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Engaging the Brain Lesson Plans Math Lesson Plans

ECED Math Activity Plan


Name: Ashley Neeley

#1

Title/Focus: Leaf Counting


Date: 10/28/2013

Age of Children: 3-5 years old Rationale for this Lesson: (Based on identified needs and interests of the child.)
choose this project? I chose this activity because it will help children to count to ten while seeing an object that represents a specific number. This activity will allow students to apply his/her natural curiosity about the outdoors to counting practice and create a counting book.
(NAEYC 4b Knowing, understanding and using effective approaches, 4d Building meaningful curriculum;, 1a Knowing understanding young childrens characteristics a nd needs) Why did you

Lesson Subject Goal: (Write the Correct number of the Indiana Foundations or Indiana School Standards on the line next to the foundation designation .Type the foundation in the box.
NAEYC 4d Building meaningful curriculum)

______ Science

____X___Math

MA.K.1.6: Count, recognize, represent, name, and order a number of objects (up to 10).

Behavioral Objectives (related to the subject area and the childs developmental needs) (NAEYC 4b Using developmentally effective approaches; 4c Understanding content knowledge in ECE) Do not use the words understand or learn. Use strong verbs that indicate what the children will be doing. Use your textbook Planning the Curriculum chapter and Chapter Nine. Page 216.

1.

Children will . . .compare a natural item (leaves) with numbers. The child will be able to see a specific number on the page and also see an item(s) that represent the numbers.

2.

Children will . . .create a counting book that will allow him/her to use for counting practice.

3.

Children will . . .gather items that will be used for data to help him/her remember numbers.

Procedural Information to Support Learning:

Materials (List all supplies, titles of books, props, teaching aids, etc.) (NAEYC 1c Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4b Knowing, understanding and
using effective approaches, strategies and tools for early education.)

11 sheets of white construction paper Glue Stapler laminating machine(optional) Heavy books, for pressing leaves Markers or crayons

Transition In (Clearly explain how you will engage the childs interest in this activity. Include words and tunes for songs/chants, etc.) (NAEYC 4a Connecting with children and families; 4bUsing developmentally effective approaches) Talk to the children about how the seasons change the trees lose their leaves. Explain what happens to the leaves and how they change colors and fall off the trees.

Read the book: Counting With Leaves by Madeline K. and Michael L. Ohlweiler Explain to the student that they will be making their own leaf counting book.
Procedures (Include step-by-step information on the order of events for this activity plan.) (4a Connecting with Children and Families; 4b Using developmentally effective approaches) Transition in (see above) numbers as needed

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

Help the child label the bottom of each page with each number. Start out by writing the number 1 and then ask the child what number comes next. Create a title page for this book. Allow the child to decorate the front cover the way he/she wants it to look. Go outside and have the child find all kinds of leaves. Always assist the child to find good leaves that will be good examples for each number. Once you find the right amount of leaves press them in a book to be able to keep them flat. (allowing several days to pass so the leaves can be dried) Once the leaves are dried have the child glue the leaves to each page that it represents. Page one should have one leaf on it; page two should have two leaves on it, and so on. Optionalyou can laminate the pages so the leaves do not get very crispy and fall off along the way. If you do not laminate the pages you can staples the pages together starting from the cover page to page number ten.

Transition Out (Clearly explain how you will prepare children to end this activity and ease into the next activity. ) (NAEYC 4a Connecting with children and families; 4bUsing developmentally effective approach) Once the book is complete allow the child to help you read what each page says and the number of leaves on each page. Allow the child to point out different features of each leaf, the shape, size, color, veins, etc. Explain to the child that he/she will be able to use this book to help them count.

Engage/Extend Learning. To encourage childrens participation in the activity, list at least three (3) open -ended statements or questions you may say during the activity to encourage childrens involvement and higher -level thinking. (NAEYC 4b, 4c)

1. 2. 3.

How many leaves did you find that are red? Why do you think leaves fall off the trees once the weather turns cold? What else could you use leaves for to learn how to count? Do you think you could count the leaves by color, size or shape?

CHILD EVALUATION & Planning


(NAEYC 4d Building meaningful curriculum through evaluation; 3b Knowing about and using observation, documentation and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches; Understands and practices responsible assessment; 1bKnowing and understanding multiple influences on development and learning;

1.

In detail, describe how and why the objectives were/were not met. Explain why or why not by including your childobservations during the activity. What was done or should have been done during the activity to create a successful experience? Describe how you would know if this happened.

If the objectives of this lesson are met I would know by how the children would react to putting leaves on each page. We start on page one and if the child picks out one leaf and then pages two comes and the child picks out two leaves, I would get the understand that the child is able to count and understand what each number represents. 2. How did the children respond to your activity? Support your answer by recording the children s dialogue, body language, observed behaviors, etc. Describe what you would see in a successful activity.

In a successful activity I would see children using this book when they are doing a counting activity. I could see children using this book just to look through and notice the difference in each leaf. If students ask questions about the book or leaves in general I would think this activity was successful. Math/Science Center materials Sources Purchase the book at: http://www.blurb.com/b/130894-counting-with-leaves Leaf activity website: http://www.123child.com/lessonplans/seasonal/fall/leaf.php Other fall activities that deal with counting. A different book that can be used: Fall is Here! Counting 1 to 10 by Pamela Jane. (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0689874707) Leaf Rubbings: Have the child place a leaf under a piece of paper, and rub the paper with crayon, and the leaf shape will appear. This works much better with green leaves. Sensory box that contains different items from trees. (leaves, bark, acorns, flowers) (some items can be fake/artificial to be able to keep them forever or you can use leaves as the base of the box and put other fall items inside.)

ECED Math Activity Plan


Name: Ashley Neeley

#2

Title/Focus: Sorting
Date: 10/28/2013

Age of Children: 3-5 years old Rationale for this Lesson: (Based on identified needs and interests of the child.)
choose this project? I chose this activity because I thought the children would show interest in it. This activity allows the children to experience items of different shapes, size, color and texture. This activity also allows the children to count and graph the amount of items in each jar. This activity allows children to know which jar is more or less than the other that they picked out. Some jars may have equal amounts and that allows the child to see two items of different characteristics be equal to each other.
(NAEYC 4b Knowing, understanding and using effective approaches, 4d Building meaningful curriculum;, 1a Knowing understanding young childrens characteristics and needs) Why did you

Lesson Subject Goal: (Write the Correct number of the Indiana Foundations or Indiana School Standards on the line next to the foundation designation .Type the foundation in the box.
NAEYC 4d Building meaningful curriculum)

______ Science

____X___Math

MA.K.1.2: Compare sets of up to ten objects and identify whether one set is equal to, more than, or less than another

Behavioral Objectives (related to the subject area and the childs developmental needs) (NAEYC 4b Using developmentally effective approaches; 4c Understanding content knowledge in ECE) Do not use the words understand or learn. Use strong verbs that indica te what the children will be doing. Use your textbook Planning the Curriculum chapter and Chapter Nine. Page 216.

4. 5.

Children will . . .compare the similarities and differences of both items. Children will . . .record the amount of items in each jar, on the graph, to find out if the items are equal to, more than or less than. Children will . . .sort two sets of different items into two groups.

6.

Procedural Information to Support Learning: Materials (List all supplies, titles of books, props, teaching aids, etc.)

(NAEYC 1c Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4b Knowing, understanding and
using effective approaches, strategies and tools for early education.)

Baby food jars with labels taken off Different items that fit into the jars: rocks, bottle caps, paper clips, dried seeds, plastic bugs, plastic beads, corks, erases, cake candles, dice, straws cut into pieces, gems, plastic coins, pipe cleaners, and pieces of felt. Some jars can also contain candy items: hard candies in different color wrappers, animal crackers, gummy worms/bears, and life savers (gummy or hard). A graph worksheet of ten boxes/cells in two different columns. Crayons or markers (optional)

Transition In (Clearly explain how you will engage the childs interest in this activity. Include words and tunes for songs/chants, etc.) (NAEYC 4a Connecting with children and families; 4bUsing developmentally effective approaches) Explain to the children that they will be learning about sorting different size, color, and amount of different objects. Read the children the book called: Sorting by Henry Arthur Pluckrose. While reading this book ask the children questions about the book and why they think sorting is an important part of the math lesson. After the story is over explain to the class that they will be doing a sorting activity with different objects. Procedures (Include step-by-step information on the order of events for this activity plan.) (4a Connecting with Children and Families; 4b Using developmentally effective approaches) Transition in (see above) numbers as needed

1. 2. 3. 4.

Read the book: Sorting by Henry Arthur Pluckrose. After the story explain to the children that they will be doing a sorting activity with different items. Have the jars of items sitting out and allow the child to pick which two jars they would like to graph. Once the child has selected the two jars they want have them go back to their sit where a graph sheet will be waiting. 5. Have the child open one jar and organize the items on one column of the graph worksheet. 6. Have the child open the second jar and organize the items on the second column of the graph. 7. After the children are done putting the items on the graph have the children estimate which set of items has the more and which has less. (Some children may have items that are equal) 8. Once the child has estimated the numbers of items have the children count and see how many are in each group. 9. Once the children have answered these questions have the children color in the amount of squares that equal the number of items. (optional) 10. Have the children compare the differences of items. (color, size, shape, etc.) Transition Out (Clearly explain how you will prepare children to end this activity and ease into the next activity. ) (NAEYC 4a Connecting with children and families; 4bUsing developmentally effective approach) Once the activity is over have the children answer questions as you walk around the room. Ask the children to compare the items by shape, color, and size. You can also ask the child is he/she has ever sorted their toys at home. Engage/Extend Learning. To encourage childrens participation in the activity, list at least three (3) open -ended statements or questions you may say during the activity to encourage childrens involvement and higher-level thinking. (NAEYC 4b, 4c)

1. 2. 3.

Are both items the same size: are they smaller than each other, bigger than each other or the same size? How many more items do you need of the one to make it equal the same amount of the other item? Why did you pick the two specific jars that you did? Could you tell what the item was that was in the jar before you opened it?

CHILD EVALUATION & Planning


(NAEYC 4d Building meaningful curriculum through evaluation; 3b Knowing about and using observation, documentation and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches; Understands and practices responsible assessment; 1bKnowing and understanding multiple influences on development and learning;

1.

In detail, describe how and why the objectives were/were not met. Explain why or why not by including your childobservations during the activity. What was done or should have been done during the activity to create a successful experience? Describe how you would know if this happened.

While walking around the room, if I was children with the right amount of box colored that matched the amount of items in that row, I would know that the child had understood this activity. If the child has the items lined up in each grow, one after another, I would know that he/she got the idea of sorting. 2. How did the children respond to your activity? Support your answer by recording the childrens dialogue, body language, observed behaviors, etc. Describe what you would see in a successful activity. If the students were engaged in the activity and if the activity had his/her attention I would know that the activity was successful. If the children were running around the room or having their attention on something else I would know that I had to go about introducing the activity a different way next time. Math/Science Center materials- Sources The items in the jars could always be changed out. Adding more jars with new items would also be interesting to the children. Using some of the items for other math activities may make the child remember this activity. Another sorting activity: http://www.kindergartenkindergarten.com/sorting-by-attributes/ Possibly having larger jars with bigger items may also get the childrens attention.

Website to purchase the book: http://www.amazon.com/Sorting-Counts-Henry-ArthurPluckrose/dp/0516454587

Science Lesson Plan

ECED Science Activity Plan


Name: Ashley Neeley

#1

Title/Focus: Carnation Color Activity


Date: 10/27/13

Age of Children: 3-5 years of age Rationale for this Lesson: (Based on identified needs and interests of the child.)
choose this project? I chose this project because it teaches children how plants use water as food. It allows the child to see the effects of what the water can do and allows the child to actually see it work with putting the food coloring in the water. Lesson Subject Goal: (Write the Correct number of the Indiana Foundations or Indiana School Standards on the line next to the foundation designation .Type the foundation in the box.
NAEYC 4d Building meaningful curriculum) (NAEYC 4b Knowing, understanding and using effective approaches, 4d Building meaningful curriculum;, 1a Knowing understanding young childrens characteristics and needs) Why did you

___X___ Science

_______Math

SCI.K.3.3: Describe and compare living plants in terms of growth, parts, shape, size, color, and texture Behavioral Objectives (related to the subject area and the childs developmental needs) (NAEYC 4b Using developmentally effective approaches; 4c Understanding content knowledge in ECE) Do not use the words understand or learn. Use strong verbs that indicate what the children will be doing. Use your textbook Planning the Curriculum chapter and Chapter Nine. Page 216.

7.

Children will . . . observe how a plant uses water as food and pulls it through the stem to get nourishment. The children will be able to see this happen due to the water being colored. Children will . . . predict what will happen when they add the food coloring to the water. Children will . . . discover how essential the functions of roots and stems are to plant growth.

8. 9.

Procedural Information to Support Learning: Materials (List all supplies, titles of books, props, teaching aids, etc.) (NAEYC 1c Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4b Knowing, understanding and
using effective approaches, strategies and tools for early education.)

White carnations (at least two) Flower vases or plastic cups Different color food coloring (dark colors work best)

Water

Transition In (Clearly explain how you will engage the childs interest in this activity. Include wo rds and tunes for songs/chants, etc.) (NAEYC 4a Connecting with children and families; 4bUsing developmentally effective approaches)

Before the class starts the flower activity I will read a book called How Plants Grow by Deborah Short, Josefina Tinajero, and Alfredo Schifini. This book explains how plants grow, what they need to live and how the plants lose their leaves in the fall. Procedures (Include step-by-step information on the order of events for this activity plan.) (4a Connecting with Children and Families; 4b Using developmentally effective approaches)

Transition in (see above) numbers as needed

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Read the book: How Pants Grow by Deborah Short, Josefina Tinajero, and Alfredo Schifini. Have the plants, vases, food coloring and water ready to start. Fill the vases full of water. Have the child count out 15-20 drops of each food coloring in each vase Have the child put the flower in the vase and let it sit. Check back throughout the day and observe the flowers Allow the flower to sit for 24-48 hours, observing it periodically On the last day examine the whole flower and have the children tell you why he/she sees.

Transition Out (Clearly explain how you will prepare children to end this activity and ease into the next activity. ) (NAEYC 4a Connecting with children and families; 4bUsing developmentally effective approach)

Explain to the student what happened. Show the student the bottom of the stem, where the color will be stronger, and explain that the water is the flowers food and it pulls the water up through its stem to be able to drink and grow. Have the children draw a picture of the flower and how the flower ended up looking after it changed colors. Engage/Extend Learning. To encourage childrens participation in the activity, list at least three (3) open -ended statements or questions you may say during the activity to encourage childrens involvement and higher -level thinking. (NAEYC 4b, 4c)

1. 2.

Why/how do you think the flower turned colors? Do you think other plants, like this flower, will change colors if we do the same experiment?

3. Do you think we use water as food to be able to grow? CHILD EVALUATION & Planning
(NAEYC 4d Building meaningful curriculum through evaluation; 3b Knowing about and using observation, documentation and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches; Understands and practices responsible assessment; 1bKnowing and understanding multiple influences on development and learning;

3.

In detail, describe how and why the objectives were/were not met. Explain why or why not by including your childobservations during the activity. What was done or should have been done during the activity to create a successful experience? Describe how you would know if this happened.

I would know this is a successful activity by the way the students acted when he/she saw the different colors on the flower pedals. When children are given hands-on activities they usually tend to understand the objective better. If each child was given a flower and had it sitting in the colored water, he/she would be able to take the flower home and explain to his/her parents what he/she did to be able to get the flower the other color. I would also be able to send home a letter asking the parents how the child told what he/she did during the activity and how the flower changed. 4. How did the children respond to your activity? Support your answer by recording the childrens dialog ue, body language, observed behaviors, etc. Describe what you would see in a successful activity. In a successful activity I would see the children asking questions and/or explaining to me how he/she knows what happened. I would possibly see the children have excitement on their faces. I would see children wanting to hold the flowers, explaining the colors, and explaining how a flower uses the water to eat. Math/Science Center materials- Sources Website that has different flower activities: http://www.teachpreschool.org/2013/03/14-fun-flower-activitiesfor-preschoolers/

Have a sensory box of different plants and other types of items that children may find outside growing by plants or fake insects can be included. Bring in different types of flowers and explain to the students that even though the flowers may look different they are all considered plants. Have children create his/her own flower out of different materials.

ECED Science Activity Plan


Name: Ashley Neeley

#2

Title/Focus: Apple Theme


Date: 10/27/13

Age of Children: 3-5 years of age Rationale for this Lesson: (Based on identified needs and interests of the child.)
(NAEYC 4b Knowing, understanding and using effective approaches, 4d Building meaningful curriculum;, 1a Knowing understanding young childrens characteristics and needs) Why did you

choose this project? I chose this project because the students will be able to learn about the story of Johnny Appleseed, how apples grow, that different colors and sizes of apples exist, and that the difference of apples makes them taste different. Lesson Subject Goal: (Write the Correct number of the Indiana Foundations or Indiana School Standards on the line next to the foundation designation .Type the foundation in the box.
NAEYC 4d Building meaningful curriculum)

___X___ Science

_______Math

SCI.K.1.1: Use all senses as appropriate to observe, sort and describe objects according to their composition and physical properties, such as size, color and shape. Explain these choices to others and generate questions about the objects. Behavioral Objectives (related to the subject area and the childs developmental needs) (NAEYC 4b Using developmentally effective approaches; 4c Understanding content knowledge in ECE) Do not use the words understand or learn. Use strong verbs that indicate what the children will be doing. Use your textbook Planning the Curriculum chapter and Chapter Nine. Page 216.

1.

Children will . . . classify apples in different size, color, and shape.

2.

Children will . . . observe the different parts of an apple, skin, meat, seed, the core and how apples grow.

3. Children will . . . discover and observe how the apple does look like a star once it is cut open. Procedural Information to Support Learning: Materials (List all supplies, titles of books, props, teaching aids, etc.) (NAEYC 1c Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments; 4b Knowing, understanding and
using effective approaches, strategies and tools for early education.)

Different types, colors and sizes of apples. Knife (used by adult only) Napkins or plates The story: Johnny Appleseed by: Reeve Lindbergh The story called: The Little Red House with no Doors and No Windows and a Star Inside. (http://www.ncagr.gov/agscool/commodities/redhouse.htm)

For the ending activity: black, red, green, brown, and white construction paper. The children will make a regular apple, one eaten apple with seeds showing, dirt with seeds in it, and a tree with little apples growing on it. (It will show a phase from a regular size apple, to it being ate, then taking the seeds and putting them in dirt and then the tree will grow.)

Transition In (Clearly explain how you will engage the childs interest in this activity. Include words and tunes for songs/chants, etc.) (NAEYC 4a Connecting with children and families; 4bUsing developmentally effective approaches) Explain to the children that they will be learning about a man named Johnny Chapman also known as Johnny Appleseed. Explain to the students that Johnny Appleseed was a legendary American who planted and supplied apple trees to much of the United States. Tell the students that many people think that Johnny Appleseed was a fictional character, but he was a real person. Then read the book Johnny Appleseed by Reeve Lindberg. Procedures (Include step-by-step information on the order of events for this activity plan.) (4a Connecting with Children and Families; 4b Using developmentally effective approaches) Transition in (see above) numbers as needed 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Read the book: Johnny Appleseed by Reeve Lindberg Show the different colors, sizes, and shape of the apples while reading the story. Cut and apples in pieces and allow the child to taste them. Have the child create his/her own picture of how an apple grows with the activity provided. (explain in detail how to create the apple pictures) For the transition out, read another story called The Little Red House with no Doors and No Windows and a Star Inside. (http://www.ncagr.gov/agscool/commodities/redhouse.htm) Once the second story is done cut another apple open and let the children see the star. Pass the apple around letting the students get a closer look at the apple.

Transition Out (Clearly explain how you will prepare children to end this activity and ease into the next activity. ) (NAEYC 4a Connecting with children and families; 4bUsing developmentally effective approach)

Read the story called, The Little Red House with no Doors and No Windows and a Star Inside. (http://www.ncagr.gov/agscool/commodities/redhouse.htm) Engage/Extend Learning. To encourage childrens participation in the activity, list at least three (3) open-ended statements or questions you may say during the activity to encourage childrens involvement and higher -level thinking. (NAEYC 4b, 4c) 1. 2. How did the apple taste? Do you think the different type of apples tasted different? Why do you think the seeds look like a star inside of the apple?

3.

Do you think that you could grow an apple tree in your yard?

4. Can you tell me the way an apple tree is made? CHILD EVALUATION & Planning
(NAEYC 4d Building meaningful curriculum through evaluation; 3b Knowing about and using observation, documentation and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches; Understands and practices responsible assessment; 1bKnowing and understanding multiple influences on development and learning;

1.

In detail, describe how and why the objectives were/were not met. Explain why or why not by including your childobservations during the activity. What was done or should have been done during the activity to create a successful experience? Describe how you would know if this happened.

I would know this is a successful activity by the way the students created his/her apple activity. If the child is able to create the activity in the way that an apple is really created then I would know that the children understood it. 2. How did the children respond to your activity? Support your answer by recording the childrens dialogue, body language, observed behaviors, etc. Describe what you would see in a successful activity. I would also know this is a successful activity when I see the expression on the students faces when they are using their senses to learn the apple and when I see the excitement when the student see the star inside once I cut the apple open. Math/Science Center materials Sources (http://www.ncagr.gov/agscool/commodities/redhouse.htm) http://www.amazon.com/Johnny-Appleseed-ReeveLindbergh/dp/0316526347/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1382990447&sr=12&keywords=johnny+appleseed+for+children Different pictures of apples for children to look at Books on apples and Johnny Appleseed that children can look at/read while having free time. If the theme is apples, have different activities and games that describe apples for the students.

Reflection on Science and Math Activities Leaf Counting The first activity I did with the children was the leaf counting activity. I explained to the children that we would be going on a walk to collect leaves for a project that we would be creating later that day. While on the walk the children seemed to enjoy being outside instead on sitting at their desks. It seemed to me that the boys enjoyed the finding the leaves for than the girls. Some of the boys got really into finding leaves that were green but in the process of changing colors. One little boy came up to me and told me what every color was that was on a particular leaf. I told the children that when they find the leaves they want to bring them back to me to be able to put in the plastic bag that I had. Once the students were done collecting the leaves and we were inside, I explain that we are going to use the construction paper that is at their desks and write each number on the bottom of them. I told the class to start at number one and write the word out. I did have to assist some of the children. A couple children numbered each piece of paper without assistance and seemed to wait patiently until everyone else was done. I then explain to the children that they would find the correct number of leaves for each piece of paper, but the number of leaves had to match the equally. I explained to the children that they can use their glue to glue on the leaves to each page. Once child got really excited when I told him that when the book is done it is going to be something that he can use as a counting tool or something to look at and admire the different shapes, sizes and colors of each leaf. He then asked if he would be able to take the book home to show is mother. I think overall the children did great with this activity. There seemed to be no issues with the children collecting the leaves or making the books. I did staple each book together after the children were done. A couple of things that I would have done different is do this activity when its not as cold out and I would have laminated each sheet after the child was done. I feel like

after a while of using the book or the children playing with it, the leaves could get a bit dry and crumble. The children really loved finding the different style, shape, and color of the leaves. Sorting The second activity that I did was a great idea for the classroom. The children got really excited when they saw all the jars and was able to pick what they wanted. Some of the children wanted to take more than one jar back to the desk at a time. I explained to them that once they were done with the jar they had then they could get another one. The jar that seemed to be very popular with the boys was the jar of fake bugs. A lot of the boys kept on asking each other when it was going to be someone elses turn. The children did very well with the graphing of each item. One child even used a different color for each box. Some of the items I used were: fake bugs, different colored buttons, different shaped beads, fake coins, rocks, candles, paperclips shaped like Mickey and Minnie mouse, and erasers. The erasers were a hit with the girls because there were different shapes and some looked like little purses, flowers, lipsticks, etc. The teacher was very excited about this activity also. She asked if I could give her more information about it and she wanted to start using this activity in her classroom more often. Once little girl asked where I got all the jars from. I explained to her that they were baby food jars and she made the comment that the baby that I got them from must have eaten a lot of food. The only change that I would do for this activity would be having doubles of each jar. With all the boys excited about the fake bugs it made me think that if there was a second jar the boys would have been able to move one more quickly. Some boys were waiting until the previous boy was done with that specific jar.

Carnation Color Activity The third activity I did with the students was the carnation color activity. As soon as I walked in the classroom with the flowers the children asked me what the flowers were for. I explained that we would be doing an activity to see how plants use water to eat. I had four carnations and red, blue, green, and yellow food coloring. I had the four plastic vases sitting out with the water already in them. I selected four children to put the food coloring in each vase. Once that was done I selected another four children to put the flowers in each vase. I explained to the children how plants use water to eat and grow. Once child asked me if the flower uses the water like we do. He then asked if they drink water like we do also. I explain the process for the use of the water to the children. I explained that the water will be sucked through the stem and with the color being add that the flower may turn colors. Throughout the day I had the children observe to see if they saw any changed in the pedal part of the flowers. One little girl said that she can see the one flower turning blue. I asked her if she knew how it was happening. She told me the flower was drinking. A couple hours after that I asked the children if they could see any other changes. At this point I think the green was the darkest and two little boys pointed it out. At the end of the day I had put a piece of the stem off and showed the children the color inside of them stem. I explain the water with the color is pulled up through the stem to be able to let the flower drink and stay alive. The only thing that I would change about this activity would be to be able to keep the flowers in the water for a couple days to show the children how dark each flower could get. The children seemed to really like this activity and I was even told that one little girl talked about the flowers the next day in class.

Apple Theme I started the apple theme activity out by reading the book Johnny Appleseed by Reeve Lindbergh. While reading the book I showed the pictures to the children and explain the different types of apples that the book talked about. While reading the book I had some apples sitting on the table next to me and one little girl said that one of the apples matches the same color of the apples in the book. I explained that each apple can look and taste different. I asked the children if they have ever seen an apple tree. Once little boy told me that he lived on a farm and had three apples trees in his yard. The same little boy said that in the summer bees like to land on the apples so we have to be careful when picking them. After the story was over I picked up each apple and told the children what kind of apple it was. I also cut each apple up and allowed the children to try each one. One little girl said that her favorite color was green so she had to try the green on first. Another little girl said that she does not like apples but she knows that they are good for her. After the children tried the apples I then read the other story, The Little Red House with no Doors and No Windows and a Star Inside. While reading the story, right before I got to the last paragraph, one little boy stood up and said, The house is an apple. I finished reading the story and asked the other students if they thought the little boy was right. One girl said that an apple cannot have a star inside. I then took the last apple and cut it and showed the class that the apple does have a star inside. I did not seem to find any issues with the activity. I did noticed that some of the children wanted to try the same apple more than once so it may be a good idea for me to bring more apples next time. The children did seem to get a bit fidgety when they realized they would be able to try the apple and did not seem to want to pay attention to the story much. When all the

children were getting ready to go home one little girl asked me if I had any more apples left because she wanted a whole one to take home for her little sister.