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BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management and BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management

Programme Handbook 2012-13
Final Award and Exit Awards: Bachelor of Science (Hons) Modes of study: Sandwich and Part-time Accreditation: Chartered Institute of Building and Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors

Department of Real Estate and Construction

Faculty of Technology, Design and Environment

Programme Code: QM / QS

Publication date: September 2012

Faculty of Technology, Design and Environment

Department of Real Estate and Construction
BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management
Accredited by the Chartered Institute of Building & Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors

BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management
Accredited by the Chartered Institute of Building & Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors

Sandwich and Part-Time Degree Student Handbook 2012/2013

Head of Department Prof Joseph Tah BSc(Hons), MSc, PhD, MCIOB, ACM Programme Lead Mr Michael Hill BEng(Hons), CEng, MICE, MIStructE Subject Coordinator Mr Michael Hill BEng(Hons), CEng, MICE, MIStructE

ac.html Our programmes endeavour to deliver a teaching and learning experience. For the university statement on Equal Opportunity and Diversity please see http://www.uk i . The Faculty endeavours to meet its duties under the Equality Act 2010 to eliminate unfair discrimination and promote equality of opportunity and good relations among members of the university community. However. the Department cannot guarantee that minor details of the actual programme delivery may not differ slightly from those stated in this handbook. which reflects the University’s regulations and the Faculty of Technology. Design and Environment promotes an inclusive learning environment in which individuals are valued and supported in achieving their full potential.ac. If you have any difficulty accessing the information contained in this document please let us know by contacting the Programme Administrator. Sofia Hussain Telephone: Email: (01865) 483909 hussains@brookes.brookes.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook The Faculty of Technology.uk/services/hr/eod/statement. Design and Environment’s commitment to meeting the requirements of the relevant/various legislations and codes of practice and offers inclusive opportunities to all appropriately qualified students. The details in the handbook were correct at the time of going to press.

..........................................................................48 U33525: Building Science and Environmental Systems..................30 U35001: Economics of Built Environment .............................78 U33573: Advanced Procurement and Dispute Resolution .... Module Descriptions ....................................................55 U33529: Integrative Project 2 .............................................. Course Structure ............................62 U33565: 36 Week Industrial Experience Placement ................................................................................................................................... Introduction ...............................................................21 U33504: Introduction to Building Design and Construction ...................Programme Specification .... 112 BSc (Hons) in Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management ............................. 7 6.........................................................................45 U33524: Construction Technology.................................................................................................BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook TABLE OF CONTENTS 1..................................................................................................28 U33509: Integrative Project I ...69 U33570: Innovation in Management and Technology ..................................... Student Guidance – Teaching............................................................................ 15 9...................................................80 U33588: Independent Study ............................................. 21 U33503: Introduction to Construction and Property Management ..84 U33593: Project Development Feasibility ........................................................................... 16 10.................................... 1 2.........................................................................87 U33594: Financial Appraisal ................................75 U33572: Project Financial Control .......................................................................... 124 ii .......................................................... 5 4.................25 U33507: Introduction to Commercial Management ..........96 APPENDICES: .................................................36 U35008: Introduction to Spatial Planning ...........................................33 U35002: Foundation Real Estate and Construction Law........................................ 6 5................................................ Teaching.......................... 17 11........................................................................................................................ Learning and Assessment Strategies.......................................112 Appendix C – Brookes Assessment Compact .......................................................................................................................... Student Participation and Representation ........................... Subject Diagram – Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management .............................. Student Feedback and Review of the Course................................39 U33521: Construction Practice and Procedure .............................................................................................................................93 U33599: Construction Management Dissertation..................................................................................................................................58 U33537: Construction Communication and Information Technology........42 U33522: Quantity Surveying Practice ........................................................52 U33527: Construction Law and Procurement ....................... Learning and Assessment ..................................Programme Specification .................100 Appendix B .... 10 8..................................... 8 7....................................................................... Subject Lists ...................... 2 3..................... 99 Appendix A .......................72 U33571: Project Management ............90 U33598: Commercial Management Dissertation................................................................ Supporting Students at Oxford Brookes University ...... 100 BSc (Hons) in Construction Project Management ..................................................................................... Subject Diagram – Construction Project Management ...........................................

.............. 131 Appendix I – Turnitin ......... 134 Appendix J – Student Guide for Supervised Industrial Experience Year ..................................... 142 Appendix M ................................................................................................................................................................... Feedback and Marking Guidelines ............................................................................................ 129 Appendix G – Cheating ................ 144 Appendix O – Health and Safety Regulations: Guide for Students ..................................Rooms .........BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix D – Undergraduate Programme Assessment......... 143 Appendix N – Headington Campus Maps ....... 130 Appendix H – Citing Your Sources .......................................................................................... 126 Appendix E – Course Assessment Schedule ................... 128 Appendix F – Consideration of Mitigating Circumstances............................................................... 146 Appendix P – Alumni: Keeping in Touch ...... 135 Appendix K – Departmental Staff Contact List ........................................ 150 iii ..................................................... 141 Appendix L – Support Services Contact Details .....

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you should have electronic access to the Undergraduate Modular Programme Handbook and Regulations and the Undergraduate Modular Programme Guide for Students. The Undergraduate Modular Programme Guide also contains the framework of rules within which the Undergraduate Modular Programme runs. you will be asked to evaluate this guide . You will find that these will provide the answers to many of the questions you have concerning the Undergraduate Modular Programme.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 1. A list of key staff roles is given in Section 10 and a full list of staff is given in Appendix K. This document is your guide to the Department and the courses in Construction Project Management and Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management. In addition to this guide. It provides useful information to assist you throughout your course. as they will be one of your main resources during your time here. Feedback The hope is that this guide will be helpful as well as informative but you are the best source of information as to what you need to know.suggest changes. Michael Hill Programme Lead Important Note: Regulations and procedures change from time to time and it is your responsibility to stay up to date. 1 . We recognise that you may find life at University difficult initially. If in doubt see your Student Support Coordinator or Subject Coordinator for guidance. and wherever this guide provides conflicting information the Undergraduate Modular Programme Guide should take precedence. Later in the year. Introduction Welcome to the Department of Real Estate and Construction at Oxford Brookes University. we are here to provide pastoral as well as academic guidance. Your co-operation in this evaluation will be valuable and appreciated. we recommend that you get to know the Student Support Coordinator and staff in the Department as soon as you can. so please do not hesitate to seek advice from us. during the important settling in period. provide feedback on what would have been useful to have been included for the benefit of future students. In addition to the documentation.

We are aware of this and feel it important that you should understand how different use or interpretation is made of similar information by different disciplines. Course Structure The BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management and the BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management are accredited by both the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and are therefore structured and designed for students that wish to go on and gain membership of these professional bodies. 2 and 4 of the course. The themes are inter-related and this will be reflected in the teaching strategies. 5 & 6 representing years 1. and the contextual framework is the building design. the choice open to you is constrained by the inclusion of compulsory modules and prerequisite chains. Each theme comprises a group of related modules whose interrelationships and complexity are developed as the course progresses. In the final year of study (normally after a year of industrial experience) there will be a different choice of modules for each course – see Sections 3. The course is divided into Levels 4. construction and commercial processes with its many variations and complexities. the teaching and assessment methods. for both courses are given in the Programme Specifications in Appendix A and B. You may notice "overlap" in the content of certain different modules. 2 .BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 2. Full-time sandwich mode is normally four years in duration with a 3rd year industrial placement. The curriculum for both courses is similar and has the main themes: Technology. the themes are prevented from becoming in any way separate entities by the incorporation of integrative project modules in each year of the course. and also as a further means of linking together certain modules. 4 & 5 for Subject Lists and Diagrams. Management and Finance. The courses are designed to be studied in either full-time sandwich mode or part-time mode. whose purpose is to equip you with the understanding and skills to integrate the processes of management within a technological context. without the requirement for an industrial placement. with an industrial placement in year 3. Course Outline Whilst the course has been structured to be compatible with the University Undergraduate Modular Programme and contains modules of equal academic merit. and the mapping against professional competences. Students that are working in the construction industry and study on the part-time mode will normally take six years to complete. For more information on the modes of study please refer to the Undergraduate Modular Programme Handbook and Regulations. Additionally. The benefit of sharing the same modules until the final year of study is that students will be able to defer the decision on which course to graduate until they have completed their 3rd year Industrial Placement and are able to make a more informed decision of their future career progression. the students of both courses will study the same choice of modules in years 1 and 2. The conceptual framework within which these themes are studied is the human activity of Construction. Due to the courses having similar professional competency requirements and learning outcomes. Students who wish to change course will request a field change at the beginning of their final year. The full details of the aims and objectives. which dictate which modules you can take in each year of the course.

organisation and costs. economics and processes. Modules also include the study of construction practice and procedure. The responsibility for drawing up your programme rests entirely with you – no one will chase you up if you forget to register your programme. Level 5 & 6 study develops and progresses the main themes of the two courses and the performance in these modules determines the degree classification. Remember that the choice of modules can be changed at the beginning of the semester in which they run. Your Academic Advisor (Subject Coordinator). In the final year (Level 6).BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management or BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management. drawing and AutoCAD. The second year (Level 5) focuses on the further development of knowledge and skills related to the discipline. The honours level modules provide the advanced study of the main themes and 3 . will deal with your Level 4 programme of study and any modifications to it. For further information on a particular module contact the module leader. You must discuss and agree your programme with your Academic Advisor as soon as possible. All but one module in Levels 5 & 6 are compulsory. add and delete modules. i. information technology and structural design. You can use the Online Programme Registration (OLPR) facility to manage and make changes to your programme of study. and therefore your 1st year programme is registered for you on the University computer system. and will develop the skills required in working and communicating with others. In the management and finance theme there is a concentration on the analytical and quantitative techniques associated with planning. You can also take up to two additional acceptable language modules. during enrolment week.always think carefully about your reasons for changing.e. Other module descriptions are held at the Academic Management Office and on the University's computer network. materials. students will have the opportunity to choose on which course they graduate . therefore the only choice is which acceptable module to study in the final year.see Appendix J. law. all of the Level 4 modules are compulsory. The studies in technology provide knowledge and practice in land surveying. Module Descriptions for both courses are included in Section 11 of this Handbook. Due to the requirements of the professional bodies. This choice will dictate the compulsory honours modules that need to be studied. Students will acquire and apply knowledge of building construction. trade skills. The sandwich mode student will normally spend the third year of the course gaining industrial experience by working in the construction industry for not less than 36 weeks. Level 4 Level 4 is concerned with the fundamental knowledge and skills required to understand the process of construction and commercial management. You should ensure that your Level 4 programme includes the compulsory modules for your subject and any recommended modules. Students wishing to be considered for exemption must have this agreed by the Industrial Placements Tutor . Levels 5 and 6 Level 4 students must make a preliminary choice of their Level 5 & 6 modules before the end of the Second Semester of Level 4. At the same time an introduction to construction procurement processes is provided and an opportunity to continue (or begin) the acquisition of language skills. which will compensate for any previous weak performance of study or any you have not previously studied. and the preparation of students for their industrial placement experience. via your PIP page . whose name and location will be found on your Student Record issued when you enrol and on your ‘Records & Results’ page on your Personal Information Portal (PIP) page. and how these are managed.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook In order to encourage cross-discipline synergy and awareness. students from other courses within the Faculty will also study on the 1st year (Level 4) modules.

These modules are normally taken in the 1st year of your programme of study.uk/uniregulations/current/ Module definitions: Basic (Level 4) Module Is a module that introduces you to a subject area or discipline. modules relate to the broad context of construction activity but offer ample opportunity for rigorous studies in depth.ac. There are no specific subject requirements for interim exit awards. For both honours and non-honours there are modules that are compulsory as shown in Section 3 . Single Module A module worth one credit Double Module A module worth two credits Prerequisite Module A module you have to take and pass before taking certain advanced modules Co-requisite Module A module you normally have to take in conjunction with another module(s) 4 . In combination the compulsory modules will provide you with the skills. It is expected that students will bring the valuable experience gained in their industrial placement to their final year studies.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook encourage more reflective and independent learning. Acceptable Module A module that has been specified as part of a course in addition to the compulsory modules. The marks achieved in acceptable modules contribute to the class of degree you will be awarded. At this level. in particular your Academic Advisor.brookes. To obtain a BSc degree without honours a student must pass within eight years at least twenty module credits including at least eight level 4 module credits and at least twelve acceptable module credits. It is at an advanced level and intended to engage students in reflective and independent learning. For full details of requirements for awards please refer to the undergraduate modular programme (UMP) regulation B2 at: http://www. Final award To obtain a BSc degree with honours a student must pass within eight years at least twenty-four module credits including at least eight level 4 module credits and at least sixteen acceptable module credits.Subject Lists. please feel free to ask any of your tutors. These modules are normally taken in the 2nd of your programme of study. Honours (Level 6) Module Is a module which is part of the honours level component of a degree and is normally taken in the final year of your programme of study. Compulsory Module Is a module that must be taken and passed. Advanced (Level 5) Module Is a module that builds on the skills. knowledge and understanding to achieve the course profile. knowledge and understanding achieved through taking basic modules. If there are any questions you have which are not answered by either this handbook or the Undergraduate Modular Programme documents.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 3. U 33504 Intro. Dissertation (Double) Acceptable Modules U 33549 Facilities Management (Level 5) U 33588 Independent Study (Level 6) Alternative Acceptable Modules (Maximum of 2) U6xxxx Language modules from list below Alternative Acceptable Language Modules for QM & QS U61500 French 1A U61501 French 1B U61404 French 2 U61512 French 3A U61513 French 3B U61514 French 4A U61515 French 4B U62500 Foundation A in Italian U62501 Foundation B in Italian U63500 Spanish 1A U63501 Spanish 1B U63404 Spanish 2 U63512 Spanish 3A U63513 Spanish 3B U63514 Spanish 4A U63515 Spanish 4B U62700 Mandarin Chinese 1A U62701 Mandarin Chinese 1B U62712 Mandarin Chinese 2A U62713 Mandarin Chinese 2B U63010 Japanese 1A U63011 Japanese 1B U63012 Japanese 2A U63013 Japanese 2B U63022 Japanese 3A U63023 Japanese 3B 5 . & Environmental Systems U 33527 Construction Procurement and Law U 33529 Integrative Project 2 U 33537 Construction CIT U 33565 Industrial Placement (non-credit) Level 6 Compulsory Modules for Honours Degree U 33570 Innovation in Management & Technology U 33572 Project Financial Control U 33573 Advanced Procurement & Dispute Resolution U 33594 Financial Appraisal (Double) U 33598 Commercial Mgmt. Dissertation (Double) Acceptable Modules U 33549 Facilities Management (Level 5) U 33588 Independent Study (Level 6) Alternative Acceptable Modules (Maximum of 2) U6xxxx Language modules from list below BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Single Honours Level 4 Compulsory Modules U 33503 Introduction to Construction & Property Management. U 33504 Intro. Subject Lists BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) Single Honours Level 4 Compulsory Modules U 33503 Introduction to Construction & Property Management. to Building Design and Construction U 33507 Introduction to Commercial Management U 33509 Integrative Project 1 U 35001 Economics of Built Environment U 35002 Foundation Real Estate & Construction Law (Double) U 35008 Introduction to Spatial Planning Level 5 Compulsory Modules for Degree/Honours Degree U 33521 Construction Practice and Procedure U 33522 Quantity Surveying Practice U 33524 Construction Technology (Double) U 33525 Building Sci. & Environmental Systems U 33527 Construction Procurement and Law U 33529 Integrative Project 2 U 33537 Construction CIT U 33565 Industrial Placement (non-credit) Level 6 Compulsory Modules for Honours Degree U 33570 Innovation in Management & Technology U 33571 Project Management U 33573 Advanced Procurement & Dispute Resolution U 33593 Project Development Feasibility (Double) U 33599 Construction Mgmt. to Building Design and Construction U 33507 Introduction to Commercial Management U 33509 Integrative Project 1 U 35001 Economics of Built Environment U 35002 Foundation Real Estate & Construction Law (Double) U 35008 Introduction to Spatial Planning Level 5 Compulsory Modules for Degree/Honours Degree U 33521 Construction Practice and Procedure U 33522 Quantity Surveying Practice U 33524 Construction Technology (Double) U 33525 Building Sci.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) 4. Subject Diagram – Construction Project Management L 1 E V E L 4 2 U35008 Introduction to Spatial Planning U 33504 Introduction to Building Design and Construction U 33503 Introduction to Construction and Property Management U35002 Foundation Real Estate and Construction Law U 35001 Economics of Built Environment U 33507 Introduction to Commercial Management (Double) KEY U 33509 Integrative Project I Term 1 [1.8] 6 .17.8] [15.14] U 33537 Construction CIT [7.6] Compulsory L 1 E V E L 5 2 U 33524 Construction Technology (Double) U 33525 Building Science and Environmental Systems U 33522 Quantity Surveying Practice U 33527 Construction Procurement and Law U6xxxxx Language Acceptable [13.16.18] U 33529 Integrative Project 2 U 33521 Construction Practice & Procedure U6xxxxx Language U 33565 36 Weeks Industrial Placeme nt U 33599 Construction Management Dissertation (Honours) (Double) U 33593 Project Development Feasibility (Honours) (Double) (Reflective) U 33573 Advanced Procurement & Dispute Resolution (Honours) U6xxxxx Language L E 1 V E L 6 2 2 U 33588 Independent Study (Honours) U 33570 Innovation in Management and Technology (Honours) U 33571 Project Management (Honours) U6xxxxx Language U 33588 Independent Study (Honours) U 33549 Facilities Management [7.2] Term 2 [5.

18] U 33529 Integrative Project 2 U 33521 Construction Practice & Procedure U6xxxxx Language U 33565 36 Weeks Industrial Placeme nt L 1 E V E L 6 2 U 33588 Independent Study (Honours) U 33570 Innovation in Management and Technology (Honours) U 33598 Commercial Management Dissertation (Honours) (Double) U 33594 Financial Appraisal (Honours) (Double) U 33572 Project Financial Control (Honours) U6xxxxx Language U 33588 Independent Study (Honours) U 33549 Facilities Management (Reflective) U 33573 Advanced Procurement & Dispute Resolution (Honours) U6xxxxx Language [7.BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS) 5.14] U 33537 Construction CIT [7.6] Compulsory L 1 E V E L 5 2 U 33524 Construction Technology (Double) U 33525 Building Science and Environmental Systems U 33522 Quantity Surveying Practice U 33527 Construction Procurement and Law U6xxxxx Language Acceptable [13.17.16. Subject Diagram – Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management L 1 E V E L 4 2 U35008 Introduction to Spatial Planning U 33504 Introduction to Building Design and Construction U 33503 Introduction to Construction and Property Management U35002 Foundation Real Estate and Construction Law U 35001 Economics of Built Environment U 33507 Introduction to Commercial Management (Double) KEY U 33509 Integrative Project I Term 1 [1.8] [15.2] Term 2 [5.8] 7 .

course content.ac. individual and group project work. laboratory practicals. Module guides. sexual orientation and religious belief. case studies. the dissertation and the professional practice experience. content and assessment and quality and availability of the facilities and resources supporting them. including the assessment for the module and usually a week by week guide as to the module’s contents. gender etc. Teaching. analysis and the development of interpersonal and problem-solving skills. week-by-week content and the tasks that students must undertake. focusing on the importance of research and research methods. Diversity and Inclusion as set out in the OBU Policy Statement: http://www. or a link to this information if it is stored elsewhere. course delivery. directly or indirectly on the grounds of ethnicity. computer classes. Various learning resources have been developed to support independent learning. The University uses Moodle as its virtual learning environment. as well as individual supervision. student evaluation and quality enhancement. All modules have a Moodle site where students can find details about the module. its structure. feedback to students and appropriate course materials. seminars. Learning and Assessment Strategies The Department of Real Estate and Construction is committed to achieving high quality in teaching. reading lists and assignment briefings underpin independent learning. The Department pursues its aims through:     course structure. They outline the aims and objectives of the module.uk/services/hr/eod/statement.ac. useful information and other material to their module sites. Teaching and Learning A wide range of teaching and learning methods are used to achieve programme objectives. The teaching and learning styles used are ones which enable students to learn equally effectively whatever their ethnicity. with its mix of subject knowledge and both professional and transferable skills. Moodle contains essential information about the modules you are registered for. reflected in the variety of teaching and learning and assessment methods. site visits.html The course is designed to ensure that the structure. simulations and group work.uk/ with your PIP username and password. 8 . You can log on at http://moodle. workshops. Diversity and Inclusion The Department embraces the University’s policy on Equality. learning and assessment and to thorough evaluation of its programmes. which is designed to meet the requirements of the relevant professional bodies and provide students with a career pathway choice in their final year. such as seminars and practicals. drawing classes. They enable students to make informed choices and to exercise selfdirection in pursuing aspects that are of interest to them within the framework of the module as a whole. Smaller group sessions.brookes. gender. including lectures. As a result students are expected to develop as independent learners and to acquire knowledge and skills which will enhance their employability and prepare them for professional roles in the built environment. Equality.brookes. fieldwork. provide equal opportunities for all students to study and do not discriminate. Lecturers may add their notes.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 6. Independent learning is developed and nurtured through student-led seminars. The dissertation is supported by a structured programme aimed at leading students through the key stages in its development. foster discussion.

Where appropriate. whilst complementing the teaching and learning methods and the variety of your learning and experience. coursework and the practical demands of learning. and the associated provision of feedback. pre-requisites. Specimen Examination Papers (where relevant). Useful web links and other resources. It is our intention to provide an appropriate balance between the following forms of assessment    diagnostic: that which provides information about the individual formative: that which helps you in your learning summative: that which gives a final and total measure of your attainment. module leader. learning outcomes. . students enter into a contract with each other over the conduct of group work. Programme administrator and contact details. learning hours. Office hours and tutorials allow individual and small group consultations with lecturers around matters of course content. links to important University-wide information including the policy for: Mitigating Circumstances. On modules with a coursework component the aim is to give individual written feedback within two weeks from the coursework submission deadline. level.Students are also encouraged to attend Library and IT training sessions. module reading list. any restrictions or requirements. Dyslexia.including module title. It is intended that the assessment method employed in each individual module will examine the general educational aims and assess the learning outcomes as detailed in the syllabus of that particular subject area. Assessment and Feedback Assessment encompasses all judgements made about the work of a student and/or their skills. Use of student feedback to improve the module. providing the module leader with a consensual basis for assessing those not contributing to the group effort. Plagiarism. Group work that is assessed is closely monitored in line with University policy to ensure equity in the provision of marks awarded to a group. All module handbooks contain both general and specific assessment criteria used by staff in the awarding of grades. All dissertation and Independent Study 9 . teaching.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook For each module this includes: the module description . Please ensure that you are always clear as to which criteria are involved in the assessment of any of your work and if necessary seek further guidance from the module leader. Syndication and Collusion. and draw upon appropriate software and networked facilities for presentations by making use of Media Workshop resources and expertise. The Brookes Assessment Compact sets out the aims and responsibilities for assessment for both the University and students. Module tutor(s) and contact details. University wide regulations and Examination Guidance. The course attempts to provide an appropriate balance of assessment methods throughout its duration and on a semester by semester basis. Assessment in form other than in unseen exam may be new to you and you may experience novel situations of peer assessment and self assessment. The Brookes Assessment Compact is provided in Appendix C. Assessment details and arrangements. learning and assessment. co-requisites etc. abilities and progress. number of credits. module number. Teaching materials like lecture notes and practical exercises.

seminar tutors and fellow students. Should you fail to negotiate an extension. it is your responsibility to discuss this with the module leader or tutor in advance of the deadline.pdf 7.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Modules are double marked. These meetings are followed by meetings of the full Modular Examinations Committee where awards are made. The Construction and Commercial Management Subject Examination Committee meets on a semester basis to discuss student progression and performance with the External Examiner present. Feedback comes in many different forms including ● Written comments on your work ● Verbal comments about your own work or some group work ● Comments made during class discussions Finally.brookes. The External Examiner carries out the important function of ensuring that a high level of academic standards and quality assurance are maintain. consult http://www. Student Guidance – Teaching. borderline cases and some examples of middle-grade marks. all fails. If you are encountering any problems with your attendance please seek advice from your Student Support Coordinator or Subject Coordinator immediately. Almost all students who fail modules and experience academic difficulties during the course are those who do not attend their classes regularly. Feedback can be about your individual assignments. Should you be unable to hand in work on time due to mitigating circumstances. We expect you to attend regularly and participate actively in your classes. It will be possible to appeal a zero.ac. Although the External Examiners do not mark student’s work. The External Examiner’s annual report can be read on PIP. Learning and Assessment Attendance You cannot expect to perform well in modules unless you attend lectures and seminars. and their participation in the examination committees. This is the last point at which your work will be accepted and these deadlines must be adhered to. For more detailed advice on how to make it work for you. Deadlines and Policy on Late Submission of Assignments At the beginning of each module which has an assessed coursework component you will be informed of the ‘deadline’ for submission. group work.uk/aske/documents/StudentFeeback_makeitwork. feedback can come from module leaders. A sample of examination and coursework is passed to the External Examiner. Feedback can help you to self-assess your work against assessment criteria as well as understanding what you have done wrong in an assignment. sample exam and coursework. The sample sent will normally include all A-grades. See Section 11: Module Descriptions for description of the assessment types and methods used in each module and Appendix E: Course Assessment Schedule for the timetable of assessment during each semester. but the student will need to demonstrate why they were unable to request the extension in advance as well as that they had valid mitigating circumstances. A percentage of other assessed work is double marked within the Department to ensure that the standard and profile of marking is appropriate. If you are taking paid employment you MUST organise this around your modules. a draft that you have prepared or even your ideas about a future project (independent study or dissertation). It will help you to improve your future assignments and to approach work in further modules. 10 . a zero mark will given for the coursework item concerned. they do oversee the assessment process through their review of exam papers. they must take priority.

if necessary. These circumstances may include sickness and personal problems. etc.brookes. Also remember to plan your work across the semester. Under normal circumstances. Consideration of Mitigating Circumstances The University provides students with the opportunity to raise issues that may have affected (or are currently affecting) their performance in an assessment (exams or coursework). seminars and tutorials) you will need to undertake a considerable amount of independent study if you want to achieve satisfactory results. bearing in mind that you will be taking an average of four modules a semester. Student Services who can offer expert advice.html In most circumstances students will need to provide sufficient documentary evidence (medical certificate. If you have 24 contact hours for a particular module. will state the deadlines for each element of coursework assessment. It is essential that you become familiar with the facilities of the library at an early stage in your course. For circumstances where a student’s performance is affected for 1 week or less. Do not leave everything to the last minute before a deadline.ac. It is each individual student’s responsibility to manage their own coursework and it is important that you plan and manage your time and commitments to enable you to meet deadlines.e. If you have genuine difficulties in planning your workload go and see your Student Support Coordinator or. You are expected to spend approximately 150 hours working towards the successful completion of each single credit module (or 300 hours for double modules). Full guidance for students submitting a request following Mitigating Circumstances can be found at: http://www.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook The module handbook. The University defines mitigating circumstances as: ‘Circumstances which are beyond the control of the student and which could not be reasonably accommodated by the student and which seriously impair performance in assessment’ All three elements of the definition must be met in order to substantiate a claim for mitigating circumstances. Please remember that you are “reading for a degree”. is within the word limits set out for the assignment and is appropriately referenced. checked for grammar and spelling errors. His office is on the Second Floor of the Gipsy Lane Library. The Library The course library materials are based at the Gipsy Lane Campus. self-certification may be acceptable. It is also the time during which you prepare coursework for assessment.) to support a claim for mitigating circumstances. You will not fulfil your potential without completing an appropriate amount and level of study. Allowing Time for Study In addition to your contact hours for each module (i. Independent study is the time spent alone or with other students in which you develop your knowledge and understanding of the issues that are introduced in lectures and seminars. lectures. the only basis for awarding extensions will be due to illness. 11 . A policy statement is provided in Appendix F. Room L308K. this leaves 126 hours in which you should be undertaking independent study. Geoff Morgan is the Subject Librarian. published to students at the start of the module. Presentation of Written Work The Department of Real Estate and Construction expects that students provide essays and other written work in word-processed form. Students must ensure that the work is wellpresented.uk/services/asd/registry/sas/mit circs. It will also state if penalties will be imposed for work which exceed the specified word limit.

Students must check the time of their examinations on the official exam timetable or on their PIPs.30am to 8pm. PCs are also installed in foyers and corridors around the University. impersonation. The University takes the issue of cheating very seriously and students have been expelled or had their degree withheld. plagiarism and collusion with others when the work is supposed to be an individual assignment. anti-virus software. Make sure you read Appendix G: Cheating. printing. magazines and newspapers. located in Abercrombie extension . Information on computer facilities including. The Faculty also has its own Resources Room. Remember to take your enrolment/library card to all your examinations and place it on your desk. can be found at http://www. The Gipsy Lane Campus Computer Services help desk is located on the 1st floor of the Library and is open weekdays from 8.. skills and knowledge and has not been produced by means that will give them an unfair advantage over other students. During the middle of each semester you should check that your name is entered on the draft examination lists for all modules that you are taking during that semester by referring to your Personal Information Page (PIP) (see below). It is essential that you arrive at the exam room by that time. Remember to pick up the free library publications. During vacation it is open weekdays from 9. All students are automatically assigned a computer account on enrolment and will have access to all Computer Services facilities. You should refer to the Undergraduate Modular Programme Guide for Students for detailed information concerning the organisation of examinations at the University. Examinations It is important that you become familiar with the requirements and regulations regarding examinations. Free information leaflets are available in the library concerning the services offered.30pm and 1.30am to 12. PC hire. Computer Services Oxford Brookes Information Solutions (OBIS) is the directorate providing.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook In addition to a wide range of textbooks. for quick access to email.ac. A typical room has 20 Pentium PCs and a laser printer. which will help you find your way around the Construction and Commercial Management literature.30pm (4pm on Fridays). etc. which has copies of useful materials for your course.brookes. There are over 500 networked PCs available to students in the open access rooms across the campuses. There will also be a session specifically designed for students on how to make the best use of the library. journals. managing and supporting the University's IT services and infrastructure for all staff and students. You will be given a guided tour of the library in your first week here. In order to avoid accusations of plagiarism in particular you 12 . Cheating may take a variety of forms and includes submitting another student’s work as one’s own. and many of the rooms are open 24 hours a day. including email and the World Wide Web within 24 hours. and library tours are arranged at the beginning of each semester. which sets out the University’s regulations on Cheating and gives more details. Cheating and Plagiarism The University has strict rules to ensure that students’ work for assessment is actually the result of their own individual effort.obis. It is an invaluable aid and crucial if you are going to get the full benefit of the range of services on offer. and weekends 11pm to 4pm. Remember that the Subject Librarian is available to answer your queries.uk A wide range of computing facilities is available to all students.30pm to 4. access is also available to on-line databases. If you are late you will be refused admission and thus fail the exam.

It provides an opportunity for long-term. A helpful PIP 'Guide for Students' is available from outside the Academic Management Office (located above the Main Foyer. In each year of the course. If you are not successful in passing a module.e. emergency contact and mobile phone details request attendance and council tax exemption certificates view your student record. PIP training and drop-in sessions run during Week 0 and Week 1 in Semester 1 and Week 0 in Semester 2. see the section on Citing Your Sources in Appendix H. Using PIP you will be able to:          enrol online view your personal details and course fees maintain your address. The External Examiner checks and approves the marks awarded. you will be awarded a resit if you obtain a mark between 30% and 39%. and will be either be on a subject related to Construction Management or 13 . More details about Turnitin are provided in Appendix I. students will study on a designated Turnitin module which will require them to submit one coursework element through Turnitin via the module Brookes Virtual site. Detailed information regarding possible grades following assessment is included in the Undergraduate Modular Programme Guide and an outline is set out later in this section. Dissertations are taken for two credits. add and delete modules register for your graduation ceremony. The dissertation differs markedly from most conventional modules. Module Results The Construction and Commercial Management Subject Examination Committee comprises the Subject's teaching staff and the External Examiner. Headington Campus) and PIP queries can also be sent to the Systems Team (Academic Management Office) at ard-systems@brookes. and to pursue work on it throughout most of your final year. and ensures that the standards and results are comparable with other universities. Turnitin Turnitin is a web-based text matching tool that supports students in the development of good academic practice when preparing written work for assessment. timetable and examination timetable make various online change requests and view online messages regarding the status of these requests use the Undergraduate Modular Programme (UMP) Handbook which contains all current field lists. up-to-date module descriptions. It may also be used as part of an investigation into an alleged case plagiarism.uk.ac. It meets in the vacation after each semester to approve the examination and coursework results. under supervision. so it is important to familiarise yourself with it. programme regulations. Resits for semester 1 modules are held during the Easter Break in semester 2 and resits for semester 2 modules are held in July. You will be asked to start thinking about a likely topic for your dissertation at the beginning of your industrial placement third year. Personal Information Page (PIP) Your Personal Information Portal (PIP) is a suite of web pages that you will rely upon a great deal during your time at Oxford Brookes. syllabuses and the General University Calendar use the 'Online Programme Registration' (OLPR) facility which will enable you to manage your own programme i.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook should take care in referencing the sources of your work. Dissertations Students will write a dissertation as part of the honours element of their programme. self-generated study and research.

Study Visits and Field Trips A number of modules have field trips attached to them – some of these are compulsory .that means you must attend and pass these field trips. especially those prerequisite to final year modules. It is your responsibility to make yourself available for field trips so check arrangements with your module leaders early on. Be sure you have appropriate clothing.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Commercial Management depending on which course you have chosen. The present rate is between £10. documentation (e. entry charges etc.e.00 per day. You should agree a topic with a supervising tutor before the start of the first semester of your final year and complete the appropriate form. you are required to make a contribution to accommodation costs. A student who passes fewer than 6 Modules in Level 4 will be asked to retake the failed modules.full details are given in Appendix J. A student who has not passed all the compulsory Level 4 modules for their course may be refused permission to progress to Level 5 by that course and be required to retake the failed modules while formally remaining in Level 4. pen/pencil. to get back up to 6 in order to progress into final year. 2nd year) will not be allowed to progress to their final year. Some trips are planned to take place within semester time. travel. A student within paragraph above who wishes to remain full-time may take Level 5 and 6 modules although still within Level 4. The dissertation is usually between 8000 and 10. Students’ behaviour on any study visit or field trip is expected to be responsible and mature. Industrial Placement The third year of the course is normally spent gaining industrial experience in the construction industry . money. camera (and film). Local Education Authorities may be willing to extend grants to cover extended term dates and the University as a matter of course normally notifies these to LEA's. and may be refused permission formally to progress to Level 5. Where trips are residential.g. form E111 for emergency healthcare). M199. They will need to repeat failed 2nd year modules. travellers cheques etc. normally immediately preceding the semester in which the module takes place. passport and visas as necessary for trips abroad. You may also be required to meet other costs. In particular.g. foreign currency. e. That means that as an absolute maximum a 14  . Any notification of inappropriate behaviour will be taken very seriously by the University and could lead to disciplinary action being taken. perhaps outside "normal" module slots. and others take place in the vacation.000 words long.00 & £15. students should be aware of the University Regulations. The “22 Rule”: A student cannot ordinarily graduate with honours if they have taken more than 22 modules in Level 5 and 6. headgear. A student who passes fewer than 6 modules in Level 5 (i. Your completed dissertation will be submitted in week 8 of the final semester of your degree. Progression Rules Brief summaries of the rules which relate to your progression from one year of study to the next are given here. You will find full details of the progression rules in both the Undergraduate Modular Programme Handbook and the Guide to Students. Please note:      A student who passes fewer than 3 modules in a year will be required to withdraw from study at the University. footwear. provided that the student has passed any prerequisite module(s) for any such module. equipment: notepad.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook  student can only afford to fail 6 modules in Level 5 and 6. student representatives and representatives from the various academic support services. Grades of Assessment Assessment will be based on the following grading system: A 70% and above Distinction B+ 60-69% Very Good B 50-59% Good C 41-49% Pass D 40% Bare Pass RC 30-39% (resit coursework) RE 30-39% (resit examination) RB 30-39% (resit both coursework and examination) F Less than 29% . For more information see http://www. Faculty Academic Enhancement and Standards Committee The Faculty AESC comprises programme leaders in the faculty. 8. ensuring the effective operation of the University’s processes for managing quality and standards.ac. 3917).uk/international/studyabroad_exchange/outgoing The Department of Real Estate and Construction coordinator for European university exchanges is Philip Turner (AB1. It is ultimately responsible for overseeing the implementation of University teaching and learning strategies.decision to be made at a later stage CE Credit for prior experiential learning P Capped at 40% (passing a resit) DD Ungraded deferred assessment (Disciplinary) Generic assessment criteria for the grades above is given in Appendix D Opportunities to Study Abroad Oxford Brookes has links with a number of universities in other countries and students may spend a semester or more abroad while obtaining credits towards their degree programmes. Student representatives are encouraged to play an active role in directly influencing the way in which the programmes are administered and developed. student representatives are elected to represent the student body as a whole. As part of the function of this committee. Within the programmes. The non-honours degree does not carry RICS or CIOB accreditation. All marks obtained will be awarded DE 0-99% Resit through mitigating circumstances (Examination).11. student representatives will participate in periodic reviews and programme approval events. All marks obtained will be awarded DF Deferred Assessment . All marks obtained will be awarded DC 0-99% Resit through mitigating circumstances (Coursework). 15 .brookes. ext. A student will not normally be allowed to take a module which has a prerequisite module which they have not passed. as that will take him/her to 22. and for facilitating communication within and across Faculties. Students must make sure that they agree the exchange and the programme of study abroad with the Subject Coordinator before they depart. Student Participation and Representation The University have a policy of involving students in all of their committees and decision-making bodies.fail at first attempt FR Less than 39% .fail at resit S Pass when assessment based on pass/fail basis only MS Ungraded pass arising from mitigating circumstances DB 0-99% Resit through mitigating circumstances (Exam and Coursework).

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Subject Committee Membership consists of all staff. The agendas and minutes of the Subject Committee are available electronically for all students to see. Student representatives have access to block email facilities so that they can contact and communicate easily with all course students. Student Feedback and Review of the Course At the end of each module you take on the course you will be given an opportunity to express your views about your experience. There is also a specific meeting for Year 1 students in Semester 2 to discuss Year 2 & 4 programmes. policies and future development. Student Representatives Student representatives are elected to the Subject Committee by the students on the Course. This asks students about their experience on the 16 . Many positive suggestions have come from students on the Committee and it is an effective forum for the airing of issues of concern. and to give students the opportunity to contribute to matters relevant to the Subject's current practice. It is very important that all years are fully represented and elections will take place early in the first semester. This will normally be done by the completion of an opinion survey administered during the class. It is the most important forum in which student opinion can be brought to bear to influence present practice and future policy. Year 2 students to discuss the industrial placement. Requests should be made to the Subject Coordinator. and Year 3 students to discuss the dissertation. Teaching staff obtain important feedback from these surveys and the results form an important part of the module report which the module leader prepares and submits to the Subject Committee the following semester. Staff/Student Meetings Apart from the regular Subject Committee meeting general subject meetings of all staff and students can be called at any time at the request of either staff or students to discuss any particular problem or issue that may arise. Feedback from students is treated very seriously and so we ask that you complete the form carefully after thinking about your responses. This includes proposed changes and planning of the overall structure of the course. This is undertaken with the External Examiner. The Committee's decisions are taken to the Modular Course Examinations Committee for approval each semester. the Student Support Coordinator administers an ‘exit survey’ which is completed by each student in their last semester before graduating. Positive suggestions from students can lead to changes in the way the module is delivered in future. The Committee also functions as the Examination Committee (without the student representatives and the subject librarian). Also. and up to two student representatives from each year group. the subject Librarian. 9. Degree classifications are also discussed at the meeting in July. Their role is to represent student interests. The Subject Committee usually meets once each semester. In addition to individual module questionnaires the Department organises student focus groups to gain feedback on current issues pertaining to the taught programmes and student experience. The Committee is responsible for all academic and administrative aspects of the teaching on the course. If you have any comments to make contact the student representative of your year and should you wish to stand as a representative you can nominate yourself for the Subject Committee. The surveys are anonymous and the results can therefore not have any effect on your grade.

Views of graduating students provide staff with invaluable information for the future planning and development of the course. The framework is represented in the diagram below: Student Programme-based Academic Experience Induction. we cannot help if we do not know there is a problem! It can be difficult to ask for help or advice but there are a number of points of support and contact within the University. and compulsory. This section of the Student Handbook sets out the Student Support Framework and describes the key staff roles involved in supporting students within the Faculty and the wider University. Student Support Framework The Faculty provides an academic and personal support framework for all undergraduate students. B. making referrals to other University services as necessary. Supporting Students at Oxford Brookes University The University has committed itself to providing a supportive environment where respect is shown to all and where all staff and students.that embeds the academic and professional development of all students into programmes in a proactive. However. culture. faith or any other factor are encouraged to perform at their potential. This comprises two tiers of support: A. Individual course reviews feed into the Faculty and eventually the University review meetings. appropriate and coordinated manner. ethnic background. 10. Academic and Professional Development. Remember. Student Support Co-ordinators . It is important to stress that you should always seek help sooner rather than later from your friends. Careers Student Issues Student Issues Student Support Coordinators Referrals Academic Advisors (Subject Coordinators) Student Services Referrals Counselling Student Union Referrals Head/Deputy of Department 17 . including the student evaluation results.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook course as a whole and their time at Oxford Brookes University. Programme Support . The report of the Subject Coordinator and the module reports. race. manner. regardless of their gender. can and sometimes do arise.who respond to students who have personal or academic problems in a fast. are the central agenda items for the Annual review meeting which also includes the student representatives from the Course. problems. age. Most students enjoy their time at Oxford Brookes University and complete their studies without experiencing any particular difficulties. big and small. Each course in the University is subject to an Annual Review process which is carried out in the first semester during the autumn and examines the previous academic year’s performance. (dis)ability. the course staff or the University.

The Module Leader is responsible for the overall operation of the module including study programmes.16) during the working week or you can email or phone the office to make an appointment. Within the student support framework. as well as all activities within the Department. however. Module Leaders Every module within the University has a leader. Your email address will be your studentnumber@brookes. then please notify the Academic Management Office immediately. Subject Coordinator and Academic Advisor (Michael Hill) The Subject Coordinator is responsible for co-ordinating the activities of the course. financial issues. reading lists.21. Michele. If you need information about a module – guidance about prerequisites. Important messages may be sent directly to your home address. There are various channels for communication within the University. monitoring student progress and liaising between staff and students. Much of Joseph’s work is outside of the Department on Faculty and University committees. contact the OBIS Service Desk on ext.uk. 18 . Michael acts as the Academic Advisor available to help and assist you with advice and information on all aspects of your course during your time at Oxford Brookes.uk.Bethanie Cunnick and Diane Chung) The Student Support Coordinators should be your first port of call for any of the following types of issue – PIP problems. Senior Programme Administrator (Dan Sames) The Senior Programme Administrator is responsible for the general administration and admissions in the Faculty. This is often the fastest and easiest method of conveying messages within the University (and elsewhere)! Please get into the habit of regularly checking your email for messages. who is a full-time member of staff. overseeing the quality and standards of the teaching and assessment processes.AB2.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Key Staff: Student Support Coordinators (Michele Jacobs. personal issues. even when the teaching is shared by several staff or undertaken by part-time or external staff. For help or information on computer services within the University. Bethanie and Diane will refer you on to the appropriate support if they cannot provide you with a solution to your problem. Contacting Staff All Real Estate and Construction staff are based in offices on the first floor of the Abercrombie Building on the Gipsy Lane Campus. Programme Administrator (Sofia Hussain) The Programme Administrator provides support to both students and staff in matters relating to course administration and is located in the Programme Administrator’s Office in the Abercrombie extension . You can drop into the Student Support Office (Abercrombie Extension AB3. so if you change your address. choosing your programme of study. All staff and students are registered on email via the computer system. students should feel free to approach Joseph directly where necessary. Programme Lead (Michael Hill) The Programme Lead is responsible for managing the Department’s undergraduate programmes. On occasions it may be necessary to contact you via the post.ac. 3311 or at servicedesk@brookes. assessment and appraisal of the module by students and through the Annual Review. for example – you should contact the Module Leader.ac. disability or sickness and learning difficulties. Head of Department (Joseph Tah) The Head of Department is responsible for all aspects of the programmes we offer.

Members of staff will normally assign a number of hours a week when they have office hours. module guides. These times will be displayed on the doors of individual members of staff. As an alternative to the on-line scheme it is still possible to amend your programme by completing form M99 and obtaining your Academic Advisor’s signature. and announcements of meetings. These are times at which they will be available to see students without prior appointment. reading lists. There are a number of other methods by which staff can be contacted. You will receive training in how to use the system in induction week. On-Line Programme Registration The University operates an on-line programme registration scheme which enables you to design and manage your own programme. without completing forms. Therefore please ensure you withdraw from a module by the deadline. Staff telephone numbers and email addresses are given in Appendix K. telephone or written communication. If you do not delete the module by this deadline it will show an F grade on your student record. He is also available to advise on programmes and course matters generally. The Subject Coordinator must sign Level 5 and 6 forms and change of Field forms. So please check the notice boards on a regular basis. if not. research seminars and talks. You can do this via PIP by going to the module description and clicking on the ‘request late addition’ link. it will be added to your programme the moment they authorise the request. If you wish to make any amendments to your programme of study this should be done with the assistance of your Academic Advisor. These are good times to see staff for signatures. Your Academic Advisor can still provide you with valuable advice on amending your programme and if you are in any doubt about whether you have the right number or combination of modules make sure you do consult him or her. If you are unable to contact a member of staff in an emergency. 19 . New students will find that the University computer has already prepared a programme for them. If the module leader allows you on to the module. please note that department staff cannot enter into communication with others on your behalf.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook In order to maintain confidentiality. even members of your family. This may well include times.It is not possible to withdraw from any module after 4. it is easy to change it. i.30 pm on the Friday of week 2 of the semester in which the module runs. class lists. The Academic Advisor must sign your Level 4 forms if you choose not to make changes on-line. Noticeboards There are a number of noticeboards on the first floor Abercrombie corridor that will regularly have important messages and information relating to courses and course organisation. general information or advice. add or delete modules. please contact the Programme Administrator. this will then go to the module leader for them to consider.If you miss the Week 0 deadline for adding modules that start in that semester then you will have to request a late module addition. Follow the instructions on the screen and submit the request. You should try and meet your Academic Advisor on the Thursday/Friday of the week before the academic year begins so that you know where they are to be found if you need advice or assistance later. Please note that: . who will find another member of staff to assist you. .e. If you wish to see a member of staff outside of their office hours you should arrange an appointment via email. This may be what you would have chosen for yourself but. next to relevant semester start and end dates.

the courses have established very good links with local. with appropriate confidentiality and you should have no fear of subsequent victimisation.brookes. Oxford Brookes is one of very few departments of Construction where leading construction companies proactively visit to meet and interview students during our Milk Round process.ac. via the computer network.brookes. national and international construction companies. literature searching Drop-in sessions are available at the Gipsy Lane Library Monday-Friday .co.uk/uniregulations/current/studconductcomplaints Appeals The University has formal procedures that allow you. Should you wish to lodge a complaint it is important that you follow the correct University procedure. employers and courses. a work placement. Full details of the University’s Student Complaint Procedure can be found. and offers the support of individual professional Careers Counsellors. Complaints The Faculty. to appeal against a decision of an examination committee (i. has hundreds of full and part time jobs. The University Careers and Employment Centre has information and links on a vast range of occupations and employment sectors. if you feel that you have a justified cause.uk/services/upgrade Careers and Employability Construction Management and Quantity Surveying offer good graduate employability. assignments and dissertations  Statistics.uk/uniregulations/current/studconductcomplaints / 20 . The full web address is: http://www. A formal procedure exists that allows you to lodge complaints with the Faculty or University. Talentbank. More details of the services provided by the Careers Centre can be found at http://www. which appeal to prospective employers. The online vacancy service. maths  Finding information. Through the industrial placement scheme. and the University.check the website for semester and vacation times. on the Regulations homepage. Because of this. recognise that there may be occasions when student feedback mechanisms are not sufficient to deal with every type of problem that might occur. against a mark you are awarded for coursework or examination). Many of these companies provide placements and then go on to sponsor and employ our graduates.brookes.e. Any complaints will be treated seriously.uk. interpersonal and business skills. Oxf ord Brookes’ students have established a reputation for achieving high levels of professional. Full details of the Appeal Procedure can be found. The full web address is: http://www. See website . on the Regulations homepage.ac.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Upgrade – Study Advice Centre Upgrade is the University’s study advice service for anyone who wants advice on:  Study skills – planning and writing essays. part-time/ casual work or going on to further study.brookescareerscentre.ac.http://www. It’s never too early to make a start and Brookes students can use the service for free for 3 years after graduating. The Centre can help you whether you are looking for your first graduate job. via the computer network. You may appeal on the grounds that:     medical evidence has not been considered by the committee ‘the assessment was not conducted in accordance with the regulations for the programme’ ‘the judgement of an examiner or examiners was improperly affected by personal bias’ ‘there was a material administrative error or some other material irregularity in the conduct of the assessment…’ Should you wish to lodge an appeal it is essential that you follow the correct University procedure. on specific grounds.

Module Descriptions Module descriptions. cash flow statements and balance sheets. and requirements in relation to the area of practice.ac. pre-requisites and slotting times change from time to time. This especially applies to non U335xx modules. the roles of the industries in macro-economy. funding.  Fundamental characteristics and operation of construction and property companies. It covers the basics of the economics of the industry. and BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM).00 (N) . basic management roles and responsibilities. including profit and loss statements. operational issues.uk 01865 483941 Module Description This module provides an introduction to the construction and property industries by looking at the ways that participant companies are organised and operate their businesses. CZ.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 11. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Basic Level 4 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM).  The stages of development and construction projects including strategic business planning.  Legal/regulatory compliance. U33503: Introduction to Construction and Property Management Module Leader: Dr Youngha Cho ycho@brookes. RI. and how they compete with each other as well as how they cooperate together. BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ). 13. tendering.00-16. BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI). preparation of company and project accounts. Successful completion of this module will provide students with the pre-requisites required for further stage II Property and Corporate Management module.Seminars This module provides students with an understanding of the fundamental components of how the two industries operate. Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: Course Content  The economic conditions that influence construction and property industries. professionalism and business ethics.  Accounting principles and procedures. Design and Development (DT). EM. procurement. often significantly. You may obtain copies of the latest module descriptions via the University Computer Network and are advised to do so when deciding on your programme.Environment. and alternative pathway for BA (Hons) Cities . DT None None Semester 1 Every year None None Friday 11:00-12:00 (M) – Lecture. QM. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS). and construction management which contribute to the achievement of corporate objectives. QS. 21 .  Professional standards required for the development and construction process and the information required to prepare a development brief or project brief.

The principles of health and safety. viii Make objective judgements based on limited or  imperfect information. iii Select appropriate project identification. Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. the student will be able to: 1. v Define the major Health & Safety and environmental risks in construction and  development activity with an emphasis on ethical and professional conduct. development and procurement routes  with full appreciation of the associated risk management. x Develop key professional skills in the production  of project strategic briefs making full use of ICT and the ability to communicate ideas and concepts. codes of practice and other regulations appropriate to the area of practice. Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module. Practised     Assessed      22 . xi Develop data collection and analysis skills and the application of these to the management of development and construction projects Practised Assessed             2. Basic business skills on research. teamwork. students Taught will be able to: i Categorise the roles of the participants in the property development and construction process including issues of sustainability and insight into  the economic and social performance of the built environment. responsibilities imposed by law. the economics of the market and the appropriate legal frameworks. students Taught will be able to: vii Develop a professional approach to business  challenges. in terms of  development and planning costs. vi Formulate an outline programme for given real  estate. problem-solving and communication in the area of practice. and of the industry to the wider economy. iv Describe the economic significance. ix Develop leadership skills in conjunction with  team project development with a view to the management of project teams. report writing. development and construction project.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook    Various types of property which are interested and transacted in the market. financing. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. ii Describe the interrelationships of the main  participants and professionals as part of business planning.

J. (1990) The Modern Construction Firm.  Perform distance-learning tasks.  Participate in seminars. Blackwell Publishing.  Visit local construction and property development projects. & Cannon.  Develop reflective learning.M.(2006) Markets and Institutions in Real Estate and Construction.  Hillebrandt. P. J. and x-xv i to viii. 6th ed. Taught students will be able to: xii Independently work using standard academic  enquiry and descriptive methods xiii Orient delivered work to fit into standards business documents xiv Work in class and on site visits as a small task-based group xv Make individual and team presentations xvi Demonstrate people management skills     Practised Assessed          Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend lectures that address key themes and provide background concepts and information.  Deakin.M. MacMillan 23 .(2004).M. MacMillan  Hillebrandt. J. M. Thompson South-Western. and x-xiv i to vi i to viii 10 hours 10 hours 120 hours 10% 40% 30% 20% Indicative Reading List  Daft. MacMillan  Hillebrandt. (2000) Economic Theory and the Construction Industry (3rd ed). G. P. & Cannon. Richard L.M.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 3.  Ball. financial instruments and the urban environment. Aldershot : Ashgate.M. RICS  Cole. MacMillan  Hillebrandt. (2004) Management theory and practice. (1995) The Construction Company in and out of recession. (2006) The New Era of Management. P. A. (Recommended text book). (1989) The Management of Construction Firms: Aspects of Theory. & Cannon.  Make individual and group presentations. M. Notional Learning Time Lectures Workshops/ Tutorials Directed Study Assessment Coursework (100%) Assignments: Group Presentation Group Report (3000 words) Online class quizzes Individual Reflective Report (1000 words) Learning Outcomes i to viii. P.M. Lansley. P. London : Thomson. Property management : corporate strategies. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully.M.

D. The economics of property management : the building as a means of production . Prentice Hall Perry.(Recommended text book).. Blackwell Publishing. M. Thomas Telford Plat. Oxford: Blackwell. Oxford : Butterworth-Heinemann. Wellings. F. S (2002) An essential guide to property management London : Estates Gazette. R. Steel.(2007) Project Management in Construction 5th ed. Heath R. and Wood. A. Walker.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook       John G. (2006) Introduction to Building (4th ed. H.T. and Greeno. (2001). (2003) Risk Assessments: Questions and Answers.): Mitchells Building Series. Osbourn. RICS Validation History Validated October 2007 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 24 . P.(2006) British Housebuilders: History and Analysis.

uk 01865 483962 Module Description This module introduces students to the principles of building design. DT None None Runs across both Semesters 1 and 2 Every Year None None Semester 1 . property development. defects.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33504: Introduction to Building Design and Construction Module Leader: Mr David Shiers davidshiers@brookes. property development and building management. Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: Course Content  The property development process  The professional team  Physical appraisal of the site  Building performance parameters  Building Regulation and Development Control legislation requirements in the context of newbuild development  Foundation types  Building structural form  Principles and practice of construction: walls. construction technology. refurbishment  Environmental context. QM. roofs and floors  Building costs and site management  Measurement of buildings  Buildings in use. QS. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Basic – Level 4 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM). RU.00 (E) Semester 2 . The construction of buildings is explained using simple building structures and knowledge gained from this module will be applicable to both other subject areas and more complex forms of building dealt with in later construction modules.Tuesday 13. RI. Valuation.00 (E) This module both draws upon and informs the knowledge and experience gained in other Year 1 modules including the Integrative Project. CZ.Environment. including the statutory requirements affecting these processes. Law and Planning programmes.Tuesday 13. maintenance. and alternative pathway for BA (Hons) Cities . Design and Development (DT). BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM). Management. BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI). building services and sustainability  Site Plant and Equipment  Construction Materials 25 . BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS). EM. BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ). construction and property management.ac.00 – 16. frame. provides the essential practical basis upon which knowledge gained from subsequent modules can be interpreted and applied.00 – 15. BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU). An understanding of building design.

 xii.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module. viii. students Taught will be able to:  ix. Relate technological issues to other issues such  as sustainability. environmental protection and design economy. Report Writing  xi. Disciplinary/Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully.viii Assessment Coursework (Construction ‘Log Book’.xii i . Measure an existing property in accordance with the relevant codes of measurement Practised Assessed       3. Group Research  x. the type of components and elements of buildings ii. Data Collection and Analysis. building survey) Unseen written examination 50% 50% 26 . students Taught will be able to: i. Describe the methods of construction. the student will be able to: 1. Notional Learning Time Lectures Workshops/seminars/site visits Directed Study 20 hours 20 hours 110 hours Learning Outcome i . Understand the procedures related to common codes of measurement iv. etc. Graphic and Presentation Skills Practised Assessed         Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend lectures which address the core issues of building design & construction. Describe the performance of building materials in  relation to their normal use v. students Taught will be able to: vi. in particular for domestic buildings. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. Recognise roles and responsibilities for technical quality within the construction team vii.  Attend workshops and site visits to develop understanding of core skills and knowledge. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Apply current Building Regulations and other  standards to simple building structures iii. Compare construction methods for assessment of overall building performance Practised Assessed           2.

. Andrew (1993) Domestic Building Surveys. students must achieve an overall mark of 40% or greater. J (2007).. In order to pass the module. G. Materials in Construction: An Introduction.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook The examination is an unseen examination of two hours duration. Spon  Reid. Laxtons  Noy. (2005) Edward Building Surveys and Reports. (2000). and Waters. 1 to 5 Crosby Larchwood  Billington. The main criteria for assessment are:  Demonstration of knowledge of principles of construction techniques and appropriate use of building materials  Application of understanding of Building Regulations and other standards to building design and construction  Ability to measure an existing property ands to apply the relevant method of measurement.. (1988) Understanding Buildings. Longman  Taylor. (1985) The Construction of Buildings Vols. Blackwells  Parnham P. (2010) Building Construction Handbook. (2001) Residential Property Appraisal.D. The Building Regulations Explained and Illustrated. M. E. Longman  Williams. Blackwell  Chudley R. To pass this module. Simmons. (3rd Ed). Spon Validation History November 2003 Amended 2007 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 27 . M. Indicative Reading List  Barry R. students must obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment. and Rispin C.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook

U33507: Introduction to Commercial Management
Module Leader: Dr Franco Cheung kcheung@brookes.ac.uk (01865 483356)

Module Description This module introduces the fundamental knowledge of cost planning and commercial management. Students will acquire the basic skills to estimate construction cost based on various levels of design information. Students shall also learn the selected statistical techniques and discounting methods applied to construction management problems as well as the considerations that affect design economics of buildings. Originating School Level Size Status The Built Environment Basic - Level 4 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM), and BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS). QM, QS None None Semester 2 Every year None None Thursday 9.00 – 12.00 (J)

Field Pre-requisite Co-requisite Placing Years running Restrictions Exclusions Timetable Slots

Course Content  New rules of measurement (NRM)  Fundamental descriptive statistics  Measurement of gross internal area and elemental unit quantities  Building cost estimates  Cost planning process  Design economics  Cost data management  Discounting methods Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module, students will be able to: 1. Knowledge and Understanding
Having completed this module successfully, the students will be able to: (i) Describe and interpret data in statistical terms (ii) Analyse relationships in numerical terms (iii) Recognise correct use of and assumptions implicit in net present value calculations (iv) Recognise building design economics (v) Familiarise with the measurement principles for building areas and building elements with reference to the new rules of measurement (NRM) (vi) Compile order of estimates based on limited design information Taught        Practiced Assessed      

28

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook

2.

Professional Skills
Having completed this module successfully, the students will be able to: (vii) Choose and use appropriate statistical and numerical techniques (viii) Use inexact data, recognising its limitations, in the solution of building problems (ix) Use building cost data sources appropriately Taught  Practiced    Assessed   

3.

Transferable Skills
Having completed this module successfully, the students will be able to: (x) Apply common sense in the interpretation of numeric results (xi) Apply methods in collecting cost data Taught Practiced    Assessed  

Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:     Attend explanatory lectures Participate in seminars Attend practical and problem-solving classes Investigate the Building Cost Information Service

Notional Learning Time Lectures Seminars Workshops Directed study

9 hours 9 hours 5 hours 127 hours

Assessment Coursework (100%) - Group Coursework - Elemental cost plan - Individual Assignment – Data Analysis - 2 web quizzes (7.5% each)

(50%) (35%) (15%)

Learning Outcomes iv – vi, viii - xi i, ii, v – xi i – xi

Indicative Reading List  Kirkham, R. (2007) Ferry and Brandon's Cost Planning of Building, 8th ed. Blackwell Publishing.  Smith, J. and Jagger, D. (2007) Building Cost Planning for the Design Team, Elsevier.  Rees, D.G. (2001) Essential statistics, 4th ed. Chapman & Hall.  RICS (2009) New rules of measurement (NRM), Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors. Validation History March 2011

29

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook

U33509: Integrative Project I
Module Leader: Dr Ye Xu yexu@brookes.ac.uk 01865 483534

Module Description This module consists of a series of lectures and seminars that provide students with a background to the disciplines that they study in Year 1 and to introduce them to, academic essay writing, oral presentations, group work, secondary research methods and referencing. The module’s focus is to encourage students to question the value of the heritage of the Built Environment and how they think about space, place and design. It seeks to link this overview with the kinds of economic, legal and social systems that produced, or revived, the different types of architecture / town planning which helped shape the built environment. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Basic – Level 4 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM) and BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU), BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI), BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM), BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS), BSc (Hons) Construction Management and Recommended for BA (Hons) Cities - Environment, Design and Development (DT). EM, RU, RI, QM, QS, CZ, DT None None Semester 2 Every Year None None Friday 9.00 -12.00 (M) This module draws upon the knowledge and experience gained from a range of real estate issues taught in Year 1. It requires students to evaluate a real world example in a holistic way using the knowledge they learnt from various first year modules.

Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context:

Content  Development process;  Architecture/design issues;  Property market mechanisms;  Sustainability;  Project Management. Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module, you will be able to: 1. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully, students Taught will be able to: i. Have a clear sense of the content and substance of the degree course they have embarked upon 30

Practised Assessed  

Be aware of the core academic standards and practices of the property and construction profession vii.  xiii.  integrate across subjects. Problem Solving  xvi. vi.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook ii.Oral presentation Skills Practised Assessed                 Teaching and Learning Experiences Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to demonstrate that they have the ability to:  write clearly and cogently. To be able to critically review arguments and read academic research articles  viii. 31 .  xii. Be aware of some of the debates and issues involving the Built Environment iv. Study Skills  xiv. Word Processing  xvii.  conduct clear and concise oral presentations. layouts and feasibility studies  x. social and legislative constraints on development proposals 2. To be able to format and layout coursework to the appropriate standards. Practised Assessed             3.  understand and analyse some set reading and demonstrate some critical thinking in answers. Use of Internet as Research Tool  xviii. To be able to reference secondary materials in coursework correctly. research and presentation skills to enable students to direct their own learning within the remainder of Stage I and beyond. students Taught will be able to:  v.         Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. To be able to search for secondary research materials  ix. Be aware of the breadth of issues and disciplines involved such that each student can make considered choices about developing their module programme iii. Report Writing  xv. Ability to prepare site appraisals. Appreciation of the input of environmental. students Taught will be able to:  xi. Awareness of the importance of sustainability issues in the built environment. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Possess a range of study.

Indicative Reading List  Reading lists in different first year modules  Oxford City Council (June.xvii i . West End Area Action Plan Submission Document 2007-2016 Volume 2. using good professional English and correct academic referencing and citation.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Notional Learning Time Lectures Seminars Workshops Directed Study Assessment Coursework Consisting of: Written Submission Oral presentation to peers The main assessment criteria are:    20 hours 20 hours 20 hours 90 hours 100% 50% 50% Learning Outcome i . students must obtain a minimum of 35% in all of the three assessed pieces of work and must achieve an overall mark of 40% or greater as an average over all three pieces of assessed work. Validation History November 2003 Amended 2007 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 32 . To pass this module. Any failure to attempt any element of assessment on the module without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of the module without the right to resit. Demonstration of the ability to present materials clearly and effectively in written form. Demonstration of the ability to synthesise materials received and researched so as to produce a cogent written report.xviii Demonstration of the ability to access and retrieve relevant secondary materials from the Library and via the Internet. 2007).

particularly in terms of the property market. including competition and market entry. QS.  Land and capital in the context of the built environment.00-12. Successful completion of this module provides students with the pre-requisites required for more advanced Real Estate and Construction Management and Planning modules. 33 . Investment markets are examined as well as the role that real estate plays in investment strategy by government and the private sector. Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: Course Content  Microeconomic market theory. BA Planning and Property Development (DV). including supply and demand. rents and interest rates. their production and decision-making in relation to the residential and commercial property markets and the construction industry. in particular land and capital markets and pricing. QM.uk 01865 483852 Module Description This module provides an introduction to the micro-economics of markets. elasticity and the limitations of the price system.00 (G).  Market structures and performance. and selected government policies are examined. 13. CZ.ac.Environment. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS).00 (H) . The role of government.  Price and market analysis including price determination. DV. MPL. Design and Development (DT).BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U35001: Economics of Built Environment Module Leader: Dr Claire Roberts croberts@brookes. BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ).00 (G) – Lecture Wednesday 10. Students examine land and capital in the context of this economic and organisational framework. in particular the market for land and property. BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM). MPlan City and Regional Planning (MPL) and alternative pathway for BA (Hons) Cities . Using the description of the macro-economy as a foundation. BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM). RP. in particular the market for land and property.Seminars This module provides students with broad grounding in theory relating to economics in the built environment.  Organisations. Students analyse prices and markets and the organisations operating in property market and how their decisions need to be guided by the planning system. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Basic – Level 4 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI). EM. students investigate the inter-relationships between the property market and the activity of the whole economy. RI. Successful completion of this module will provide students with the knowledge and understanding of economics required for Level 5 and 6 in Real Estate and Construction Management and Planning.00-15. DT None None Semester 2 Every Year Cannot be counted with: U51013 Economics in Context None Wednesday 9.00–10. to enable detailed consideration and analysis of issues underlying the built environment. and BA (Hons) City and Regional Planning (RP).

construction  and capital markets. iv.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook  The inter-relationships between the property market and the activity of the whole economy. the student will be able to: 1. and selected government policies. iii. Use cost/revenue data to explain aspects of organisations’ economic market behaviour. Discuss the performance implications of  alternative market structures. Disciplinary/Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully.Use appropriate data and simple economic models to explain aspects of government policy.Analyse Technical Material  Practised Assessed         34 . viii. students Taught will be able to: x. students Taught will be able to: ix.  ii.  and interpret economic concepts in relation to the government policy framework within which the market for real estate operates. Explain the effects of changes in the level of  economic activity upon the macro-economy and the market for property and construction. students Taught will be able to: i. Discuss the macro-economic context of the market  for property and construction. Outline the economic methodology in the context of property markets. v. vi. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. with  particular reference to property and construction. Practised Assessed   3.  Practised Assessed              2. Explain the role of the planning system in  overcoming market inefficiencies and imperfections. particularly in terms of the property market. Calculate from Simple Data  xi. and the planning of these. Analyse Economic Data  xii.  The role of government. Explain the demand and supply mechanisms through which markets operate. including key taxation and monetary policies.  Changes and growth in the level of macro-economic activity and the government’s role in the economy. Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module. Problem Solving  xiii. vii. Apply market analysis to the land.

xiii The main criteria for assessment are:       Use of key economic concepts. v. (2000) Economic Analysis for Property and Business  Begg D. Indicative Reading List  Warren. viii. Notional Learning Time Lectures Seminars/Workshop Sessions Directed Study Assessment Coursework (50%) Exam (50%) Two online tests Essay (1200 Words) Unseen written examination 12 hours 12 hours 126 hours 20% 30% 50% Learning Outcome i. including group workshop sessions. to reinforce understanding of the core concepts and demonstrate their applications to markets. v. To pass this module. vi. Demonstration of knowledge of the relevant economic theory. M. attend tutor-led seminars. iii. iii. vii. vii. which address core economic concepts and their application to property markets. ix i. iv. iv. study independently using the teaching material. xi. ii. ix i. Fischer S and Dornbusch R (2005) Economics 8th edition. Any failure to attempt any element of assessment on the module without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of the module without the right to resit. report writing and self-appraisal skills. vi. which contains key concepts. Clear presentation (including word processed text for the coursework). ii. iv.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:     attend lectures. Ability to structure a logical argument. Application of relevant economic theory. Use of appropriate diagrams. in-text questions and study guidance. xii. McGraw Hill Validation History November 2003 Revised on merger of U35001 and U37704 July 2005 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 Amended 2011 35 . viii. vi. iii. ii. students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater. and also obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment. vii. viii. attend and participate in student-led seminars to reinforce understanding of the core concepts and develop oral communication. v. x.

 The contents of contracts.Seminars This module provides a foundation for the advanced legal specialisms taught at Level 5. doctrine of causation.00 (A) . QS. contracts of agency. the essential elements of a valid contract: offer. principles of negligence. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Basic – Level 4 Double Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM).ac.00–12. Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: Content  The doctrine of judicial precedent and the structure of the courts.00–16. trespass. QM.uk 01865 483459 Module Description This module introduces students to the study of law.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U35002: Foundation Real Estate and Construction Law Module Leader: Dr Sally Sims ssims@brookes. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS). capacity. DT None None Semesters 1 and 2 Every Year Cannot be counted with: U22100 Introduction to Law None Monday 11. formalities. loss and damage. the development of environmental law. DV. EM. and professional negligence. using specifically the substantive areas of contract law and law of tort. the doctrine of incorporation. BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ). BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI). such as advanced commercial valuation and construction procurement. BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU). and remedies 36 . strict liability.Lecture Monday 13.00 (C) . acceptance. 17. duty of care.00-18. the limitation defence. CZ. BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM).  Nuisance. and for other real estate and construction management modules with inherent legal perspectives. and remedies. RI. occupiers’ liability. defences. Design and Development (DT). breach and standard of conduct. performance and termination of contracts. RU. BA Planning and Property Development (DV) and alternate pathway for BA (Hons) Cities Environment. express terms.  Purpose of tort. and legality. consideration. intention to create legal relations. The module provides a foundation for the advanced legal specialisms studied in Stage II.  The business context of contracts. implied terms.00 (B).

which develop the skills of identification and classification of problems and their resolution through the application of pre-acquired knowledge.  iii. Demonstrate an understanding of professional liability issues affecting the practice of general practice surveying./lecture notes and primary and secondary research in the University Library and School Resource Centre. Identify and analyse legal problems in given factual situations utilising both common law and  statutory principles. 2. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. the student will be able to: 1. in England and Wales. students Taught will be able to:  i. Written Communication  viii. v. Conduct effective research using primary and  secondary legal sources. Demonstrate an understanding of the basis of civil obligations. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. students Taught will be able to: iv.  Attend seminars.  Study independently using the module workbook. Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module.  Undertake the required number of Brookes Virtual quizzes Notional Learning Time Lectures Workshops/seminars Directed Study Assessment Exam (60%) Coursework (40%) Unseen written examination Legal report 60% 40% Learning Outcome i-viii i-viii 22 hours 22 hours 256 hours 37 . students Taught will be able to:  vi. including both contractual and tortious liability. 3.Problem Solving Practised Assessed       Practised Assessed     Practised Assessed       Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend lectures. which address the key conceptual themes and explain fundamental legal principles. Basic Analysis  vii. Describe the operation of the machinery of the civil justice system and its constituent parts in England and Wales.  ii.

Sweet & Maxwell  Smith.  Sweet & Maxwell’s Tort Textbook. Butterworths. additional information and online assignments to improve your essay writing and exam skills. Tort  Rogers (2002) Winfield and Jolowicz on Tort. students must obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment. Sweet & Maxwell.  Appropriate use of case and statutory material to support arguments. and Smith. 18th Edition (2000) and supplements. To pass this module. 4th Edition. S. 12th Edition. Validation History November 2003 Amended 2007 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 Amended 2011 38 .BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook The examination is an unseen examination of two hours duration. ATH (2002) Glanville-Williams: Learning the Law. In order to pass the module. Sweet & Maxwell. 16th Edition. 9th Edition. Butterworths. 30th Edition and supplements.  Application of relevant legal principles to factual problems. Oxford University Press  Furmston (2001) Chesire. Sweet & Maxwell. (2008) Chitty on Contracts. Reference Books  Chitty J.  Clarke and Lindsell on Torts.  Zander (2003) Cases and Materials on the English Legal System. P. Fifoot and Furmston’s Law of Contract. English Legal System  Bailey S. 14th Edition. Contract  Atiyah. (2003) Nutcases Contract Law 5th Edition Sweet & Maxwell  Sweet & Maxwell’s Contract Textbook.  Ability to develop logical argument. S. Sweet & Maxwell. The main criteria for assessment are:  Demonstration of knowledge of the legal topics included in the module content. 6th edition. A. students must achieve an overall mark of 40% or greater. Brookes Virtual  Brookes Virtual supports the module with supplementary reading.  Ruff. Indicative Reading List General  Card. (2006) Atiyah's introduction to the law of contract. Murdoch & Murdoch (1998) Law for Estate Management Students. 6th Edition.  Clear expression and orderly presentation. et al (2002) The Modern English Legal System. Weidenfeld.A.

00 (H). Urban policy and renaissance. None None Semester 1 Every Year None None Wednesday 9. QM. Linking planning to wider property development processes 39 . RP.00 (K) This module introduces students to the theory and practice of landuse planning. countryside and urban restraint policy and sustainable communities policies. BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ). BA (Hons) Business of Real Estate (RU). sustainable development/climate change. MPlan City and Regional Planning (MPL). BA (Hons) City and Regional Planning (RP). A new focus deals with the mitigation of and adaptation to climate change. with wider links to sustainable development issues Field Pre-requisite Co-requisite Placing Years running Restrictions Exclusions Timetable Slots Context: Content     Problem-solving exercises based on planning practise.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U35008: Introduction to Spatial Planning Module Leaders: Dr Michael Stubbs mdstubbs@brookes. Certificate in Spatial Planning studies. BA Planning and Property Development (DV). BA (Hons) Cities Environment. heritage and countryside policy.00 -12. FBE.ac.uk Mr Philip Turner pturner@brookes. QS. Design and Development (Single & Combined Honours) (DT/DE). DT/DE. The teaching approach deals with a predominant workshop style.00 -16. EM. Sustainability and climate change policy.00 (G) and 13. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS). in which students work on problem-solving exercises to address issues pertinent to the submission of planning applications.uk 01865 483487 01865 483917 Module Description This module provides an introduction to spatial planning and deals with some of the challenges currently faced by the system. BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM). Originating School: Level Size Status The Built Environment Basic – Level 4 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management (EM).00 .16. and Thursday 13.ac. DV. MPL. BSc (Hons) Real Estate Management RICS/RTPI Joint Route (RI). RI. development of urban renewal and renaissance. RU. CZ. and alternative compulsory for and Foundation Built Environment (FBE).

group led. to assist. information gathering and problem-solving exercises. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Disciplinary/Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. Explain the ideologies and origins of planning. ii. set reading (including textbooks) and Brookes Virtual resources. relevance and impact of planning policies. and tutor led sessions within those workshops. mechanisms for  renewal. Consider the best means by which planning and property development industry may deliver an urban renaissance. Discuss the appropriateness. Consider practical case studies. urban design concepts. Understand the implementation of planning controls. Word Processing Teaching and Learning Experience Students undertaking this module will have the opportunity to:     Attend workshops which address the core principles of development management. urban renewal/ renaissance. Study independently through the medium of set assignments. Practised Assessed        Practised Assessed   Practised Assessed        Notional Learning Time Lecture/Workshops (10 x 2. social and  economic objectives of planning. you will be able to: 1. climate change. Data Analysis xi. Project work and the ability to write cogent examination answers. students Taught will be able to: vi. Written Presentation  vii. 2. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. climate change and the relationship between policy and the environment. Oral Presentation  viii. 3. students Taught will be able to: v. Report Writing x.Group Work ix. iv. Utilise a module workbook.5) Examination briefing session Directed Study 25 hours 2 hours 123 hours 40 . legislation and case law. Attend and participate in a variety of student led. countryside protection and development feasibility. students Taught will be able to: i. the promotion and control of development. iii. the development of planning legislation.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module. to reinforce their understanding and enhance their skill development. the current planning  system.

I. A & Houghton. (2009) Urban Planning & Real Estate Management. J (2008) Jigsaw Cities: Big Places. M.  Smith-Morris. London. CABE & DETR.. E. 3rd Edition. Taylor & Francis Press. Taylor Francis. A. R. London.  Power. and also obtain a minimum of 35% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment.  Urban Task Force (2005) Towards an Effective Urban Renaissance. Stubbs. London: Policy Press. Validation History November 2003 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 Amended 2011 41 . London. (1997) British Town Planning and Urban Design. Macmillan. Oxford.  Ratcliffe. dealing with key parts of the syllabus. T (2005) The Weather Makers. small spaces. Indicative Reading List  Bentley.vi i – vi Students will be required to complete a set of independent week-by-week problem-solving exercises. The Main criteria for assessment are:    Demonstration of an understanding of the key issues and techniques involved in urban growth/restraint. To pass this module. (2000) Cities for a Small Country. London. theories and knowledge to a given problem or issue An ability to present material effectively both orally and in written form (only oral is assessed). M. Butterworth Architecture. et al (1985) Responsive Environments. students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater.  The Princes’ Foundation (2000) Sustainable Urban Extensions: Planned through Design. J. London. London.  Flannery. Thomas Telford. & Power. DETR (2000) By Design. Any failure to attempt any element of assessment on the module without reasonable excuse will result in a failure of the module without the right to resit. & Keeping. climate change/sustainability and site development/feasibility An ability to apply skills. London.  Rogers. Longman.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Assessment Coursework (workbook exercises) Written Exam (50%) (50%) Learning Outcomes i .

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33521: Construction Practice and Procedure Module Leader: Dr Zhihong Wong zhihong. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS). BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ).Environment. and alternate pathway for BA (Hons) Cities . Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Advanced Level 5 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM). you will be able to: 1. to administer contracts with respect to payment valuation. Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: Course Content  Tender analysis  Contract mechanism for payment valuations. variation assessment. CZ. students Taught will be able to:  i. and to understand the implications of various regulations in respect to contract administration. contractual claims. DT None None Semester 2 Every Year None None Tuesday 1. guarantee.  ii. and variations in accordance with the principles laid down in the JCT standard building contract  Supply chain study and sub-contracting  Professional ethics  Employer’s protection such as performance bond.wong@brookes. QS. The students shall develop the skills to assess tenders in pre-contract stage.ac.uk 01865 482834 Module Description The success of all construction works relates directly or indirectly to proper contract practice and the observance of appropriate procedure. This module discusses a wide range of contract practices.00 – 4. This module also provides an opportunity for students to obtain the Construction Skills Certification Scheme card through application to the CSCS test centre and sitting their formal Health & Safety test. QM. and claims evaluation during construction and in post-contract stage. and retention and insurance provisions under common contract conditions  Health and safety relating to the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations  Building Regulations with reference to Standards and Building control.00 (E) This module provides students with knowledge of current construction practice and procedure in preparation for the industrial placement year and is a prerequisite for the Level 6 Project Management module. Design and Development (DT). Discuss implications of legislation and regulations 42 Practised Assessed   . Describe key codes of practice relating to health and safety.  CSCS training and test Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully.

iii. Develop self-management. Practised Assessed     Teaching and Learning Experiences Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend explanatory and interactive lectures  Participate in. and variations 2. Examine and compare competitive tenders. Assess payment valuation. vii. Explain contract mechanism under JCT standard building contract relating to payment valuations. contractual claims.   Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. students Taught will be able to:  vii. iv.. and also obtain a minimum of 30% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment Indicative Reading List  Ashworth.  vi. contractual claims.  v. ii. and variations. communication and teamwork skills Practised  Assessed    3. vi To pass this module. Advise on contractual arrangement for specialist works.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook on health and safety including building standards control. students Taught will be able to:  iv. (2007) Willis' Practice and Procedure for the Quantity Surveyor. Blackwell Publishing. 12th ed. Advise on contractual issues in a professional manner viii. students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater. including delivery of seminars  Engage in practical simulation of industrial practice Notional Learning Time Lectures 10 hours Seminars/Workshops 26 hours Directed Study 114 hours Assessment Exam (50%) Coursework (50%) Online tests Project Portfolio Unseen Exam 15% 35% 50% Learning Outcomes i. iii iv. ii. and Hogg K. 43 . iii. viii i. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. vi. A. v. v.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook  Ramus. N.  Trickey G. QAA 2005. Revised 2006. and Birchall S. Hackett M. Revised 2004. Wiley Blackwell Validation History Written 2002..  Carnell. (2000) The Presentation and Settlement of Contractors' Claims.. 4th ed. Griffiths P. (2006) Contract Practice for Surveyors. J. Butterworth-Heinemann. (2005) Causation and Delay in Construction Disputes.. J.. Spon Press. Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 44 . Accredited 2004. 2nd ed. 2nd ed.

ii.uk 01865 482834 Module Description The module concerns the measurement and estimating of building works. Field Pre-requisite Co-requisite Placing Years running Restrictions Exclusions Timetable Slots Context Course Content  Taking off principles  Standard Method of Measurement  Measurement of excavator. Understand and apply estimating and tendering procedures.wong@brookes. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. It also considers and the financial monitoring and controlling of such a work once obtained. Familiarise with measurement principles and  the standard method of measurement.Environment. SMM7.00 (E) This module aims to develop students’ skills in the preparation of conventional cost models further from the elementary cost planning skills acquired at Level 4. Practised   Assessed       45 . BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ) and alternative pathway for BA (Hons) Cities . QS.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33522: Quantity Surveying Practice Module Leader: Dr Zhihong Wong zhihong. QM. Originating School Level Size Status The Built Environment Advanced Level 5 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM). BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS). iii. concreter and bricklayer  Tendering  Estimating  Cash flow  Resource planning Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module a student is expected to gain: 1. Design and Development (DT).  iv. Understand the use of programme to plan  resources. students Taught will be able to: i. CZ. Understand and demonstrate the importance of  producing a cash flow budgets.ac. Students will learn the basic principles for building measurement using standards of measurement as well as the use of various software tools to comprehend the measurement and estimating tasks. DT U 35005 None Semester 1 Every year None None Tuesday 1.00 – 4.

W. Prepare and evaluate financial forecasts  Practised    Assessed    3. 7 Edition C.I..O.vii Indicative Reading List  BCIS (2010) BCIS Wessex SMM7 Estimating Price Book 2010. vii.O. (2005) Construction Project Administration.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 2. (2003) Estimating for Builders and Surveyors. Prentice Hall  RICS. RICS. Grant. (2009) Quantity Surveyor’s Pocket Book. Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully.D. viii.E.R. v.I. R. x. F. RICS/Construction Confederation  RICS (2009) NRM: RICS New Rules of Measurement. D. BCIS Wessex th  Brook. (2000) SMM7: Standard Method of Measurement for Building Works. students Taught will be able to: v. Measure building quantities with reference to  SMM7 vi. Estimate and analyse building unit rates  vii. Butterworth-Heinemann th  C. Develop presentation skills on costing exercises xi.(2009) Code of Estimating Practice.E.K.B.vii i .. Appreciate drawing information x. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. students Taught will be able to: viii. (2004) Estimating and Tendering for Construction Work 4 Edition Butterwoth Heineman  Buchan. Fleming. iii. E./Longman th  Frisk.B. Collate cost information ix. 2nd Edition Butterworth Heineman  Cartlidge. 8 Edition. Work in team to product cost documents that simulates real life practice Practised Assessed        Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  attend lectures exploring key themes  attend practice sessions simulating the work situation under supervision  produce documents simulating the real life practice Notional Learning Time Lectures Practical simulation exercises Workshop Directed Study Assessment Coursework (100%) Group Assignment Portfolio of Assignments (Individual) Online quizzes (Individual) 10 hours 14 hours 3 hours 123 hours 40% 40% 20% Learning Outcomes i. 46 . xi i .. F. M.

.. Validation History Written 2002. Trench. 10th Editon. QAA 2005 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 47 . W. Revised 2004. Blackwell Science. (2005) Wills’s Elements of Quantity Surveying. Accredited 2004. A.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook  Willis.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook

U33524: Construction Technology
Module Leader: Mr Michael N Hill mnhill@brookes.ac.uk 01865 483351

Module Description This module develops knowledge and skills related to building technology, and prepares students for their industrial placement year out. The studies provide knowledge and practice in land surveying, drawing, structural analysis and trade skills, as well as knowledge of construction design and process. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Advanced Level 5 Double Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM), BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS), BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ), and Acceptable for BA (Hons) Cities Environment, Design and Development (DT). QM, QS, CZ, DT U 33504 None Semesters 1 and 2 Every year None None Semester 1 and 2 - Monday 13.00 – 16.00 (B) The module builds on knowledge from prerequisite study and together with other technology-related modules prepares students for the industrial placement. It also provides grounding for further technology-related studies at Level 6

Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context

Course Content  Introduction to surveying: Maps and reference systems; Levelling; Linear measurement, use of theodolite  Setting out: Basic methods; Line and level; Structures, drainage and roads. Simple curves; theodolite and tape methods, obstructions.  Drawings and Specifications  Behaviour of structural elements  Applied mechanics; shear, bending, tension, compression  Construction materials  Introduction to trade skills: bricklaying, steel fixing, carpentry, plastering, etc.  Site investigation; soils, derelict land  Site operations and plant  Building substructure and superstructure  Buildability, quality and prefabrication  Building finishes  Innovation, integration, research and design

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BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook

Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module, the student will be able to: 1. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully, students Taught will be able to:  i. Understand the basic principles and instruments involved in surveying.  ii. Explain the structural behaviour of building elements and materials.  iii. Understand the influence of site investigation, data design and production processes iv. Understand the building process as a  systematic sequence of operations, which must be planned and organised v. Understand how the economics of production  are influenced by the effective use of labour, plant, materials and energy vi. Realise the importance of legislation, materials,  selection, specification and control in the building process vii. Explain the concepts of component technology,  “buildability”, quality control and performance

Practised 

Assessed      

2.

Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully, students Taught will be able to:  viii. Choose and execute appropriate methods for fundamental setting-out operations.  ix. Apply the results of site and soils investigations to problems associated with foundations and ground works  x. Prepare site construction layout plans, a method statement and simple works programmes  xi. Prepare technical drawings, sketches xii. Contribute to discussions on buildability and effectiveness of alternative structural systems  for low and medium rise buildings including temporary works, scaffolding/formwork xiii. Investigate and make recommendations on the selection and use of common types of plant  and equipment xiv. Investigate and make recommendations for the ordering, storage and control of materials on  site. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully, students Taught will be able to: xv. Carry out practical work as a member of a  group. xvi. Work individually to develop skills in problem solving. 49

Practised 

Assessed  

 

 

3.

Practised Assessed    

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook

xvii. Use information handling skills; library skills; information technology (word processing, graphics, spreadsheets); record and organise information. xviii. Use academic skills; research, analyse, synthesise, interpret xix. Write reports and illustrate them; prepare drawings, sketches and schedules; make seminar presentations including visual aids and handouts

Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend lectures  Participate in seminars  Work in problem solving groups  Participate in laboratory observations  Manufacture and test construction elements  Participate in field exercises  Participate in the use of draughting and surveying equipment Notional Learning Time Lectures Workshops Seminars Problem solving classes Directed Study Assessment Exam (25%) Coursework (75%) Comprising: Surveying practical & site test Drawing exercise Structural appraisal Materials evaluation exercise Technology Portfolio Unseen technology exam Learning Outcomes i. viii, xv, xvi ix, xix ii, xii vi, ix, xii, xvii, xviii viii-xiv iii-vii, ix-xiii

32 hours 20 hours 12 hours 6 hours 230 hours

25% 10% 20% 10% 10% 25%

Indicative Reading List  Bannister, A. & Raymond, S. (1998) Surveying, (7th ed) Longman  Brookes, A.J. (1998) Cladding of buildings, (3rd ed.) Longman  Charles, J., Charm, R., Watts, K. and Fordyce, G. (2003) Brownfield Sites – Ground Related Risks for Buildings, BRE  Chudley, R and Greeno, R. (2006) Advanced Construction Technology, (4th ed), Pearson/Prentice-Hall  Emmitt, S. and Gorse, C. (2006) Barry’s Advanced Construction of Buildings, Blackwell.  Foster, J.S. (2007) Structure and Fabric, (7th ed) Parts 1 and 2), Mitchell  Gauld, J.B. (1995) Structures for Architects, 3rd Edition, Longman.  Harris, F. and McCaffer, R. (2006) Modern Construction Management, (6th Ed), Blackwell  Hodgkinson, A. (1988) A J Handbook of Building Structure, Butterworth

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& Price. P. Thomas Telford. (2006) Surveying for Engineers. trade literature. S. & MacLennan. Palgrave Summerhayes. (2003) Buildability: Successful Construction from Concept to Completion. J. BRE Digests. (2007) CDM Regulations: Procedures Manual. especially those of the Health & Safety Executive and Construction Skills. RICS Books Sadgrove. QAA 2005. B.) Spon Irvine. Building Regulations.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook              Holroyd. W. Reference should also be made to relevant BS Codes of Practice. (2006) Total Quality in the Construction Supply Chain. MacMillan Oakland. Hong Kong University Press Thorpe. Journals. technical publications etc. (2004) Quality Management in Construction. (2006) Surveying for Construction.S. B. and Sumner. Illingworth. (4th ed) Palgrave Macmillan. J. Gower Uren. (3rd ed). W. Butterworths Seward. S. T. (2003) Construction Safety – Questions and Answers. (2000) Construction Methods and Planning. Thomas Telford RICS (2003) Contamination and Environmental Matters – Their Implications for Property Professionals. (ed. Reports. Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 Amended 2011 51 .F. ButterworthHeinemann. P. (2nd ed. Validation History Accredited 2004.M. (5th ed). McGraw-Hill Education Martin. J. (1988) Setting-out Procedures. (2nd ed).R.M.L.) (2005) Construction Quality Management. (1999) Structures: theory and analysis. 3rd edition. W. F. (2003) Understanding Structures. D. Revised 2004. Blackwell Tang. Perry.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33525: Building Science and Environmental Systems Module Leader Mr Max Muncaster mmuncaster@brookes. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS) and BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ). air conditioning  Vertical transportation  Relationship with structure. design. CZ None None Runs in Semester 1 only Every year None None Monday 5. waste disposal  Space heating and cooling  Ventilation. industrial and public service buildings. control  Thermal studies  Utility services  Building Control and Legislation  Sanitation. ii. This module provides knowledge and understanding of the methodologies used to design and install building services within domestic. Field Pre-requisite Co-requisite Placing Years running Restrictions Exclusions Timetable Slots Context Course Content  Environmental comfort  Vision. colour  Sound. commercial. commissioning Learning Outcomes On completion of this module students will be able to: 1. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. installation. students Taught will be able to: i. industrial and public service buildings.00 – 8. sewage. QM.00 (C) This module builds on the basic knowledge gain in the Level 4 technology module and introduces students to building services provision within domestic. Understand scientific and analytical approaches to solving problems associated with the built environment with particular reference to building services. noise.ac.  52 Practised Assessed     . lighting. QS. commercial. Explain the structural needs of services. Originating School Level Size Status The Built Environment Advanced – Level 5 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM).uk 01865 484079 Module Description The ability to evaluate the environmental performance of a building demands an understanding of the scientific principles behind the design and operation of building services.

Contribute to discussions on the application and effective use of assessment methods. v. Identify safety hazards and prepare safety  plans. Research and analyse a topic  xviii. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Investigate and make recommendations on the  selection and use of common types of scientific assessments. Apply the result of research investigations to the solving of problems. Realise the importance of materials. students Taught will be able to: vii. Prepare laboratory and project assessment  reports and diagrams.Write reports and illustrate them  xix. xii. selection and control in the building process. Disciplinary/Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. x. students Taught will be able to: xv. Identify and evaluate scientific assessment methods related to the building process           2. Use information technology  xvi. which contribute to building services provision  Make seminar presentations  Work in problem solving groups 53 . Undertake a method of analysis and prepare a  method statement. Record and organise information  xvii. viii. xiii. vi. xiv. Evaluate relative merits and costs of types of services provision and construction design Practised Assessed         3. Recognise the influence of legislation on the provision of building services. Converse with specialist on the effective use of scientific data. iv. Appreciate the application of scientific principles to problems associated with the building services.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook iii. xi. ix. Work in groups Practised Assessed          Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend lectures designed to provide a base of knowledge of the many factors.

)  McMullon. 6th Edition. v. 5th Edition.V. xiv. (2007) Building Services Engineering. & Greeno. Longmans  Mitchell’s (2004) Environmental science.netgregs. xv. as and when appropriate. Building Regulations. Palgrave  Mitchell’s (2002) Building and Environment. Reports. xiv. v.uk (website for Environmental Management guidelines for building etc. iii. revised and rewritten 2002. students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater. xviii To pass this module. D. Accredited 2004. Journals. (1999) Building services and equipment. technical publications etc. xv. (2011) Building Services Handbook. Blackwell  Hall. (2003) Building Services. QAA 2005 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 54 . ii. Technology and Design.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Notional Learning Time Lectures Problem solving exercises Directed Study Assessment Coursework (100%) 24 hours 12 hours 114 hours Services design and evaluation exercise Technical evaluative report (1500 words) 60% 40% Learning Outcomes i.CIOB. iv. xvi. Taylor and Frances  Greens. iii. H. viii. trade literature. R. and also obtain a minimum of 30% in both pieces of coursework Indicative Reading List  Chatterton. revised 2004. F. ButterworthHeinemann  http://www. Longmans/CIOB  Hall. xvi ii.uk  http://www. vii. iv.gov. Validation History Approved 1992 as 4325 Building Services I. BRE Digests. Longmans Reference should also be made to relevant BS Codes of Practice. org. R. R. xvii. (2004) Environmental Sciences in Building. 5th Edition.

and it is a prerequisite for the level 6 Advanced Procurement module which takes many of the concepts and application to a higher level. The course is based on “problem-based learning” in which students are presented with a structured series of problems and are assisted in exploring and applying relevant law and contractual terms in relation to these problems. DT U35002 None Semester 1 Every Year None None Monday 9. It complements level 5 Quantity Surveying and Construction Practice modules. BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ) and alternate pathway for BA (Hons) Cities . including standard forms of building contract.  Application of law of contract and tort to construction situations  Standard Forms of Contract including modern partnering forms such as PPC 2000  Contracts and the allocation of risk  Contract procedures and practice  Dispute avoidance and resolution  Overview of environmental and planning law. processes  Procurement procedures including tendering and contractual arrangements  Management of health and safety with reference to the law on health and safety and management principles. procurement and forms of contract form part the essential core expertise of both construction project managers and quantity surveyors. QS. Material covered in the module will be applied or will relate to other modules including. principles.00 – 12. potentially all the level 6 modules. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS).BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33527: Construction Law and Procurement Module Leader: Nick Spencer Chapman nspencerchapman@brookes. This approach is to develop intellectual and research skills rather than focus overly on knowledge of a body of law which is constantly changing. Design and Development (DT). CZ. Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context Course Content  Parties.ac. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Advanced Level 5 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM).Environment.00 (A) Procurement law.uk 01865 483362 Module Description An introduction to the law particularly relevant to construction and construction contracts. transport and land-use planning and sustainability 55 . QM. The module builds on the knowledge of law developed at Level 4.

Disciplinary/Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully.  xv. Take initiative and lead.  iii. Speak effectively. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully.  xii. Apply key cases in construction law including key principles arising and evaluate the clarity and ‘fit’ within the developing body of law. Write effectively. Undertake research using appropriate legal source material and interpret the results in a practical way. analysis and synthesis. students Taught will be able to: i.  ii. Practised Assessed             Practised Assessed     Practised Assessed                   Teaching and Learning Experiences Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend lectures that address key themes and provide background information. students will do the following: 1.  xvi. Evaluate team performance.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Learning Outcomes In successfully completing the module. lectures will generally include interaction 56 . Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Discuss the philosophy and rationale underlying the provisions of standard forms of contract and their procedures.  x. Describe and apply the main concepts in each of the branches of law covered. 3. students Taught will be able to:  ix. Accept responsibility and carry out agreed tasks. Use academic skills of research. xiii. 2.  xviii.  xix.  v.  xi. Establish relationships. Learn both independently and co-operatively. Evaluate the methods of dispute resolution encountered in construction. Negotiate and be responsive. Analyse issues and situations. students Taught will be able to:  vii.  viii. Use library skills to find and organise information. xiv. Apply legal reasoning to the types of problems encountered in connection with building and construction contracts. Evaluate and apply the key provisions of typical standard forms of construction contract.  xvii.  iv.  vi. Evaluate the procedures used for procuring construction work including tendering procedures and contractual arrangements. interpretation.

Harlow. Oxford. M. tendering & contract administration. with some help from tutors. J (2004) Construction Contract Law: the essentials. www. vi i. Sudbury: HSE Books  Hackett. vi-viii i. Managing Health and Safety in Construction. et al (2006) Partnering in the construction industry : a code of practice for strategic collaborative working.constructingexcellence. ii. J. v. vi i-viii. Thomas Telford  Bennett. xvii Indicative Reading List  Adriaanse. www. I Robinson. Notional Learning Time Lectures 18 hours Workshops 16 hours Directed Study 116 hours Assessment Coursework (100%) Individual problems Online formative interim quizzes Online end-quiz Portfolio of work 25% 10% 40% 25% Learning Outcome i. www. S Peace. iii. London. iii.hse. organise and present information and apply it to problems. et al (2007) The Aqua Group guide to procurement. A (2006) Contractual procedures in the construction industry. xi. J and A Baird (2001) NEC and partnering: the guide to building winning teams.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook     Discuss in groups. Basingstoke: Palgrave. problems presented. London. ii.gov. G and M Thomas (2005) Construction partnering & integrated team-working Oxford.org. ii.and links to other sites). Oxford.scl. electronic databases and the internet to find. Pearson/Prentice Hall  Bennett.uk  Health and Safety Executive. Butterworth-Heinemann  Health and Safety Commission (2007). iv.uk  Tony Bingham (barrister and writer for Building magazine). QAA 2005 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 57 . Joint Contracts Tribunal  Thomas.uk  Society of Construction Law (includes many useful downloadable documents – free to students . rewritten 2002. revised 2004.org.tonybingham. xii. v. v. Blackwell  Joint Contracts Tribunal (2005) Standard Form of Building Contract. Sweet and Maxwell Reading also includes numerous papers provided via Brookes Virtual and also many web sites including the following:  Constructing Excellence.org Validation History Approved 1992 as M4327 Construction Law and Contract I. Accredited 2004.  Ashworth. London. J (2005) Construction Law (9th ed). Blackwell  Uff. ix. www. Undertake formative quizzes which encourage notes and material provided to be read and research to be carried out – all with immediate feedback. iv. iv. Undertake group and self-directed learning Use information sources including the library. iii.

including environmental.  Teamwork and creative problem solving  Working within imposed frameworks  Research training and application 58 . social and economic issues. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS). value/risk/time/cost/quality trade-offs. They will develop proposals firmly grounded in research to meet a comprehensive client brief for a mixed-use development.ac. It also attempts to prepare the students for their placement year by exposing them to how development projects are delivered in the UK and Europe.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33529: Integrative Project 2 Module Leader: Dr Esra Kurul ekurul@brookes. large-scale development proposal. primarily with other members of their discipline as a development consortium. The project will draw upon knowledge from a wide range of disciplines and expertise areas to give students the opportunity to develop an in-depth understanding of different approaches to developing project proposals or critically evaluating them. DT U33503: Introduction to Construction & Property Management U33509: Integrative Project 1 None Semester 2 Every Year None None Monday 09. Design and Development (DT). QM.00 – 12. BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ) and alternate pathway for BA (Hons) Cities . development and construction processes.Environment.  Construction sequencing: from need to post occupancy.00 (A) This module draws upon the knowledge and experience gained. and associated issues  Sustainable development & construction  Construction as a strategic exercise. Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: Course Content  Planning. specifically in the modules that are taught in the first semester of the second year. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Advanced – Level 5 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM).  Alternative approaches to procurement  Identification and analysis of project constraints and opportunities.uk 01865 484322 This module provides an opportunity for synthesising material from basic and advanced modules and other sources by applying it in the context of a complex.  Management and innovative thinking. CZ. Emphasis is placed on working effectively in groups. The students will work in teams.  Anticipation and ways of overcoming obstacles. QS.

  3. students Taught will be able to: ix.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Learning Outcomes In successfully completing the module. and in evaluating team performance and establishing relationships. Learn to work effectively as part of a team and utilise negotiation skills within a working  environment vi. xiii.Conduct research & analyse findings using a robust  analytical framework Practised Assessed             59 . Gain an in-depth understanding of the  development process and associated issues iii. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. Apply knowledge and ideas from the pre-requisite modules and the field-trip in solving a concrete and complex problem. Take part in formal and informal meetings vii. a major development proposal starting from fundamental principles iv.Be creative and innovative xiv. students will do the following: 1. xii. xv. Practised    Assessed    Practised Assessed         2.Maintain records of processes. negotiating and being responsive. ii. progress and achievements. Identify options and alternatives and evaluate  different strategies. Listen actively. Investigate and formulate. xi. Work as a member of a team in accepting responsibility and carrying out agreed tasks. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Engage in research (primary and/or secondary) and apply findings to solving a problem. Solve problems x. Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully.Reflect on their experience of the module to identify personal development areas for their  placement year. Critically evaluate different approaches to formulating development proposals and delivering large-scale facilities viii. taking  initiative and leading. students Taught will be able to: v. students Taught will be able to: i. in teams.

London : Spon.  Proctor. xv viii. negotiating and being responsive.A (1996) Project Management in Construction.G (1992) Project Management Demystified. Notional Learning Time Field Trip Lectures Formal team meetings & tutorials Informal seminars Directed Study Assessment Coursework (100%) European Field Trip Workbook Interim Presentation Final Presentation Research Report (1500words max) Group work contribution 25% 15% 25% 25% 10% Learning Outcome ii. iii.  Drucker. P. xiii.. progress and achievements. RICS: London.F. London: ODPM.JR (2000) Construction Planning & Control. London: Routledge  Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (2006) Securing the Future: delivering UK sustainable development strategy.W (2001) Building Design Management. (2005) Evaluating Sustainable Development in the built environment. xiv. D.  Identify options and alternatives and evaluate different strategies. London: CABE.E. x. xii. communication. London. learning.. London: CABE & RIBA. Ling. ix. xii. xi. P. Spon.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Teaching and Learning Experiences Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Develop self-management.  Duerk. xiv. xiii. and Fordham.  McLoughlin. London: Spon  RICS (2006) European Housing Review. Butterworth – Heiemann  Illingworth. De Silva.237-247. D. (2004) Sustainable Property Development.S. iv.  Maintain records of processes. London: ODPM. K (2004) Review of Housing Supply. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold  Dulaimi. T.  Consider career options. x. R. xiv. iii. taking initiative and leading. xii..  CABE and Home Builders Federation (2003) Building for Life. v. F. xiv 32 hours 12 hours 12 hours 12 hours 82 hours Indicative Reading List  Belbin.  Keeping. ii.  Gray. Oxford: Blackwell Science. (2000) Beyond the Team. ix. teamwork and problem-solving skills. xv i. (1999) Creative Problem Solving for Managers.C. ix. iv. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann. Hughes. Lombardi. M. pp. vi. Shiers. ii. x. (2002) ‘Enhancing Integration and Innovation in Construction’. 60 . Oxford: Blackwell Science. vi.M. x. M. (eds) (2002) Sustainable urban design: an environmental approach. Oxford..Y.4. v. M. (1993) Architectural Programming. xi. R. vol.  Work cooperatively and synthesise proposals.  Listen actively. no. viii. xi. London: Blackwell Science. xii.  Work as a member of a team in accepting responsibility and carrying out agreed tasks.  Thomas. (1999) Innovation and Entrepreneurship. and in evaluating team performance and establishing relationships. Ofori. I (1999) Creative Technological Change: The Shaping of Technology and Organisations. N.Y.30. xv v. xii i. iv.  Walker.  Be creative and innovative. Building Research and Information.. vii. Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann  Barker. G.  Brandon.F. London: Routledge  Reiss.  Building Futures (2004) Housing futures 2024. xi. viii. P.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook  Wijnen (2000) Managing Unique Assignments: A Team Approach to Projects and Programmes. Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 61 . Validation History This module was first approved in 1992 and re-approved in 2002. Aldershot: Gower. QAA 2005. Accredited 2004. Revised 2004.

Students will develop an understanding of the use of ICT in the production.00 (F) This module builds on knowledge gained from the use of various software applications in other modules. BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ) and acceptable for BA (Hons) Cities .  iv. industry standards and protocols Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module. Understand the relationships between information from multiple sources.ac. Design and Development (DT). communication and management of project information within construction supply chains. It advances knowledge on computer-aided design and concepts behind integrated databases and information systems to support construction project teams.uk 01865 483351 Module Description Communication and information technologies (ICT) currently play a critical enabling role in the successful delivery of construction projects. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. Select and compare alternative computer systems Practised  Assessed    62 . coordination. CZ. QS. software.  iii. DT None None Semester 2 Every year None None Tuesday 5. Apply computer-aided design techniques to produce project information. It develops students’ knowledge of the information and communication technologies that they may encounter in industry on their placement year Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context Course Content  Computer-Aided Design  Building Information Modelling (BIM) and project collaboration technologies  Data management and integrated information systems  Use of ICT on construction sites  Construction management software applications  Systems.00 – 8. Apply techniques for managing and communicating information. students will do the following: 1.  ii. sharing. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Advanced – Level 5 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM). BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS).Environment. QM. students Taught will be able to:  i.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33537: Construction Communication and Information Technology Module Leader: Mr Michael Hill mnhill@brookes.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook

2.

Disciplinary/Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully, students Taught will be able to: v. Organise and design the details for a building project; vi. Work effectively as part of a team by meeting individual targets; vii. Select and prepare appropriate specifications; viii.Influence project information standards and  protocols

Practised   

Assessed   

3.

Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully, students Taught will be able to: ix. Manage time and tasks; x. Work co-operatively and independently;  xi. Use information technology;  xii. Use IT as an aid to problem-solving

Practised    

Assessed   

Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend briefing lectures and training sessions  Work in groups to develop proposals from brief  Work individually to targets agreed by the group and in line with brief  Produce a portfolio of work  Undertake self-managed learning  Work co-operatively with other students Notional Learning Time Lectures CAD Drawing sessions Directed Study Assessment Coursework (100%) Coursework – CIT CAD Drawing Exercises 50% 50% Learning Outcome iii, v, vi, vii, viii, x i, iii, v, vi, vii, x, xi, xii

12 hours 18 hours 120 hours

The assessment will test the student’s understanding of techniques and methods for the production and management of information using various software packages. Additionally, there will be a requirement for the student to produce a portfolio of their learning experiences. Indicative Reading List  Betts, M., Smith, D. (eds) (1999) Strategic Management of IT in Construction, Oxford: Blackwell Science (UK).  Cook, T. and Prater, R. (2000) The ABCs of Architectural and Interior Design Drafting Using Autocad 2000. Prentice Hall.  Doherty, P. (2000) Cyberplaces: The Internet Guide for Architects, Engineers, Contractors & Facility Managers, Kingston, MA: R.S. Means Company, ISBN 0876296142  Electronic Journal of Information Technology in Construction (Open Access Journal), http://www.itcon.org/

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BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook

      

Finch, E. (2000) Net Gain in Construction: Using the Internet in Construction Management, New York: Architectural Press. Fukai (2002) Graphic Communications in Construction, New York: Prentice Hall. Griffith, A. (2000) Management Systems for Construction, Harlow: Longman Pearson. Richard, P. and Fitzgerald, J. (2009). Introduction to AutoCAD 2010: a modern perspective. Prentice Hall, London. Sommerville, J. and Craig, N. (2006). Implementing IT in Construction. Taylor and Francis, London. Sun, M. (2003) Understanding IT in Construction (Understanding Construction), London: Spon Press. Yarwood, A. (2009). Introduction to AutoCAD 2010 2D and 3D design. Elsevier, Oxford

Validation History Validated in 1997 as 4337 Production Information Systems; rewritten 2002; revised 2004; Accredited 2004; QAA 2005 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010

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BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook

U33549: Facilities Management Module Leader: Mr Michael N Hill mnhill@brookes.ac.uk 01865 483351

1. MANAGEMENT DETAILS Module title: Module number: Module leader: Level: No. of credits: Mode of delivery: Pre-requisites: Co-requisites: Barred combinations: Other restrictions or requirements: Timetable information: Facilities Management U33549 Michael Hill 5 15 Face to face None None None None Semester 2 - running for 12 Weeks Monday 17.00-20.00 - Slot C Programme/s in which this module may be taken BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS) BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ) BA (Hons) Cities - Environment, Design and Development (DT) 2. MODULE AIMS This module is concerned with buildings and their occupiers, be they offices, hospitals, supermarkets, airports or universities etc., where the main activity of the organisation is not directly related to real estate. In other words the real estate is an incidental, non-core, function. Where such organisations have a significant amount of real estate they should manage it carefully and this module will look at the strategic estate implications as well as the complex and dynamic day-to-day activities. The module concentrates on the role of Facilities Management and aims to familiarise the student with the key aspects of this role. Status Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable

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Hypothesise and evaluate alternative strategies vii.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 3. OUTLINE SYLLABUS Topics to be covered:          Introduction to Facilities Management and Workplace Productivity Developing an Estates Strategy in support of the overall business strategy Building Pathology and Maintenance Needs Maintenance Management Space Management Energy Management Customer Care and Organisational Frameworks Regulatory Framework Computer-Based Information Systems 66 . Develop teamwork skills Critical self-awareness and personal literacy 4. students will be able to: i Appraise the need for maintenance and management of buildings throughout their life. ii. iv Analyse and formulate organisational frameworks within which maintenance plans may be implemented. Design for maintenance and client needs Graduate Attribute developed Academic Literacy Academic Literacy Academic Literacy Other GAs developed Digital and Information Literacy Academic Literacy Academic Literacy Academic Literacy Critical selfawareness and personal literacy v vi. Identify and define roles and responsibilities for estates and facilities managers iii Plan for maintenance needs: collect and analyse appropriate data. LEARNING OUTCOMES On successful completion of this module.

v-vi i-vi 30% 20% 50% To pass this module. 6. and class discussion. selected reading and guest lecture presentations for student reference Assessment and the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of learning outcomes is provided by a Group Presentation.2 Opportunities for formative assessment and feedback Formative assessment and feedback on performance is provided through the group and individual coursework elements. and develops team work skills. Industrial relevance is explored through visiting speakers and case studies. an individual Report and an end of semester Written Examination. students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater. TEACHING LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT STRATEGY Lectures convey the factual knowledge of the role of facilities management and aim to familiarise the student with the key aspects of this role. in-class assessment debriefings.1 Summative assignments 30 hours 6 hours 78 hours 36 hours Word count/ length of exam Learning outcomes assessed Weighting Coursework 1 Group Presentation Coursework 2 Individual Report Written Examination n/a 1000 2 hours i-iii.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 5. in-class assessment debriefings. ASSESSMENT TASKS 7. 67 . Group Presentations provide the opportunity to demonstrate and apply subject knowledge and develop communication and presentation skills. and also obtain a minimum of 30% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment. VLE provides lecture notes. LEARNING HOURS (10 notional learning hours per credit) Scheduled learning and teaching activities Lectures Seminars/workshops Guided independent study Directed/independent study Preparation for assessments 7. Formative feedback on performance is provided through the group and individual coursework elements. Group Work Exercise provides the opportunity for case study analysis and problem solving. 7. v-vii i-iii. and class discussion.

(2003) Facilities Management Handbook (2nd ed). Coventry  RICS Business Sciences (2002) Building Maintenance. D. INDICATIVE READING LIST  Barrett. (2002) Building Adaptation. Macmillan  Seeley.H.. Coventry  Seeley.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 8. (2001) Defects in Building. RICS Books. Arnold  Nutt. Westmann. W. Macmillan  Richardson. (ed) (2000) Facility Management: Risks and opportunities. and Baldry. Wiley-Blackwell  Williams. Spon  Glover. (2002). C. (2000) Surveying Buildings (4th ed) RICS Books  Langston. S. D. A (1998) Facilities Management: An Explanation (2nd ed). F. Butterworth-Heinemann  Birkinshaw. Planning and Procurement. B. Butterworth-Heinemann  Hollis. RICS Books. RICS. L. Blackwell Science. (4th ed). Oxford Date module first approved: Date of most recent revision: 1992 February 2012 68 . Spon  McGregor. M. M. Wiley. (1996) Building Maintenance Management.H. Butterworth-Heinemann  Macmillan. Spon  Douglas. (2003) Building Surveys (5th ed). (2010) Facilities Manager’s Desk Reference. R. Butterworth-Tolley  Charter. I. Oxford  Parke. Spon  RICS (2004) Building Surveys of Residential Property. B. Oxford  Best. Coventry  Booty. and Hen. Building Economics Bureau  Wood. B. J. UK. (1999) Facilities Management and the Business of Space.A. (2003) Building Care. V. C. (eds) (2003) Facilities Management: Towards Best Practice.Blackwell  Wordsworth.R.S.R. (1976) Building Maintenance. P. and Langston. Blackwell Science. Stationery Office  Wiggins. C. (2nd ed). Blackwell Science. Butterworth-Heinemann  Garrard. (2003) Diagnosing Damp. and Lange-Koi. (3rd ed). I. and Taylor. Strategic Management of Built Facilities. and Parrett. Oxford  Clements-Groome. C. (2003) Designing Better Buildings. Blackwell  Wood. Creating the Productive Workplace. Blackwell Science. P. P. (2002) Facilities Economics. Strategy.S. (2000). (eds) (2003) Workplace Strategies and Facilities Management.M. (2nd ed). (2009) Building Maintenance. J. and Swallow. B. B. R. D. M. (2001)HAPM Guide to Defect Avoidance. (2001) Lees’ Building Maintenance Management. (2000) Defects and Deterioration in Buildings. P.

CZ U33521: Construction Practice and Procedure U33254: Construction Technology A student should normally have passed at least six modules at Level 5 before progressing to the Industrial Placement. QM. and provides an opportunity for students to consider their future career progression. students Taught will be able to: i. QM or QS. Originating School Level Size Status The Built Environment Advanced – Level 5 Non-credit bearing Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM). management and processes encountered during the placement ii. None Runs across both Semester 1 and 2 Every year None None The placement module enables students to put into practice the knowledge gained at level 4 and 5.uk 01865 483351 Module Description The Industrial Experience year of the BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) and BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS) sandwich degrees provides professional and practical experience in the construction industry. Use knowledge and experienced gained on placement to identify a potential final year research project. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. Practised Assessed    69 . employers and students will all have specific objectives in their involvement in the industrial year of work experience. However. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS) and BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ) when they are studied in sandwich mode. QS. in successfully completing the module.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33565: 36 Week Industrial Experience Placement Module Leader: Mr Michael Hill mnhill@brookes. On return to the University. Demonstrate understanding of the design. Field Pre-requisite Co-requisite Placing Years running Restrictions Exclusions Context Course Content  Minimum 36 weeks continuous work experience in an approved capacity. to graduate. The learning outcomes achieved by individual students will differ.ac. Learning Objectives The School. all students should be able to: 1. students have the opportunity to select on which pathway.

Reflect on industry experience in the consideration of future career progression Practised    Assessed    3. vi. Demonstrate the use and consolidation of skills learned during the first two years of academic study. confidence and the ability to accept responsibility Practised   Assessed   Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Gain knowledge and understanding through practical experience.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 2. 2. v. iv. its operation and staff iv. vii i. the reports written by the Academic Supervisors of the visit made to the student’s placement the presentation by the student at the Industrial Placement Presentation day 70 .  Participate in presentations to peers and staff. iv. vi i. v. Disciplinary/Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. v. Demonstrate a structured practical experience of industry. vii i. iii. Demonstrate the development of self awareness. vii. v. iii. iii.  Participate as a member of a professional team. vi. Notional Learning Time Industrial Experience in the Construction Industry Placement Briefing Placement Visit Placement Presentation Placement Experience Fair Assessment Coursework (pass/fail) Visit day report Placement presentation Placement report Employer signed objectives Placements fair presentation Learning Outcomes i. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. vi. vi. students Taught will be able to: iii. iv. students Taught will be able to: vi. iii. The assessment will be based on the following information: 1. Appreciate industrial standards and levels of performance v.  Exhibit at an industrial experience fair. vii 36 Weeks minimum 1 hour 3 hours 3 hours 3 hours The Industrial Placement must be satisfactorily completed for the award of a sandwich degree/degree with honours. vii i.

as a result of (i) to (iv) needing further investigation.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 3. Accredited 2004. 5. Validation History Approved 1992. 6. who will report to the Field and Examination Committees. QAA 2005 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 71 . re-approved 2002. a report following a meeting with the student a careers fair presentation by the student during his or her final year study The candidates will be assessed by the Industrial Placement Group. revised 2004. a final critical report by the student describing his or her experiences and the perceived benefits of the industrial placement a placement summary sheet including a list of the training objectives completed and countersigned by the employer if required. 4.

 Rethinking construction management processes. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully.00 – 20.00 (L) To remain competitive. techniques and services. To achieve this end. roleplay and seminars. Apply the fundamentals of business strategy to the construction industry. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: The Built Environment Honours – Level 6 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM). QS. future innovation and change. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of advanced  management techniques of the innovation process. organisations need to be able to react constantly to the changing challenges of the construction industry. through to exploring methods of global business expansion and the examination of novel business models that are changing the world of business. methods and services are developed and introduced. It explores how management can foster an innovative culture for the successful incorporation of new technologies. 72 Practiced Assessed    .  Leadership. The scope of study extends from evaluating science-based innovation. case studies. students Taught will be able to: i. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS). the student will be able to: 1.  Innovation management and planning. motivation and communication. the module utilises formal lectures.  Innovative solutions to green construction. QM. and Acceptable for BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ). this module will equip students with the skills and knowledge required to engage with.ac. CZ U33524 Construction Technology None Semester 1 Every Year Cannot be counted with: U33541 Management and Innovation None Thursday 17. Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: Course Content  Innovation and new product development.  ii. By juxtaposing recent innovation in management techniques and the latest developments in construction technology.uk 01865 483454 Module Description This module leads the student through an examination of how new products.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33570: Innovation in Management and Technology Module Leader: Dr George Blumberg gblumberg@brookes. and thus manage.  Championing change  Managing research and development Learning Outcomes In successfully completing this module.

viii. xv To pass this module. v. Critically review productivity and suggest improvements. v. Prepare a business plans for innovation  projects. Communication of complex ideas and plans. students must obtain an overall mark of 40% or greater.  xiii. Disciplinary/Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully.  Take part in role play exercises. xiii. teamwork and the effective and ethical management of conflict is necessary. x. 73 11 hours 9 hours 2 hours 128 hours .BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook iii. iv. and also obtain a minimum of 30% in both the coursework (aggregate) and examination elements of the assessment. xi.  Make individual presentations on problem solving.          2. Express the financial and budgetary basis of new product development.  xv. vii. x. Critically evaluate the relative merits of new technologies. xiv. students Taught will be able to: vii. iv. xiv. Ability to critically evaluate the potential of a business idea. Understand leadership.  ix. viii. xv Presentation 10% iv. x. ii. Develop a structured commercial argument. Recognise formal application of communication  and presentation techniques in a pressurised business setting. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Practiced Assessed          Practiced Assessed         Teaching and Learning Experiences Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend lectures which address main ideas and stimulate discussion. 3. Notional Learning Time Lectures Seminars Case Study discussion Directed Study Assessment Exam (50%) Coursework (50%) Learning Outcome Written assignment 40% i. xii. Business planning for new product development. xiv Unseen written examination 50% i to xii. Recognised the advantages and limitations to new technologies. Develop and promote a commercial argument. students Taught will be able to:  xii.

(2009) Engineering Economy. Pearson International  Westland. James P and Daniel T. . . C.London : Penguin. Palgrave Macmillan  Liker.: Harvard Business School. . .M and Koelling. Steven D. (2004) The Toyota Way: 14 Management Principles from the World's Greatest Manufacturer. Mass. . 2003.Boston.  Chesbrough. MA: Harvard Business School Press.  Christensen. 2006 . C. & Gorse. Jeffrey K. 2006. James P. (Peter Ferdinand). 1999. () Global Innovation Management.G.P. Construction Management (2 edition. Harold L. Validation History Validated March 2010 74 . E. 1962.  Levitt. Simon and Schuster nd  Daniel Halpin and Ronald W. Woodhead. 1909-2005 Innovation and entrepreneurship: practice and principles. The innovators solution: creating and sustaining successful growth / Clayto . . Peter F. McGraw--Hill  Womac. MA: Harvard Business School. The innovator's dilemma: when new technologies cause great firms to fail . reprint. Sirkin .Boston.New Directions (2002). Clayton M. (2003) Lean Thinking: Banish Waste and Create Wealth in Your Corporation. C. 1997  Christensen. Freakonomics : a rogue economist explores the hidden side of everything / St .Boston.: Harvard Business Schoo. 2003. Construction Management . J. Jones.  Andrew. 2006)  Denny McGeorge. S.Payback: reaping the rewards of innovation / James Andrew. Clayton M..Boston.  Drucker. Henry William Open innovation: the new imperative for creating and profiting from technology .A. (2010) Barry’s Advanced Construction of Buildings Oxford: Wiley – Blackwell  Sullivan. Mass. W. Wicks.Rev.Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Indicative Reading List  Emmitt.

human behaviour and organisational design  Innovations in project management  Quality. risk and value management  Design management  Management and health and safety. The learning style is participative and the module includes at least one simulation.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33571: Project Management Module Leader: Dr Christos Vidalakis cvidalakis@brookes. including legal framework and procedures  Communication and negotiation 75 . QM. The module builds on the skills and knowledge that students are likely to have built up during their placement years and also on the level 5 Construction Procurement and Practice modules. CZ U33521 Construction Practice and Procedure U33527 Construction Procurement and Law None Semester 1 Every Year Cannot be counted with: U33542 Project Management None Tuesday 17. the role of the project manager and interactions with others  Planning and programming including Gantt charts. It also complements the theory and techniques which are developed and practised in level 6 Project Development Feasibility module. Critical Path Method and use of software  The project team – selecting.uk 01865 483359 Module Description This module provides a detailed study of the knowledge and tools required of project managers of construction projects.ac. most of which are essential for general project management. particularly the client’s project manager or professional project manager who provides advice and management to the client from developing the brief. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: The Built Environment Honours – Level 6 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) and Acceptable for BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ). through selection of consultants through construction to hand-over and evaluation.00 – 20. Course Content  Client’s role.00 (F) This module covers many of the core techniques and skills of construction project management. motivating and directing  Brief review of procurement strategies  Managing. leading.

students Taught will be able to:  ix. value and reducing the potential impact of commercial risk making reference to contracts and software as appropriate Practised      Assessed            2. Describe theories of human behaviour and organisation and evaluate how these apply to roles and relationships in relation to problems.  x. Evaluate procedures for selection of project team members  v. Evaluate techniques for identifying and refining client priorities and preferences and formalising the client brief  iii. Evaluate the approaches developed for improving quality. Apply understanding to selecting forms of procurement to particular sets of circumstances  iv. Negotiate. projects and organisations  vi.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Learning Outcomes In successfully completing the module. 3. Evaluate the role of the project manager in the construction process  ii. Negotiate. students will do the following: 1. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Present proposals for example in relation to appropriate organisational procedures. particularly in relation to various project situations such as setting up business relationships and dealing with claims. Disciplinary/Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. with reference to relevant legislation and human behaviour in organisations  vii. presenting proposals. students Taught will be able to:  xi. with the benefit of knowledge of theories of negotiation and participation in a negotiation exercise Practised   Assessed   Practised Assessed    76 . and using appropriate forms of writing and presentation. Evaluate risk and health and safety considerations. Communicate more effectively and in a professional manner particularly in relation to handling difficult people and situations.  xii. Analyse projects and specific problem situations produce suitable programmes and use these to evaluate priorities and deal with delay and disruption  viii. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. students Taught will be able to:  i.

& Palmer. B. (2007). Oxford. 1996) Project Management Skills in the Construction Industry. (2004). Body of Knowledge.. Thomas Telford  Thomas. Lend me your ears: all you need to know about making speeches and presentations.. Thomas Telford.  Scott. Harlow. Project management in construction. et al. (2004). Contractual procedures in the construction industry. Oxford. Construction Management. J. S. Oxford. A. Butterworth-Heinemann. and M. Construction partnering & integrated teamworking. (2006). et al. Notional Learning Time Lectures In class practical and problem-solving exercises Directed Study Assessment Coursework (100%) Simulations and presentations Online formative interim quizzes Online end-quiz Portfolio of work 30% 8% 20% 42% Learning Outcome i-viii. ix-xi i-viii i-viii i-viii. Profitable partnering for lean construction. (2002).  CIOB (2002) Code of Practice for Project Management for Construction & Development. Pearson/Prentice Hall. High Wycombe: APM  Atkinson. C. S. Oxford. B. Blackwell Science.  Cain. London: Vermilion  Bennett. Partnering in the construction industry : a code of practice for strategic collaborative working. (2002). J. (2004). Peace. Robinson. T. Negotiation Skills in Engineering and Construction. I. M. lectures will generally include interaction  Participate in role-play exercise(s) and presentations  Undertake group and self-directed learning  Undertake formative online quizzes with feedback and a summative final online quiz. D. new directions 2nd ed. (2006). Procurement routes for partnering : a practical guide. Oxford. Oxford  Naoum. G. M. Thomas (2005). & Billing. 2002). G. 3rd ed. Validation History Validated March 2010 77 .  Association for Project Management (APM. Blackwell. tendering & contract administration.. ix-xi 22 hours 11 hours 117 hours Indicative Reading List  Ashworth.  Construction Industry Council (CIC.. London. The Aqua Group guide to procurement. J. (1991) .BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend lectures that address key themes and provide background information. Blackwell Pub. Blackwell  McGeorge. Blackwell & CIOB  Hackett. Blackwell Science. A.  Broome.

students Taught will be able to:  i Understand approach to analyse cost and value of development  ii Familiarise with costing concepts such as net present value. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: The Built Environment Honours – Level 6 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) QS U33522 Quantity Surveying Practice None Semester 1 Every Year Cannot be counted with: U33543 Project Financial Control None Friday 13.00 – 16. Course Content  Building Design Cost Management Process  Feasibility Study  Elemental Cost Plan  Risk Management Process  Risk Analysis  Life cycle costing  Cost Report Learning Outcomes In successfully completing the module. students will do the following: 1. internal rate of return.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33572: Project Financial Control Module Leader: Dr Franco Cheung kcheung@brookes. Effective cost and resource management during the design stage holds the key to achieve the best value of client’s investments.uk 01865 483356 Module Description Finance is the lifeblood of any business. Students will need the core measurement and estimating skills acquired through level 5 modules to comprehend advanced cost models in this module. Businesses in property development and constructions are no exceptions.00 (N) This module aims to advance students’ knowledge on project finance and their skills on the preparation and use of sophisticated models to give cost advice. price indices and construction cost data  iii Understand various quantitative risk analysis techniques Practised Assessed       78 . Students will also learn to identify and assess project financial risks with the use of advanced methods. This module allows students to acquire the knowledge and techniques required to plan and monitor the finance of commercial development project through the design and construction phases. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully.ac.

J. (2004).. Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. (2004) Whole Life-cycle Costing: Risk and Risk Responses. and Matysiak. risk and budget at various design stage in a professional manner ix Develop self-management. Raftery J. Taylor & Francis Validation History Validated March 2010 79 . iv.. A. and Higgon D... D. R. R. (2000) Real Estate Investment.  Brown. R and Norman. v. (2002) Building Design Cost Management. vi. ix iii. A. 4th ed. students will be able to: iv Collate cost data and prepare budgets for feasibility studies v Apply knowledge in design economics to produce elemental cost plans vi Apply probability approach to evaluate commercial risks vii Analyse life cycle cost data and apply life cycle costing techniques to evaluate design options Taught     Practised    Assessed     3. Pearson Education. G. and Lover. ii.. Kirkham. vi. P. Blackwell Science  Loosemore M.  Jagger.. ii. vii 10 hours 16 hours 3 hours 121 hours Indicative Reading List  Ashworth A.. 624 FLA. G.  Flanagan.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 2. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Smith.. H. Cost Studies of Buildings. students Taught will be able to: viii Provide advise on cost. 2nd Edition. Reilly C. iii. Blackwell Scientific Publications. viii i. G (1993) Risk Management and Construction. Ross. v. Oxford: Blackwell Science. communication and report writing and presentation skills Practised Assessed     Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend explanatory and interactive lectures  Participate in workshops  Engage in practical simulation of industrial practice  Produce cost report in a professional manner Notional Learning Time Lectures In class practical and problem-solving exercises Workshops Directed Study Assessment Coursework (100%) Individual Feasibility Report Cost Plan and Risk Analysis Group Project Online Web Tests 40% 40% 20% Learning Outcome i. Prentice-Hall  Boussabaine. vii. (2006) Risk Management in Projects.

It starts with the role and needs of the client and the client’s project manager and how various procurement routes and project management options should be considered in relation to these needs.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33573: Advanced Procurement and Dispute Resolution Module Leader: Dr Zhihong Wong zhihong. CZ U33527 Construction Procurement and Law None Semester 2 Every Year None None Monday 13. cost or quality. including the use of electronic procurement tools. The module covers dispute avoidance and dispute resolution techniques and procedures. collateral warranties and other legal devices  Delay and disruption claims – formulation and requirements  Conflict avoidance and dispute resolution including behaviours. partnering and PFI  Procurement procedures for consultants. staying fore-armed and legal procedures  Electronic procurement. as well practical and legal factors involved. uses role play.00 – 16. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: The Built Environment Honours – Level 6 Single Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) and BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) and acceptable for BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ) QM. Course Content  Procurement routes including early contractor involvement. QS.ac. and which have the potential for harming project relationships and causing long-term harm. The expertise and skills developed thus lie at the heart of the function of the modern quantity surveyor. early contractor involvement. in relation to difficult situations and disputes. NEC.uk 01865 482834 Module Description This module builds on the understanding of procurement developed in U33527 Construction Procurement and Law. It also aims to develop the core skills and techniques for avoiding or dealing with situations in projects where difficulties arise causing problems with time. The module provides opportunities to develop decision making skills and.00 (B) This module builds on the skills and knowledge that students are likely to have built up during their placement years and also on the level 5 Construction Procurement and Practice modules. It goes on to consider options such as PFI. bonds. contractors and subcontractors (applicable for contractors and for consultant selection of named subcontractors and in partnering contracts)  Forms of contract including JCT forms of various kinds. extranets and electronic collaboration tools 80 .wong@brookes. PPC2000 and the Constructing Excellence form  Contractor or consultant default – protecting the interests of the client. insurances. partnering and various forms of contract can be implemented and the advantages and disadvantages or doing so.

 ii. economic. Apply knowledge of commercial risks to evaluate ways of protecting client interests e.  iv. Discuss how delay and disruption may affect a project and apply techniques for evaluating contractual claims  x. value and dangers of these systems  xi. Undertake the selection of appropriate procurement route in various situations taking account of client needs and preferences and relevant external factors such as political. personal behaviours and preparation and evaluate methods for resolving disputes on construction projects Practised  Assessed                      81 . social and technical factors and prospects. through the use of insurances. collateral warranties and other legal devices. students Taught will be able to:  i. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully.g. bonds. Evaluate techniques for evaluating client priorities and determining a form of procurement appropriate to circumstances. and discuss how the form of contract selected affects the management of the contract in practice. Describe how extranets and electronic collaboration tools are used and discuss the impact.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Learning Outcomes In successfully completing the module.  iii. students will do the following: 1. Also discuss the legal duties and liabilities of consultants in relation to project responsibilities for example in relation to design and supervision of the works  ix. Compare and evaluate forms of contract for various circumstances. Evaluate how procurement procedures need to take account of risk and health and safety  vii. Analyse procedures for selection of professional project team members  v. Evaluate the various procurement procedures considered in the module and discuss how these procedures may best be implemented. Analyse how the chance of disputes may be minimised through appropriate procedures. Explain and evaluate the procedures involved in electronic procurement and their actual and likely impacts  vi.  viii.

S. Notional Learning Time Lectures (including interactive sessions) In class practical and problem-solving exercises Directed Study Assessment Coursework (100%) Simulations and presentations Online formative interim quizzes Online end-quiz Portfolio of work 30% 8% 20% 42% Learning Outcome i-xi. Pearson/Prentice Hall. Butterworth-Heinemann 82 . Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Contractual procedures in the construction industry.          xiv. Partnering in the construction industry: a code of practice for strategic collaborative working. Harlow. J. xvi i-xi i-xi i-xi. xii-xvi 20 hours 12 hours 118 hours Indicative Reading List  Ashworth.. et al. students Taught will be able to: xii. Use communication skills at a professional level in ways which are appropriate for complex situations  xvii. Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully.  Bennett. share or transfer risk Evaluate the impact of legislation and case law on the need for. and methods of providing. xii-xv.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 2. Apply systematic procedures for making decisions when there are a variety of criteria and separate evaluations against each criterion Evaluate risk and describe various strategies can be used to minimise its impact. Demonstrate ways of working more collaboratively and of handling personal difficulties when they arise. and a prepare for a final summative assessment demonstrating grasp of knowledge and its application. Peace. and of resolving conflicts. (2006). students Taught will be able to:  xvi. xv. (2006). Practised   Assessed  Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend explanatory and interactive lectures  Participate in workshops  Engage in a practical simulation of formal dispute resolution  Undertake formative online quizzes written to aid the application of knowledge to situations. protective measures for the parties Use various methods for evaluating and presenting the impact of delay and disruption on time and cost  Practised  Assessed  xiii. A. 3. Oxford.

Raftery J. London: Routledge. G. (1998). and M. & Billing.078624/CON)  Chappell. B. J.. J (2005) Building contract claims.078624/MOR)  Morledge.  Flanagan.. Oxford. (2006). (1991) . Negotiation Skills in Engineering and Construction. Jenkins (2003). Partnering and alliancing in construction projects. (1997). Taylor & Francis  Morgan. Smith. London. Blackwell  Kuakye. Robinson. 3rd ed. (2000) Avoiding claims in building design: risk management in practice. Oxford: Blackwell Science (343. London: RIBA (343.07869/POW)  CIOB (2002) Code of Practice for Project Management for Construction & Development. (2008) Construction delays: extensions of time and prolongation. G (1993) Risk Management and Construction.5/GIB)  Hackett. Construction partnering & integrated teamworking. Blackwell Science: RICS Research. Reilly C. Will (2008). 624 FLA.). & Sim. A. Malcolm T.A.  Gibson. Sweet & Maxwell. Construction Law (10th ed. R and Norman. (692. A. Construction Contracts: Law and Management (4th ed). tendering & contract administration. John and Hughes..  Murdock. M.. Longmans  Loosemore M. J. 2nd Edition.  Scott. Latheronwheel. Oxford: Blackwell Science (692/TAY)  Thomas. and Higgon D. Oxford. et al. London: Sweet and Maxwell  Roe. David. and J.  Uff. (2008) Dispute avoidance: a non-confrontational approach to the management of construction contracts. Thomas (2005). J. London... (2007). The Aqua Group guide to procurement. S. (343. Chandos. (2002). London: Sweet and Maxwell Validation History Validated March 2010 83 . (2006) Risk Management in Projects. Thomas Telford  Taylor. I. R. R. P. et al. Procurement routes for partnering: a practical guide. B. Blackwell & CIOB  Critchlow. Oxford. Construction Project Administration.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook  Broome. Making partnering work in the construction industry. Oxford. (2009). Building procurement. D. Blackwell Scientific Publications. B. (ed) (1997) Construction disputes: avoidance and resolution. Blackwell. Thomas Telford  Campbell. Caithness.

contractual or technological aspect of building or construction industry. Demonstrate new knowledge. students Taught will be able to: i.uk 01865 483369 Module Description This module provides an opportunity for an individual and appropriate field.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33588: Independent Study Module Leader: Dr Mark Austin maustin@brookes. Learning Objectives In successfully completing this module. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. cost. ii. Autonomously plan an in-depth investigation into a construction related problem. QS. The module allows students to pursue the study of an area in which they have a particular interest. QM. The topic is to be selected with appropriate guidance and approval from both module leader and designated tutor. Undertake a review of the research and other  authoritative sources of information on a particular topic related to a commercial. Originating School Level Size Status The Built Environment Honours – Level 6 Single Acceptable for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM). The topic and supervision arrangements must receive the prior approval of the module leader. laboratory or desk based research study. or explore hitherto  unknown relationships between existing fields of knowledge related to the construction industry iii. Practised  Assessed       84 . legal. CZ U33529 Integrative Project 2 None Semester 1 or 2 Every year None None None This module provides the student with the opportunity to undertake an in-depth study into an aspect of construction that is not specifically covered in other modules at level 6. BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS) and BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ).ac. Identify and understand the application of relevant methods of research analysis to problem solving iv. Field Pre-requisite Co-requisite Placing Years running Restrictions Exclusions Timetable Slots: Context: Content An investigation into a topic in any aspect of the course covering an area related to the building process or product. students will enable to: 1. Each student will be supervised by a tutor.

vi. etc. Disciplinary/Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. iv. vii. Present an oral report viii. xii. etc. Independent thinking. Use library skills. ii. a student will spend time on reading relevant material.) xiv. research. writing. preparation and submission of a report. Assessment Coursework (100%) Seminar presentation Written report (5. synthesis. managing their own time  Develop an in depth knowledge of a specific aspect of the selected area of study  Produce an in-depth report  Present a seminar to staff and peers on the selected area of study Notional Learning Time Individual tutorials 8 hours Independent Study 142 hours Additionally. iii. viii. fostering critical evaluation and a logical approach. xiii. students Taught will be able to: v. iv. xvi i. Present ideas to different audiences using appropriate media xvii. xv 85 . planning. Set personal objectives  x. students Taught will be able to:  ix. v. including information technology  xiii. Identify and evaluate personal learning strategies  xv. Liaising with other professionals within the industry. Present a written report to a professional  standard Practised     Assessed    3. Use appropriate language and form when writing and speaking xvi. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. vii.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 2. Use a wide range of academic skills (analysis. Manage time and tasks in an autonomous manner xi. Independently undertake and manage a lengthy project of work Practised          Assessed     Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend tutorial/surgeries with supervisor and mentor  Work as an individual. Learn independently and be self evaluative xii.000 words) 10% 90% Learning Outcomes ii.

&Tight. and as a seminar to staff and peers. QAA 2005 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 86 . revised 2004. (2006) How to research 3rd Edition.S.R. (2005). (2007). Hughes. (2009) How to write your dissertation. Palgrave Bryman. Doing a successful research project : using qualitative or quantitative methods / Martin Brett Davies. Palgrave Macmillan  Walliman. M. L.. Oxford University Press Davies. M. A. C. Sage Publications Journals: Electronic journal of business research methods Journal of Mixed Methods research Survey Research Methods Validation History Approved 1992. which will be submitted as a bound document. Social research Methods 3rd Edition. Indicative Reading List     Blaxter. Accredited 2004. Greetham.B. (2008). N. Your research project : a step-by-step guide for the first-time researcher 2nd Edition. re-approved 2002. Open University Press. based on the production. B.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Coursework. content and presentation of the study.

00-16.  Project Finance.  Project Evaluation.00-12. marketing. Content  Site appraisal. and their inter-relationships. the widerange of issues that need to be taken into consideration for a development appraisal. value and social considerations.00 (K) This module is designed such that students put the knowledge they gained in level 5 and 6 modules into practice by applying it in undertaking a feasibility study on a project of their choice.  Development proposals.00 (J) and 13.ac.  Feasibility. including cost planning. Within this module there is a requirement for students to focus on elements of the project appraisal that reflect their chosen degree pathway of project management.  Risk Management. different stages of the development process.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33593: Project Development Feasibility Module Leader: Dr Esra Kurul ekurul@brookes. sales.  Logistics & mobilisation. including markets.  Procurement Strategy.  Financial Appraisal. profit and cash flow. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: The Built Environment Honours – Level 6 Double Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) and BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ).  Project Planning & Programming.  Design & technology for sustainability. QM. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully.  Project realisation.uk 01865 484322 Module Description This module is concerned with developing the students’ understanding of the tasks associated with appraising a development proposal. students will able to: 1. Apply their knowledge of the development process from feasibility through to commissioning and to establish inter-dependencies between different stages in devising a project programme 87 Practised  Assessed  . The students develop this understanding by applying the principles of financial appraisal and risk management on a mixed-use development of their choice. Learning Outcomes In successfully completing the module. the students Taught will be able to:  i. CZ U33522 None Semesters 1 and 2 Every Year None None Thursday 9.

process and critically evaluate relevant market. the students Taught will be able to: xii. and development mix to address social considerations viii. financial issues such as cash-flow and project programme  ix. city and corporate policies influence the development process in a project of their choice Undertake financial appraisal of different development options. and to undertake them xi. including construction costs. iv. Practised   Assessed         3. Apply their knowledge of how Government. Reflecting on experience & identifying actions for improvement xvi. collate. sales and hand-over Appraise risk and opportunity. iii. vi. Work in a group Practised      Assessed      Teaching and Learning Experiences Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend lectures designed to build the foundations of their independent learning  Attend seminars designed to share knowledge. presentations. develop their understanding of the development appraisal process and to ask pertinent questions  Attend tutorials to ask specific questions about their own proposals  Undertake independent learning  Formulate project appraisal reports 88 . Taking initiative xiii. Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. v. Evaluate different design & technology options in terms of their sustainability. costs in use for retained property Develop an appropriate project programme for a given development proposal. including marketing. reports and posters. and develop appropriate risk management strategies Appraise development cost against value of property                2. Peer reviewing and giving constructive feedback  xv. Present their proposals in a professional manner using a range of media including IT. cost and policy data x. the students Taught will be able to: vii. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Evaluating alternative solutions to a problem  xiv. Research.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook ii. Identify tasks relevant to different stages of development appraisal. Evaluate the appropriateness of different procurement options for a given proposal taking into account the relationship between procurement.

(2004) Sustainable Property Development. Oxford: Blackwell Science. D (2010) Property Development. N. vii.  Brandon. x. Indicative Reading List  Ashworth. 2nd Edition. QAA 2005 Amended 2008 Validated March 2010 89 . Victoria: Blackwell. I V (1995) Building Economics. N. Taylor & Francis  Ratcliffe. (2006) Risk Management in Projects. and Reed.068 MAN. New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. 692.  Seeley. to be released. (This book is the new edition of Cadman & Topping. (2003) Property Finance. xiii xiv. iii. M. (2003) Building Ecology: first principles for a sustainable built environment. M. London: E & F N Spon..5 SEE. 4th ed. vii. D. C. (2007) Ferry & Brandon’s Cost Planning of Buildings. London: Estates Gazette. Halperin. vii. R.  Smith. (2008) Construction Funding: The Process of Real Estate Development.  Grahama. P. 5th Edition. xii. ii. (2004) Cost Studies of Buildings.E.. P.  Wilkinson. Oxford. ix i. (2006) Managing Risk in Construction Projects.. A.. P. ix. v. Reilly C. Stubbs. Raftery J. T. x. 1995) Validation History Revised 2004 . Oxford: Blackwell Science. D. Jobling. ii. Ch 11. M. Routledge.  Smith. Collier. xv xi.  Isaac. D. (2005) Evaluating Sustainable Development in the built environment. London: Spon Press.  Collier..F. Abingdon. Merna.J. and Topping R.A.J. xv xvi xv Reflective interviews must be passed to complete Honours element of this module. Blackwell Publishing. (1995) Property Development. London: Palgrave Macmillan. viii. D.  Issac. A. Oxford: Blackwell Science. (2008) Property Development. A. (2003) Urban Planning and Real Estate Development. 2nd Edition. 624. vi. J.  Cadman. S. Paperback edition. 4th Edition. and Finance. R. Thomas Telford. Harlow: Pearson Prentice Hall. Lombardi.S. 4th ed.. 8th ed. and Shepherd.S. Macmillan.  Loosemore M.068 APP. xi i. iv. (2003) Appraisal.  Millington. Risk and Uncertainty.. (2001) An Introduction to Property Valuation . N. Shiers.. xiii. ii. Appraisal. P. Maldon.  Kirkham. and Higgon D..  Keeping. 624. xiv.. ix.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Notional Learning Time Lectures 20 hours Seminars 14 hours Tutorials 3 hours per student Directed Study 263 hours Assessment Coursework (100%) Site identification brief Market study report Development appraisal report Poster presentation 2 Peer reviews Group work contribution Reflective interviews 10% 20% 35% 10% 20% 5% Pass/Fail Learning Outcome i. xi. reprinted in 1998.

Students will be asked to choose a site and appraise a development proposal for a mixed-use development. It demands good comprehension of conventional cost models that students learnt in level 5 modules.00 (J) and 13. Financial appraisals shall give strong evidence in quantifiable terms about the costs. They will need to understand the context of the site. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: The Built Environment Honours – Level 6 Double Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS). evaluate the potential development options. identify the market forces and needs. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. Content  Site identification  Context study  Market analysis  Development timeframe  Project Finance  Cost and benefit analysis  Residual valuation  Development proposals  Cost planning  Risk Analysis  Procurement  Strategic case Learning Outcomes In successfully completing the module.00 (K) Students will be asked to produce a financial appraisal of a development case in a professional manner. benefits and risks of developments.00-12.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33594: Financial Appraisal Module Leader: Dr Franco Cheung kcheung@brookes.uk 01865 483356 Module Description The decision to develop buildings in the inception stage is crucial. and assess the viability of the options. QS U33522 None Semesters 1 and 2 Every Year None None Thursday 9.ac. Within this module there is a requirement for students to focus on elements of the financial appraisal that reflect their chosen degree pathway of commercial management. Commercial developers often make use of financial appraisals to decide whether to put forth development proposals in the inception stage. the students Taught will be able to:  i. students will able to: 1.00-16. Understand the development process from inception through to commissioning and to establish interdependencies between different stages 90 Practised Assessed  .

including marketing.                    Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. Understand the planning and control mechanism in the UK and the social concerns in commercial development iii. the students Taught will be able to:  ix. Research. Evaluate development cost and benefit of proposed development scheme 2. process and critically evaluate relevant market. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. the students Taught will be able to: xii. sales and hand-over vii. Propose a timeframe for a given development proposal. Work in a group and independently Practised    Assessed    3. Identify tasks to comprehend a financial appraisal. including construction costs. Analyse risk and opportunity of the proposed development scheme viii. Peer reviewing and giving constructive feedback  xv. Take initiative xiii. and to undertake them xi. Reflect on experience & identifying actions for improvement xvi.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook ii. Present their proposals in a professional manner using a range of media including IT. costs in use for retained property iv. Undertake financial appraisal of different development options. cost and policy data x. develop their understanding of the development appraisal process and to ask pertinent questions  Attend tutorials to ask specific questions about their own proposals  Undertake independent learning  Formulate project appraisal reports Notional Learning Time Lectures 20 hours Seminars 14 hours Tutorials 3 hours per student Directed Study 263 hours 91 . collate. Practised      Assessed      Teaching and Learning Experiences Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend lectures designed to build the foundations of their independent learning  Attend seminars designed to share knowledge. Evaluate alternative solutions to a problem  xiv. Evaluate different financial and commercial options of mixed use development mix v. presentations. reports and posters. Evaluate the appropriateness of different contractual arrangements for a given proposal vi.

xiii xiv. ii. ix. 2nd Edition. (2006) Managing Risk in Construction Projects. Raftery J.. 3rd Edition. S. (2008) Property Valuation: The Five Methods. London: Spon Press. Macmillan. M. G V and Blair. M. Reilly C. M.F.. N. J. (2002) “A vision and methodology for integrated sustainable urban development: BEQUEST.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Assessment Coursework (100%) Site identification brief Market study Business proposal (Incorporates financial appraisal) Poster presentation 2 Peer reviews Group work contribution Reflective interviews 10% 20% 35% 10% 20% 5% Pass/Fail Learning Outcome i.. D. 2nd Edition. vi. S L (1990) Feasibility Studies in Construction.  Grahama.  Kirkham. 2nd Edition. Blackwell Publishing. ii. Indicative Reading List  Barnett. Paperback edition.. and Nijkamp. Mitchell. P.  Millington. D. xv xi. (2009) Urban Planning and Real Estate Development.” Building Research and Information 30: 83-94  Brandon.S. G. xiii. M.E. A. Thomas Telford  Smith.  Isaac. London: Palgrave Macmillan.  Ratcliffe. ii.  Gruneberg.  Keeping. D. R. (2003) Appraisal. and Shepherd. D. Oxford: Blackwell Science..  Cadman. (2003) Building Ecology: first principles for a sustainable built environment. London 624 GRU. T. xiv.. iv. (2007) Ferry and Brandon’s Cost Planning of Buildings. Shiers. D (1996) Property Development.  Loosemore. Jobling. Oxford: Blackwell Science.  Bentivegna. J P (1988) How to conduct and analyse Real Estate Market and Feasibility Studies. (2008) Property Development. Blackwel. Oxford: Blackwell Science. P. xv xvi xv Reflective interviews must be passed to complete Honours element of this module. iv. ix i. van Nostrand Reinhold. (2001) An Introduction to Property Valuation.  Smith. v. N. ix. (2005) Evaluating Sustainable Development in the built environment. P. 5th Edition.. Stubbs. Risk and Uncertainty. (2004) Sustainable Property Development.  Issac.. Basingstoke.J. and Topping R. x. xii. Curwell. Mitchell. iii. Taylor and Francis. London: E & F N Spon. New York.. P. (2006) Risk Management in Projects. D. London: Estates Gazette. P. Validation History Validated March 2010 92 .  Scarrett. V.. Lombardi. P. vii. xi. (2003) Property Finance.J. Deakin. viii. Merna. x. Taylor and Francis.. Lonbardi. xi i. M. vii. Higgon.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33598: Commercial Management Dissertation Module Leader: Dr Mark Austin maustin@brookes. problem solving. cost. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: The Built Environment Honours – Level 6 Double Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying & Commercial Management (QS) QS U33529 Integrative Project 2 None Semesters 1 and 2 Every Year None None None Building upon the research skills and training obtained in Level 4 and 5. Undertake a review of the research and other authoritative sources of information of a particular topic related to the commercial. including the citation of references Learning Outcomes In successfully completing the module. a dissertation will be presented. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully. Each student will be supervised by a dissertation tutor. cost.uk 01865 483369 Module Description The Commercial Management Dissertation will normally consist of an industry or literature based research study associated with the commercial. this module provides the opportunity for students to carry out a significant independent research study requiring the application of research methods. students will do the following: 1. Course Content  An investigation into a topic in any aspect of the course covering an area related to the building process or product. The topic. or contractual aspects of building or construction. students will be able to: i.ac. Industry relevance is advocated and students are encouraged to develop their research question in conjunction with their placement year employer and their chosen pathway of Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management.  Viva presentation of the planed program of work including research methods to be undertaken  Presentation of an in-depth literature review of current research  Report presentation. independent working and professional report writing. ethics form and supervision arrangements must receive the prior approval of the module leader. following which. legal. The topic to be selected with appropriate guidance and approval from both module leader and designated tutor. legal or contractual aspect of building or construction industries and identify a gap in knowledge. 93 Taught Practised Assessed    .

Analyse a problem and the issues relating to it xvii. Identify strategic options Practised Assessed               Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend a seminar on literature searching  Attend workshops on research methods  Discuss research and work done with supervisor  Work as an individual. Manage time and tasks in an autonomous manner xii. iv. Use library skills. students Taught will be able to: v. Demonstrate new knowledge. and/or explore hitherto unknown relationships between existing fields of knowledge related to the construction industry Identify and understand the application of relevant research methods. including information  technology xiv. Undertake research viii. Learn independently and consult expert opinion as appropriate xiii. Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. Write effectively  xv. Present a written report to professional standards Practised      Assessed      3.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook ii. arguing logically  and drawing conclusions as appropriate ix. Observe closely and consider practical issues  vii. managing their own time  Develop an in-depth knowledge of a specific aspect of construction management  Develop contacts within the construction industry  Prepare and present a viva on their work. for researching construction based phenomena Autonomously plan an in-depth investigation into a construction related problem         2. Present ideas orally with assistance of appropriate media xvi. Thinking independently with critical evaluation and a logical approach vi. Think laterally about a problem xviii. before supervisors and mentors  Produce and present a dissertation 94 . Set personal objectives xi. iii. Write and communicate orally. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. students Taught will be able to: x.

R. vi. Your research project : a step-by-step guide for the first-time researcher 2nd Edition. xviii i. xiii. (2008). Palgrave Macmillan  Walliman.. Palgrave  Bryman. xiii. Social research Methods 3rd Edition. Oxford University Press  Davies. iii. ii. viii.B. &Tight. xvi. xviii Indicative Reading List As recommended by supervisor and more generally:  Blaxter. ix. Hughes. Open University Press. xiv. iv. A. (2005). x. xvii. (2006) How to research 3rd Edition. Doing a successful research project : using qualitative or quantitative methods / Martin Brett Davies. C. L. (2007). Sage Publications Journals: Electronic journal of business research methods Journal of Mixed Methods research Survey Research Methods Validation History Developed 2008 Validated March 2010 95 .BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Notional Learning Time Lectures 4 hours Seminars/workshops 4 hours Supervisor tutorials 8 hours Independent Study 284 hours Assessment Coursework (100%) Presentation/Viva Final Dissertation 10% 90% Learning Outcome iii.S. vii. iv. (2009) How to write your dissertation. N.  Greetham. v. vii. M. M. xvi. viii. xv. B.

Industry relevance is advocated and students are encouraged to develop their research question in conjunction with their placement year employer and their chosen pathway of Construction Project Management. Knowledge and Understanding Having completed this module successfully.  Viva presentation of the planed program of work including research methods to be undertaken  Presentation of an in-depth literature review of current research  Report presentation. problem solving.  technological or contractual aspects of building or construction industries and identify a gap in knowledge. The topic to be selected with appropriate guidance and approval from both module leader and designated tutor. independent working and professional report writing. The topic. Taught students will be able to: i. ethics form and supervision arrangements must receive the prior approval of the module leader. a dissertation will be presented.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook U33599: Construction Management Dissertation Module Leader: Dr Mark Austin maustin@brookes. QM. students will do the following: 1. this module provides the opportunity for students to carry out a significant independent research study requiring the application of research methods.ac. following which. Course Content  An investigation into a topic in any aspect of the course covering an area related to the building process or product. Undertake a review of the research and other authoritative sources of information of a particular topic related to the managerial. Originating School: Level: Size: Status: Field: Pre-requisite: Co-requisite: Placing: Years running: Restrictions: Exclusions: Timetable Slots: Context: The Built Environment Honours – Level 6 Double Compulsory for BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) and BSc (Hons) Construction Management (CZ). Each student will be supervised by a dissertation tutor. literature or laboratory based research study associated with the management.uk 01865 483369 Module Description The Construction Management Dissertation will normally consist of an industry. contractual or technological aspects of building or construction. including the citation of references Learning Outcomes In successfully completing the module. 96 Practised Assessed   . CZ U33529 Integrative Project 2 None Semesters 1 and 2 Every Year None None None Building upon the research skills and training obtained in Level 4 and 5.

Set personal objectives xi. Analyse a problem and the issues relating to it xvii. Undertake research viii. Develop knowledge. Present ideas orally with assistance of appropriate media xvi. students Taught will be able to: v.         Professional Skills Having completed this module successfully. managing their own time  Develop an in-depth knowledge of a specific aspect of construction management  Develop contacts within the construction industry  Prepare and present a viva on their work. Identify and understand the application of relevant research methods. for researching construction based phenomena iv. Present a written report to professional standards Practised      Assessed      3. Write effectively  xv. Autonomously plan an in-depth investigation into a construction related problem 2. Learn independently and consult expert opinion as appropriate xiii. Identify strategic options Practised Assessed               Teaching and Learning Experience Students completing this module will have been given the opportunity to:  Attend a seminar on literature searching  Attend workshops on research methods  Discuss research and work done with supervisor  Work as an individual. Use library skills. before supervisors and mentors  Produce and present a dissertation 97 . Observe closely and consider practical issues  vii. arguing  logically and drawing conclusions as appropriate ix. Write and communicate orally. Transferable Skills Having completed this module successfully. Manage time and tasks in an autonomous manner xii. including information  technology xiv.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook ii. students Taught will be able to: x. Thinking independently with a critically evaluative and logical approach vi. Think laterally about a problem xviii. and/or explore hitherto unknown relationships between existing fields of knowledge related to the construction industry iii.

Open University Press. v. M. xiii. (2009) How to write your dissertation. Oxford University Press  Davies. iii. Social research Methods 3rd Edition. Palgrave  Bryman. vi. (2006) How to research 3rd Edition. viii. vii. ii.R. xviii Indicative Reading List As recommended by supervisor and more generally:  Blaxter. xiv. C. &Tight. Palgrave Macmillan  Walliman. xv.B. Doing a successful research project : using qualitative or quantitative methods / Martin Brett Davies. B..BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Notional Learning Time Lectures 4 hours Seminars/workshops 4 hours Supervisor tutorials 8 hours Independent Study 284 hours Assessment Coursework (100%) Presentation/Viva Final Dissertation 10% 90% Learning Outcome iii. Hughes. iv. x. Sage Publications Journals: Electronic journal of business research methods Journal of Mixed Methods research Survey Research Methods Validation History Developed 2008 Validated March 2010 98 . (2007). xvii. iv. xiii. ix. xviii i. A. vii. N. M. xvi. (2005).S. Your research project : a step-by-step guide for the first-time researcher 2nd Edition. viii. L.  Greetham. xvi. (2008).

Turnitin Appendix J .Headington Campus Maps Appendix O .Programme Specification BSc (Hons) in Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management Appendix C .Undergraduate Programme Assessment.Departmental Staff Contact List Appendix L .Health and Safety Regulations: Guide for Students Appendix P .Student Guide for Supervised Industrial Experience Year Appendix K .Brookes Assessment Compact Appendix D .Cheating Appendix H .Programme Specification BSc (Hons) in Construction Project Management Appendix B .Alumni: Keeping in Touch 99 .Rooms Appendix N .Consideration of Mitigating Circumstances Appendix G . Feedback and Marking Guidelines Appendix E .Support Services Contact Details Appendix M .Course Assessment Schedule Appendix F .Citing Your Sources Appendix I .BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook APPENDICES: Appendix A .

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix A . Property and Surveying (2008) The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) http://www. Part-Time English Construction.DipHE QM K221 BSc/QM K221 Face to Face – on campus Sandwich Full-Time.rics.uk Technology.ciob.org/ The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB)  www.Programme Specification BSc (Hons) in Construction Project Management SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION Awarding body: Teaching institution and location: Final award: Programme title: Interim exit awards and award titles: Brookes course code: UCAS/UKPASS code: JACS code: Mode of delivery: Mode/s of study: Language of study: Relevant QAA subject benchmark statement/s: Oxford Brookes University Oxford Brookes University BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management Certificate of Higher Education – CertHE Diploma of Higher Education . Design and Environment May 2012 External accreditation/recognition: (applicable to programmes with professional body approval) Faculty managing the programme: Date of production (or most recent revision) of specification: 100 .org.

and student sponsorship. plant and sustainability and construction techniques. developers. national and international projects. team work.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook SECTION 2: OVERVIEW AND PROGRAMME AIMS 2. Other benefits of a placement for students are: course subjects are put into context. Students who wish to change course. and a choice of degree pathway in the final year of study. professional mentoring. and this is how many of the subject area are taught with reference to interesting and often live projects. Within the broad syllabus there are four main themes – technology. visiting speakers. contractors and sub-contractors. The course also provides the opportunity for some of the syllabus (one semester) to be studied abroad as part of our international exchange programme. cost and monitor projects as well as personal/personnel management skills such as communication. project managers and quantity surveyors. The theme of Management encompasses the areas of management techniques to plan. The benefit of sharing the same modules until the final year of study is that students will be able to defer the decision on which course to graduate until they have completed their 3rd year Industrial Placement and are able to make a more informed decision of their future career progression. Site visits and a European field trip are an essential and popular component of the course. and is therefore structured and designed for students that wish to go on and gain membership of these professional bodies. With a modern fully equipped construction technology laboratory. The course content is best understood through its application to real projects. There is also a dedicated departmental computer suite to provide students with practical experience in the use of construction based IT software. project based learning. Construction industry employers are very much in favour of graduates with work experience. trade skills and land surveying. For technology.1 Rationale for/distinctiveness of the programme The BSc (Hons) degree in Construction Project Management is accredited by both the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB). time management. American and Australian Higher Education Institutions. and provides experience. on private. opportunity to form views about future career (choice of pathway). the programme has very strong links with industry which provide many benefits including placements. in fact many companies secure their graduates through first providing a placement. focus and confidence in preparation for the final year of study. In the final year of study (after a year of industrial experience) there is be a different choice of modules for each course. students are afforded the opportunity to gain first hand practical experience in material manufacture and testing. working for clients. To provide the choice of degree pathway the course shares the same choice of modules in years 1 and 2 as the BSc (Hons) degree in Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management. 101 . can then make a request to change at the beginning of their final year. management. Our graduates are successfully employed as construction managers. a compulsory industrial placement year experience. Through our placement employers and our professional liaison group. leadership. the course is designed with a broad syllabus. paid employment and potential sponsorship in final year. consultants. To compliment this career choice. commercial. The breadth of career opportunities within the construction industry has a significant influence on the design of the course. This includes course links with European. students are provided with knowledge of construction materials. site visits. etc. and practical experience. Therefore the course has a compulsory industrial placement year which provides essential practical work experience.

maintenance and management of national and international built assets. finance) ability to apply the above in the planning and management of construction projects understand the behaviour of construction materials understand construction processes apply management principles and practice to the solution of construction management problems demonstrate a confident familiarity with the process of design and its relation to construction understand health & safety issues and their place in the social. and to appreciate the contribution of education and construction to society. redevelopment. have appropriate professional and transferable skills and are highly employable. technological. operational and economic context of design.2 PLO8 Academic literacy have a sound understanding in some depth of the core subject areas of construction project management (management process and technique. political and environmental frameworks. economic.  develop the intellectual and practical skills of the student in the processes underpinning the finance and management of resources and the appropriate deployment of current technology within the context of changing social. development. The course is designed specifically to meet the learning outcomes of the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements and the professional competencies required by both the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and the Chartered Institute of Building.  stimulate students’ intellectual curiosity and provide an environment in which they are able to appreciate and develop their full potential. the course aims to:  enable students to obtain and maintain professional management careers in the construction industry.  prepare students for life-long learning.1 PLO1 PLO2 PLO3 PLO4 PLO5 PLO6 PLO7 3. SECTION 3: PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES Knowledge. maintenance and disposal/reuse of built assets Research literacy apply the processes of critical analysis and reflection to research projects in construction management 102 . technology.  prepare students for leadership roles in the global construction of the 21st Century. More specifically. construction. understanding and skills: 3. study and enquiry.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 2.  meet society’s needs for well-educated graduates who are adaptable. legal.2 Aim/s of the programme The overall aim is to deliver a high quality vocationally relevant undergraduate course in Construction Project Management to prepare students for professional roles in the built environment in the ongoing processes of evaluation.  prepare students for employment in a range of contexts or for further study and a career where construction and project management knowledge and skills will be applied.

1 Programme structure and requirements: The following tables provide the list of modules at each level.4 Digital and information literacy competently use communication and information technology apply software to the solution of problems in construction management PLO13 PLO14 3. showing their credit value and status (compulsory/acceptable/etc.).5 Global citizenship understand the practice of construction management in the making and maintenance of built assets in their social economic and environmental context have an awareness of construction management and building in its national and international contexts PLO15 PLO16 SECTION 4: PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND CURRICULUM 4. LEVEL 4 – Year 1 Module Code U33503 U33504 U33507 U35001 U35002 U35008 U35009 Module Title Credits Status Semester of delivery 1 1&2 2 2 1&2 1 2 Introduction to Construction and Property Management Introduction to Building Design and Construction Introduction to Commercial Management Economics of Built Environment Foundation Real Estate and Construction Law Introduction to Spatial Planning Integrative Project 1 15 15 15 15 30 15 15 Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory 103 . written and graphic media be self-aware and competent in self-management PLO10 PLO11 PLO12 3.3 PLO9 Critical self-awareness and personal literacy apply a logical approach to problem solving be a capable and enthusiastic independent learner throughout her/his life communicate effectively in oral.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 3.

1B. Foundation B U635** Spanish: 1A. 2A. 4B U627** Mandarin Chinese: 1A. 3A.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook LEVEL 5 – Year 2 Module Code U33521 U33522 U33524 U33525 U33527 U33529 U33537 U33549 Module Title Credits Status Semester of delivery 2 1 1&2 1 1 2 2 2 Construction Practice and Procedure Quantity Surveying Practice Construction Technology Building Science and Environmental Systems Construction Procurement and Law Integrative Project 2 Construction Communication & Information Technology Facilities Management (normally taken in year 4) Language Modules (maximum of 2 modules normally taken in years 2 and/or 4) 15 15 30 15 15 15 15 15 Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Acceptable U6**** U615** French: 1A. 1B. 4A. 2B U630** Japanese: 1A. 4A. 3A. 3B. 2. 2B. 2. 2A. For full details of pre-requisite links between modules see the subject diagrams provided in the appendices of the programme handbook. 104 . 1B. 3A. 1B. 3B. 3B 15 Alternative Acceptable 1or2 LEVEL 5 – Year 3 Module Code U33565 Module Title Credits Status Semester of delivery 1&2 Pass/ Compulsory* Fail *module compulsory unless evidence of prior equivalent experience provided 36 Week Industrial Placement Experience LEVEL 6 – Year 4 Module Code Module Title Credits Status Semester of delivery 1 1 2 1or2 1&2 1&2 U33570 Innovation in Management and Technology U33571 Project Management U33573 Advanced Procurement and Dispute Resolution U33588 Independent Study* U33593 Project Development Feasibility U33599 Construction Management Dissertation *only available in special circumstances 15 15 15 15 30 30 Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Acceptable Compulsory Compulsory Progression onto Level 5 and 6 modules normally require pre-requisite modules in Level 4 and 5 to be passed. 4B U625** Italian: Foundation A.

Assessment and Feedback Assessment encompasses all judgements made about the work of a student and/or their skills. seminar materials. Module guides. links to relevant web-sites. Smaller group sessions.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook For the standard requirements for progression and awards on the course refer to the Undergraduate Modular Programme Regulations at: http://www. simulations and group work. This can take the form of online module descriptions and handbooks. Students are also encouraged to attend Library and IT training sessions. drawing classes. including lectures. digital and information literacy. workshops. as well as individual supervision. and draw upon appropriate software and networked facilities for presentations by making use of Media Workshop resources and expertise. seminars. analysis and the development of interpersonal and problem-solving skills. fieldwork. and the associated provision of feedback.brookes. such as seminars and practicals. individual and group project work. The department is fully committed to the full use of online resources and is engaged in the utilisation of Brookes Virtual Learning Environment software for resource-based learning. Office hours and tutorials allow individual and small group consultations with lecturers around matters of course content. The Brookes Assessment Compact sets out the aims and responsibilities for assessment for both the University and students. It is intended that the assessment method employed in 105 . Academic staff in the department make significant use of electronic resources. site visits. lecture slides and electronic testing. coursework and the practical demands of learning. Various learning resources have been developed to support independent learning. focusing on the importance of research and research methods.1 Teaching.brookes. The dissertation is supported by a structured programme aimed at leading students through the key stages in its development.ac. They enable students to make informed choices and to exercise self-direction in pursuing aspects that are of interest to them within the framework of the module as a whole. research literacy. case studies. Independent learning is developed and nurtured through student-led seminars. critical selfawareness and personal literacy.2 Professional requirements Professional accreditation from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) is achieved through the successful completion of the BSc (Hons) degree as set out in the University Undergraduate Modular Programme Regulations. laboratory practicals. Every module of study is designed with specific learning outcomes that enable students to develop in the five key graduate attributes of academic literacy.uk/virtual/strategy/. week-by-week content and the timetabled assessment tasks that students must undertake. They outline the aims and objectives of the module. SECTION 5: PROGRAMME DELIVERY 5. the dissertation and the professional practice experience. The course provides an appropriate balance of assessment methods throughout its duration and on a semester by semester basis. and global citizenship.uk/uniregulations/current/acadregulations/specific/undergraduatemodular-programme-regulations 4. foster discussion. Learning and Assessment Teaching and Learning A wide range of teaching and learning methods are used to achieve programme objectives. computer classes. Full details of the Universities ELearning strategy can be found at: http://www. reading lists and assignment briefings underpin independent learning. abilities and progress. its structure.ac.

verbal comments about individual or group work. each student is expected to carry out 100-120 hours of independent study and research on the subject. whilst complementing the teaching and learning methods and the variety of the student learning and experience. group work. An assessment schedule is also provided with dates for submission and feedback.brookes. a draft assignment or even ideas about a future project (independent study or dissertation).2 Assessment regulations The programme conforms to the University Undergraduate Modular Programme Regulations: http://www. In addition. providing the module leader with a consensual basis for assessing those not contributing to the group effort. Feedback can be about individual assignments. The intention is to provide an appropriate balance between the following forms of assessment    diagnostic: that which provides information about the individual formative: that which helps students in their learning summative: that which gives a final and total measure of students attainment. seminars. The programme modules are either coursework only or coursework and exam. etc. A sample of examination and coursework is passed to the External Examiner. workshops. and provide the specific assessment criteria used by staff in the awarding of grades. Group work that is assessed is closely monitored in line with University policy to ensure equity in the provision of marks awarded to a group. Feedback can help students to self-assess their work against assessment criteria as well as understanding what they have done wrong in an assignment. The Construction and Commercial Management Subject Examination Committee meets on a semester basis to discuss student progression and performance with the External Examiner present. These meetings are followed by meetings of the full Modular Examinations Committee where awards are made. On modules with a coursework component the aim is to give individual written feedback within two weeks from the coursework submission deadline.uk/uniregulations/current 106 . students enter into a contract with each other over the conduct of group work. All dissertation and Independent Study Modules are double marked. A percentage of other assessed work is double marked within the Department to ensure that the standard and profile of marking is appropriate. It will help students to improve their future assignments and to approach work in further modules. or comments made during class discussions. 5. The sample sent will normally include all A-grades. borderline cases and some examples of middle-grade marks. practicals.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook each individual module will examine the general educational aims and assess the learning outcomes as detailed in the syllabus of that particular subject area.ac. all fails. All module handbooks contain a description of the assessment types and methods. Typical contact for each module is 2-3 hours a week and can involve lectures. tutorials.40% respectively. Feedback comes in many different forms including: written comments. Where appropriate. Assessment in form other than in unseen exam may be new to students and they may experience novel situations of peer assessment and self-assessment. with a typical split of 60% .

with the following contextual information to enable them to familiarise themselves with the programme/s:  Programme specification  Programme handbook  Module descriptions/handbooks  Regulations and policies governing the programme Much of this information can be accessed via the Personal Information Portal (PIP) or on the University web pages. Placement Tutors. 6. Subject Coordinators. Programme Information All students will be provided. Academic Management Office Student Support Services Careers Centre Students Union Induction New students will follow an induction programme to orientate them and help them settle in quickly within their new learning environment (HE and Brookes).2 CRB checks Not applicable SECTION 7: STUDENT SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE Sources of help and advice for students are provided in the many ways including:        Induction Session Handbooks Student Support Coordinators.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook SECTION 6: ADMISSIONS 6. including A-level at grade B Other typical offers include: • 2 A-levels plus 2 AS-levels equivalent to the offers above • 1 12-unit vocational A-level (any programme) plus 1 A-level or 2 AS-levels • BTEC national diploma DMM. Academic Advisors.1 Entry criteria Typical Offer: A-level: grades BBC to BCC IB Diploma: 30-31 points Advanced Diploma: grade B. by the subject coordinator. Programme Leads. Offers and the level of offers are dependent on performance at interview. They will have introductory meetings with their subject coordinators and meet their academic advisor. They will also be provided with assignment deadlines and examination dates at the start of each semester. 107 . All to include GCSE: Mathematics grade C or above Interview Applicants are required to attend an interview (usually between December and mid-March) before an offer is made.

students are provided with advice and guidance on job applications. There is a dedicated Student Disability and Dyslexia Service. interview preparation and information about health and safety. and after the placement year. further study opportunities. Before the year out. covering both academic and personal welfare. students are provided with support before. who provide a drop-in service for questions about any aspect of student life. CV writing. First destination surveys frequently show that over 90% of students are in full-time employment within 6 months of graduating. who will facilitate the students’ academic development. alternative assessment arrangements and liaison with teaching staff to ensure that they are aware of your requirements. SECTION 9: LINKS WITH EMPLOYERS The main link with employers is through the departmental Construction Professional Liaison Group as well as the established links with placement providers. funding. students are supported by a dedicated industrial placement tutor and administrator. SECTION 8: GRADUATE EMPLOYABILITY As a vocational course with a compulsory industrial placement experience year. staff offer advice and support on a range of issues. including physical access. Oxford Brookes students and graduates can expect the Careers Centre to provide support during and for three years after graduation in the form of:  individual confidential drop-in slots  help with locating relevant and up-to-date information on occupations. or preparing for an exam. interviews and aptitude testing. which provides advice on study skills such as planning and writing essays. voluntary work. Thus there is a range of support mechanisms for students. but some do progress into quantity surveying and commercial management. Central Support Services for students The university’s support services include Upgrade. The majority of students are employed as graduate construction and project managers as befitting the course. They also give advice on statistics and mathematics. who will arrange progress visits from staff and be available to give advice on academic. professional and pastoral matters. mental health problems and medical conditions. During the placement year. such as academic advisers and subject coordinators. and student support coordinators.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Support for students It is recognised that students need support and advice throughout their studies so that they can make the best of their time at Oxford Brookes. Many of the placement opportunities are arrange through established links between the course and industry. dyslexia and other specific learning difficulties.  a range of careers education workshops which may be delivered directly by the Careers and Employment Centre or via academic Departments. assignments and dissertations. employers and graduate vacancies  help with applications. which provides support for students with disabilities including sensory and mobility impairments. Careers As the sandwich degree has a compulsory industrial placement year experience. support is provided for the preparation and submission of the placement report. On completion of the placement. Here. during. often through workshops  a user-friendly website which delivers information and relevant links effectively. These links provide the following benefits to students and the course: 108 . the graduate employability is excellent. research. vacation work. and with the development of transferable skills.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook        Visiting speakers from industry and professional bodies Work placements/opportunities for work-based learning Site visits to live construction projects Course development advice and feedback Dissertation mentoring Research collaboration Sponsorship of student prizes and scholarships SECTION 10: QUALITY MANAGEMENT Indicators of quality/methods for evaluating the quality of provision The internal indicators of quality for the programme come from many sources. Their annual report on the standards of the assessment and learning materials is considered at the Annual Review Meeting. The external indicators of quality for the programme come primarily from the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) and the accrediting professional bodies. Property and Surveying (2008)). the programme undergoes a rigorous Periodic Review. annual module evaluation surveys. The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) accreditation is achieved through the approved mapping of programme modules against the professional competences set out in the RICS Assessment of Professional Competences (2006). student representation at Subject Committee and Annual Programme Review meetings. The course is designed specifically to meet the learning outcomes of the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements (Construction. where it is tested against the quality framework set by the University. Every five years. The course and centre accreditation is reviewed on a five yearly basis through a formal accreditation visit. again with feedback from students and external sources. The primary ones are those based on regular student feedback via focus groups and surveys on specific issues. This accreditation is reviewed and renewed each year at the RICS/Brookes Partnership meeting. The Programme Team also seeks advice and guidance from the Department's Professional Liaison Group for construction. The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) accreditation is achieved through the approved mapping of programme modules against the learning outcomes set out in the CIOB Education Framework (2007). The External Examiners for the programme are present at Exam Committee meetings and see samples of st udents’ coursework and feedback. 109 . and the professional competencies required by both the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and the Chartered Institute of Building.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) Programme Specification .BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management Matrix of RICS Competences mapped against Programme Modules 110 .

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) Programme Specification .BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management Matrix of CIOB Learning Outcomes mapped against Programme Modules 111 .

rics.org.http://www.uk Technology.DipHE QS KN22 BSc/QS KN22 Face to Face – on campus Sandwich Full-Time.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix B .Programme Specification BSc (Hons) in Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION Awarding body: Teaching institution and location: Final award: Programme title: Interim exit awards and award titles: Brookes course code: UCAS/UKPASS code: JACS code: Mode of delivery: Mode/s of study: Language of study: Relevant QAA subject benchmark statement/s: Oxford Brookes University Oxford Brookes University BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management Certificate of Higher Education – CertHE Diploma of Higher Education . Property and Surveying (2008) The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) . Design and Environment May 2012 External accreditation/recognition: (applicable to programmes with professional body approval) Faculty managing the programme: Date of production (or most recent revision) of specification: 112 . Part-Time English Construction.org/ The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB)  www.ciob.

consultants. commercial. With a modern fully equipped construction technology laboratory. the programme has very strong links with industry which provide many benefits including placements. leadership. Site visits and a European field trip are an essential and popular component of the course. and a choice of degree pathway in the final year of study. developers. paid employment and potential sponsorship in final year. cost and monitor projects as well as personal/personnel management skills such as communication. Through our placement employers and our professional liaison group. The course also provides the opportunity for some of the syllabus (one semester) to be studied abroad as part of our international exchange programme. construction managers and project managers. time management. Within the broad syllabus there are four main themes – technology. Our graduates are successfully employed as quantity surveyors. and this is how many of the subject area are taught with reference to interesting and often live projects. The course content is best understood through its application to real projects. plant and sustainability and construction techniques. trade skills and land surveying. and is therefore structured and designed for students that wish to go on and gain membership of these professional bodies. students are afforded the opportunity to gain first hand practical experience in material manufacture and testing. The theme of Management encompasses the areas of management techniques to plan.1 Rationale for/distinctiveness of the programme The BSc (Hons) degree in Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management is accredited by both the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB). American and Australian Higher Education Institutions.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook SECTION 2: OVERVIEW AND PROGRAMME AIMS 2. working for clients. and student sponsorship. To provide the choice of degree pathway the course shares the same choice of modules in years 1 and 2 as the BSc (Hons) degree in Construction Project Management. students are provided with knowledge of construction materials. management. in fact many companies secure their graduates through first providing a placement. can then make a request to change at the beginning of their final year. and practical experience. Students who wish to change course. Construction industry employers are very much in favour of graduates with work experience. contractors and sub-contractors. on private. The benefit of sharing the same modules until the final year of study is that students will be able to defer the decision on which course to graduate until they have completed their 3rd year Industrial Placement and are able to make a more informed decision of their future career progression. To compliment this career choice. 113 . Therefore the course has a compulsory industrial placement year which provides essential practical work experience. There is also a dedicated departmental computer suite to provide students with practical experience in the use of construction based IT software. team work. visiting speakers. Other benefits of a placement for students are: course subjects are put into context. In the final year of study (after a year of industrial experience) there is be a different choice of modules for each course. a compulsory industrial placement year experience. and provides experience. professional mentoring. project based learning. For technology. This includes course links with European. The breadth of career opportunities within the construction industry has a significant influence on the design of the course. etc. the course is designed with a broad syllabus. opportunity to form views about future career (choice of pathway). national and international projects. site visits. focus and confidence in preparation for the final year of study.

understanding and skills: 3.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 2.  develop the intellectual and practical skills of the student in the processes underpinning the finance and management of resources and the appropriate deployment of current technology within the context of changing social. maintenance and disposal/reuse of built assets Research literacy apply the processes of critical analysis and reflection to research projects in construction cost management 3. construction. redevelopment. study and enquiry.  prepare students for employment in a range of contexts or for further study and a career where construction cost management knowledge and skills will be applied. development.  prepare students for life-long learning. The course is designed specifically to meet the learning outcomes of the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements and the professional competencies required by both the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and the Chartered Institute of Building. technological.  meet society’s needs for well-educated graduates who are adaptable.  stimulate students’ intellectual curiosity and provide an environment in which they are able to appreciate and develop their full potential. and to appreciate the contribution of education and construction to society. legal. have appropriate professional and transferable skills and are highly employable. management. technology) ability to apply the above in the planning and commercial management of construction projects understand the behaviour of construction materials understand construction processes apply management and cost principles and practice to the solution of construction management problems demonstrate a confident familiarity with the process of design and its relation to construction understand health & safety issues and their place in the social. operational and economic context of design. economic. SECTION 3: PROGRAMME LEARNING OUTCOMES Knowledge. More specifically.2 Aim/s of the programme The overall aim is to deliver a high quality vocationally relevant undergraduate course in Construction Cost Management to prepare students for professional roles in the built environment in the ongoing processes of evaluation. political and environmental frameworks. maintenance and management of national and international built assets.  prepare students for leadership roles in the global construction of the 21st Century.6 PLO1 PLO2 PLO3 PLO4 PLO5 PLO6 PLO7 Academic literacy have a sound understanding in some depth of the core subject areas of construction and cost management (finance. the course aims to:  enable students to obtain and maintain professional management careers in the construction industry.7 PLO8 114 .

9 Digital and information literacy competently use communication and information technology apply software to the solution of problems in construction and cost management PLO13 PLO14 3.8 PLO9 Critical self-awareness and personal literacy apply a logical approach to problem solving be a capable and enthusiastic independent learner throughout her/his life communicate effectively in oral. written and graphic media be self-aware and competent in self-management PLO10 PLO11 PLO12 3. LEVEL 4 – Year 1 Module Code U33503 U33504 U33507 U35001 U35002 U35008 U35009 Module Title Credits Status Semester of delivery 1 1&2 2 2 1&2 1 2 Introduction to Construction and Property Management Introduction to Building Design and Construction Introduction to Commercial Management Economics of Built Environment Foundation Real Estate and Construction Law Introduction to Spatial Planning Integrative Project 1 15 15 15 15 30 15 15 Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory 115 .1 Programme structure and requirements: The following tables provide the list of modules at each level.10 Global citizenship understand the practice of cost construction management in the making and maintenance of built assets in their social economic and environmental context have an awareness of construction and cost management and building in its national and international contexts PLO15 PLO16 SECTION 4: PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND CURRICULUM 4. showing their credit value and status (compulsory/acceptable/etc.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 3.).

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook LEVEL 5 – Year 2 Module Code U33521 U33522 U33524 U33525 U33527 U33529 U33537 U33549 Module Title Credits Status Semester of delivery 2 1 1&2 1 1 2 2 2 Construction Practice and Procedure Quantity Surveying Practice Construction Technology Building Science and Environmental Systems Construction Procurement and Law Integrative Project 2 Construction Communication & Information Technology Facilities Management (normally taken in year 4) Language Modules (maximum of 2 modules normally taken in years 2 and/or 4) 15 15 30 15 15 15 15 15 Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Acceptable U6**** U615** French: 1A. Foundation B U635** Spanish: 1A. 1B. 3A. 3B. 3B. 3A. 1B. 1B. 2B U630** Japanese: 1A. 4A. 4B U625** Italian: Foundation A. For full details of pre-requisite links between modules see the subject diagrams provided in the appendices of the programme handbook. 4A. 116 . 3B 15 Alternative Acceptable 1or2 LEVEL 5 – Year 3 Module Code U33565 Module Title Credits Status Semester of delivery 1&2 Pass/ Compulsory* Fail *module compulsory unless evidence of prior equivalent experience provided 36 Week Industrial Placement Experience LEVEL 6 – Year 4 Module Code U33570 U33572 Module Title Credits Status Semester of delivery 1 1 2 1or2 1&2 1&2 Innovation in Management and Technology Project Financial Control Advanced Procurement and Dispute U33573 Resolution U33588 Independent Study* U33594 Financial Appraisal U33598 Commercial Management Dissertation *only available in special circumstances 15 15 15 15 30 30 Compulsory Compulsory Compulsory Acceptable Compulsory Compulsory Progression onto Level 5 and 6 modules normally require pre-requisite modules in Level 4 and 5 to be passed. 2A. 2A. 1B. 2B. 3A. 4B U627** Mandarin Chinese: 1A. 2. 2.

computer classes. week-by-week content and the timetabled assessment tasks that students must undertake. Full details of the Universities ELearning strategy can be found at: http://www. as well as individual supervision.uk/virtual/strategy/. 117 . its structure. such as seminars and practicals. digital and information literacy. abilities and progress. Various learning resources have been developed to support independent learning. Independent learning is developed and nurtured through student-led seminars. research literacy. seminar materials. including lectures.uk/uniregulations/current/acadregulations/specific/undergraduatemodular-programme-regulations 4.ac. individual and group project work. links to relevant web-sites.2 Professional requirements Professional accreditation from the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) is achieved through the successful completion of the BSc (Hons) degree as set out in the University Undergraduate Modular Programme Regulations. analysis and the development of interpersonal and problem-solving skills.brookes.ac. foster discussion. Academic staff in the department make significant use of electronic resources. Smaller group sessions. focusing on the importance of research and research methods. simulations and group work. They outline the aims and objectives of the module. The dissertation is supported by a structured programme aimed at leading students through the key stages in its development. lecture slides and electronic testing. drawing classes. site visits. case studies. seminars. laboratory practicals. critical selfawareness and personal literacy. The department is fully committed to the full use of online resources and is engaged in the utilisation of Brookes Virtual Learning Environment software for resource-based learning. Learning and Assessment Teaching and Learning A wide range of teaching and learning methods are used to achieve programme objectives.3 Teaching. SECTION 5: PROGRAMME DELIVERY 5. fieldwork. Office hours and tutorials allow individual and small group consultations with lecturers around matters of course content. workshops. and global citizenship.brookes. This can take the form of online module descriptions and handbooks. and the associated provision of feedback. Module guides. and draw upon appropriate software and networked facilities for presentations by making use of Media Workshop resources and expertise. Students are also encouraged to attend Library and IT training sessions. coursework and the practical demands of learning. the dissertation and the professional practice experience.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook For the standard requirements for progression and awards on the course refer to the Undergraduate Modular Programme Regulations at: http://www. The Brookes Assessment Compact sets out the aims and responsibilities for assessment for both the University and students. Every module of study is designed with specific learning outcomes that enable students to develop in the five key graduate attributes of academic literacy. They enable students to make informed choices and to exercise self-direction in pursuing aspects that are of interest to them within the framework of the module as a whole. Assessment and Feedback Assessment encompasses all judgements made about the work of a student and/or their skills. reading lists and assignment briefings underpin independent learning.

The intention is to provide an appropriate balance between the following forms of assessment    diagnostic: that which provides information about the individual formative: that which helps students in their learning summative: that which gives a final and total measure of students attainment. It will help students to improve their future assignments and to approach work in further modules. group work.uk/uniregulations/current 118 . etc. Feedback comes in many different forms including: written comments. A percentage of other assessed work is double marked within the Department to ensure that the standard and profile of marking is appropriate. or comments made during class discussions. and provide the specific assessment criteria used by staff in the awarding of grades. providing the module leader with a consensual basis for assessing those not contributing to the group effort. verbal comments about individual or group work. all fails. All dissertation and Independent Study Modules are double marked. seminars. These meetings are followed by meetings of the full Modular Examinations Committee where awards are made.40% respectively. All module handbooks contain a description of the assessment types and methods. practicals. with a typical split of 60% . The programme modules are either coursework only or coursework and exam. Feedback can be about individual assignments.ac. workshops. students enter into a contract with each other over the conduct of group work. tutorials. 5. An assessment schedule is also provided with dates for submission and feedback. a draft assignment or even ideas about a future project (independent study or dissertation). whilst complementing the teaching and learning methods and the variety of the student learning and experience. each student is expected to carry out 100-120 hours of independent study and research on the subject. On modules with a coursework component the aim is to give individual written feedback within two weeks from the coursework submission deadline. Feedback can help students to self-assess their work against assessment criteria as well as understanding what they have done wrong in an assignment. Where appropriate.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook The course provides an appropriate balance of assessment methods throughout its duration and on a semester by semester basis. Typical contact for each module is 2-3 hours a week and can involve lectures. A sample of examination and coursework is passed to the External Examiner. borderline cases and some examples of middle-grade marks. It is intended that the assessment method employed in each individual module will examine the general educational aims and assess the learning outcomes as detailed in the syllabus of that particular subject area. Assessment in form other than in unseen exam may be new to students and they may experience novel situations of peer assessment and self-assessment. In addition.4 Assessment regulations The programme conforms to the University Undergraduate Modular Programme Regulations: http://www.brookes. Group work that is assessed is closely monitored in line with University policy to ensure equity in the provision of marks awarded to a group. The Construction and Commercial Management Subject Examination Committee meets on a semester basis to discuss student progression and performance with the External Examiner present. The sample sent will normally include all A-grades.

All to include GCSE: Mathematics grade C or above Interview Applicants are required to attend an interview (usually between December and mid-March) before an offer is made. Offers and the level of offers are dependent on performance at interview. including A-level at grade B Other typical offers include: • 2 A-levels plus 2 AS-levels equivalent to the offers above • 1 12-unit vocational A-level (any programme) plus 1 A-level or 2 AS-levels • BTEC national diploma DMM.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook SECTION 6: ADMISSIONS 6. Academic Advisors. Programme Information All students will be provided.1 Entry criteria Typical Offer: A-level: grades BBC to BCC IB Diploma: 30-31 points Advanced Diploma: grade B. Academic Management Office Student Support Services Careers Centre Students Union Induction New students will follow an induction programme to orientate them and help them settle in quickly within their new learning environment (HE and Brookes). 6. They will also be provided with assignment deadlines and examination dates at the start of each semester. Programme Leads. by the subject coordinator. They will have introductory meetings with their subject coordinators and meet their academic advisor.2 CRB checks Not applicable SECTION 7: STUDENT SUPPORT AND GUIDANCE Sources of help and advice for students are provided in the many ways including:        Induction Session Handbooks Student Support Coordinators. with the following contextual information to enable them to familiarise themselves with the programme/s:  Programme specification  Programme handbook  Module descriptions/handbooks  Regulations and policies governing the programme Much of this information can be accessed via the Personal Information Portal (PIP) or on the University web pages. Subject Coordinators. 119 . Placement Tutors.

vacation work. staff offer advice and support on a range of issues. voluntary work. Central Support Services for students The university’s support services include Upgrade. Many of the placement opportunities are arrange through established links between the course and industry. which provides advice on study skills such as planning and writing essays. but some do progress into construction and project management. and after the placement year. The majority of students are employed as graduate quantity surveyors and commercial managers as befitting the course. further study opportunities. interview preparation and information about health and safety. students are provided with support before. and with the development of transferable skills. They also give advice on statistics and mathematics. Oxford Brookes students and graduates can expect the Careers Centre to provide support during and for three years after graduation in the form of:  individual confidential drop-in slots  help with locating relevant and up-to-date information on occupations.  a range of careers education workshops which may be delivered directly by the Careers and Employment Centre or via academic Departments. First destination surveys frequently show that over 90% of students are in full-time employment within 6 months of graduating. CV writing. research. students are provided with advice and guidance on job applications. There is a dedicated Student Disability and Dyslexia Service. On completion of the placement. mental health problems and medical conditions. professional and pastoral matters. support is provided for the preparation and submission of the placement report. which provides support for students with disabilities including sensory and mobility impairments. and student support coordinators. dyslexia and other specific learning difficulties. Thus there is a range of support mechanisms for students. often through workshops  a user-friendly website which delivers information and relevant links effectively. Careers As the sandwich degree has a compulsory industrial placement year experience. or preparing for an exam. During the placement year. who will arrange progress visits from staff and be available to give advice on academic. employers and graduate vacancies  help with applications. who will facilitate the students’ academic development. Before the year out. students are supported by a dedicated industrial placement tutor and administrator. during. funding. alternative assessment arrangements and liaison with teaching staff to ensure that they are aware of your requirements. Here. including physical access. covering both academic and personal welfare. the graduate employability is excellent. interviews and aptitude testing. SECTION 8: GRADUATE EMPLOYABILITY As a vocational course with a compulsory industrial placement experience year. 120 . who provide a drop-in service for questions about any aspect of student life. assignments and dissertations. such as academic advisers and subject coordinators.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Support for students It is recognised that students need support and advice throughout their studies so that they can make the best of their time at Oxford Brookes.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook SECTION 9: LINKS WITH EMPLOYERS The main link with employers is through the departmental Construction Professional Liaison Group as well as the established links with placement providers. again with feedback from students and external sources. The Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) accreditation is achieved through the approved mapping of programme modules against the learning outcomes set out in the CIOB Education Framework (2007). the programme undergoes a rigorous Periodic Review. Every five years. The external indicators of quality for the programme come primarily from the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) and the accrediting professional bodies. where it is tested against the quality framework set by the University. The primary ones are those based on regular student feedback via focus groups and surveys on specific issues. student representation at Subject Committee and Annual Programme Review meetings. The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) accreditation is achieved through the approved mapping of programme modules against the professional competences set out in the RICS Assessment of Professional Competences (2006). The External Examiners for the programme are present at Exam Committee meetings and see samples of students’ coursework and feedback. and the professional competencies required by both the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors and the Chartered Institute of Building. Property and Surveying (2008)). annual module evaluation surveys. These links provide the following benefits to students and the course:        Visiting speakers from industry and professional bodies Work placements/opportunities for work-based learning Site visits to live construction projects Course development advice and feedback Dissertation mentoring Research collaboration Sponsorship of student prizes and scholarships SECTION 10: QUALITY MANAGEMENT Indicators of quality/methods for evaluating the quality of provision The internal indicators of quality for the programme come from many sources. This accreditation is reviewed and renewed each year at the RICS/Brookes Partnership meeting. The Programme Team also seeks advice and guidance from the Department's Professional Liaison Group for construction. The course and centre accreditation is reviewed on a five yearly basis through a formal accreditation visit. The course is designed specifically to meet the learning outcomes of the QAA Subject Benchmark Statements (Construction. Their annual report on the standards of the assessment and learning materials is considered at the Annual Review Meeting. 121 .

BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management Matrix of RICS Competences mapped against Programme Modules 122 .BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Programme Specification .

BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Programme Specification .BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management Matrix of CIOB Learning Outcomes mapped against Programme Modules 123 .

and the associated provision of feedback 1. There are five fundamental tenets behind this compact. clear assessment criteria should be provided whenever possible. to integrate module assessment and ensure that assessment shapes learning in a coherent and holistic fashion. constructive and timely feedback as an essential part of their learning. Assessment judgements must focus on the achievement of the learning outcomes against the assessment criteria.5 2. 124 2.1 Assessment is central to the curriculum. All academic staff will therefore be encouraged to regard assessment as a fundamental and integral part of programme design. that would unfairly disadvantage any student. namely that: 1. and always when the assessment contributes to marks. The relationship between learning outcomes and assessment tasks is made explicit. or the criteria applied.4 2. assessment must be recognised as a joint responsibility between staff and students The ability to assess. In addition. and there should be no distinct boundary between assessment.1 1.5 . Assessment is designed at programme level. Students are given supportive. consistent with the aims and learning outcomes of the programme so that identified knowledge. and one that is intended to shape and develop learning. with subsequent opportunities provided to act on the feedback and to put the advice given into practice. particularly in terms of the need for active dialogue between students and staff To be effective. students and staff need to be ‘assessment literate’ and actively participate in disciplinary communities of assessment practice.2 Effective assessment is central to learning To be effective the relational nature of the assessment and feedback process needs to be emphasised. as much as to judge and measure it. skills and qualities ('graduate attributes') can be developed and recognised. the work of both self and others. 1.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix C – Brookes Assessment Compact Assessment encompasses all judgements made about the work of a student and/or their skills. is an essential skill for all graduates For the above tenets to be met in full.2 2.4 1. and this achievement authenticated as the student’s own. or method chosen. The University will therefore ensure that: 2. Every effort is taken to ensure that there is no bias in the type of assessment task. grades. or decisions about progression.3 1. and validly assessed. Such feedback will enable students to build on their positive achievements and have a clear sense of what they need to do to improve. whilst recognising progressive levels of attainment and different modes of study.3 2. abilities and progress. teaching and learning.

9 2. and adequate resources are provided.1 Actively engaging with assessment tasks. spending sufficient time on the task. 3. Actively engaging in the development of assessment policy at course and programme level through the established processes and student representative system.3 3.) specifically designed to involve students in assessment.g. including taking the initiative when appropriate (e. marking exercises. and students and their peers.6 Programmes include activities (e. asking for clarification or advice). feedback provided. self and peerassessment. Students will be expected to take responsibility for their own learning through: 3. and to develop their abilities to make their own informed judgements (assessment literacy).2 3. regular peer discussion and student involvement. and by handing work in on time. etc.8 2. Institutional values and policies consistently support this compact. and acting on. including carefully reading the guidance provided. to encourage dialogue between students and their tutors.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 2. and make every effort to avoid the concentration of assessment deadlines. Actively engaging with. Actively engaging in activities designed to develop assessment literacy.10 3. and awareness of new ideas and techniques Disciplinary communities of assessment practice are developed through. Programmes produce assessment schedules of summative assessment.7 2. 2. for example.4 13/5/09 125 . ensuring their work is authentic and their own (whether individual or groupwork). Academic staff are provided with staff development in assessment literacy.g.

In addition to the B+ criteria listed below:         Examples of creativity/ originality/ imagination/ insight. We all look for this mark first of all . To reach both a summative and a formative assessment of your work we use two sets of criteria. These benchmarks contrast with the outcomes assessment in that they apply to broad academic capabilities not your understanding of the specific content of a piece of coursework for a module/unit. The assessment requirements usually indicate which learning outcomes are being assessed for each piece of coursework. mark 60-69% (Equivalent to Upper Second at the end of the course)         Information reasonably full and accurate Well presented Logical. This is the summary of our performance. These are described in the module/unit outline in your course handbook and should also be in your module/unit handbook as well. For these reasons the Department of Real Estate and Construction places great importance on assessment of. referencing. references. Each module/unit has a series of learning outcomes. The following guidelines and the feedback on your work will assist you in understanding what your marks mean so you can enhance your performance. notes) full and accurate Communicative skills of a very high order Grade B+. its organisation. This helps to direct our knowledge and understanding and enhance our capabilities. experience and assessment of others. 1. We learn by appraising and evaluating our own performance and achievements. a proxy for an evaluation of many variables in your work. Summative assessment provides you with an overall mark for your work. critical and independent judgement. coherent and lucid Appropriate selection of content/ theory/ style in key areas Clear identification of the issues Evidence of wide and relevant reading Appropriate application of theory Evidence of evaluation/ justification/ critical thought 126 . You should realise that these guidelines cannot cover all types of assignments. Marking Guidelines. 2. Offers analytical comment.inevitably.essays.e. projects. Assessment is both summative and formative. critical awareness and so on. bibliography. Grade A. critical evaluation and independent discussion Comprehensive coverage of content/ theory within the constraints of word limits Rigorous handling of evidence Own ideas developed and justified from theoretical frameworks Realistic evaluation of work. Feedback and Marking Guidelines Assessment and feedback are crucial elements in the learning cycle. we also learn from the informed critical evaluations. depth of understanding. But it is only a summary. In contrast the marking guidelines provide benchmarks for your achievement against a set of generic academic indicators . mark 70% or more (Equivalent to First Class honours at the end of the course). and feedback on student work . This is formative assessment: an indication of the strengths and weaknesses of your work. with appropriate rationale Critical apparatus (i.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix D – Undergraduate Programme Assessment. oral presentations. The mark and feedback indicate how well you have understood the learning outcomes. nor can all the points be apposite to all your assignments.quality of analysis. Learning Outcomes.

coherent and organised Appropriate selection of content/ theory but some key aspects may be missed Evidence of reading Superficial evaluation Referencing present General understanding of concepts Critical thought and rationale for work adequately demonstrated Written work is mainly focused on module’s aim and themes Meaning apparent. the module must be retaken if a pass grade is to be achieved 127 . mark 30-39% and Fail (F) 29% or less               Question asked is not addressed Thinking confused/ illogical Content/ theory inaccurate or inappropriate or disorganised Meaning unclear Significantly under/ over/ required length as specified in module handbook Absence of references Critical thought/ analysis/ theory lacking Value judgements/ generalisations unsupported Appropriate reading not very evident Written work does not address module’s aims and themes Not sufficiently literate Conclusions insubstantial/ invalid R grade indicates that these weaknesses can be corrected by further independent work and revision and a re-sit will be awarded F grade indicates that the weaknesses are so serious that they may not be remedied by further independent work and no re-sit will be awarded. spelling and punctuation largely accurate Conclusions largely well argued and substantiated Grade C. spelling and punctuation Conclusions present Grade D.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook      Referencing relevant and accurate Clear evidence of understanding Grammar. spelling and punctuation accurate Good focus on module's aims and themes Conclusions well-argued and substantiated Grade B. mark 50-59% (Equivalent to Lower Second at the end of the course)            Generally competent thinking and presentation Thought given to selection of content Identification of main issues of the subject Evidence of reading around the subject Some application of theory Evidence of evaluation/ justification/ critical thought Mostly accurate referencing Reasonable level of understanding of the topic area Some focus on module's aims and themes Grammar. RE. RB). mark 41-49% (Equivalent to Third class honours at the end of the course)            Shows an attempt to be logical. 40% (A borderline pass) Grade Refer (RC. but language not always fluent Some inadequacies in grammar.

3&4 – Wk 14 Exam Exam FB5 FB4 – Week 14 FB2 FB5 FB5 Week 12 SB4 Week 13 + FB4 – Jan 2011 Exam Yr1 Exam SB1 SB1 SB1 SB4 FB4 SB1 SB1 FB1 FB1 FB1 SB2 FB2 SB1 SB5 SB1 Yr3 SB5 FB4 FB3 SB4 Yr4 SB – Assessment Submission FB – Assessment Feedback 128 .BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix E – Course Assessment Schedule Assessment Submission/Feedback Week by Module Number This is the first draft. please refer to the respective Module Handbook or Moodle for latest revision Module No U33503 U33504 U33507 U33509 U35001 U35002 (D) U35008 U33521 U33522 U33524 (D) Yr2 U33525 U33527 U33529 U33537 U33565 U33549 U33570 U33571 U33572 U33573 U33593 (D) U33594 (D) U33598 (D) U33599 (D) Semester 1 1 2 2 2 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 SB1 FB1 FB1 SB1 SB1 FB1 SB2 FB2 SB3 FB3 SB4 SB1 FB1 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6 Week 7 Week 8 Week 9 SB2 SB2 Week 10 Week 11 SB3 FB2&3 SB1 FB2 SB2 FB2 FB4 FB2 SB2 FB1 SB2 FB1 SB2 SB3 FB3 FB5 FB1 FB1 SB2 SB1 SB1 SB1 SB1 SB1 SB1 FB1 SB1 FB1 SB4 SB1 SB1 FB1 SB2 FB1 SB2 FB2 – Week 16 FB2 – Week 16 FB1 SB2 SB4 SB2 FB4 FB4 FB2 SB5 FB2 SB5 SB1 FB1 FB1 SB1 FB1 SB2 SB2 FB2 FB2 FB1 FB1 FB1 SB3 FB3 SB2 FB2 FB2 SB4 SB3 SB2 SB3 SB6 FB6 SB3 SB6 FB6 SB2 SB3 SB2 SB3 FB2 FB2 SB4 SB3 SB2 SB3 FB2 SB4 FB3 SB3&4 FB3 Exam Exam FB2 Jan 11 Exam FB4 FB3 Exam FB2 – Jan 2011 FB3 FB4 – Week 14 FB2.

You can view the entire full guidance on mitigating circumstances on-line at: http://www. What are mitigating circumstances? Mitigating circumstances are circumstances which were beyond your control and which could not be reasonably accommodated by you and which seriously impaired your performance in assessment. where you may be allowed to self-certify your difficulties if there is a valid reason why you cannot provide evidence. This is because the University wants you to demonstrate your full potential in assessments – if it is agreed you were affected by mitigating circumstances then we will give you an extension or a re-sit so you can demonstrate your potential unaffected by such circumstances. When should I submit my evidence of mitigating circumstances? In all cases. the University approved a new way in which circumstances that may have affected your performance in an assessment are to considered – these are called ‘mitigating circumstances’. So don’t delay if you wish to claim mitigating circumstances! What if I miss a deadline without mitigating circumstances? If you miss an assessment deadline or an exam without approval for valid mitigating circumstances you will receive zero for that assessment. If you miss a deadline you will not only need to demonstrate that you were affected by mitigating circumstances but you will need to provide evidence that you were unable to submit your claim by the deadline. In all cases you will be required to provide satisfactory documentary evidence to support your claim – if you fail to supply satisfactory documentary evidence your request will be turned down. The University does not increase marks on the basis of mitigating circumstances. an entire module). Where can I find out more? The Academic Management Office and your Faculty (Student Support Co-ordinators) will advise you of the exact deadlines and ways in which you must submit evidence of mitigating circumstances. you should submit your claim and your evidence as soon as possible and in any case always before an assessment deadline or exam.html FOR FURTHER DETAILS ABOUT HOW TO SUBMIT A CLAIM FOR MITIGATING CIRCUMSTANCES PLEASE CONTACT THE FACULTY STUDENT SUPPORT COORDINATORS OR PICK UP A LEAFLET FROM THE FACULTY STUDENT SUPPORT OFFICE 129 . and to help you appreciate the way in which the University is able respond to your mitigating circumstances. The regulations are designed to make the process easier to understand.brookes. in certain situations only. The only exception is for very short extensions to an assessment deadline (up to one week).BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix F – Consideration of Mitigating Circumstances In 2010.ac. be more transparent. what will happen? If your claim for mitigating circumstances is approved then you will be granted an extension to your submission deadline of up to four weeks or allowed to re-sit your examination (or. these circumstances could be medical or personal. All three parts of this definition must be met for the University to agree you were affected by mitigating circumstances. This short summary describes the way in which the process operates. You must not miss deadlines! If mitigating circumstances are approved.uk/services/asd/registry/sas/mit circs. For example.

brookes. Cheating or assisting someone else to cheat (including attempting to assist someone else to cheat) may be subject to disciplinary action in accordance with the University's Disciplinary Procedure. its alteration.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix G – Cheating All assessments are intended to determine the skills. The University defines a number of different forms of cheating. Collusion – except where written instructions specify that work for assessment may be produced jointly and submitted as the work of more than one student. although any form of cheating is strictly forbidden not only those listed below. Falsification – the invention of data. The University may consider any request placed with any form of custom writing service to be a form of cheating. Do not risk losing your degree and all the work you have done. writings or inventions as your own. submitting work you have paid for as your own.      If you require any further information please contact Matthew Andrews. Duplication – submitting work for assessment that is the same as. Plagiarism – taking or using another person's thoughts. statistical services and computing services including programme and code development. essays and dissertations (including outlines and guides). impersonation – taking an assessment on behalf of or pretending to be another student. proposals. and therefore to be an offence under the Student Conduct Regulations. without acknowledgement of the previous submission. Academic Registrar on 01865 483128. Custom Writing Services – this includes the use of any service which produces custom materials for a fee or other benefit. To avoid plagiarism you must make sure that quotations from whatever source are clearly identified and attributed at the point where they occur in the text of your work by using one of the standard conventions for referencing. whatever use is then made of the material produced. The University takes this issue very seriously and students have been expelled or had their degrees withheld for cheating in assessments.uk/regulations 130 . using notes or unauthorised materials in examinations. The Library has a leaflet about how to reference your work correctly and your tutor can also help you. its copying from any other source. you must not collude with others to produce a piece of work jointly. Neither is it acceptable to change some of the words or the order of sentences if. It is not enough just to list sources in a bibliography at the end of your essay or dissertation if you do not acknowledge the actual quotations in the text. posters. or otherwise obtaining it by unfair means. copy or share another student's work or lend your work to another student in the reasonable knowledge that some or all of it will be copied. Full guidelines can be found at: http://www. presentations. or broadly similar to. but not limited to. work submitted earlier for academic credit.ac. If you are having difficulty with your work it is important to seek help from your tutor rather than be tempted to use unfair means to gain marks. by failing to acknowledge the source properly. These are:  Submitting other people's work as your own – either with or without their knowledge. This extends to include any request for any piece of work (either formative or summative assessment or work which is not linked to any form of assessment or creditbearing element of your programme) including. This includes copying in examinations. reports. understanding and knowledge of each of the individual students undertaking the assessment. or allowing another person to take an assessment on your behalf or pretend to be you. exam notes. Cheating is defined as obtaining or attempting to obtain an unfair academic advantage. or inventing quotations and/or references. the editing or improvement of existing work. you give the impression that it is your own work. abilities.

and therefore it is in your interest to provide full and complete references. Credit must be given for other people's work. Harvard Referencing System The Department recommends the Harvard Referencing System. or when using a direct quotation. 1992) When referencing more than one work by the same author in the same year. This bibliography should list all the relevant sources used. 131 . notice considerable differences in the way quotations and references are presented in different books and journals. If there is more than one entry for the author they are listed in chronological order. Initials are not used except where two authors with the same surname are cited. If it isn't. for example. they are listed in alphabetical order of their first name. the first entry should list all the authors. Remember that assessors are looking for evidence of a wide and thorough literature search. the page number or numbers should be included. You should reference your sources for information for the following reasons:   Arguments must be supported by evidence from reliable and credible sources. Referencing in the text Cited documents are referred to by inserting the author's surname and the year of publication in the text at the point of reference. if there is no reference you are in effect claiming the work is your own. Bibliography With the Harvard system it is not necessary to provide a list of references and a bibliography. only a bibliography should be included. You will gain no credit for making things up. For example: (Smith et al. both generally and specifically referenced in the text. you should distinguish between them as follows: (Brown 2001a) (Brown 2001b) This system must be consistent with entries in the bibliography. Where authors have the same surname. Your references and bibliography will be evidence of this. which vary across subject disciplines and from publication to publication. Without evidence from either primary or secondary sources (backed up by reference) your assertions will carry little or no weight. or using anecdotal or impressionistic evidence.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix H – Citing Your Sources The reference of sources is an essential aspect of academic writing. but subsequent references may be abbreviated. you will be guilty of plagiarism (intellectual theft) for which there are severe penalties. For example: "It has been shown that …(Brown 2001)" "Brown (2001) has shown that…" Where a specific reference is made to a particular piece of work. Entries should be included in alphabetical order by surname. You will. For example: (Brown 2001: 27) (Brown 2001: 27-32) When there are more than two authors. There are a number of referencing conventions.

magazine) the entry should be as follows: Author. Reading. Place of publication: Publisher. The Guardian. 1: 209-219. the article should be attributed to the newspaper: Elliott. ‘Normative International Theory: approaches and issues’. Light (eds). (opere citato meaning 'in the work cited') as shown below: Hoffman.: Addison-Wesley. J. but where no author is identified. (1994). cit. H. Initials (Year) Title of book. in A. For a particular chapter in an edited book the entry should be as follows: Smith. J. R. Review of International Political Economy. NS. (2004) ‘Brain drain must stop if poor countries are to be helped’. Periodicals For a paper or article from a periodical (journal. MA. 31 May. T. and K. Halifax. K. it is only necessary to write out the full details of the book once for its main entry. Newspaper Articles A newspaper article where the author is identified should be entered as follows. For example: Strange. 6 December. M. Light. Other Items Items of personal communication or interviews: Spence. R. op. (1979) Theory of International Politics. The Guardian (2004) ‘Brain drain must stop if poor countries are to be helped’. J. London: Pinter. 6 December. S.. 132 . Groom and M. (1996) Personal Communication. paper presented to the annual meeting of the Canadian Political Science Association. in A. Title of periodical. cit. L. Volume number: Page numbers. Where several different chapters from the same edited book are referenced. Groom and M. Nossal (2003) ‘Putting People at Risk: The Crisis in East Timor and Canada’s Human Security Agenda’. Conference Proceedings The proceedings of a conference should be referred to as for a book: Hataley. Initials (Year) ‘Title of paper/article’. Other references to the book then use the abbreviation op. 15 May. (1994) ‘Marxism and International Relations’. Contemporary International Relations: A Guide to Theory. For Example: Waltz.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Book entries An entry for a book should include the following: Author. (1994) ‘Wake up Krasner! The World Has Changed’. trade press.

regional. Bayart correctly noted that. as well as on the international community itself. Quotations When actually quoting material and the quotation is two lines or shorter it can be placed within the text as follows: Writing on the cusp on the new millennium. If this is not available then think carefully about whether the source is valid and authoritative.brettonwooodsproject. Quotations that are more than two lines long should be indented and spaced as following: According to one analysis. national. both benign and malign. ‘More than ever. on Africa. that unpublished material is less likely to be available for others to research. and tends to be viewed as less authoritative than published work. transforming. networks. A. and discourses that have wide-ranging impact. (Latham et al. 2001: 5) 133 . however. Web References Smith. and local forces through structures. they play a major role in creating. (2003) ‘Open statement on steps to democratize the World Bank and IMF’. and destroying forms of order and authority. retrieved on 10 June 2004 from http://www. the discourse on Africa’s marginality is a nonsense’ (2000: 267). Above all. these networks can be understood as part of a broader phenomenon of transboundary formations that link global.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook You should remember.org Please list an author for websites wherever possible.

brookes. Turnitin will be used on three occasions in the undergraduate programmes (once during a compulsory module in Stage I. Turnitin may be used in other modules for one or all pieces of assessment. For more information on the use of Turnitin in the University see: http://www. Turnitin may be used as part of an investigation into an alleged case of plagiarism but its primary use is to support students’ academic development and enhance good academic practice. Turnitin produces an ‘Originality Report’ for each submitted piece of work which indicates all the matches in the student assignment to the web-based sources on its database. This text-matching tool allows academic staff to check students' work for improper use of sources or potential plagiarism by comparing it against continuously up-dated databases (including web-pages and student work).html 134 . and thus can provide academic staff with the opportunity to help students develop proper citation methods as well as to safeguard students' academic integrity.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix I – Turnitin Turnitin is a web-based tool that supports students in the development of good academic practice when preparing written work for assessment. once again in a compulsory module in Stage II and finally during the dissertation or project module).ac. In addition.uk/services/asd/registry/turnitin.

educational and enjoyable. It is hoped that you find the industrial experience interesting. The Presentation day will require you to return to the University and give a short presentation on your placement experience to date. It is up to you to make the most of the industrial placement opportunity. and must be submitted along with your Final Report on Industrial Placement. which takes place during Semester 2. The purpose of this visit is to provide an opportunity to discuss with you and your employer the quality and relevance of the training experience to date. Your diary will be inspected during this visit. This day also provides an opportunity for the Department to brief you on final year dissertations. or who are studying part-time whilst working at an appropriate level in the construction industry are advised to register for the course in "Fulltime Mode". A Final Report on the industrial placement year is presented. during the year out in industry. For a full description of the Module. Students who have suitable and relevant prior industrial experience. There is no exemption from this module for Sandwich mode students. The assessment of your industrial experience is based on the following:       Diary of training experience Final report on your placement Industrial placement summary sheet. countersigned by employer Placement visit report Industrial placement day presentation Poster presentation at Industrial Placements fair 2 You must normally satisfy the above requirements to pass the module and proceed to the final year of the course. Your progress. together with other documents at the Industrial Placements Fair in Week 4 of Semester 1 following the end of the Industrial Placement. please refer to the Module Handbook. You are responsible for obtaining employment that will provide the appropriate training. normally undertaken in the middle of Stage 2 by students on the Sandwich Mode. will normally be monitored by a visit from a member of staff from the Department. 135 . Progress will also be monitored at the Industrial Placement Presentation day. Summary Industrial training experience is an essential and integral part of your BSc course.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix J – Student Guide for Supervised Industrial Experience Year 1 Introduction The information contained in this guide is intended to provide a brief introduction to the Module U33565 Industrial Experience Placement. A second visit may be necessary if there is a change in employer or if a student requests it. The Industrial Training Tutor can advise you in this respect During the industrial placement you are required to keep a diary of your experience. and to agree future training opportunities for the remainder of the placement.

You may be based on a construction site. research investigation or approved specialist activity. Lists giving sources of information. to develop a future career strategy by learning about the construction industry from first hand experience. They will. A member of staff from the Department will liaise with senior members of staff of the organisation providing the industrial experience. general management. agree a programme for each student. to explore. it is expected that during the final year some students will undertake projects directly related to some aspects of the experience gained in the third year. 4 Obtaining Employment It is your responsibility to obtain a suitable industrial experience placement. in a design office. design/detailing. to make the student apply to practical situations some of the knowledge and techniques learned in the University. to demonstrate the importance of the theoretical work studied during other years of the course. which will ensure that he or she is actively involved in some aspects of building. management and construction processes used in building. to give the student the opportunity to develop a mature outlook and to encourage him or her to accept responsibility. works programming/planning. In addition. in depth. topics covered more generally by the contents of the course. plant. During this period you may participate in one or more of the following activities: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) site engineering/supervision/surveying/setting out/inspecting. materials and labour scheduling.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 3 Course Requirements and Objectives The student will normally spend the third year of the course gaining industrial experience by working in the construction industry for not less than 36 weeks. 136 . possible employers. in a research laboratory. The industrial experience period is important as it provides you with experience of job involvement and practical applications of the knowledge and techniques gained by you earlier on the course. in engineering administration or with fabrication or other specialists. the main objectives of the industrial experience are: (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) to familiarise the student with some of the design. In addition to the general educational aims stated in the module description for U33585. if possible. are held by the Industrial Training Tutor or posted on a Department notice board. estimating/costing/valuing/buying. office administration/personnel. but you will be given help. trade and professional organisations.

The employer must be capable of providing suitable work experience at the right level. After a suitable interval. You should seek advice from your Personal Tutor before sending application forms. Use family. Writing to companies "on spec" can also be successful. In addition to making job applications you will be required to complete a considerable number of forms so that the Placements Tutor and Academic Management Office can keep track of your progress. 5 Job Applications Make job applications in writing following instructions on the notice board or in response to advertisements.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Some prospective employers are invited to visit the University to interview students for industrial training placements. major organisations will do this. Further guidance about interview technique is available from the Placements Tutor and/or the careers office in Student Services. These can be pursued at the Industrial Placements Fair. friends or other contacts to obtain names of suitable employers. and even more especially if you are out of work. Only apply for jobs that you think you would accept if you were offered. interesting personality. follow up an application or interview with a telephone call or further letter pursuing your interest in the job. Always adhere to deadlines . 6 Interview You are likely to be called for interview following successful selection. Be punctual.late applications will not be accepted. employers are often looking for an individual's "spark" that shows he or she has a lively. smart and polite. Informal information about jobs can be obtained from the Industrial Placements Tutor or by phone to the companies themselves. It pays to have done a bit of homework and found out something about the employer beforehand. These are formal events. In general. it is essential to make written applications neatly. Whilst this may seem an unnecessary chore at the time it is essential that your industrial training is approved and the fees for this year paid (often by your Local Authority) otherwise you may find problems in progression or face the necessity of paying this fee yourself. many small firms can do this. Details will be posted on the notice board. as we are contacted by employers from time to time throughout the year with placements available . Other employers send details of their companies together with application forms. However. Further information on obtaining employment will be given during Semester 1 of the first year of Stage II. particularly those involved in specialist activities. It is very important to keep in touch with the Placements Tutor whilst you are working. Refer to the notice board often. with perfect English and spelling. Advertisements in trade and professional magazines and publications often give useful information on names and addresses of possible employers and details of who to contact in their organisations.if we cannot contact you or if we do not know you are looking for work. however. 137 . then you may be the loser. Current final year students have undergone industrial training and may be useful contacts. letters or CVs. As competition for jobs is sometimes quite severe.

Never hold more than two offers. If you prefer not to accept an offer by a particular deadline given to you. The diary will also help you to prepare the report on your industrial experience summarising your overall activities and commenting on their value to you. You are strongly advised to keep a record of job applications with dates. Honest. say. the work and its relationship to building. being inaccurately and insufficiently detailed. Never let a deadline go by without being in contact. you are unsuccessful. drawings. They should include a factual record of your work. remember . you will be offered several jobs after only a few applications. addresses and replies. If after. 8 Problems Getting Jobs Industrial training placements are subject to the laws of supply and demand besides a dependence on the fortunes of the economy in general and the construction industry in particular. whereas your colleagues are. Week 4.allowing a back-log of entries to mount up will result in them becoming a major task. photographs. in detail. 7 Accepting Job Offers Typically.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook The industrial training must be approved before accepting a job offer. names. held in Semester 1. and almost certainly. sketches. The final report should incorporate any plans. It will assist in the appreciation. write or telephone and ask for an extension. 9 Diary and Report During your industrial training year you are required to keep a diary of your activities for submission to the Industrial Training Tutor shortly after the commencement of the final year. than perhaps your application technique could be improved. Your reports. and your application record to the Placements Tutor to discuss ways of improving your chances. polite and prompt communications will always be appreciated. 138 . All students who have seriously tried to get jobs have succeeded in previous years. relating to the works with which you have been involved. The reports are a formal critique of your industrial year experiences. diary and other documents will be presented at an Industrial Placements Fair. stating especially what you feel you have learned during the period. You should only have applied if you wanted to work for a particular company. bring a copy of your application form and letter. You must inform the Placements Tutor of your prospective employer and obtain his approval on the quality of the training.we may wish to place another student with that organisation in the future. Always record your activities soon after they take place . A hard-backed page-a-day diary will probably best suit your needs. twelve applications. If you find that you are not getting offers. You may be "juggling" several outstanding offers or waiting to hear from firms. besides commenting on your assessment of the firm. the nature of your employment and its training and educational value to you. etc.

It is essential that we are kept advised of your location and given the name. will be made by your prospective final year project supervisor. The first visit (usually between September and January) will normally be made by the Industrial Training Tutor. employers reports to the Department. In addition. reporting on work. in the following Spring or Summer. photography and drawings. 11 Monitoring Progress Visits will be arranged by the Department to see you at your place of work. Diaries will be inspected. You will be required to make a presentation stand promoting your organisation with posters. requested. progress and any difficulties. the quality of the diary and reports of the industrial year. presentation and general style as it is the formal record of your work for one year. The need for this close contact cannot be over emphasised. Further details about the final report and the Industrial Training Fair will be given to you on your return for the final year of your course. A report length of 1500-2000 words should suffice. by arrangement with the Department.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Although many students prefer their reports to be typed. diary and other documents. firstly. This should normally result from: (a) (b) (c) (d) notes made by the tutors as a result of their visits to each student. with all illustrations captioned. 10 Industrial Placements Fair The purpose of the Industrial Training Fair is. 12 Assessment The Examination Committee must be satisfied that the industrial experience meets the course requirements as to its duration. 139 . address and telephone number of your supervisor or manager at any time. Letters at intervals of six to eight weeks should meet this requirement. separate discussions are often held. it will provide an opportunity for the current second year students (and first year) to see what the industrial year is all about. nature. Interim reports and final reports from employers will be In the case of students employed overseas it is likely that visits will be made by locally based academic or practising engineers. The second visit. to enable the Industrial Placements Tutor to assess your year in industry and also to assess you reports. You must be prepared to answer questions about all aspects of your organisation. quality and reporting. the presentation at the Industrial Placements Presentation Day. Secondly. they may be neatly handwritten. the students will be expected to correspond regularly with the Industrial Placements Tutor. Time towards your industrial training will only count if you have registered your location with the Industrial Placement Tutor. You should ensure that the report follows good practice in the use of English. and come to some conclusions about their own aspirations for the year. It is usual for the tutor to have joint discussions with both student and employer. additionally.

documents and photographs (where permitted) will not only help your industrial training report and Industrial Placements Fair. Some supervisors may be over-subscribed and will have to turn students away. 140 . and will normally be circulated to you during the year. A list of suggested topics is available from the Dissertation Module Leader. then you will be able to discuss the project with your supervisor during the second progress visit. 14 Making the most of the Industrial Year The industrial training year is a marvellous opportunity to see the Construction Industry at first hand. It is essential that you enhance your experiences by observing and questioning what is happening around you. It is a chance to talk to construction professionals at all levels and find out more about building and construction management as a career.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook 13 Final Year Dissertation During your industrial training you may encounter problems or aspects that particularly interest you. Alternatively. You must decide what your topic area will be. you may decide to pursue a dissertation unrelated to your third year employment. and who you would like as a supervisor. The industrial training year is the start of the continuing educational process of learning by experience. It is up to you to contact your prospective supervisor during the early part of your industrial year. An early decision is advisable. which will be with you throughout your career. If the topic is suitable and the supervisor agreeable and available. Collecting copies of drawings. This could form the basis of your final year Dissertation.

ac.uk gdalton@brookes. Charlotte (Mrs) MUNCASTER. Mike (Mr) RAISTRICK.ac.ac.uk pjturner@brookes.uk rkeivani@brookes.ac. George (Dr) CAO.uk dsames@brookes. Principal Lecturer in Economics and Investment Appraisal (PT) Programme Lead UG & Subject Coordinator for UG QM/QS Programme Administrator (UG REM & QM/QS) Student Support Coordinator Reader & Research Manager Executive Office Administrator for Departments of Planning and Real Estate & Construction Senior Lecturer in CM.ac.ac.ac.uk hussains@brookes. Bethanie (Mrs) DALTON. Claire (Dr) SALTER.uk 141 . Sally (Dr) SPENCER-CHAPMAN.uk christos.ac. Dan (Mr) SHIERS.uk bkitchener@brookes.uk davidshiers@brookes.ac.ac. Ramin (Dr) KITCHENER.uk gblumberg@brookes.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix K – Departmental Staff Contact List Department of Real Estate and Construction Academic (FT and PT) and Admin Staff ABANDA.ac.uk rgee@brookes.ac.uk DENT.ac.ac.uk ssims@brookes.ac. Vivienne (Mrs) STUBBS. Nick (Mr) GROVER.ac.ac.ac. Rebecca (Mrs) GODDARD.uk jfreeland@brookes. Andressa (Mrs) MORGAN.ac. Christos (Dr) WONG.ac.uk yexu@brookes.uk aminogue@brookes.uk croberts@brookes. Albert (Dr) CHEUNG.ac.uk nick. Laura (Ms) CUNNICK.vidalakis@brookes.french@brookes.uk ngoddard@brookes. Mark (Dr) BLUMBERG.uk maustin@brookes.uk rgrover@brookes.uk mpatrick@brookes.ac.ac.ac.uk iraistrick@brookes.uk jcao@brookes. Philip (Mr) VIDALAKIS. Ray (Mr) SAMES.uk jtah@brookes.uk mjacobs@brookes.uk kcheung@brookes.ac.ac. Gina (Ms) AB113a AB108 AB109 AB108 AB112 AB112 AB316 AB202 AB202 AB316 AB107 3475 3369 3454 3473 3356 3941 3531 4310 3502 3531 4142 Research Assistant Senior Lecturer in CM Senior Lecturer in CM/REM Senior Lecturer in Valuation Senior Lecturer in CM Senior Lecturer in REM Student Support Coordinator Senior Programme Administrator Academic Administration Manager Student Support Coordinator Programme Lead PG and Principal Lecturer for Quality and Validations Principal Lecturer in REM (PT) Associate Lecturer (REM) Prof in REM & SC for REM PG Studies (REM/IRE) Senior Lecturer in REM and Subject Coordinator for UG REM Senior Lecturer in Law. Esra (Dr) MINOGUE.ac. Michael (Dr) TAH. Ian (Mr) ROBERTS. Diane (Mrs) COLLINS.ac.uk dchung@brookes.uk bcunnick@brookes.ac.ac. Richard (Mr) HILL. Ruth (Ms) COOPER.ac.uk nspencerchapman@brookes.uk mnhill@brookes.uk mdstubbs@brookes. Max (Mr) PATRICK. Franco (Dr) CHO. Henry (Mr) AUSTIN.uk mmuncaster@brookes.uk ycho@brookes. Peter (Mr) FREELAND. Julian (Mr) FRENCH.ac.uk rsalter@brookes. Youngha (Dr) CHUNG.ac. Subject Coordinator for PMBE Programme Administrator (PG RE) Programme Administrator (PG PMBE) Associate Lecturer (CM) Senior Lecturer in REM Associate Lecturer (REM) Senior Lecturer in Real Estate Valuation And/Or Investment Lab Manager Senior Programme Administrator Senior Lecturer in REM Senior Lecturer in REM Senior Lecturer in CM (PT) Senior Lecturer in REM (PT) Senior Lecturer in REM (PT) Head of Department of Real Estate and Construction Senior Lecturer in REM Senior Lecturer in CM Senior Lecturer in CM Senior Lecturer in REM fabanda@brookes.wong@brookes.ac.uk KURUL.ac. Ye (Dr) AB112 AB221 AB221 AB110 AB110 AB113 AB111 JPG05 AB202 AB104 AB104 AB110 AB110 AB110 AB106 AB111 AB108 AB109 AB111 4322 3904 3342 4079 3275 3342 3852 3364 3202 3962 3459 3362 3480 3487 3919 3917 3359 2834 3534 ekurul@brookes. David (Mr) SIMS. Barbara (Ms) AB110 AB113 AB105 AB104 AB111 AB110 AB107 AB221 AB316 BU218 AB120 3481 3213 3486 4090 3396 3488 3351 3909 3357 3409 3315 prdent@brookes.ac.ac. Nick (Mr) SPURGE. Michele (Ms) KEIVANI.ac.ac.uk ruthcollins@brookes.uk vcspurge@brookes. Joe (Prof) TURNER.uk lcooper@brookes. Nick (Prof) GEE. Michael (Mr) HUSSAIN Sofia (Mrs) JACOBS.uk cmorgan@brookes. Zhihong (Dr) XU.ac.uk zhihong.ac.

uk 142 .ac.uk/services/upgrade/ Students’ Union Advice Centre (SUAC) Upgrade Helena Kennedy Student Centre Academic English For International Students ICELS reception Enquiries and advice: http://www.ac.ac.sup@brookes.uk/schools/education/icels/ For undergraduates AcademicEnglishUG@brookes.brookes.uk http://www.ac.uk For postgraduates AcademicEnglishPG@brookes.brookes.uk http://www.ac.co.uk/students/accommodation Tel: (01865) 484670 careers@brookes.uk/student/services/isas/ Tel: (01865) 484657 jkpye@brookes.brookes.ac.uk/studying/life/support/matureguide/ Tel: (01865) 484770 suadvice@brookes.ac.uk Chaplaincy Counselling Services Student Disability and Dyslexia Service Financial Aid Office www.brookescareerscentre.ac.ac.ac.uk http://www.uk/students/new/ Induction Programme International Students Advisory Service Mature Students Advisory Service Tel: (01865) 484681 isas@brookes.uk/studying/finance/aid Tel: (01865) 484686 http://www.ac.uk Tel: (01865) 484690 chaplaincy@brookes.uk http://www.uk or chaplain@brookes.uk/student/services/disability-dyslexia Tel: (01865) 484728 finaid@brookes.uk http://www.brookes.ac.uk/studying/life/studentunion Tel: (01865) 873653 upgrade@brookes.ac.uk/student/services/chaplaincy/ Tel: (01865) 484650 ssrecpt@brookes.uk http://www.brookes.brookes.ac.ac.ac.uk Tel: (01865) 484653 dyslex.ac.ac.brookes.ac.uk http://www.brookes.brookes.uk http://www.ac.ac.uk http://www.ac.uk/student/services/counselling/ Tel: (01865) 484651 disabilitysupport@brookes.ac.ac.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix L – Support Services Contact Details Accommodation Office Careers Services First Floor Helena Kennedy Student Centre First Floor Helena Kennedy Student Centre Ground Floor Helena Kennedy Student Centre First Floor Helena Kennedy Student Centre First Floor Helena Kennedy Student Centre First Floor Helena Kennedy Student Centre First Floor Helena Kennedy Student Centre First Floor Helena Kennedy Student Centre First Floor Helena Kennedy Student Centre Tel: (01865) 484660 accomm@brookes.brookes.brookes.ac.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix M . Psychology. Buckley Building Birch House: houses computer rooms Clerici Building: Blackwell Bookshop. Media Workshop. Students’ Union Shop Ground floor Sinclair Building Tonge Building/Ter House (Humanities) Willow Building: Lecture Rooms FH G HKSC IC JPG L MC MH MLT R S SG TO WB 143 . Student Administration Office (SAO) Fuller Building: Brookes Restaurant. Hotel & Restaurant Management Gibbs Building (Social Sciences) Helena Kennedy Student Centre (Student Services. Design and Environment. Public Relations. Enquiry Centre. Food Hall. Student Union) ICELS Building: International Centre for English Language Studies John Payne Building Ground Floor: Technology Laboratory Library Media Centre: Creative Services. Postgraduate Research Centre. Reprographics Unit (print room) Main Hall Main Lecture Theatre Refectory Sinclair Building: Biological & Molecular Sciences.Rooms The University room numbering system might at first sight appear to be confusing – here’s how it works: AB BU BH C Abercrombie Building: Faculty of Technology. Graphics Workshop. Main Lecture Theatre MLT). Examination & Conferment Unit. Conference Services. Board Rooms. Main Hall (MH). Business. Finance. Reception.

BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix N – Headington Campus Maps 144 .

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Appendix O – Health and Safety Regulations: Guide for Students
The Faculty of Technology, Design & Environment is committed to ensuring the health, safety and welfare of the Faculty’s staff, students and visitors. This is achieved through the co-operation of all personnel within the Faculty in implementing the University Health and Safety Policy, this is detailed in the Oxford Brookes University Safety Manual. This leaflet is provided to help guide you towards the relevant information, regarding your responsibilities, and advise you on where to get help and assistance. STUDENT SAFETY (http://www.brookes.ac.uk/regulations/saferegs.html) This web-page contains information posted by the University and should be read by all students and gives a basic overview of safety within the University. FACULTY SAFETY POLICY (currently on the Faculty share drive N. Students who would like a copy should e-mail School Safety Advisor who will provide an electronic copy – acglass@brookes.ac.uk) This is the Faculty’s Health and Safety Policy, it contains school policy, structure and reporting details as well as a brief overview of safety information available for both staff and students. HEALTH & SAFETY - Directorate of Human Resources (http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/hr/health_safety/) This provides useful on-line information for all members of the University, including the University Safety Manual and the Smoking Policy. UNIVERSITY SAFETY MANUAL (http://www.brookes.ac.uk/services/hr/health_safety/docs/index.html) This is made up of detailed Safety Notes on specific topics, the index also makes clear the contents and sections which should be read by staff and students.

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Contacts
Location Gipsy Lane Site Headington Hill Site Wheatley Site Name Andy Glass Faculty Safety Advisor Elaine Le Corre Reason Safety Advisor for Faculty Departments based at Gipsy Lane and First point of contact for Safety Advice within the Faculty. Safety Advisor for School of Arts Ashley Rowles Safety Advisor for Department of Computing & Communication Technologies and Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical Sciences Responsible for Health and Safety within the Faculty. Your Programme Tutor will be able to help you with guidance regarding health and safety requirements for various activities and projects University Safety Officer Assistant Safety Officer Occupational Health Nurse Occupational Health Advisor Staffed 24 hrs ever day Contact x3343 GIP - AB120 X4956 HDH – RHG.05a X3512 WHE – R2.27a

Faculty

Paul Inman PVC/Dean of Faculty Programme Leads

x3350 GIP - AB120

University

Tim McGill Gordon Langford Christie Rainbird Angela Pullinger Security Control Office

x5744 WHE - A1.06 x5745 A1.06 X5531 WHE-A1.03 x5773 WHE - A1.02 x3060 GIP – CG.19

Accidents ALL accidents, incidents or near misses are reportable thus you must read and understand University procedure, this is detailed in Safety Note No. 11 of the University Safety Manual. Following an accident: Seek assistance from person(s) present at the scene. If present inform a member of staff. If necessary call emergency services 222 during working hours, 999 at other times. Inform Security internal x3060 external 01865 483060. If a person is injured and sent to hospital the Safety Officer must be informed immediately, do this via the Security Office. ALL accidents/incidents occurring OFF-SITE must be reported to Security Office immediately. Complete an Accident report form, send this to the Faculty Safety Advisor – Andy Glass.

Fire
Fire and Evacuation Procedures are detailed in Safety Note No. 9 you must read and understand this notice.

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Please contact the Faculty Safety Advisor – Andy Glass for assistance. NOTE: A Risk Assessment is a mandatory for any activity that may be hazardous. activities which create dust. WALK. DO NOT use lifts. structure etc. displayed in the corridors or on the internal phone book available on networked PC’s. where there may be a potential hazard must be the subject of a Risk Assessment before materials are brought on site or work begins. First Aid In the event that you require a first aider you should find a list of your nearest qualified person. Please note NO naked lights are permitted in any building without permission from the University Safety Officer. projects. Projects .e. A HAZARD is the potential to cause harm and present in every work activity. Safety Note No. with phone number. When the alarm bell rings you must: Evacuate the building. If you want to use hazardous substance or embark on a process using a hazardous substance you first need to complete a COSHH Assessment. this includes activities such as spray painting. Telephone Security Control Office. Do not attempt to leave by any vehicle. under the H&SWA 1974. etc.Risk Assessments ON-SITE All activities. 36 details the assessment required. performing a test. COSHH – is the Control of Substances Hazardous to Health. do not expose yourself or others to hazards. 148 . NOTE: Most hazardous substances are labelled as such and detailed handling and user information is available. to carry out an assessment for both substance and activity where the substance is deemed to be hazardous. i. Please contact the Faculty Safety Advisor – Andy Glass for assistance. The University is required. When a potentially hazardous activity.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook On discovering a fire: Sound the alarm at the nearest fire alarm point. If you require help please contact the Faculty Safety Advisor – Andy Glass. Fire Notices posted in rooms detail safe routes and assembly points. A standard form is available in Departmental Offices. Inform a member of staff or Fire Fighter of any disabled personnel or anyone who may be trapped. DO NOT run. fieldwork. If in doubt ask. GET WELL CLEAR OF BUILDINGS AND ACCESS ROUTES. are also the subject of Risk Assessments. etc. Off-Site All off-site activities. x222 from an internal phone or 999/112 from a public line. etc. Do not re-enter the building until instructed to do so by a responsible member of staff. building a structure. A RISK is the likelihood of that potential being realised. is discovered without a previously agreed risk assessment work will be stopped immediately and if necessary action will be taken to reduce risks.

Please remember our safety. relies upon the commitment from all staff. please contact one of the staff listed at the beginning of this Appendix under Contacts. see anything you consider dangerous etc. Andy Glass Faculty Safety Advisor 5/9/2012 149 . please would you reply to acknowledge receipt and confirmation you have read it. students and visitors who surround us.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook If none are available and the injury is serious either call emergency services or take the person to the Casualty Department at the JR hospital. each and every one of us. Other If you need help. This information will also be sent to you via e-mail. advice.

Keep us up to date with your contact and career details. and become eligible for certain benefits which we have negotiated on your behalf. which will give you news of other alumni. who would welcome contributions of news articles about your career or any unusual activities you undertake. such as Reunion Dinners or Open Days when you will be welcome to return to Oxford. 150 . the Programme Administration Office and Academic Management Office (C block. theatre tickets. Tell others about happenings in your life with our message board. With the alumni magazine once a year you will receive an "alumni up-date" form that will show you the data we hold about you on the computer. give us a forwarding address such as your parents' or relatives' home address. At least once a year you will receive a copy of the Alumni Magazine. if you are moving about frequently. For further details of Oxford Brookes University Alumni Association please write to the Alumni Officer. Hear what’s going on at Oxford Brookes. As a past student of the University you become an Associate Member of Oxford Brookes University Alumni Association. We will certainly be pleased to tell you OUR news! When you leave the University your name and current address will be entered on our database of past students in the Alumni Office. It is particularly important that if either of these changes during your time at Oxford. The Alumni Association (a registered charity) offers certain additional benefits to those who wish to join as full members: Members can continue to use facilities on campus.uk/alumni At the time of enrolment you completed a card giving both home address and your address in Oxford.BSc (Hons) Construction Project Management (QM) BSc (Hons) Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QS) Student Handbook Appendix P – Alumni: Keeping in Touch After you have left the University. the University. If enough alumni express an interest in getting together in a particular region. The Alumni Relations Service at Brookes allows graduates to:       Look for an old classmate through the ‘Find a Friend’ service. such as applying for our VISA card. It also helps to let your Personal Tutor know as well. Other financial services will also be available to Oxford Brookes alumni. Remember too that the University runs many short courses that may be useful to you in updating your own knowledge in certain areas. Communication is a two-way process. We will ask you to correct or update this as necessary. and enjoy certain discounts on meals. Please keep us up to date with your address: or. If you are interested. Send a virtual postcard. its staff and students. some events in regions of the UK and even in overseas countries. weekend breaks. and you will be kept fully informed through the alumni magazine. which has no annual fee and offers a very competitive rate of interest. which we hope will be of interest to particular groups of past students. but others will be planned in London and. hopefully. please visit the website: http://www. Please keep in touch with the Alumni Office by returning this postage paid form each year. Outward Bound courses. first floor) must be notified immediately. Felicity Peacock. we hope you will keep in touch with us. and so on. then we will do our best to put them in touch with each other and help them arrange a suitable meeting or event. Many of these will take place on the campus. You may also develop your own expertise in areas that we would be pleased to make use of in planning our courses.ac.brookes. and we will be delighted if you continue to make the most of your links with Oxford Brookes University. and tell us your news. This is edited by the Alumni Officer. The Alumni Relations Programme involves arranging events and reunions each year. Sign up to be a mentor to a Brookes Student.