PROJECT MANAGEMENT

COURSE SYLLABUS
COURSE OVERVIEW
This course is being created to fill a perceived need, “How do you herd cats?” Or in other words, how do you deliver a difficult to understand product, with highly technical (weird people), on time, on budget and with an acceptable level of quality? Students will learn first and foremost, why we even need project management, what does project management really mean and what they need to do to ensure that project management is done well. The students will learn the primary characteristics of project management and what the different roles of a project need to do to ensure success. The key skills of estimation, scheduling and developing control mechanisms will be understood and applied to a project to see how they work. At the conclusion of the course the student will be able to generate the planning concepts needed to manage a group of resources to develop a set of requirements in a way that meets a customer’s needs. Knowledge and Abilities Required Before the Students Enter the Course: Students are assumed to have the skills to complete a project and have worked on a project in the past. This would better be a technical project, but any project will do. They should also be able to understand the key concepts associated with project management.

HOW TO SUCCEED IN THIS COURSE
To Pass the Course In order to be prepared for future coursework, you must earn at least a “C” in this course. To do this, you must complete the following tasks at a bare minimum:  Complete the assigned readings. The bulk of the knowledge required to succeed in this course comes from the assigned reading in the textbooks and other materials. When you come to class, I will assume you have completed the reading and we will not repeat the information covered there—though I may ask you questions that require you to know it. Attend and participate in class. Classroom time is about discipline, skill, and working toward professional performance and quality. Most classes will feature in-class discussions and exercises. While you will usually complete these in teams of two or three students, you will submit your work individually, as is the rule with all coursework. Produce a governing control document. This document will consist of at least five parts each of which will be developed independently, but which will also be combined to form the control document. This document (paper or electronic) is usually called the Project Management Plan (PMP) or plan for short. Pass the Assessments (exams). These include: o Weekly Assessments on selected reading and lecture material o Comprehensive Assessments at the middle and end of the semester

To Excel in the Course Class sessions, reading assignments, and exercises cover most of what you need to meet the minimal requirements above. But if you wish to achieve a very good or exemplary grade, you will need to go beyond that material by researching, practicing, and experimenting with the subject matter. Just as on the job, above-average performance requires initiative and taking charge of your own learning. The grading rubric at the end of this syllabus describes this

requirement in more detail.

LEARNING-BY-DOING (LBD), STORY-CENTERED CURRICULUM
To be a successful software development professional, you must understand project management principles. This course gives you opportunities to do just that. Learning-by-doing activities include individual and small group tasks, completed in a situated, context-rich environment that authentically mirrors the workplace. This environment, called the “back story,” uses an approach called story -centered learning, which casts you in the role of a team lead at a firm, iCarnegie consulting, where you will solve problems that resemble those encountered by real companies every day. Most of the tasks will begin with an email from your “manager,” whom you may also need to interview to scope out the project. You will also have access to requirements specifications, and other documents for the details of what is expected for each task. As you complete the tasks, the instructor will play three roles in addition to my traditional function as an instructor. I will act as:  As your manager at iCarnegie, I want (and expect) you to do well at the work I give you, and will have information to help you succeed. However, I have my own job to do, so you will need to respect my time. I will have little patience if you come to me unprepared or ask questions you could have answered yourself. A coach who helps you to complete your assigned project, not by spoon-feeding you the answers, but by guiding you to find them on your own. As a coach, most of what I say to you will take the form of questions. My goal in doing this is not to frustrate you, but to make you think. As your customer, I will work with you to help you define your project and provide information to complete the various parts of the overall Project Management Plan. Keep in mind, that as a customer, I will not automatically give you everything you need. You will need to interview and work with me, like you would in the real business world, asking the right questions to get the information that you need. Like the manager role above, I will have little patience if you come to me unprepared or ask questions you could have answered yourself.

In this class, professionalism is as important as technical skill. Besides demonstrating computer know-how, you will need to work effectively in teams, examine problems from multiple viewpoints, ask questions and conduct research to ensure you understand client requirements, and articulate your solutions clearly, using standard computing terminology. Having mastered these skills, you can count on applying them regularly once you graduate and enter the workplace. Another integral part of learning by doing is seeking and absorbing the hard-earned wisdom of seasoned domain experts in your community of practice. In this course, you will be able to do this by consulting me, of course. You will also have access to case studies, textbooks, and course labs. I encourage you to refer to these resources as needed to complete the deliverables for this course. Finally, just as on the job, your work products will be evaluated against standards —by you, by your classmates, by the instructor, and by the whole class. You will need to work both quickly and effectively, and doing so will require a solid command of the basic individual skills from the reading and lectures.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
After completing this course, you will be able to demonstrate the following knowledge, assessed through class discussions and assessments:           Discuss the reasons why project management is important. Give a clear understanding of what the project manager role does. Provide a clear model of what are good project management practices. Understand the ways to measure the progress of a project. Discuss the key driver for a project. Reflect how the drivers are represented in a Project Management Planning. Good understanding of Project Management terminology. Know how to develop an estimate for a project. Know how to develop a schedule for a project. Develop a set of metrics meaningful to a project.

      

Understand the difference between measures and metrics. Understand how risks should be addressed in a PMP. Be able to choose between control mechanisms for a project. Understand process models and how they relate to lifecycles. Understand development lifecycles and how to choose. Know similarities and differences between project management and software PM. Understand key concepts of traditional and Agile project management.

After completing this course, students will be able to produce and use estimates, measurement options, risk management reports, schedules and budgets. They will also be able to create and use earned value reports, project status reports and change management reports.

PREREQUISITES
Prerequisites required for the course are:  None

CO-REQUISITES
You should complete the following courses concurrently with this one:  None

MATERIALS
Online Resources & References Site 1 - Software Project Survival Guide – Steve McConnell  A well written discussion of key ideas needed for considering during development of project management for a software project. This text looks at the things that are a “Minimum” for success of the project. http://www.elib.hbi.ir/computer/webdevelopment/pdf/[1572316217]Microsoft%20PressSoftware%20Project%20Survival%20Guide-1997.pdf Note: Additional online resources and references may be added as needed. Materials & Supplies 

Note: Additional materials and/or supplies may be added as needed. Additional Tools, Aids & Instruments GanttProject  This open source software will be used for exercises in Project 04 for project scheduling.  http://www.ganttproject.biz/

Tool / Aid / Instrument 2 Title  Detailed Description  Location

Note: Additional tools, aids and instruments may be added as needed.

Textbooks Evaluating Project Decisions: Case Studies in SE By Carol L. Hoover, Mel Rosso-Llopart, Gil Taran
Published Oct 27, 2009 by Addison-Wesley Professional.

Software Project Survival Guide By Steve McConnell Online link Microsoft Press, October 22, 1997

Essentials of Software Engineering By Frank Tsui , Orlando Karam Jones & Bartlett Learning, Apr 22, 2010

Succeeding with Agile: Software Development Using Scrum By Mike Cohn Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional, November 5, 2009

COURSE POLICIES AND EXPECTATIONS
Class Rules Respect the learning environment:      Come to class on time and prepared to discuss the assigned reading. Do not distract the class with excessive private conversations. Turn off all mobile devices. Bring paper and pens/pencils. Bring your ability to think.

Collaboration and Academic Integrity Academic integrity is fundamentally about ethical behavior. Appropriate collaboration and research of previous work is an important part of the learning process. However, not all collaboration or use of existing work is ethical. Different classes have different rules about collaboration. These are the standards you will be held to for this class. Unless otherwise noted on the assignment, we expect you to know and follow these rules.  You may only get help on graded assignments from designated people.

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You are always welcome to get help on an assignment from your professors, professional school mentors, tutors, or any other faculty member. They may help you at the computer, on paper, or any way they believe will be effective. Several undergraduate TAs may also be associated with this class. You may get their help with assignments outside of class. They may only help you work on papers.

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There is a great deal of support available to you from a number of people. If you are struggling with an assignment, by all means, please seek help from one or more of them. You are welcome (and encouraged) to talk through concepts and ideas with your fellow students and study with them. You may not, however, share your work with another individual or get help with your assignment from any other source, including members of your family. Avoid talking about any homework assignments in any specific way. In particular, do not give direct help to, nor receive direct help from, your classmates on a graded assignment. Never show your work to your classmates or seek to see their work . Homework should be completed individually. In cases where inappropriate sharing occurs, all students involved are at fault, regardless of whether they are the source or recipient of shared work.  If something has your name on it, you are claiming it as your own work and academic integrity rules apply. The assignments in this class are exercises designed to help you absorb and comprehend the covered topics. Doing the work is much more important than getting the right answer. The act of practicing things and trying is critical. We live in a time when a vast amount of information is available online, and I have no doubt you can easily find source code or answers to questions on assignments. Before using this information, ask yourself if you are misrepresenting others’ work as your own. For example: o o Copying something written by someone else online and turning it in is cheating and will be treated as such. Reading a Wikipedia page that helps you understand an important concept to complete an assignment is perfectly acceptable, but copying the Wikipedia page into your submission is not.

There is a wide grey area between the above examples. Keep in mind that it’s the instructor’s judgment that counts! If you're ever unsure about whether an action is permissible, ask before you do it. Remember that quotes and references are critical in identifying the difference between your work and information from others. The severity of sanctions imposed for an academic integrity violation will depend on the transgression and ascertained intent of the student. Penalties for a first offense may range from failing the assignment to failing the course and referral to an academic review board. You can find more information about the consequences of academic integrity violations from your University Resources such as Student Affairs.

CLASS FORMAT AND SETUP
Three 50-minute classes will be held each week. Every week, in which the project is delivered, an assessment will generally be conducted for the concepts from the task topic.  Normally classes will consist of 10 minutes of organizing discussion and 40 minutes of exercises that address issues and questions from the assigned reading and homework. Some of the code you create in the exercises will be the basis for subsequent ones, so always keep copies. In classes in which assessments are administered, the class will normally begin with a 10-minute Assessment (see below) covering the reading and class exercises, followed by 40 minutes of discussion and exercises.

You will also complete additional Assessments in the middle and the end of the semester. See the Course Schedule for the sequence of class topics.

CUSTOMER PROJECTS
There are 5 parts to the customer project, and each part consists of a task for the course which can also be considered a small project. These parts will all be brought together into a final deliverable (Task 06) which will be the

Project Management Plan (PMP) to your manager for you and your proposed team on developing a product. Below are the projects (Tasks) you will need to complete to assemble your plan for your manager at iCarnegie Consulting. Task 00 – Project Teams (Week 1) You will be provided with information on the value of teams, what motivates technical people, and an introduction to problem understanding. This information will build a foundation to prepare you to work on the customer project. Task 01 (Project 01) – Build the Scope Document (Weeks 2, 3 & 4) You will be provided with the definition for a project iCarnegie Consulting is considering bidding on. We expect you to help your manager prepare for a meeting in 3 weeks to fully understand the Scope of this project. Task 02 (Project 02) – Once your Scope is approved you will develop an Estimate for the project. (Weeks 5 & 6) You will Estimate the project based on the Scope you identify, the resources you are assigned to build the product and the assumptions you make about the project. Task 03 (Project 03) – The Scope and Estimate now force us to consider Risks on the project (Weeks 7 & 8) You need to clearly identify key Risks for your manager and how to address them. Task 04 (Project 04) – The Schedule for the project must be provided to your manager in two weeks (Weeks 9 & 10) The Schedule must be provided to your manager so that he can bid on the resources he needs at the next managers budget meeting. Task 05 (Project 05) – Develop the appropriate Control Strategy. (Weeks 11 & 12) Which Control Strategy best serves the project based on Scope, Estimates, Risk and Schedule? What process and overall development strategy will work best? You must provide the answer for your manager. Task 06(Project 06) – Capstone project to put together a complete Project Management Plan (Weeks 13, 14 & 15) “Plans are worthless. Planning is essential.” - Dwight D. Eisenhower, general and president (1890-1961) You will put together a complete PMP which consists of all the five parts you have developed and include an overview, glossary and other key items needed for the project. You must provide a polished final plan for your manager. Create the primary management tool and planning document for the project for your manager. Is it worthless, or can we make a plan that is a great starting point for the project?

COURSE GRADING
Your course grade will be calculated based on your scores on the deliverables described above, using the percentages below. Task Topic Assessments PMP Components (Projects) Class Exercises participation Midterm Assessment Final Project (Half PMP) Quantity 3 3 18 Percentage 15% 30% 30% 10% 15%

There is no curve for this course.

A grade of “AU” requires at least a 95% score. A grade of “DE” requires at least an 85% score. A grade of “SA” requires at least an 80% score. Factors for Grading Customer Projects As you can see on the table above, the customer projects represent the largest portion of your course grade. Specific requirements for these vary by project, and you can find the detailed requirements on the grading form for each project on the LMS (Learning Management System). Major factors include:      Completeness of documents. Clear understanding of the problem. The document is understandable and clear to use. The document is correctly delivered as required. Clear discussion for ideas.

Due Dates and Times Readings are due before the class period on the day the topic is covered. You will be expected to demonstrate your understanding of the material during the discussions and exercises. PMP components tasks are due at 10 pm on the date specified in the Course Schedule. Submissions will lose 10% off the top for each hour the assignment is submitted late. For example, a perfect paper submitted two hours late would earn a grade of just 80%. The time of submission is determined by the time stamp the course LMS assigns when the project is submitted. Computers are unreliable, as are computer networks. Except in exceptional, extended cases, problems with the computer or the network are not reasonable excuses for being late. You may submit your work more than once, so if you find yourself struggling to finish an assignment, it is often better to submit a version before the deadline, even if it is not finished. This way, if the network goes down or your computer crashes; you have submitted something before the deadline. Start early and get your work done ahead of schedule and you will not have to worry! Each of you is granted one “I had a real bad day” 24-hour extension. You must inform your professor when you want to use this by sending me an email, with the subject “Project Management: I had a real bad day,” which specifies which assignment is to be given this extension. Do not even think about asking for a second one! Assessments are given at the start of class, generally on Fridays. There is no way to make up an Assessment. You are allowed to drop one Assessment, which means you can have a “real bad day” for an Assessment as well. In-class exercises require you to be present at the start of class and —with a few exceptions, which I will note— complete the majority of the in-class exercise before the end of class. Since there are so many exercises, and all together they only represent 12% of your grade. You are allowed to drop two exercise scores. However, if you come to class, actively participate, and try your best, you should do fine. Submitting Work Your name must be prominently displayed at the top of every document you submit, including each and every project file. Exercises: All exercises that require you to submit something to the LMS require you to name the exercise file or folder properly. The name must start with your school user ID. It must then be followed by a blank. The blank must then be followed by ExerciseNN, where NN is a pair of digits, ranging from "01" to "43.” For example, Student Lynn Carter's school ID is LRCarter, so upon submitting Exercise 01, he would name his submission LRCarter Exercise01. Assessments: All Assessments that require you to submit something to the LMS requires you to name the file properly. The name must start with your school ID. It must then be followed by a blank. The blank must then be followed by AssessmentNN, where NN is a pair of digits, ranging from "01" to "06.” For example, student Lynn Carter's school ID is LRCarter, so upon submitting Assessment 01, he would name his submission LRCarter Assessment01.

PMP tasks: All PMP tasks must be submitted via the LMS. All submissions must be named properly. The name must start with your school ID. It then must be followed by a blank. That blank must then be followed by ProjectNN, where the NN is a digit. For example, student Lynn Carter's school ID is LRCarter, so upon submitting Project01, he would name his submission LRCarter Project01. Programs are projects, which are stored as folders on your computer. When you first create the project, name the project using this scheme so the folder will be named properly from the beginning. Before uploading the project, you will need to compress the folder into an archive file. It is this compressed (zipped) archive that you will upload to the LMS. Submission rules Do not attempt to change the name of a compressed archive after it has been created . When the archive is decompressed, the name of the original item will be restored, so the effort to change the name will be lost. If you rename the archive after it is created, you will lose credit. Failure to follow these submission rules   If you do not include your name on the top of each and every document/file in the submission, you will lose 10% off the top. For example, a score that would have been a 94% will become an 84%. If you fail to properly name the file before you upload it , or properly name a folder before you compress it and upload it, you will lose 10% off the top of your grade. For example, a project that would have been a 90% will become an 80%.

Plan before you submit so that you don’t make a mistake. Maybe a checklist would help ensure you get it right each time.

Appendix A: Assessment Rubric Definitions
Unsatisfactory Actions and Effort 0 1 Not enough actions to address deliverables or irrelevant actions 2 Actions cover the deliverables but a few major problems Satisfactory relation to the action and a course deliverable with a few major problems 3 Actions cover the deliverables but some minor problems Satisfactory relation to the action and a course deliverable with a few minor problems 4 5 Marginal Satisfactory Good Very Good Exemplary

Action description

Not related to deliverables or the course

Actions cover the deliverables with no problems

Actions cover the deliverables with excellent insight

Results

Relation of these results to the action and a class deliverable is unclear

Relation of these results to the action or a class deliverable is unclear

Satisfactory relation to the action and a course deliverable with no problems

Satisfactory relation to the action and a course deliverable, compellingly written

Effort and Size

Unable to use this effort figure to compute a production rate and other major problems

Difficult to use this effort figure to compute a production rate or other major problems

Able to compute a production rate with a few major problems

Able to compute a production rate with a few minor problems

Able to compute a production rate with no problems

Able to compute a compelling production rate

Unsatisfactory Notes 0 Major problems and missing key points

Marginal 2 A major problem and missing a few key points

Satisfactory 4 A few minor problems or missing a few key points Some focus but potentially confusing and wordy expression Valid reference but not specific enough and potentially credible source

Good 6 Technically good with the majority of the key points addressed Good focus and adequate expression

Very Good 8 Technically good with all of the key points addressed

Exemplary 10 All of the key points covered compellingly

Technical content

Summarization

Cut and paste

Excessive text and not well written Incomplete reference details or no reason to believe the source is credible

Good focus and good expression

Compelling and compact expression Valid focused reference with compelling rationale for its credibility

Credible references

Incomplete reference details and no reason to believe the source is credible

Valid reference and potentially credible source

Valid focused reference and acceptable credible source with rationale

Unsatisfactory Action Item Log 0

Marginal 2

Satisfactory 4 Satisfactory action items to properly cover the key course deliverables but there are major issues Satisfactory relation to the action and a course deliverable with a few major problems

Good 6 Satisfactory action items to properly cover the key course deliverables but there are minor issues Satisfactory relation to the action and a course deliverable with a few minor problems

Very Good 8 Satisfactory action items to properly cover the key course deliverables with no issues

Exemplary 10 Satisfactory action items to properly cover the key course deliverables with excellent insight/expression Satisfactory relation to the action and a course deliverable, compellingly written

Usage

No relation to key course deliverables and no connection to actions

Not enough action items to properly cover the key course deliverables

Results

Relation of these result to the action and a course deliverable is unclear Unable to use this effort figure to compute a production rate and other major problems

Relation of these result to the action or a course deliverable is unclear

Satisfactory relation to the action and a course deliverable with no problems

Effort and Size

Difficult to use this effort figure to compute a production rate or other major problems

Able to compute a production rate with a few major problems

Able to compute a production rate with a few minor problems

Able to compute a production rate with no problems

Able to compute a compelling production rate

Unsatisfactory Plans 0

Marginal 1

Satisfactory 2 Satisfactory coverage of upcoming key deliverables with a major issue Relation of these tasks to the deliverables is satisfactorily described with a major issue

Good 3 Satisfactory coverage of upcoming key deliverables with a few minor issues Relation of these tasks to the deliverables is satisfactorily described with a few minor issues

Very Good 4

Exemplary 5 Insightful coverage of upcoming key deliverables, compellingly written Relation of these tasks to the deliverable is compellingly described with no issues

Deliverables (What)

No relation to any deliverable

Little relation to any key deliverable with a few major issues

Good coverage of upcoming key deliverables with no issues

Tasks (How, who, why, and when)

Relation of these tasks to the deliverables is unclear

Relation of these tasks to the deliverables has a few major issues

Relation of these tasks to the deliverables is well described with no issues

Unsatisfactory Lessons Learned 0

Marginal 1 Description of any surprises or the results (expected and actual) and the gap between them has a few major issues

Satisfactory 2 Description of any surprises or the results (expected and actual) and the gap between them has a major issue

Good 3 Description of any surprises or the results (expected and actual) and the gap between them has a few minor issues

Very Good 4 Description of any surprises or the results (expected and actual) and the gap between them has no issues

Exemplary 5 Compelling description of any surprises or the results (expected and actual) and the gap between them with no issues Lessons and the relation of the context to the lessons are compellingly written with no issues

Context (expected versus actual output and surprises)

Description of any surprises or the results (expected and actual) and the gap between them is unclear

Lessons learned

Lessons and the relation between the context and the lessons are not clear

Lessons and the relation of the context to the lessons are poorly described

Lessons and the relation of the context to the lessons are satisfactorily described with a few major issues

Lessons and the relation of the context to the lessons are satisfactorily described with a few minor issues

Lessons and the relation of the context to the lessons are well described with no issues

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