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FIRST LATINO ROUNDTATBLE

BREAKFAST
Westin Hotel
Friday May 19th, 2000
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM
FIRST LATINO ROUNDTATBLE
BREAKFAST
Westin Hotel
Friday May 19th, 2000
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Sponsored by: Progreso Latino, CHisPA & The Governor’s Advisory Commission
on Hispanic Affairs

Agenda

8:00 AM – 8:30 AM REGISTRATION

8:30 AM – 8:45 AM WELCOME/INTRODUCTIONS

Goals and Objectives

Organizational Structure

8:45 AM – 10:00 AM OPEN DISCUSSION

Time line

Next Steps

ADJOURN
The Latino Roundtable
Our Challenge
No group has a larger stake in the path our community chooses as we begin the new millennium
than Latinos. Latinos comprise more than 10 percent of this state, including almost 51 percent of
the school age population. It is the youngest and fastest growing minority in the state. Soon after
the turn of the century, Latinos will represent the largest minority group in the United States, and
within 50 years 20 percent of the entire population will be Latinos. As citizens with a substantial
role and stake in the future of this state and nation, we, Latino Americans look forward with
hope and promise to a community that truly reflects the "American dream."

Conversely, we can become a united and even greater community, a community that values all of
its citizens, where communities and families are strong and prosper, where we encourage and
build on our rich diversity. We can be an even more prosperous community, where we bring
together the enormous productive potential of all of our people, where all have an equal
opportunity to contribute to our economy and to our future-to have a decent job, a good
education, to be healthy-and to thrive through our enterprise and hard work. We can become a
community where every child can have a full and productive life. It is our choice.

About The Latino Roundtable


The Latino Roundtable will be a coalition of RI Latino community Leaders that represent the
diverse Latino cultures in the state. Roundtable members understand how changes in the world
and national economies will affect the Latino community in Rhode Island, and how the public
and private sectors can work together to provide support as we look to improve our community.
The Roundtable's central purpose will be to pursue the development of public policy that will
help Latinos compete in the state economy and provide a high quality of life for the state's
citizens. The Roundtable will achieve this purpose by defining strategic goals and objectives, and
communicating these objectives to government officials and the public at large.

What We Will Do
The Latino Roundtable will identify and define key long-term issues facing Rhode Island in its
search for steady and significant improvement of the Latino community.
The Latino Roundtable will create legislative and gubernatorial support for certain indispensable
elements of our community progress. We will be advocates for points of view. We will be a
force for actual shifts in public policy towards those indispensable elements needed for growth.
The Roundtable will seek to change many of the anti-Latino attitudes among open-minded
leaders for public policies that promote long-term growth of our community.

Mission
The overall improvement of the Rhode Island Latino climate through the direct
involvement of Latino leaders in order to identify and influence public policy outcomes.
Approach
• Careful selection and prioritization of issues (both short and long term) coupled
with commitment of talents and resources to deliver desired outcomes.
• Interact and work in partnership with Rhode Island's government leaders.
• Coalesce support among a broad-based coalition of organizations to work in
concert promoting a proactive agenda on issues where there is a consensus on
how to achieve change.
• Increased awareness about the need for action on key public policy issues.
• Commit to both a vision for and technical understanding of the issues,
recognizing that substantive involvement in the public policy arena takes time and
that essential broad-based support for reform cannot be accomplished overnight.

Process
An issue-oriented task force structure that directs research, supervises preparation of
position papers, recommends policy and advocates change to factors affecting Rhode
Island's Latinos well being.

Outcomes
• Legislative and corporate reforms bringing decisive, constructive change that
places Rhode Island Latinos in a leadership position statewide.
• Latinos speaking with one voice and working in concert on issues, thus creating a
powerful force for an improved quality of life for Rhode Island's Latino
community.
• Rhode Island Latino Roundtable will be identified as coalition with one voice that
influences public policy with key opinion leaders.
PRESS RELEASE

May 5, 2000

Contact: Tomás A. Avila


(401) 467-0111
(401) 467-2507
E-Mail: cybertwin@netscape.net

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

First Latino Roundtable Breakfast

Providence-The Center for Hispanic Policy & Advocacy (CHisPA), Progreso Latino and the
Governors Advisory Commission on Hispanic Affairs will be holding their inaugural Latino
Roundtable breakfast Friday May 19th, 2000 at the Westin Hotel 8:30 AM – 10:00 AM. The
breakfast is being organized to bring together a coalition of RI Latino community Leaders that
represent the diverse Latino cultures in the state. The Roundtable members understand how
changes in the world and national economies will affect the Latino community in Rhode Island,
and how the public and private sectors can work together to provide support as we look to
improve our community.
No group has a larger stake in the path our state chooses as we begin the new millennium
than Latinos. Latinos comprise more than 10 percent of this state, including almost 51 percent of
the school age population. It is the youngest and fastest growing minority in the state. Soon after
the turn of the century, Latinos will represent the largest minority group in the United States, and
within 50 years 20 percent of the entire population will be Latinos. As citizens with a substantial
role and stake in the future of this state and nation, we Latino Americans look forward with hope
and promise to a community that truly reflects the "American dream."
According to Patricia Martinez, Executive Director of Progreso Latino, the oldest and
largest Latino organization, “We can be a more prosperous community, where we bring together
the enormous productive potential of all of our people, where all have an equal opportunity to
contribute to our economy and to our future-to have a decent job, a good education, to be
healthy-and to thrive through our enterprise and hard work.”
The Roundtable's central purpose will be to pursue the development of public policy that
will help Latinos compete in the state economy and provide a high quality of life for the state's
citizens. The Roundtable will achieve this purpose by defining strategic goals and objectives, and
communicating these objectives to government officials and the public at large.
For more information about the breakfast, call CHisPA 401-467-0111, Progreso Latino 401-728-
5920.
###
Calendar of Events
June 1-30 Colectiva del “Chicano Movement” Sol City Gallery
June 23rd CHisPA's CLDI Graduation Providence Library
June 24th Central Falls Fiesta del Pueblo James Park
June 25th RILPAC Summer Cookout, 61 Tappan Street
June 25th Colombians TPS Rally Pawtucket City Hall
June 27th Redesign the Providence H.S. Brown University
June 29th Democracy Fellows Training J & W University
June 30th CHisPA's Tropical Night 421 Elmwood Avenue
July 8th Coronación Reinado Dominicano Portuguese Club
July 23rd Colombian American Festival
August 12th Virgen de Urkupiña Festival St. Patrick Church
August 13th 13th Annual Dominican Festival, Roger Williams Park
August 20th Providence Puerto Rican Parade
August 26th RILPAC 80th Women Suffrage, RI Foundation
September 15th Hispanic Heritage Month Begins
September 16th Latino Festival @ WaterFire Steeple Street
September 23rd Fiesta de Las Americas
October 6-8 DANR Conference New York
October 15th Hispanic Heritage Month Ends

Independence Day
July 4 U.S.
July5 Venezuela
July 09 Argentina
July 20 Colombia
July 28 Peru
August 06 Bolivia
August 08 Ecuador
August, 25 Uruguay
September 7 Brazil
September 15 Central American
September 16 Mexico's
September 18 Chile

PARTICIPANTS
NAME ORGANIZATION Email
CHisPA
Tomás A. Avila 421 Elmwood Avenue Cybertwin@netscape.net
Providence, RI 02907
Quisqueya En Acción
Pedro Baez 807 Broad Street Pebaso@aol.com
Providence, RI 02907
Proyecto Esperanza
Alido Baldera 400 Dexter Street projecthope@esperanza.coxatwork.com
Central Falls, RI 02863
CHisPA
Betty Bernal 421 Elmwood Avenue Najabe@juno.com
Providence, RI 02907
Nice & Neat Cleaning Service
Silvia Bernal 30 Vernon Street Sylvia_bernal@usa.net
Providence, RI 02903
Providence En Español
Ana Cabrera 1849 Smith Street Providesp@aol.com
North providence, RI 02911
Jorge Cardenas Marriott Attended
Senator Jack Reed
Norelys Consuegra 201 Hillside Rd. Ste. 200 norelys_consuegra@reed.senate.gov
Cranston, RI 02920
Providence En Español
Victor Hugo Cuenca 1849 Smith Street Providesp@aol.com
North Providence, RI 02911
District 20 Candidate
Gonzalo Cuervo 194 Calla St. Gonzaloque@tuinformacion.com
Providence, RI 02905
Congressman Patrick Kennedy
Jackie Dacosta 249 Roosevelt Ave., Ste. 200
Pawtucket, RI 02860
Quisqueya En Acción
Melba Depeña 807 Broad Street dedicada@rikidscount.org
Providence, RI 02907
CHisPA
Ernesto Figueroa 421 Elmwood Avenue Ernesto_figueroa@latinmail.com
Providence, RI 02907
Angel Taveras for Congress
Andy Galli P.O. Box 9366 Andrewgalli@aol.com
Providence, RI 02940-9366
Senator Chaffee's Office
William Kinsella 10 Dorrance St., Suite 221 William_kinsella@chafee.senate.gov
Providence, RI 02903
LADO
José Gónzalez 421 Elmwood Avenue rid25279@ride.ri.net
Providence, RI 02907
Senator's Chaffee
Leonor M. Guerrero 10 Dorrance St., Suite 221 leonor_guerrero@chafee.senate.gov
Providence, RI 02903
Senator Chaffee's Office
William Kinsella 10 Dorrance St., Suite 221 William_kinsella@chafee.senate.gov
Providence, RI 02903
Proyecto Esperanza
Carlos Lopez 400 Dexter Street projecthope@esperanza.coxatwork.com
Central Falls, RI 02863
Governor's Advisory
Commission on Hispanic
Marta Martinez Affairs Mvm57@aol.com
23 Spring Garden Street
Cranston, RI 02888
Progreso Latino
Patricia Martinez 626 Broad Street Progreso@loa.com
Central Falls, RI 02863
Presencia Newspaper
Gil Antonio Mejia 198 Eight Street presencia@yahoo.com
Providence, RI 02806
Nelson Mejia MET High School Attended
Poder 1110
Tony Mendez 1226 Mineral Spring Ave. Tuinformacion@aol.com
North Providence, RI 02904
WSBE Channel 36 TV
Pablo Mijares 50 Park Lane mijares@wsbe.org
Providence, RI 02907-3124
CHisPA
Luisa Murillo 421 Elmwood Avenue lmurillo@nea.org
Providence, RI 02907
Guatelmatecos Unidos
Olga Noguera 421 Elmwood Avenue Onoguera@dhs
Providence, RI 02907
Progreso Latino
Luis Peralta 626 Broad Street Peralta70@hotmail.com
Central Falls, RI 02853
Lydia Perez Puertoriqueños Unidos
P.O. Box 8168 yorubapr@earthlink.com
Warwick, RI 02888
Vidal Perez Brown University Vidal_perez@brown.edu
Poder 1110
Johana Petrarca 1226 Mineral Spring Ave. jpetrarca@tuinformacion.com
North Providence, RI 02904
RIEDC
Janet Pichardo West Exchange Street janetpich@hotmail.com
Providence, RI 0293
Senate 10 Candidate
Juan M. Pichardo 229 Atlantic Avenue Jmpichardo@hotmail.com
Providence, RI 02907
Poyecto Esperanza
Beatriz Restrepo 400 Dexter Street projecthope@esperanza.coxatwork.com
Central Falls, RI 02863
Federal Hill House Asso.
Javier Rico 9 Cortland Street
Providence, RI 02909
Martin M. Rivera Initiative for Human Dev.
CHisPA CLDI
Sarita Rivera 19 Derby St. Apt.4 tarisa@yahoo.com
Pawtucket, RI 02860
TangoUSA
Delia Rodriguez-Masjoan 807 Broad Street # 134 Deliasmidt@latinmail.com
Providence, RI 02907
CHisPA CLDI
Gilbert Rodriguez 19 Derby St. Apt.4 Gilrod212@yahoo.com
Pawtucket, RI 02860
CHisPA
Ralph Rodriguez 421 Elmwood Ave. rrodriguez@mhrn.state.ri.us
Providence, RI 02907
Quisqueya En Acción
Elvys Ruiz 807 Broad Street
Providence, RI 02907
Parents Network
Brenda Serrano 400 Warwick Ave Suite 12 brendaserrano@home.com
Warwick RI 02888
Proyecto Esperanza
Olga Silva 400 Dexter Street projecthope@esperanza.coxatwork.com
Central Falls, RI 02863
City of Providence
Olga Shirzadi Providence City Hall Oshizardi@worldnet.com
Providence, RI 02903
Maria Luisa Vallejo Dept. of Health Attended
Bell Atlantic
Elba Vargas 300 Metro Center Blvd. vargasel@yahoo.com
Warwick, RI
American Express Financial
Leticia Velazquez 175 Hillside Road Leticia.x.velazquez@aexp.com
Garden City
Cranston, RI 02920
Westin Hotel
Friday June 16th, 2000
8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

Sponsored by: Progreso Latino, CHisPA & The Governor’s Advisory Commission
on Hispanic Affairs

Agenda

8:00 AM – 8:30 AM REGISTRATION

8:30 AM – 8:45 AM OPENING


• Welcome
• Introductions
• Announcements

PRESENTATION

8:45 AM – 8:55 AM Mat Brown, Democracy Compact


9:00 AM – 9:25 AM Brenda Serrano, RIPIN
9:30 AM – 9:50 AM Q & A/Wrap Up

10:00 AM ADJOURN

Next Meeting Friday July 28th, 2000


Register
Patricia Martinez
Marta Martinez
Tomás Alberto Avila
Margarita Guedes
Vidal Perez
Yolanda Perez
Luisa Murillo
Juan M. Pichardo
Janet M. Pichardo
Olga Shirzadi
Erick Cahow
Johana Petrarca
Tony Mendez
Victor Hugo Cuenca
Ricardo Patiño
Victor Capellan
Melba Depeña
Olga Noguera
Brenda Serrano
Milagros Acevedo
Elizabeth Presley
Ernesto Figueroa
Delia Rodriguez Masjoan
Latino Community
Issues
INDEX
?

?
Education
Aside from the intrinsic value of knowledge, education is often viewed as the strongest route to
economic well-being. Our competitive global marketplace relies on education as the means to
uncharted opportunities. One constantly finds a need for adapting to an evolving information-
based society. For Latinos, a significant segment of America’s labor force in the 21st century,
structural, economic, and social obstacles may thwart the hope of a quality education. Our
dedication to improving Latino educational opportunities shall focus on the examination of
barriers to academic achievement

Immigration
Recent federal legislation has raised financial roadblocks to the reunification of families.
Regulations explaining recent legislation has yet to be promulgated creating confusion and room
for abuse. Immigrant families are often confused about entitlements for -which they may or may
not be, eligible (e.g. education and health care versus public assistance) This confusion may lead
families to not access necessary services. Further, families may fail to register the American
born children of undocumented parents with negative consequences for these children. The
recent "anti-terrorism act" has, in some cases, been misapplied to persons with minor offense
histories. Also, individuals may be advised to admit to (committed 'or not) crimes unaware of
the potential negative impact to their immigration status.

Health
Hispanics suffer a greater incidence of some highly preventable diseases, such as AIDS,
tuberculosis, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and breast and cervical cancer, than other U.S.
groups. Moreover, Hispanics are less likely to have access to health insurance, adequate
preventive medical care, or public health education materials. Latino's health programs work to
develop culturally-relevant, bilingual health education and promotional materials for those in the
Hispanic community not being reached by national, mainstream health education efforts, as well
as to provide assistance in the form of model programs, consultation, and training to Hispanic
community-based organizations and mainstream health agencies.

Economic Empowerment
In several areas related to economic well-being, Hispanics have demonstrated stability and even
some upward mobility. For instance, Hispanic men are the most likely group of workers to be in
a job or looking for one. However, a substantial segment of Latinos faces serious economic
challenges. Nearly three in ten Hispanics and two in five Hispanic children are poor. (Most
Latinos in poverty are part of "working poor" families - those that have at least one full-time
worker, yet earn wages below the official poverty level; often, they receive no health insurance
or other important benefits.)

Redistricting/Down Sizing
st
As the 21 century begins, and we welcome a new millennium and the 2000 census is conducted,
battle lines are already forming on how the RI political map will be redrawn in 2002. This battle
is brewing in the General Assembly over how to conduct legislative reapportionment, the
politically explosive issue of drawing a new political map to reflect Rhode Island's population
changes over the decade of the 90's as well as in community organization.
Adding ammunition to this battle is the schedule down sizing of the Legislature from 150-
members body to 113 approved by the voters in 1994 by a margin of 51.8%. This schedule
downsizing is fuelling a lot of concern, from a variety quarters, over the impending size
reduction for the Rhode Island General Assembly.

Census 2000
After the last national headcount, Census Bureau officials admitted they had undercounted
minorities much more than the broader population, and that Hispanics had fared worse than most
other groups. At a national level, 4.4 percent Blacks and 5.2 Hispanics were overlooked
compared to 1.6 percent of the total population. Hispanics and bureau officials agreed that the
government should begin its outreach efforts to all communities earlier than it had in the past.
That effort will include a media campaign and all local community groups would be encouraged
to participate. However, other issues provoked debate, and many remain skeptical about the
Census Bureau's estimates of those who were overlooked in the last census.

Economic Development
Economic growth and employment creations are crucial variables in any urban revitalization
strategy. Jobs -- their quality, availability and location - and access to economic opportunity are
critical building blocks on which a city, its people and its businesses depend. It is necessary to
understand the nature of both the local workforce and the occupations that local and regional
industries will employ so that effective strategies may be developed to ensure that Providence
residents will be able to access and compete for available jobs. In light of the major
demographic changes our state is experiencing and the explosive growth of Latino businesses
across this nation and in Rhode Island, and as we approach the next millennium, our aim is to
assist in facilitating a systematic, gateway approach, to economic development in the Latino
community and all other sectors that interact with it.

Civil Rights
Discrimination in employment, housing, and other aspects of daily life severely limits the
economic and social opportunities available to Hispanic Americans. Latinos shall conduct policy
analysis and advocacy activities in the civil rights arena in order to promote and protect equality
of opportunity in education, employment, housing, public services, and public accommodations
for all Americans.

Leadership Development
The development of Latino leaders is essential to achieving full Latino participation in the
nation's social and economic mainstream. Leaders play a critical role in organizing communities
for self-determination, advocating for community improvement, and representing the interests of
the communities they lead. We believe that leadership is already present in each community, but
generally undeveloped to its full potential. Our leadership development efforts, therefore, shall
seek to help community-based organizations identify and support leaders who have commitment
to their communities and to develop their knowledge, skills, and experience in order that they
can work effectively within and outside the Hispanic community to improve its resources,
services, and opportunities.
Citizenship
Naturalization is the critical last step that new Americans take in order to participate fully in the
civic life of the United States. Latinos shall conduct policy analysis and advocacy activities in
order to ensure that the naturalization process is accessible and efficient, with minimal backlogs
and waiting periods. In addition, Latino's Citizenship Projects shall provide resources and
technical assistance to their communities in the various stages of the U.S. citizenship application
process.

Media Advocacy
The manner in which Hispanic Americans are perceived by other Americans and the community,
own self-image is extensively influenced by media portrayals of Latinos. Latinos shall conduct
research to document media images of Latinos, and challenges unfair or inaccurate portrayals
which influence others opinions and views.

Political and Civic Engagement


As the political climate reshapes, the Latino population is showing a renewed commitment to
demonstrating its political strength. The remarkable growth of the population and the
significance of the Latino electorate has undergone intense scrutiny and become the subject of
fiery debate across the nation. Policymakers and the public alike have voiced their need for a
better understanding of the Latino community and the significance and actuality of the Latino
vote. We shall seek to fill this void by conducting in-depth analyses of Latino voting trends in an
effort to bring clarity to Latino perceptions and experiences in the electoral process. Work of this
nature enables us to give voice to the Latino community and allows elected officials and civic
leaders the opportunity to focus their efforts on those issues that most concern their
constituencies.
Social Integration
The Latino community is a complex, diverse body that often cannot be defined in traditional
terms. Knowing this, we shall strive to take innovative approaches to research that will address a
wide range of topics including affirmative action, crime and welfare policies and examine their
potential impacts on the social environment, subcultures and dynamics of the Latino population.
While attempting to address the challenges presented by the social incorporation of Latinos into
American society, we shall also bear in mind the important role of immigration in the Latino
community.

Reference

Avila, Alberto, Tomás Community Leadership Development Initiative Structure & Vision,
Providence, RI January 1, 1998

Avila, Alberto, Tomás Community Latino Economic Empowerment in the Next Millennium,
Providence, RI November 8, 1997

Avila, Alberto, Tomás, NCLR 1999 Annual Conference; Launching a New Millennium
Summary, Providence, RI August, 1999

Avila, Alberto, Tomás, The 2nd Annual Harvard University Latino Law and Public Policy
Conference, "Access To Opportunity" Summary, April 1999

Avila, Alberto, Tomás, 2nd Annual Dominican American Roundtable Summary, June 1999

Avila, Alberto, Tomás, 6th Annual Latinos in the New Millennium Conference: Report,
November 1999

Center for Hispanic Policy & Advocacy - Latinos at A Cross Road: Millennial Economic
Empowerment Forum, Providence, RI March 22, 1999.

Gounaris, Marilyn, Martinez, Marta, Cruz Francisco - Under One Roof: The Juanita Sanchez
Multi-Services Center, Providence RI May 22, 1993

Michaelson, Rita C. Report on the Hispanic, Portuguese and Cape Verdean Populations in Rhode
Island, Providence, RI, September, 1986

National Hispanic Leadership Agenda, 1996 Policy Summary, Washington, DC October 15,
1996

Plan Providence The - Improving Access to Jobs and Economic Opportunity: The Development
of a Jobs Policy for Providence A Policy Concept Paper, February 1, 1998

Rodriguez, Ralph, Governor's Advisory Commission on Hispanic Affairs Action Forum Report,
Providence RI, November 13, 1997
Rodriguez, Ralph, Governor's Advisory Commission on Hispanic Affairs Nuestro Futuro/Our
Future: Meeting The Needs of Rhode Island Hispanics Community; A policy Summary,
Providence RI, April 4, 1997

Williams, Anastasia; Moving The Hispanic Community Forward: Report of Anastasia Williams
Economic Development Task Force, Providence, RI March 1993.