and other events taking place in the Santa
Barbara area for the next week. It is by no means comprehensive. Be sure to read feature stories in each issue that complement
the calendar. In order to be considered for inclusion in this calendar, information must be submitted no later than noon on the
Wednesday eight days prior to publication date. Please send all news releases and digital artwork to slibowitz@yahoo.com)
by Steven Libowitz

THURSDAY, MARCH 27
April Showers You dont
need any formal training to play
bluegrass, Celtic music and dance
tunes, but it doesnt hurt, either.
Canadian ddler, singer-songwriter,
and step dancer April Verch has
beneted from both formal training
she attended the prestigious/
jazz-oriented Berklee College of
Music in Boston and folk-based, via being born and raised in Ontario,
where traditional Ottawa Valley-style ddle tunes representing a melting pot
of Franco-Celtic rule the day. The winner of the Grand Masters Fiddle and
Open Fiddle Championships in the late 1990s, Verch also performed at the
opening ceremony of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, and has
both taught and performed at Mark OConnors Fiddle Camps. Verchs
trio featuring bassist and clawhammer banjo player Cody Walters and
guitarist Hayes Grifn, who boasts a masters in jazz improvisation from
the New England Conservatory specialize in ddle tunes full of energy,
virtuosic playing, and strong songs. Undoubtedly well hear material from
her ninth album, Bright Like Gold, and get a solid sample of her thrilling step-
dancing, which she often does in rhythmic contrast to her bowing. WHEN:
7-10 pm WHERE: Ojai Valley Womans Club, 441 Ojai Avenue COST: $20
in advance, $25 at the door (half-price under 16 and small children admitted
free) INFO: 665-8852 or www.ojaiconcertseries.com

FRIDAY, MARCH 28
Chopra on Ethical Business Deepak
Chopra has been a leader in many elds,
including pioneering exploration of the
mind-body connection and merging ancient
Eastern wisdom with modern Western
technology, leading to Time Magazine to
dub him the poet-prophet of alternative
medicine. Now, hes coming to Santa
Barbara to talk about being successful in
business while also assuming responsibility
for the whole of society, promote energy
independence for California, and discuss his
mission to raise the consciousness of 100
million people. Its a newer, more global
and business-oriented twist to the essence of Dr. Chopras message that all
things in the universe are interconnected. After smaller and private events
held yesterday and this morning in conjunction with the Santa Barbara-
based think tank World Business Academy, the visit from Dr. Chopra the
author of more than 75 best-selling books culminates in a major address
at the Arlington tonight. WHEN: 7 pm WHERE: 1317 State Street COST:
$25-$35 ($100 VIP includes priority seating and pre-talk reception at 6 pm)
INFO: 963-4408 or www.worldbusiness.org/deepak
singer, Sugaray Rayford, returns to
town fronting his own eight-piece band
to headline the organizations 37th
anniversary concert, adding one more
notch to the oldest existing U.S. blues
society. Texas-born Rayford began, like
so many blues greats, making music in
church, only Sugaray was just 7 when
he started singing and playing drums
on Sunday mornings, so the gospel
inuence is still quite prevalent. His
soulful and gravelly voice, reminiscent
of old-school blues and soul belters
like Muddy Waters, Otis Redding and
Teddy Pendergrass, features phrasing
that makes the music conversational
though when he gets going, the intimacy
fades and you feel the passion. Santa
Barbaras own blues stalwarts Deep
Blue open the concert. As always, the
concert includes free barbecue snacks
and door prizes for early arrivers,
plus a large dance area and plenty of
seated viewing. But the birthday bash
also means free cake for all, and a free
blues CD to the rst 37 guests. WHEN:
8 pm WHERE: Carrillo Recreation
Center, 100 East Carrillo Street COST:
$30 general, $40 VIP seating (includes
free beverage); members receive $5
discount INFO: 722-8155 or www.
SBBlues.org
SUNDAY, MARCH 30
Wail away Theres no shortage of
good Dixieland jazz in town, what with
Ulysses Jasz holding down Saturday
nights over at the James Joyce on a
weekly basis. Still, theres a lot of appeal
for this months Santa Barbara Jazz
Society concert featuring the Yankee
Wailers. Wally Holmes, who ran
the Sweet and Hot Jazz Festival in Los
Angeles for years, is the bands leader
and he brings along a ne assortment
of musicians who make their bread and
butter living playing for hit TV shows
and other studio sessions but jump at the
chance to wail away on the traditional
jazz tunes and swinging songs from
the 1920s to the 40s. Foots will be
stomping to the upbeat rhythms and,
yeah, its totally cool if you want to get
up and dance. WHEN: 8 pm WHERE:
SOhO, 1221 State Street, upstairs in
Victoria Court COST: $25 ($15 for SBJS
members, $7 for professional musicians
and full-time students) INFO: 962-7776/
www.sohosb.com or 687-7123/www.
sbjazz.org
TUESDAY, APRIL 1
Accidental Celebrity Before
he became a self-described minor
television celebrity, John Hodgman
was a writer, expert and professional
literary agent living in New York City,
with gigs such as humor editor for The
New York Times Magazine, advice
columnist for McSweeneys, comic
book reviewer for The New York Times
Book Review, and a freelance journalist
specializing in non-wine alcohol,
Battlestar Galactica and other esoteric
subjects. These days, of course, hes
a household name or at least has
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 43 The only way to enjoy anything in this life is to earn it first. Ginger Rogers
Legendary Host of A Prairie Home Companion
Garrison Keillor
With pianist Richard Dworsky
WED, APR 2 / 8 PM / GRANADA THEATRE
Tickets start at $35 / $18 UCSB students
A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price
Corporate Sponsor:
Qawwali Music of Pakistan
Protg of Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan
Asif Ali Khan
THU, APR 3 / 8 PM / UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
$38 / $18 UCSB students
The protg has become the master of
Suf devotional music. Time Out Sydney
Paul Farmer
In the Company of the Poor
SUN, APR 6 / 7 PM (special time) / CAMPBELL HALL
$15 / FREE for UCSB students (Valid ID/ limited availability)
Co-presented by
Event Sponsors: Dorothy Largay & Wayne Rosing
Les Ballets Trockadero
de Monte Carlo
TUE, APR 8 / 8 PM / GRANADA THEATRE
Tickets start at $35 / $19 all students
One of the great comic creations of the
American stage San Francisco Chronicle
Principal Sponsors: Anne & Michael Towbes
John Hodgman
I Stole Your Dad
TUE, APR 1 / 8 PM / UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
$25 / $12 UCSB students
Wonderfully absurd. The New York Times
Author and
Correspondent for
Featuring the World-renowned Brazilian Guitar Duo
The Assad Family
A Brazilian Songbook
Srgio, Odair, Badi,
Clarice & Carolina Assad
WED, APR 9 / 8 PM / UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
Tickets start at $25 / $15 UCSB students
(805) 893-3535
www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu
TUESDAY!

FRIDAY, MARCH 28
Freda on Film The Marjorie Luke Theatre is
getting ready to celebrate its 10th anniversary next
month with a Beatles bash a full evening concert
featuring The Fab Four, considered the nest tribute
band in the land. Tonights preliminary event should
help set the scene, as the theater is hosting Beatles
Fan Club Night, spearheaded by a screening of Good
Ol Freda, a feature-length documentary about Freda
Kelly, a shy teenager from The Beatles hometown
of Liverpool who began working for the band long before they made it big.
Kelly was their loyal secretary from beginning to end, 11 years in all, even
though the group itself only lasted 10. In the movie, Freda tells her stories for
rst time in half a century, offering behind-the-scenes tales of the musicians
and bands development in the 1960s. Good Ol Freda which has played
the lm festival circuit for a year examines not only how The Beatles
inuenced Kellys life, but also how she shaped theirs. The event also features
a rafe with prizes, including an autographed script by the cast of Glee, a
Beatles episode that recently aired; a DVD of the doc plus a T-shirt and movie
poster; and two tickets to the Fab Four concert on April 26. WHEN: 7:30 pm
WHERE: Santa Barbara Junior High, 721 East Cota Street COST: free ($5
donation requested) INFO: 884-4087 or www.luketheatre.org

SATURDAY, MARCH 29
Soul Street Dance Dance
companies like to give a nod to earlier
styles even in their most contemporary
pieces, but the current show from the
acclaimed Houston dance sensation Soul
Street is taking that to extremes. Titled
Breaking Backwards, the moves in the
show go back many decades in break
dancing, hip-hop and acrobatic tricks, while the music ranges even further,
from classical (Vivaldi) to Big Band (Count Basie), the early days of rock n
roll (Elvis), Motown (Temptations), hard rock (Aerosmith) and the King of Pop,
Michael Jackson. Colorful costumes and lots of comedy alongside the thrilling
moves make for an evening geared to appeal to all ages. WHEN: 7:30 pm
WHERE: Matilija Auditorium, 703 El Paseo Road, Ojai COST: $20 general,
$18 seniors, $10 children INFO: 646-8907 or www.ptgo.org
a recognizable face portraying the
Resident Expert on The Daily Show with
Jon Stewart and the nerdy PC in
Apples PC vs. Mac smackdown ads.
Hes also the best-selling author of the
Complete World Knowledge trilogy.
Now, the wry Hodgman whom the
press has described in a accidental
rhyming couplet wonderfully absurd
(The New York Times) and archly
amusing nerd (Los Angeles Times)
has created a new performance
role: himself. In I Stole Your Dad,
Hodgman offers his observations on
topics from how to dress like a young
and relevant person, to fax machines
and other obsolete technology, to
how to spend your time now that the
world hasnt ended, contrary to the
Mayan prophecy. Also on the agenda:
Downton Abbey, the state songs of
Tennessee, and the lm criticism of
Ayn Rand. The one-man show played
to sold-out houses at the Under the
Radar Festival off Broadway just this
January; tonight it comes to UCSB
as a Student Appreciation Event also
open to general public. WHEN: 8
pm WHERE: UCSBs Campbell Hall
COST: $25 INFO: 893-3535 or www.
ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2
No Fooling, Theyre Funny
Just a day after April Fools, the
jokes return to the Jewish Community
Center for another session of All-Star
Comedy Night. Host and emcee
Louise Weezy Palanker has
booked L.A.-based comedian Jackie
Kashian characterized by L.A.
Weekly as like the comic next door if
the comic next door is prone to acutely
hilarious family stories as headliner,
with fast-rising stand-up/storyteller
Dylan Brody, a playwright, humorist,
and author whose unique tales are
both easy to relate to. Palanker has
her own opening set, plus bits from her
current Comedy Club students. Snack
food and drinks are provided. WHEN:
6-8 pm WHERE: 524 Chapala Street
COST: $8 in advance/$10 at the door
(students/seniors $4/$5) INFO: 957-
1115 or www.sbjf.org MJ
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 44 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
ENTERTAINMENT (Continued from page 39)
its in their hands. It needs to be let go.
You cant have too many chefs in the
kitchen.
(Connected performs at 8 pm March
28-29 and April 4-5, plus 2 pm March
30 & April 6, at Plaza Playhouse Theater,
4916 Carpinteria Avenue, Carpinteria.
Tickets cost $17 general, $13 seniors/
students. Call 684-6380 or visit www.
plazatheatercarpinteria.com.)
Shen Yuns Grand
Granada Spectacle
The Shen Yun Performing Arts
production coming to the Granada
Theatre this weekend is brand-new
for 2014 from a company thats only
been in existence since 2006. But this
colorful Eastern extravaganza full of
exciting dance, music, and acrobatic
feats is bred of something a lot older,
steeped in 5,000 years of Chinese cul-
ture.
The brilliantly costumed dancers
who come from China as well as
Japan, Korea, Europe, and the U.S.
move in sync with a live orchestra
blending Western and Chinese music,
for a total of more than 100 perform-
ers who bring to life 19 new per-
formance numbers with beauty and
energy depicting stories from the birth
of China, up through its many dynas-
ties to the modern-day nation. There
are more than 400 sets of costumes,
and spectacular animated backdrops,
all adding to the show that is said to
uplift as well as entertain audiences.
Kelly Wen, one of the productions
two emcees, talked about the compa-
ny, the culture and the performances
last weekend.
Q. There have been massive market-
ing efforts surrounding this show and it
seems to have paid off. Many of the events
have been sold-out in big arenas. Why is it
so popular even in place where audiences
arent familiar with Chinese culture?
A. The show really takes you on a
journey from ancient China right up
through today. Theres a very rich
tapestry throughout as we travel
from heavenly kingdom through the
dynasties to current times. You get a
taste of the vastness of Chinese cul-
ture whether you have familiarity or
not... (and) theres a real message of
hope, something uplifting you can
take away. So its not only the cultural
aspect, but also spirituality. Our 5,000-
year culture is based on Buddhism,
Taoism, and Confucianism, so you see
the connection between heaven and
earth thats prevalent throughout the
show.
I understand that classical Chinese
dance is at the heart of the show. Can you
explain what that is?
Its an ancient system passed down
through generations that has three
main components: bearing, form, and
techniques. The dancers start at a very
young age, when their bodies have
flexibility and agility, and theyre able
to set a strong foundation. All of our
dancers are trained in our facility in
New York, which is the only institu-
tion outside of China preserving this
type of dance system in its purest
form. It takes many hours of training
to get those basic movements and
learn the techniques. People see the
tumbling and acrobatics in gymnastics
and shows like the Shanghai Acrobats
and think that dance evolved from
there. But its the other way around;
they originated in Chinese dance.
How do you condense 5,000 years of
history, myths, legends, and culture into
a two-hour show?
Good question. The show is com-
posed of 21 different vignettes. It starts
in a heavenly realm and tells the story
by connecting the dynasties. But we
also explore ethnic groups. Chinese
culture is very diverse there are
70-plus minorities within the culture.
For example, we do some Mongolian
dance to elicit their culture.
There are lots of stories in the show.
How are they selected?
They come from Chinas four great-
est literatures. We take from the sto-
ries and legends which have been
recorded throughout the history and
make up the essence of culture over
time. The history is so long and vast,
that we are able to bring out new
themes from these stories every year,
focusing on different heroes or dynas-
ties. For example, theres the story of
the monkey having to go through 81
tribulations on the way to receive the
Buddhist scriptures. This year talks
about just one of the tests the toad
monster. Thats the piece we focus
on. The meaning behind the dances
is to bring out the aspect and quality
of Chinese culture and principals of
life. Its Chinese culture in its purest
form, appreciated by people around
the world.
Ive read that Shen Yun dance is more
authentic than other Chinese dance today,
even back in China. How is that?
The classical system is still taught
in some schools in China, and they do
preserve it well. But how they use it is
different. Its become a massive cho-
reography to impress people by the
numbers, which is what you saw in
the Olympics, for example. Its mixed
with other dance forms like modern
or jazz. But even in its own artistic
creations, its not pure. In our show,
its very accurate and authentic, using
classical dance for its true purpose:
to tell the story of the people and the
culture. Its in our DNA, like how you
speak and talk and move. It transmits
the message of Chinese heritage.
What can you tell me about the cos-
tumes? I know theyre very elaborate and
full of bright colors and unusual fabrics.
What does that represent?
All of the costumes are hand-made
and tailored for each dancer. The
materials are very fine, such as silk.
Our designers put a lot of research
to replicate the distinct style of each
dynasty or ethnic group. When you
see the Yao dancers, for example,
its a very close portrayal. They
want to be as accurate as possible
on stage. So as much as possible, the
costumes represent what they wore
back then.
What does it take to put the show
together? How much time goes into creat-
ing the production?
When we formed in 2006, we want-
ed to revive Chinese culture in its pur-
est form. All of the artists share that
vision. For half a year were on tour,
and the rest of the time is dedicated
to putting together the whole new
set of programs. People in our group
are really dedicated. And the reason
they put their heart and soul into it
is because theyre united by passion
for reviving Chinese culture. A lot has
been lost in China today due to the
communist regime; after the cultur-
al revolution, those traditions have
been denied or destroyed. Our show
reflects what has happened from
ancient China to today, so its import-
ant that the art reflects the modern
theme. Its a part of the show but
it connects with the main theme, the
unity between heaven and earth. The
spiritual practice is part of Chinese
culture, so thats why its in the show.
Its the journey.
So that brings up the question, if youre
unfamiliar with the culture and not par-
ticularly interested in the politics, will
you have any idea whats going on?
Oh, yes. The dance form in itself
communicates the message very clear-
ly, but we also have backdrops that
transport audiences into each scene.
Theyre state of the art digital, with
animations. If its a story dance, we
see the dancers come from the back-
drop and pop out into the scene, a
very 3D effect. And its my job to
introduce you to what youre about to
see. My emcee partner and I are both
bilingual and we explain it, so you
dont have to flip your program book
in the dark.
(Shen Yun performs at 7:30 pm
Saturday, March 29 then 2 and 7 pm
Sunday, March 30 at the Granada, 1214
State Street. Tickets cost $50-$150. Call
899-2222 or visit www.granadasb.org.)
Choral Directors
and Choral Society
Roundup
Miscommunication caused the can-
cellation of my preview in this col-
umn of the American Choral Directors
Association (ACDA) Western Division
Conference, which was held right here
in Santa Barbara for the first time
in February. But the weekend was
quite a boon to the local choral sing-
ing community, as choirs both ama-
teur and professional performed in
four different venues around town. I
particularly enjoyed an impromptu
singing session by the audience as we
awaited the start of Alamires concert
at the Old Mission, and a super-ener-
gized a cappella set by the House Jacks
complete with two vocal rhythm
demonstrations with audience partici-
pation back at the conference HQ at
the DoubleTree Resort (plus the alco-
hol-aided, off-the-cuff singing in the
poolside hot tub, but thats another
story).
The event kicked off with short sets
from some local ensembles, and this
week we get our first chance to hear
any of them perform since that fabled
weekend. The Santa Barbara Choral
Society sings for the first time at the
Lobero since the theaters renovations
this weekend, offering a program of
works both older (Haydn, Bruckner)
and contemporary (Ola Gjeilo, and
Morten Lauridsen, the American com-
poser who was honored in person and
the exclusive subject of a Los Angeles
Master Chorale concert during the
ACDA convention). Concerts begin
at 8 pm Saturday and 3 pm Sunday;
tickets cost $20-$40. Call 963-0761 or
visit www.lobero.com.
Next Thursday, Quire of Voyces is
back in action, singing for free at
the Museum of Art as part of 1st
Thursday. MJ
Mila Wizel as
Lucille and
George Coe
as Noel in
Connected, a
collection of
one-act plays
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 45
er-end market, condominiums, which
generally price in the low end of the
$1-2m sector, should be doing better.
Yet the current median sales price is
just $850,000; in 2008, it was $2.1m.
Since the First of the Year
Sales of single-family homes in
Montecito are down a significant 40%
since the first of the year. After a strong
upward bounce off the depressed
market bottom, both sales and median
price have trended down over the past
few months.
Although our market is different
in fundamental ways, nearly every-
one else is faring better than we are.
For instance, while our median sales
price is down 21%, the Upper East
is up 25%, West of State Street up
34%, Hope Ranch has risen 114%, and
Goleta south and north are up 14%
and 21%, respectively. Buyers have
been willing to buy more home in
these areas this year than in 2013. In
Montecito, not so much.
When we take a look at the pres-
ent heat scores instead of median
price that lags at least 30 days it
seems that buyers do like us and,
in fact, do so 25% more than a year
before. Better yet, they are choosing
properties in all price ranges includ-
ing estate properties in the $4m and
above range.
By next month, we should be join-
ing our neighbors in the positive col-
umn of the median price chart.
We still have an awkward economy
to deal with, however. The chief econ-
omist for the California Association
of Realtors predicts home prices in
California to advance just 3% this
year. Here in Montecito, where many
Americans daydreamed about while
shoveling snow the past several
months, I predict we see at least three
times that number. MJ
Work alone is noble. Thomas Carlyle
Feel the Heat Index
Real Estate View
by Michael Phillips
Michael is a realtor
at Coldwell Banker,
and is a Montecito
Planning Commissioner.
He can be reached at
969-4569 and info@
MichaelPhillipsRealEstate.
com
T
he Montecito Heat Index iden-
tifies the present demand for
Montecito single-family homes
and answers the question, How is the
market doing today?
The index metric is homes presently
under contract (pending) compared
to the number of homes available for
purchase (listed) in five price sectors.
And since demand is highly season-
al and in fact variable on a monthly
basis, the current heat score gets com-
pared to this date a year ago.
The scores reflect present market
strength and as opposed to sold
data, which is trailing by a month or
more the Heat Index provides lead-
ing data that identifies present buyer
interest and predicts future sales num-
bers. Data are from the Santa Barbara
Multiple Listing Service and uniform-
ly deemed reliable.
Todays combined heat score is 125
compared to 100 last year, representing
an increase in buyer demand of 25%.
With a top score of 45, the $1-2m
sector continues to take the honors,
outperforming last year by 9 points.
The $2-3m groups score was identi-
cal to a year ago and remains in high
demand month over month.
Fewer buyers stepped up in the
$3-4m price group. With a score of
9, it underperformed compared to
last years 13.
For many, the $4-5m sector is where
the Montecito market begins to self
identify a long-gated drive, guest-
house, swimming pool, large rooms,
high ceilings, and a view of the moun-
tains or islands from your patio. Estate
properties. This sector has been strug-
gling and has been somewhat ignored
since the downturn. Today, it posts
a 26 compared to 10 a year ago, an
increase of 160%. Strong demand for
this sector is welcomed news, indeed.
The high-end, $5m-plus group has
also been more or less sidelined since
the troubles, yet today scored a 10
with 67% more activity than last year.
Pre-meltdown on this date in 2008,
this sector was our demand leader.
Even though we dont measure
Condo Heat, if you will, it is diffi-
cult not to notice how little present
demand there is for condos. Sales are
down a considerable 57% from last
year. Given the activity in our hot low-
Adam Black | VP, Senior Loan Officer
805.452.8393 | ablack@bankofmanhattan.com
Exceeding Expectations in Your Neighborhood
Member FDIC
If you have a 93108 open house scheduled, please send us your free directory listing to realestate@montecitojournal.net
93108 OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY

SUNDAY MARCH 30
ADDRESS TIME $ #BD / #BA AGENT NAME TELEPHONE # COMPANY
1685 Fernald Point Lane 1-3pm $24,000,000 6bd/6ba Maureen McDermut & Bob Lamborn 689-6800 Sothebys International Realty
859 Picacho Lane 2-4pm $9,600,000 6bd/9.5ba Ron Madden 284-4170 Village Properties
36 Hammond Drive By Appt. $6,850,000 4bd/4ba Bob Lamborn 689-6800 Sothebys International Realty
1460 Bonnymede Drive By Appt. $6,450,000 4bd/4.5ba Gayle Lofthus 689-9011 Village Properties
2796 Bella Vista Drive 1-4pm $5,995,000 4bd/3.5ba Tomi Spaw 698-7007 Village Properties
910 Buena Vista Drive By Appt. $5,995,000 4bd/4.5ba Peggy Olcese 895-6757 Sothebys International Realty
1081 Alston Road 2-4pm $4,695,000 5bd/4.5ba Ted Campbell 886-1175 Village Properties
425 Ennisbrook Drive By Appt. $4,649,500 4bd/5ba Nancy Hussey 452-3052 Coldwell Banker
2794 Bella Vista Drive By Appt. $4,285,000 3bd/4.5ba Maureen McDermut 570-5545 Sothebys International Realty
1255 East Mountain Drive 2-5pm $4,150,000 3bd/3ba Tim Walsh 259-8808 Village Properties
491 Live Oaks Road 2 -4pm $3,450,000 3bd/3ba Andrew Templeton 895-6029 Coldwell Banker
260 Sheeld Drive 2-4pm $3,150,000 6bd/4.5ba Jason Streatfeild 280-9797 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices
1260 Mesa Road 1-4pm $2,999,000 4bd/4ba Darin Guglielmo 698-8258 Village Properties
2108 Summerland Heights Lane 1-4pm $2,650,000 4bd/4ba Brian King 452-0471 Village Properties
1372 Plaza Pacica By Appt. $2,549,000 2bd/2.5ba John Holland 705-1681 Sothebys International Realty
623 Parra Grande Lane 1-4pm $2,495,000 6bd/4ba Sherry Zolfaghari 386-3748 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices
385 Paso Robles Drive 1-4pm $1,800,000 4bd/3ba Nancy Hussey 452-3052 Coldwell Banker
232 Hot Springs Road 1-4pm $1,729,000 4bd/3ba Lorie F. Bartron 563-5054 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices
190 Cedar Lane 1-4pm $1,565,000 3bd/3ba John Holland 705-1681 Sothebys International Realty
137 Buttery Lane By Appt. $1,549,000 1bd/1ba Maureen McDermut 570-5545 Sothebys International Realty
If you have a 93108 open house scheduled, please send us your free directory listing to realestate@montecitojournal.net
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 46 Tui Voici oi rui Viiiaci
SPECIAL SERVICES
Marketing and Publicity
for your business,
non-prot, or event.
Integrating traditional
and social media
and specializing in
PSAs, podcasts,
videos, blogs, articles
and press releases.
Contact Patti Teel
seniorityrules@gmail.com
Family Legacy Preserved Forever
Does it worry you that your family legacy,
memories and stories are going to be lost
forever? I can draw out this depth and
richness in the book of your life story. I take
time to get to know my subject, researching
and writing the rst chapter for free. If we
continue well arrange a fee. Phone Paul on
805 453 2428. Commission this as a gift
for a family elder?
Everyone has a story. If you would like to
preserve your past, pass along your hopes
and dreams, and provide inspiration for
younger generations, allow me to attend
while you reminisce. Together we will
create a written account that will become a
cherished legacy for your family.
Lisa OReilly, Personal Historian, 684-6514
Qualied experienced in home care
specialist can organize your home; support
your needs with delicious cuisine with
respect and sensitivity to individual needs.
20yrs exp. and ex local refs.
Lotusfrend@aol.com/698.5120
TUTORING SERVICES
PIANO LESSONS Kary and Sheila
Kramer are long standing members of the
Music Teachers Assoc. of Calif. Studios
conveniently located at the Music Academy
of the West. Now accepting enthusiastic
children and/or adults.
Call us at 684-4626.
SPECIAL REQUEST
WANTED! Art ~ Airplanes ~ Classic Cars
~ Pistols ~ Speedboats ~ 1919 to 1969
(Cash!!)
Please call R.A. Fox at 805 845-2113.
Used Nespresso Pods Wanted For
Local Artist Do you drink Nespresso
Coffee? I want
your used
coffee pods.
Im a local artist
and I use these
colorful pods in
my creations.
Save them for
me and I will pick them up from Carp. to
Goleta area. Creative purposeful recycling
(up-cycling) at its best! Thanks so much!
Evelyn email me at pods.nespresso@gmail.
com
SPECIAL ITEMS FOR SALE
6 new Saks Fifth Avenue shoes, size 7B & 3
Italian leather handbags. Call 80 563-2526
after 4pm. Get ready for Easter.
HEALTH SERVICES
Fit for Life
Customized workouts
& nutritional guidance
for any lifestyle.
Individual/group
sessions in ideal
setting. House calls
available.
Victoria Frost,
CPT,FNS,MMA.
805 895-9227.
In-Home
Physical Therapy
Improve the quality
of your life. Learn to
move beyond your
limitations. Josette
Fast, PT
Over 33 years
experience. UCLA
trained. 722-8035
www.tnisphysicaltherapy.com
SPECIAL EDUCATOR with language, art,
and music therapy experience. Available for
a long-term association with people with
moderate to severe disabilities. Superior
references. Goals include developing happy
and creative experiences with support and
care. Email to discuss your situation and
ideas: artlanguagetherapy@outlook.com
Dr. Jacques Charles
Aesthetics &
Wellness
Promoting First-Rate
Health & Wellness!
Chiropractic Care/
Massage/Aesthetics &
Skin care/ Electrolysis/
Nutritional & Lifestyle
Counseling. House
calls and late hours available.
(805) 965-6992 Website:
DrJacquesCharles.com
WRITING FICTION? Best-selling author
and longtime instructor for Adult Ed and
SB Writers Conference will critique your
manuscript. Excellent references (check
Amazon books). Note: Now teaching writing
class Wed. eves. 5:30-7:30. Duane Unkefer
bfzozobra@yahoo.com
Fully trained
experienced Waldorf
teacher offering
home schooling/
tutoring of the entire
Waldorf curriculum
grade 1-4, which
includes Language,
Reading, Math,
Music, Painting,
Drawing, Handwork,
German, etc. Will be available at the end of
this school year.
805 636-8372
or email ute.luebeck@gmail.com
COMPUTER/VIDEO SERVICES
VIDEOS TO DVD TRANSFERS
Hurry, before your tapes fade away. Now
doing records & cassettes to CD.
Only $10 each 969-6500 Scott
POSITION WANTED
Property-Care Needs? Do you need a
caretaker or property manager? Expert Land
Steward is avail now. View rsum at
http://landcare.ojaidigital.net
PERSONAL CHEF/CMA(certied
Medical Assistant) amazing multi-tasker with
charming disposition. Great refs, clean DMV
& background check. Travel ready. Also
available for private dining parties.
Call Victoria
805 765-7774.
HOUSE KEEPING SERVICES
Affordable house cleaning. Home
Apartment Ofce. One time, weekly &
monthly. Move-in/out cleaning.
Free estimate.
Selene (805) 698-5897.
HOUSE/ PET SITTING SERVICES
Long term pet/house sitting by a
professional woman. Reliable, love animals
and well-know in the community. Local
references. Stephanie 805-252-5229.
HOUSE SITTING SERVICE
Responsible. Insured. 805-451-6200
centralcoastsailing@gmail.com
ESTATE/MOVING SALE SERVICES
THE CLEARING HOUSE, LLC
Recognized as the Areas
Leading Estate Liquidators
Castles to Cottages Experts in the
Santa Barbara Market! Professional,
Personalized Services for Moving,
Downsizing, and Estate Sales .
Complimentary Consultation
(805) 708 6113 email:
theclearinghouseSB@cox.net
website: theclearinghouseSB.com
Estate Moving Sale Service-Efcient-
30yrs experience. Elizabeth Langtree
689-0461 or 733-1030.
REAL ESTATE SERVICES
Nancy Hussey
Realtor
(33) Closed Real
Estate Transactions
in 2013! Put This
Impressive Record
to Work for You in
2014!
805-452-3052
Coldwell Banker
/ Montecito
DRE#01383773
www.NancyHussey.com
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
MONTECITO PROPERTY FOR SALE
Homes and condos, updated Fridays
www.montecitohouses.info
Kevin/Berni Coastal Properties kevin@sbre.
com 637-2048
MESA CLOSE TO BEACH
308 Cooper 3BR 2.5Bth
$1,095,000
www.coopercottage.info
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING (805) 565-1860
(You can place a classied ad by lling in the coupon at the bottom of this section and mailing it to us: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108. You can also FAX your ad to us at: (805) 969-6654.
We will gure out how much you owe and either call or FAX you back with the amount. You can also e-mail your ad: christine@montecitojournal.net and we will do the same as your FAX).
Its Simple. Charge is $2 per line, and any portion of a line. Multiply the number of lines used (example 4 lines x 2 =$8) Add 10 cents per
Bold and/or Upper case character and send your check to: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108.
Deadline for inclusion in the next issue is Thursday prior to publication date. $8 minimum. Email: christine@montecitojournal.net
Yes, run my ad __________ times. Enclosed is my check for $__________
$8 minimum TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD $8 minimum
27 March 3 April 2014 MONTECITO JOURNAL 47 Without ambition, one starts nothing. Without work, one finishes nothing. Ralph Waldo Emerson
Get away from it all! -18.3 acres, beautiful
4 bedroom gated ranch home in Santa
Ynez. Mountain views, pools, citrus trees.
$1.99M. Call 805 452-7235.
OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE
2 Professional Ofce Suites
1224 Coast Village Circle
$850 or $1,175 per month,
utilities, parking & kitchen.
Call Bob at 805.963.1120
SHORT/LONG TERM RENTAL
CARMEL BY THE SEA vacation getaway.
Charming, private studio. Beautiful garden
patio.
Walk to beach and town.
$110/night.
831-624-6714
PAVING SERVICES
MONTECITO ASPHALT & SEAL COAT,
Slurry Seal Crack Repair Patching Water
Problems Striping Resurfacing Speed
Bumps Pot Holes Burms & Curbs
Trenches.
Call Roger at (805) 708-3485
CARPENTRY SERVICES
FINISH CARPENTRY
Custom made cabinets, doors, windows,
molding. Restoration. Cristian Salamanca
(805) 696-8507. Lic#911243
GARDENING/LANDSCAPING
Estate British Gardener Horticulturist
Comprehensive knowledge of Californian,
Mediterranean, & traditional English plants.
All gardening duties personally undertaken
including water gardens & koi keeping.
Nicholas 805-963-7896
WATER CONSERVATION
Water Savers of the Central coast will
modify your irrigation system to save 50%
or more.
We nd leaks, change sprays and install
smart controllers. We have saved clients
LOCAL BUSINESS DIRECTORY (805) 565-1860
Live Animal Trapping
Best Termite & Pest Control
www.hydrexnow.com
Free Phone Quotes
(805) 687-6644
Kevin OConnor, President
$50 off initial service
Voted
#1
Termite Inspection 24hr turn around upon request.
Got Gophers?
Free
Estimates
PLUMBERS
25% OFF W/AD. MAX. VALUE $500-
PlumbingVideo InspectionJetterWater HeaterDisposalsFaucets
Eva Van Prooyen, MFT
Psychotherapist
1187 Coast Village Road Suite 10-G
Santa Barbara, CA 93108
(805) 845-4960
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 50105
Santa Barbara, CA 93150
LIC#: 43829
BILL VAUGHAN 805.455.1609

Principal & Broker DRE LIC # 00660866
www.MontecitoVillage.com

Broker Specialist In Birnam Wood


Active Resident Member Since 1985
w w w . M o n t e c i t o V i l l a g e . c o m
millions of gallons
of water and countless thousands of dollars.
Email us today to set up a free estimate.
Dennis@Watersavers.us
TRANSITIONS
WOMENS THERAPY GROUP
Do you feel that you are at a turning point
in your life? Do you think about where
you would like your life to go? What past
unnished business is stopping us from
being present in these changing times?
Recovering from grief, loss and trauma.
A group is forming for women over 55 to
work together to create new connections,
new directions and deeper meaning. It is
an 8-week commitment and the cost is $45
per session. Facilitated by Carolyn Groth-
Marnat, PhD, MFT.
(805) 570-4383 for a personal interview.
VOLUNTEERS WANTED
Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center
employs the power of the horse to enhance
the capabilities of children and adults with
special needs in Santa Barbara. Join our
volunteer team and make a difference in
someones life. To lean more, visit www.
heartsriding.org 964-1519.
Do you love Reagan history? The
Reagan Ranch Center is seeking volunteers
who would be interested in serving as
docents for the Exhibit Galleries.
Docents will have the opportunity share
the history of President Reagan and
his Western White House. For more
information or to apply, please contact
Danielle Fowler at 805-957-1980 or
daniellef@reaganranch.org.
The 1st Memorial Honors Detail is
seeking veterans to get back in uniform
to participate in an on-call Honor Guard
team to provide military honors at funeral or
memorial services throughout Ventura and
Santa Barbara Counties.
For more information visit www.
usmilitaryhonors.org,
email carlvwade@gmail.com,
or call 805-667-7909.
Bunnies Urgently Needing Shelter is
located at the Santa Barbara County
Animal Shelter, 5473 Overpass Rd, Santa
Barbara, Ca. www.
bunssb.org Adopt /
Volunteer/Donate
with us, and help
give abandoned &
stray rabbits & guinea
pigs a better life.
SANTA BARBARA 805.687.2666 | MONTECITO 805.969.5026 | SANTA YNEZ VALLEY 805.688.2969
3868 State Street
Santa Barbara, CA 93105
1170 Coast Village Road
Montecito, CA 93108
2933 San Marcos Avenue, Suite 102
Los Olivos, CA 93441
2013 BHHAfliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway afliate, and a franchisee of BHHAfliates, LLC. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.
Equal Housing Opportunity. Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by the seller or obtained frompublic records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy
of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.
Visit us online at
bhhscalifornia.com
3622 Reeves Rd $7,250,000
Nancy Kogevinas 805.450.6233
50+ Acs in Ojai with income producing orchards. 5BD/7BA Main House.
www.Hamm-JRanch.com
1910 Carrisa Hwy $6,500,000
Ken Switzer 805.680.4622
The Zapata Ranch. Spectacular 11BD/7BA; 2750 ac ranch compound,
very private near Paso Robles.
4445 Via Bendita $4,950,000
Schultheis/Bros Gough 805.729.2802/805.455.1420
Premiere 8 acre ocean view estate site in Hope Ranch.
1376 Estrella Dr $3,700,000
Ealand/Schultheis 805.698.9902/805.729.2802
Hope Ranch 4 bedroom, 3 bath Estate on 1.5 acre parcel near the private
beach.
2401 Drum Canyon Rd $3,900,000
SiBelle Israel 805.896.4218
1006 Acre Ranch! Privacy, miles of trails for riding, & mins from SYV!
www.SiBelleHomes.com
2225 Sweeney Rd $2,900,000
Ken Switzer 805.680.4622
Prized ranchland, mainly Sta. Rita Hills AVA. 335 AC, 196 to plant, exist. 2
hms, new storage.
1332 Las Palmas Dr $6,950,000
Abbott/Winter 805.455.5409
5 bed, 4 bath w/2 half baths. Ocean View Hope Ranch Estate w/ pool/spa
& equestrian facilities on 4.5 acres. www.LasPalmasEstate.com
3938 Laguna Blanca Dr $2,795,000
Ebner & Associates 805.729.4861
Architectural Gem in Hope Ranch. 3BD/3BA on 1.07 acres with grand views of Santa Barbara. www.BuyTheBeachSB.com
4455 Via Bendita $15,750,000
Kogevinas/Schultheis 805.450.6233/805.729.2802
A Notable Estate in the prestigious part of Hope Ranch designed by George Washington Smith features 5 bedroom main house, 2
guest apartments, staff quarters, guest cottage, & 5 car garage. www.MontecitoProperties4455.com
3981 Roblar Ave $5,498,000
Nancy Kogevinas 805.450.6233
20+ Acs, 5Bd/7.5Ba, Gst Wing, Pool/Spa, Tennis Court, Room for
Horses. SantaYnezRanchoCielo.com
4630 Via Bendita $4,495,000
The Brothers Gough 805.455.1420/455.3030
Spacious Mediterranean 1BD/1BA on 3.5 useable acres in Hope Ranch
with development potential.
405 Via Hierba $3,495,000
Team Scarborough 805.331.1465
Gated 4BD/5BA 7000 SF Mediterranean estate on 1.37 lushly
landscaped acres in Hope Ranch.
4345 Via Glorieta $3,895,000
The Brothers Gough 805.455.1420/455.3030
Custom Hope Ranch 4BD/4.5BA gated estate on 1.2 acres with canyon,
mountain & ocean views.
1015 Ladan Dr $3,750,000
Paul Hurst 805.680.8216
Impeccable 5BR/7BA + Guest House. 360 views. Text GOTO 4SBRE4
to 95495.