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Official Transcript of Proceedings NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

Title:

Japan's Fukushima Daiichi PMT State Interface Audio Files

Docket Number:

N/A

Location:

N/A

Date:

March 15, 2011

Work Order No.:

NRC-4222

Pages 1-51

NEAL R. GROSS AND CO., INC. Court Reporters and Transcribers 1323 Rhode Island Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20005 (202) 234-4433

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1 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

JAPAN'S FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI PMT STATE INTERFACE AUDIO FILES

TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 2011

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2 1 2 3 4 5 0%CS53% 03865094 (CONFERENCE CALL INITIATED) AUTOMATED ANNOUNCEMENT: Welcome. You

have reached the audio conferencing system.

After the

tone, enter your conference pass code followed by the pound key. Thank you. MALE PARTICIPANT: Rich (phonetic), unless

7 8

you've heard something different than that, that's the only thing that I know of that we're sending in.

10 11 12 1 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 dosimeters,

RICH: policy discussions,

No.

I mean,

there are some ongoing

Julie,

about how we would refine

to a specific request for medical countermeasures from Japan, but nothing per se about dosimeters or dosimetry. And in fact, in I don't believe we have

I mean,

terms of external dosimeters, although I can't

in the Strategic National Stockpile, say that with absolute certainty. CINDY JONES: Okay.

Hi, this is Cindy Jones

with the NRC just joining you. JULIE BENTZ: have you here. CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: Hi, Yes. Julie. Yes. Cindy, great, wonderful to

So just so that we're

clear, all that this phone is about that Dennis (phonetic) was concernedaboutwasmakingsure therewas the dosimetry NEAL R.GROSS
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3 1 2 3 4 5 6
7

capability for our own, I've kind of defined it

the U.S.

folks that are --

and

as the responder,

the folks who

are going into the problem set. So you know, right now we've got people flying over the areas in search and rescue, you know. Those

are the kind of things we need to be certain that we're


capturing
--

CINDY JONES:
JULIE BENTZ:

Right.
-what the doses are.

10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 23 24 25

CINDY JONES:

It's

my understanding that

the DOE RAP Team, the 32-person team has dosimeters with them. They have also KI as do the people that we sent

over, the total of eight that are over there have dosimeters and KI. The discussion this morning with Naval

Reactors and crew talked about the request that came out of this morning's briefing with the White House and the Chairman regarding, I think it was the Ronald Reagan had indicated that Admiral, that they wanted to make

sure that they had dosimetry for the people that were employed on the ship. They just have some dosimeters.

We got a report back that they have 50 dosimeters on ship with 300 on the way, this morning. and it was only an hour away

So they should have that. But the Admiral was concerned that, he wanted NEAL R.GROSS
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4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 to monitor all the people on the ship, not just a few. And right now they're having to estimate what individual doses are. CDC for the So you know, KI. One we provided information for of the largest producers or

manufacturers and suppliers of TLD's is Landauer in the country here. They can get, you know,

emergency supply shipments of 100s and 1,000s when you need it. JULIEBENTZ: Okay. So before we drill down

10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20

on the actual, what we need to do, I just wanted to kind of go around the horn and figure out who's in-country that we need to be thinking about. said that there were eight. more than that. CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: sent forward. Yes. But you've got eight that were already? So NRC, Cindy, you

I think you actually have

I think you have two there, Right.

CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ:

And one on the way.

And all

of them -- everybody who's sending it


--

has the dosimetry

21
22 23 24 25

CINDY JONES: and KI. That's correct. JULIE BENTZ: DAVID BOWMAN:

Right,

they have dosimetry

Okay.

Great. so

DOE? we've

David? got 35

Okay,

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5 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 monitors, surveying correct? personnel. One of those people is working with the DART The other 34 are responders and

team at the Embassy.

they all have dosimetry with them. JULIE BENTZ: how about over to -All right, good. Let's see,

USAID, on your DART team, anybody do any of those have

other than the RAP or NRC folks, dosimeters or do you deem it

necessary for them to? I'm going to turn you

FEMALE PARTICIPANT:

over to our Urban Search and Rescue Team colleague, Jerome (phonetic), who can tell JEROME: us what the USAR teams have. Good afternoon. We have 10

Canberras, andthen the standardPPE level (indiscernible) that (indiscernible) teams, both California and Fairfax are carrying. CINDY JONES: Those are survey instruments,

Those are not TLDs. JULIE BENTZ: No, yes. Do they have any

kind of like thermoluminescent dosimeter or any kind of badge that captures the dose if they're in a radiation field, that you're aware of? RICH: No, the USARs, I believe, are active

and our safety and security officer has a instrument, an ADM-300 survey instrument.

And then with regard -pen dosimeters in

I think he's got some personal

the cache as well that can be read NEAL R.GROSS

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6 1 2 3 4 5 dosimeters? RICH: Yes. Okay. evening we're going to and they show an accumulation, or an accumulated exposure amount on those. JULIE BENTZ: Okay, so they have some pen

JULIE BENTZ: 7 8 RICH:

And this

re-validate who's using what. JULIE BENTZ: And one of the things I would

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

also like to get off of this phone conversation is that, you know, if you've got the pen dosimeters, it doesn't

necessarily mean that the USAR teams know how to use them. But we have specialists out there that perhaps if

they can link up and get some fast training on it needed. Okay. RICH: use on our side. JULIE BENTZ: would be considered that. CINDY JONES:

I'm notawareofanypassive dosimetry

Your pen dosimeter I think

I think it would be important,

Julie, and for the rest of the folks, that whenever someone is either in an area that they have at least a person or

that has a recordable thermoluminescent dosimeter,

if they have a direct reading dosimeter to have the names of the individuals and what that recording is, NEAL R. GROSS
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because

7 1 2 the question will come back later, I was in an area and I got exposed and there is JULIE 4 5 BENTZ: no record of dose. Right. And that is, for

everyone on the phone,

that is

what we want to avoid.

CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ:

Exactly. No record of dose. Okay, so

7 8

Cindy, we have a direct reading dosimeter, have the thermoluminescent dosimeter. CINDY JONES: Right.

and then we

And of the two you

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

want to have a TLD, thermoluminescent dosimeter because that can stay on just like a badge, the radiation dose wherever you go. exchanged out every month. So you can get a monthly dose, or if you Or and it will record usually

And it's

have a team going out one person could have that. if

you're short-handed on that there could be one in

an area posted in an office or in a room that would be characteristic of all the people that are in that room would receive about that same dose. But it should be

representative of the area where the people are working and interacting. JULIE BENTZ: Great. Now before we go to DoD. Has

the next point, the one person I'm missing is DoD joined? Joint Staff? LEE SMITH (phonetic): This is

Lee Smith

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8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 in the Naval Reactors. JULIE BENTZ: LEE SMITH:. I can provide some -Ah, perfect. No, no, I'm sorry, Lee. I won't

that's okay.

necessarily present myself to represent DoD, but I can share what information I have. JULIE BENTZ: LEE SMITH: Please do. For perspective, there's about

130,000people, DoD folks includingactive duty, civilians and dependents in the region. So when you're talking

10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 23 24 25

about providing dosimetry for personnel over there, do you mean all responders that you anticipate will approach within a certain distance from the reactor plant? JULIE BENTZ: good point. So by responder you raise a

Is a person who lives next to the reactor, And that's how I want to make characterizing who

is he or she a responder?

sure I understand how everyone is the responder is.

Because there's also 160,000 American and we can't badge all of them. and this is how we do it here at

citizens over there, So it's more an idea,

the states is,

you know, those people who we are asking deemed risky that we put a

to go into an area that is dosimeter on them. CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ:

That's correct. If they are caught in the plume,

there are other ways to understand their dose so long NEAL R.GROSS
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9 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 question? LEE SMITH: Yes. And I can provide some face it. as, you know, they know when they're in and whether they evacuate or shelter in place or do what is So it's necessary.

not that we are going to put a dosimeter on That would just be a monstrosity. But we

everybody.

want to understand that are we at least putting dosimetry on all those who are going into a radioactive area to do their mission. So I'm not even certain The White House is
--

well,

and let's the

not going to tell

departments and agencies how to do their own dosimetry because you already have the protocols and legal

authorities in place to do it. We just want to understand how you plan to and, you know, whether or not as an interagency, if there are certain, you know, ideaspeople arehavingthatthey've never tried before, like putting a badge on every person on the Reagan, than perhaps, if that's a necessary requirement rather for every deck on the ship or what's

you know,

depending on the missions that they go out on, the more useful idea for that.

Again not stepping into

what DoD says that they should be doing. So Lee, does that kind of answer your

perspective on what we are currently doing. NEAL R.GROSS


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10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 17 18 19 20 21 22 2 24 25 JULIE BENTZ: LEE SMITH: Okay. Please do.

And what we have in the region.

There's approximately ten ships in the region, including two aircraft carriers. Aircraft carriers being nuclear

powered obviously have the most inherent capabilities. We have a little thousand SRPDs, over 2,000 TLDs available and several or self-reading pocket dosimeters, and

about 150 electronic pocket dosimeters. JULIE BENTZ: LEE SMITH: JULIE BENTZ: LEE SMITH: How many? 1-5-0. Okay. All of our nuclear-trained

personnel wear TLDs all the time, anyway, so you're running somewhere around 500 to 550 personnel that are

automatically being monitored.

Any personnel that are

flying or performing flight ops within 100 miles of the reactor plants are being monitored with TLDs and

electronic pocket dosimeters. The smaller ships in the region supplying (indiscernible) all have self-reading pocket dosimeters. About half of them have TLDs, TLDs to the rest of them. as well. We're pushing by

I expect by the time --

the end of the day all of the ships should have TLDs, enough for at least the flight crews that are flying within a hundred miles. NEALR. GROSS
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11 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 We don't believe the ships that are sitting outside of the plume areas need to have TLDs. All of

the personnel on board, we believe we will have enough of a representative dose record of those people that remain on board to be able to (indiscernible, possibly "time-dose those that") have not left the ship. We have

a number of folks on the ground, both the shipyard and Navy personnel, TLDs and (indiscernible) As are being far as

provided for them as well. additional region or

monitoring capability that is either in the is being sent to the region, we have

(indiscernible) uraniumdetector able toperformisotopic analysis that's currently being utilized. We have a

Spectral 1000 which will also perform isotopic analysis that's being shipped to the Ronald Reagan. We also have

two Canberra Accuscan whole-body monitors that are being shipped over there. arrival time. As far as dose management or exposure And I don't have an ETA on their

management for our people that are performing flight ops, our current game plan is to limit those people to

what we call a control level of 300 millirems, starting out with per day will be reassessed on a per day basis. Then (indiscernible, possibly officers) may reset based on the operation's need, NEAL R.GROSS
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up to a thousand

12 1 2 millirems, and if they need to exceed a thousand millirems that will only be performed after a consultation with our emergency responders on the ground and (indiscernible) 4 5 at what we call the NAC, which is our emergency control center there, which they will discuss with us what their plans are if 7 8 1,000. Our guidance also includes if they need to they think they need to go greater than

go the (indiscernible, possibly ten rem) for equipment, 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Thank you. STUGREEN (phonetic): Yes, this is StuGreen saving vital equipment for higher than that for

life-saving measures, that's allowed further discretion. And then the, I believe, the discussion, we're running parallel conference calls here at 1400. I have someone

else that's on the other conference call that should be sharing similar information regarding the dosimetry availability of different reading. JULIEBENTZ: Right. No that sounds perfect.

at DHS with just has one quick question, 300 millirems, what was the time frame for that? LEE SMITH: Right now, in a given day to

be reassessed following that day. STU GREEN: JULIE BENTZ: Okay. So that's per day. important for that

And it's

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13 1 2 3 4 5 number to know that that would be occupational dose. That is not a dose that we would think would be acceptable for the public at this point? LEE SMITH: JULIE BENTZ: Yes, copy.

Okay. Good afternoon. This

ALEXANDER KOSYAK: 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 23 24 25

is Alexander KosyakfromUSAID, Office of Foreign Disaster Systems. in place There was a comment made about having protocols for dealing with radiation exposure.

Unfortunately, we don't have anything like that on hand. Is there anyone who could send out a very

quick, clean-and-dirty and short policies and procedures of how we should handle the 150 persons that we have in Japan already, and see the best way to protect them? JULIE BENTZ: about the DART members? ALEXANDER KOSYAK: MALE Search and Rescue. CINDY JONES: Can I ask that the Urban Search PARTICIPANT: That's correct. DART including Urban And by 150, are you talking

and Rescue normally, at least in this country, they would be equipped with TLDs or radiation monitors. verify that? ALEXANDER KOSYAK: Yes, I think earlier one Can you

of our colleagues had mentioned that they don't have NEAL R.GROSS
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14 1 2 3 4 5 those with them. TEDMCGUIRE (phonetic): JULIE BENTZ: TEDMCGUIRE: Okay, Julie, TedMcGuire.

Mac (phonetic).

The FEMAtask forces, the guys

that are over there from Cal-2 and Fairfax, they carry standard 50 Canberra UltraRadiacs with them.

7 8 detector, 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

JULIEBENTZ: TED MCGUIRE: yes. JULIE BENTZ: TED MCGUIRE: (indiscernible) type? JULIE BENTZ:

But aRadiac's not a dosimeter. A Radiac is a radiation

Right, but you need

--

But you're just talking about

No,

there's a dosimeter that

-- actually, Cindy, why don't you explain what dosimeter is? CINDY JONES: Okay. A dosimeter is a very

small thing, smaller than the end of an eraser on your pencil, like about two centimeters square, very thin,

that captures any, device,

and records on a thermoluminescent radiation

looks like a small piece of glass,

dosimetry for that person that's wearing it. The entire TLD is only about one inch long byahalf-an-inchthick. lapel. It clipsonjustlikeamicrophone

And that's what we're looking to have these people

that are in areas where they are doing rescue work-related

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15 1 2 activities for emergency response or should be wearing TLDs. Those are

thermoluminescent

dosimeters,

personnel dosimeters. 4
5
-

TED MCGUIRE:

Yes,

I mean,

the badge type

CINDY JONES:

Yes. -- (indiscernible) techwears

7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 correct me if that if a TLD.

TEDMCGUIRE:

CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: TED MCGUIRE:

Yes. Right. Okay. Exactly. I'm with you. But the

USAR task force, FEMA's task forces, the only thing they have is type. JULIE BENTZ: So the UltraRadiacs, and the UltraRadiacs. They don't have the badge

I'm wrong, I'm assuming that's a detector looking at it, right? But it's It will it will tell them

a person is

when to turn around, TED radioactivity, detector itself.

not keeping a -alert them to

MCGUIRE:

but it

also retains a life dose in the

CINDY JONES:

Well,

it

remains to be seen

how long that information will be kept by that detector. It will respond just like a GM detector, and most of you

these are either GM or sodium iodide. NEAL R.GROSS

They'll tell

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16 1 2 how much radiation is in the area, but they can't hold they have

information forever in that detector, even if a memory chip unless it's

sending signals back somewhere.

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

So I think the point that Julie was making earlier regarding making sure that people who are in these situations for emergency response have TLDs, go back to the question that USAID had. people. How many of those people are I

They have 150 involved with

emergency search and rescue?

And if they are, they should

be badged and get dosimetry from nearby people. JULIE BENTZ: So here's the next question

I think that we as a community need to think through and that is, I'm going to assume that the folks on the

searchandrescue teams aren'tpartofadosimetryprogram. There's not any records managers for them on their dose, like we have in the military or NRC or DOE. if that's a correct

And the question is,

assumption, how do we kind of manage them into something like that? Thoughts? MALE PARTICIPANT: I think we want to --

we'll confer with the safety and security officer out there, and share with them this evening. And again,

re-validate what we have in use and have a dialogue with themtoevaluatewhetherwewanttoestablishaTLDprogram. JULIE BENTZ: So if you look at, down into

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17 1 2 3 4 5 some of the questions I sent out in the emails, you know, there's this real tight management of the dose. And

I think what these active monitors give you are the turn-back rates. But then there's also the additional

requirement that there's a long-term management where we follow through with these folks over the long term

7 8

on, you know, how much dose has accumulated per different activity, right? So that the DoD can in fact say, yes you

10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 2 24 25

got 300 millirem today. yesterday.

You know, you got 300 millirem you know, we're going to abeyance for a

At 600 millirems,

take you off the line and hold you in week. Or, you know, if

there's a management stuff at And there

real time that you can do with this information. the question for the search and rescue team, anybody there that does that piece? MALE PARTICIPANT: MALE PARTICIPANT: JULIE BENTZ: and Security Officer. MALE PARTICIPANT: CINDY JONES: or No. Okay. is

Not that I'm aware of. Not that I know of. That's not the Safety

Is there an Incident Commander And is this team

a person in charge of this team?

by any chance within 30 kilometers of the nuclear power plants? Or are these teams primarily in an area outside

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18 1 2 that? JULIE BENTZ: CINDY JONES: 4 5 JULIE BENTZ: But what we could do is, They'll be outside it, Okay. They're part of the DART. Cindy.

you know, we've got, you know,

the DART is where the DOE RAP team is going to be located, 7 8 as is the NRC folks. CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 in here --

Yes. So it's not that we don't have

experts who can assist, as well as we could find some dosimeters and add them to the group. for kind of -to a process. But how is that

that seems to me kind of as a Band-aid And I just want to figure out from the

operator'sperspective, youknow, someideasandthoughts. C.J.:


this is

The other thing I would like to add


C.J.
--

17
18

JULIE BENTZ:
C.J.: -is if

Yes.
anybody on the call has the

19 20 21 22 23 24 25

legal frame of reference that we would need to determine, not only what is prudent from a radiological perspective, but what is government. prudent from a legal perspective for the

I don't know that we have anybody on the But if there is someone,

call that has that expertise. please speak up. CINDY JONES:

This is Cindy Jones from the

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19 1 2 NRC. I'm not a legal person, but I will tell you that

there are requirements under OSHA for personnel doing work that involves exposure to radiation and for being

4 5

monitoring.

If their work and work duties require them they need to be monitored.

to be in a radiation area,

They can be monitored with one person having 7 8 a dose that is reasonable or that is being recorded for, say, two or threepeople if onlyone dosimeter's available. But if their job functions are to go out and to do search 10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 2 I think it's, and rescue into a radiation area, them to have dosimetry. C.J.: Yes, I agree, but the question is OSHA would require

whetherwe're ina case where they're going into a radiation area or not. CINDY JONES: C.J.: Yes. So for the search and rescue, we've already seen that some Well that would be --

JULIE BENTZ: you know,

of the folks that have come back from some of these -well, C.J., answer me this was. Was the helicopter that was contaminated, was that coming back from a search and rescue mission? Or was that -I think it was, wasn't it? rather than me make the

assumption it

24
25

C.J.:

The aircraft they're talking about NEALR. GROSS

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20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 1 20 21 22 2 24 25 trend. JULIE BENTZ: C.J.: Right. I think we sort was a COD, which actually landed on Japan and then came back. have
--

But they flew through.

But some of the helos that

JULIE BENTZ: C.J.:

Right.

-- been on search and rescue missions -Right.

have been contaminated, JULIE BENTZ: C.J.:


--

and that seems to be a continuing

So the Navy piece,

of have that licked. the ground.

I'm worried about the folks on

JULIE BENTZ:

But that's what I'm saying. I think we can probably

And so the search and rescue,

assume that they could be asked to be going into -- well, if it's up by the reactors, obviously, if it's down in that

Okinawa that's going to be different, area we might as well assume it. And the legal piece, it's

but up in

interesting.

was talking with our legal and the question I had was on the, you know, who are haves and have-nots, versus the you know, those And

responders

non-responders.

there's a pretty easy,

clear divide legally on that. we're asking them to

Like Cindy said, if NEAL R. GROSS

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21 1 2 go into, you know, a place that could have a radiation So then the question is, If it's it's a team

field, we're obligated.

not necessary for us to badge everybody. 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

of six and I put a badge on one, I've taken care of that. CINDY JONES: JULIEBENTZ: Exactly. But if we have search and rescue

folks going out and there's no one on there that has a badge, that's probably what we should look into. C.J.: All right, I agree. Is there any

agency that feels like they have the capacity both in the TLD realm, but also with the footprint on the ground to maybe take the lead on getting the AID workers that are not badged and don't have anybody in each little

group with a TLD that could sort of take that role? MALE PARTICIPANT: for interrupting. Hey, Julie, I apologize

Richard and I both have to take off. We'll get

Our team has a briefing with the Secretary. back with you after this call. JULIE BENTZ: Fantastic. Thanks, This is Thanks.

MALE PARTICIPANT: CHRIS LEONARDO:

Julie. Chris Leonardo Team.

again from USAID from the Response Management

We just brought in Hal Cohen, who is our general counsel here. But another point I wanted to raise from NEAL R. GROSS
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22 1 2 ourpoint of view for our teams again, we have 157 personnel currently on the ground. And when you add in the planned

responders who are going to be part of the DART team 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 contractors. ffrom Department of Energy, from HHS and NRC, we're looking at a total of 209 people. USAID offices, From folks who are under the

we have a variety of different hiring so we're not just talking about hires. We have various

mechanisms for folks, U.S. Government

direct

contractors.

Our USAR,

Urban Search and Rescue folks

are under a cooperative agreement. And then we also have personal services

So we also want to make sure that any

distinctions, if there are any distinctions between those different hiring mechanisms. JULIE BENTZ: So my understanding of the we ask anyone to go into

way we work here in America, if

a radiation field their dose rate needs to be monitored. CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: That's correct. That's for anybody. If that's

part of their working duties, it doesn't matter the hiring mechanism. CINDY JONES: DON DAIGLER: that's correct, a little late. That's correct. This is Don Daigler. I think

and I'm sorry for getting on the call I had a problem --

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23

1
2

JULIE BENTZ:
DON DAIGLER:

That's all right.


-back at the -but you're

bringing in some great issues that we hadn't even thought 4 5 about. Once we're done here, I'm going to go downstairs there has been

and talk to our USAR leadership to see if

any thought given to monitoring the does of these folks 7 8 that's over there, and let's think about how we can get

them the appropriate coverage. JOHN HOLLAND: This is John Holland, again,

10 11 12 13 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 2 24 25

with the DART.

I think some key distinctions need to

be made that I believe our DART team and the USAR reps are utilizing their survey instruments and to determine whether our side is clear to operate in or not. And

any kind of exposure levels be occupationally exposed, to that area.

that would deem them to

then they wouldn't go into

Neither would the DART team. Right. So I mean if we start

JULIE BENTZ: JOHN categorizing exposure, warranted. limit is HOLLAND:

the entire team as having occupational

then I would agree that the program would be And I think the occupational rate or exposure one-and-a-quarter rems per quarter on a

whole-body dose. JULIEBENTZ: Sohere's theuniquepart about is that you could put your

what we're up against here,

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24 1 2 search and rescue team in a place close by Fukushima

or Tokai or any of these other places that have these reactors, and they will So it's have no reading on their

4 5 6 7 8

measurements.

safe,

right?

But then the reactors are quite fragile, so if one goes up while they're out searching, it's you've

put them kind of in --

kind of an unexpected dose.

But the reason we're up there is it is a earthquake/tsunami response, but you're in an environment. So that's just

10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 23 24 25

my personal opinion.

That's not White House opinion. What are your thoughts

I don't know how -- maybe Cindy? about that? CINDY JONES:

Well, I think that search and they

rescue teams should have a dosimeter with them if are, say, within 50 kilometers of the plant. it's

And I think

for the reasons that Julie said, in case there is

an accident or a burp of radioactive material or of steam that could be slightly radioactive at this point, that's what we know. But they should not be part of a team It's very easy.

that doesn't have any TLDs with them. It'sveryquick.

They're overnightFedExedfromLandauer

or another manufacturer of TLDs, and they can be easily put in the hands of these people at AID, or wherever

the DART members are. So I think it's very easy to do. It's not

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25 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 comment very expensive. to have at hand. JULIE BENTZ: Folks at USAID, you guys have It's quick, and it's a very good thing

the opportunity also to request from the interagency for some support, don't you? I mean, isn't it, if you

guys go out, OFDA goes out and they need to pull in people to take over, agencies? MALE PARTICIPANT: We have the ability and Again if we have the can you also request equipment from other

resources to establish a program. down log and it's with the RMT,

determined from the DART and new dialogue I think we can move forward with it.

JULIE BENTZ: be thinking about that.

Right.

And perhaps we should I'm

But for the time being,

wondering whether or not, you know, you're going to have --

again like I said,

out of the 209 members on your

DART I know 46 of them are going to be very highly trained nuclear folks who understand TLDs and dose records, and can assist you with that. know, throw some TLDs And whether or not we, that are interoperable it you or

compatible with what those guys have, a little bit easier.

might make it

So that's only kind of a thinking

outside the box. The other thing I want to go back to, Cindy's about, you know, if you're going within 50

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26 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 2 24 25 kilometers of a plant. Obviously if there is any kind you know,

of incident and that changes per Japanese,

discussion or what you're hearing across from the, you know, from this side of the ocean, changes, it might become larger, obviously, you want you know, where that it might become more to take that into

definitive,

consideration. So it's not a absolute, oh, if It's you're going based on,

within 50 kilometers of those plants.

you know, where the exclusion zones or where the zones are being figured out at the moment. CINDY JONES: 20 kilometers, Right. And right now it's And it's

or 12 miles for evacuation.

30 kilometers for sheltering. if

I just used 50 as a --

you're getting that close, and you have a team with that team have a TLD,

you and none of those people in

you need to get one so that you can have a record of dose for that team. C.J.: The other option, and I don't know,

I would be interested in say, is

what the DART folks have to

if we could, sort of self-select into areas for self-select out of those warranted. What until

teams that don't have TLDs,

areas where we would think a TLD is

do you think of that approach, where we manage it such time that we get TLDs to them? NEAL R.GROSS
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27 1 2 3 4 5 doable, JULIE BENTZ: DART? Do you think that's

or does that constrict you in any way? CHRIS LEONARDO: You're talking about making

sure that our teams are not operating within a 50 kilometer radius of a reactor? C.J.: Of the reactors of concern, yes.

7 8 Our team is

CHRIS LEONARDO:

The reactors of concern?

not operating within 50 kilometers of a But they are within that radius not a reactor of concern. assigned to work -Just to let you know, Onagawa what, two days ago? So in

reactor of concern. 10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 it. of Onagawa, which is

terms of where the team is CINDY JONES: was a reactor of concern, C.J.: It

could be already and us not know

CINDY JONES: to interrupt you, Chris.

I'm so sorry.

I didn't mean

CHRIS LEONARDO:

That's okay.

I'm sorry.

I guess mypointbeingthat the team is assignedalocation by the Minister of Foreign Affairs in Japan. been assigned a location. So we've

So I honestly don't know what We have which is led

the feasibility of changing location. established a joint base of operations, by the Chinese,

and then as well as the Brits.

So it's

a Chinese search and rescue team, NEAL R.GROSS


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28 1 2 3 4 5 E 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 17 18 19 20 21 22 2 24 25 that if it of if (indiscernible), as well as our two teams. And I don't We've

really know if we could change that at this point.

got all our equipment and, you know, been assigned that piece of the grid. So it wouldn't be easy. Chris, I would think that this Dave Bowman and kind of an easy probably

JULIE BENTZ:

not be a bad time for us to look at -Cindy, tell me if I'm wrong. right? It's This is

problem to solve,

150 members,

not all of them needing TLDs, just the, you know, there's a portion of that, that can be taken under the wing of

either the NRC or DOE teams heading in that direction. CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: Right. Is that a useful way to think

about this problem right now? CINDY JONES: Yes. It's just a function

that NRC team or a member of the DART team needs the same area as whatever the DART function

to be in is

for that day. JULIE BENTZ: Right, but also I was thinking

DART was able to get some more TLDs and slap can DOE and NRC give

on their USAR folks, you know,


--

them a quick training

CINDY JONES:
JULIE BENTZ:

Absolutely.
-a brief, and then be

responsible to read their TLDs. NEAL R. GROSS


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29 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 CINDY JONES: Absolutely. And what does,

just so everyone is aware, you don't read the TLDs there. They get sent back to the supplier, read, overnight or in get mailed back. JULIEBENTZ: Sothen, Cindy, with that idea, a 48-hour period. and they can be They actually

you've got these TLDs that give you kind of a delayed understanding of dose. And you've got people, you know

-- howdotheydotheir, you know, real timedoseassessment? 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 23 24 25 Bowman. JULIE BENTZ: Yes. CINDY JONES: Well, they'll have someone

that has a meter, either a Radiac or a GM or a Celumidide (phonetic) that will be with them that will measure the ambient radiation air effluence, to know if radiation -then if and they'll be able

they're at low radiation area or what the or no radiation area, for example. And

the radiation area does increase,

those people

will have dosimeters. to know if hour, it's,

But they'll certainly be able so many microSieverts per

you know, is,

or whatever it

so that they can monitor how excuse me,

much their daily intake or exposure rate, should be for that period of time. JULIE BENTZ: DAVE BOWMAN: Okay. Hey, Julie,

this

is

Dave

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30 1 2 DAVE BOWMAN: Okay, so what I heard was that I mean, I'm willing

NRC said they could support this.

to say, and I'm not the decision-maker, 4 5

but our people

have a big job to do over there, and we didn't resource having to provide training on dosimetry counts. I mean, if that's the priority obviously,

7 8

youknow, youguys intheWhiteHousewillmakethedecisions. But not knowing how far away the USAR teams are, could become a big strain on our DOE team. this

So I mean,

10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 23 24 25

if

NRC's willing to do that here,

we certainly would

appreciate that fromthe Department of Energyperspective. JULIE BENTZ: So the only thing I can tell that, the one

you about the White House perspective is

thing that almost got Dennis (phonetic) out of his chair was when PACOM commander said that they were concerned about dosimetry. So I think this is a really big deal. I

don't think anybody here wants to put any of our responders at risk. So I would say it probably is a big deal, and

I know you're not resourced for the mission. NRC's not resourced for the mission.

I know But you

know, common sense, it seems like this is pretty low-level. I mean, you're dealing with really high-speed, low-drag folks to begin with that you just kind of have to say, here, clip this on your lapel. NEAL R. GROSS
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31 1 2 3 4 5 You know, here's the -- you know, Don Daigler, you could probably write out the procedures two seconds that says, you know, in about

when you get back, if

your Radiac meter gives you any kind of information you may have been exposed, hand this to point-of-contact gets back for

x, and then we just have to make sure it 7 8 However, 10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 point,

being read while some more TLDs are handed forward. I don't think this is a high amount of work. I do get your point that everybody's going

over there with an incredible task in MALE PARTICIPANT: Julie,

front of them. on a separate

are there any teams or personnel being staged that we should just account for now

right now to go in

so that we don't get them to tail-chase on any more people? JULIE BENTZ: Yes. So we've got the CCMRF So you

that is being racked and stacked to go forward. know,

there's the 20-person planning team that they're

pulling up, maybe being there and, what, trying to see three, 24, 36 hours? Is that what I heard -Right. this morning? And then

MALE PARTICIPANT: JULIE BENTZ: --

21
22 23 24 25

there are backup of an additional 500-person team that, I don't know if they're going to be back-benched somewhere in the event of something happening. But I think that

we've at least got 20 coming fairly quickly. NEAL R.GROSS


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32 1 2 CINDY JONES: have dosimetry? JULIE BENTZ: 4 5 CINDY JONES: Yes. Is it possible when they leave And those people, Julie, will

or when they go they can bring dosimetry with them, extra dosimetry?

7 8 them,

JULIE BENTZ: given the mission.

Well,

we can certainly give

I think what would be nice, just make

and maybe Don Daigler you can do that, or is 10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 23 24 25 a mission request, right?

Can you guys do that? Don went down to talk

MALE PARTICIPANT: to the USAR folks,

Julie, but I can pass that along. Right, because the USAR folks right? they're working

JULIE BENTZ:

kind of belong out of your pocket, MALE PARTICIPANT:

Well,

under USAID right now, but yes, they're part of theNational Urban Search and Rescue crew. JULIE BENTZ: Right. And it might be that forward just

FEMA just builds out a program, and throws dosimeters in really, it, you know,

and pushes it It's

their direction.

unless you get a manager going with

we're going to have to ask somebody over there to And I know within program managers

kind of take on the management stuff. the military there's always some

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33

1 2

and manage it

with NRC. CINDY JONES: Right. This is Major Matthews at

MAJOR MATTHEWS: 4 5 Joint Staff. JULIE BENTZ:

Hey,

Jimmy.

MAJOR MATTHEWS: 7 8 the military dosimeters handed, I'm not sure if

The military, I don't know, are

IM-93 or whichever ones

they meet the same requirements

for civilians, because unlike a civilian nuclear worker 10 11 12 13


14

that you get registered in the system, you get read every month and all, the military does not register each soldier
in the same way --

JULIE BENTZ:

Right.
-unless they're in a

MAJOR MATTHEWS:

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

radiation dosimeters at the, if

type

job

normally.

It's

just

that

the

(indiscernible) to the people that are read and I'm not sure

really at the company level,

that's going to cut it

for a civilian dosimetry as

far as your OSHA standards fall. JULIE BENTZ: Correct. So we're not

actually asking for the dosimeters from DoD,

but more

along just a person who understands the requirements for, you know, the management of the stuff and just sending it is back. Like I said, it looks like DOE Japan. NRC

going to be doing it

while they're in

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34 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 as well. USAID, is going to be doing it while they're in Japan. FEMA can get the dosimeters and they, of a process, and push it forward. out where the, you know, it Probably kind

you know,

We just have to figure Is

kind of where the gap is.

going to be in somebody there understanding what to

do with the dosimeters. CHRIS LEONARDO: again. JULIE BENTZ: Yes. I think because the USAR This is Chris Leonardo from

CHRIS LEONARDO:

teams are deployed under out cooperative agreement that it would fall to -- we would be responsible for developing this, not FEMA because they're not under a FEMA assignment right now. JULIE BENTZ: Fair enough. Fair enough.

You're more than welcome to develop the procedures for this deployment. I was just thinking, as Don said before

he shot downstairs, that FEMA should develop this across the USARprogram so that, you know, when people are deployed like this, there's already a process in place like you get with DOE and NRC and DoD. HAL COHEN: Yes, this is Hal Cohen with USAID as we described,

Perhaps what we could do is

our DART will consist of, in addition to our own personnel, the USAR teams, the 32, 39 member DOE team as well as

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35 1 2 3 4 5 the 11 NRC folks. Why don't we reach back to the operational side to understand exactly what they have and what they'll be bringing and what they understand would be required beyond what they have? And based on that, we'll also

this evening be speaking with our DART in the field that 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 19 20 21 22 2 24 25 include the Safety and Security officer who is from FOH to get input, as well. And with that, I think we'll if anything,

have a much better understanding of what, beyond that is

required at least with respect to the

folks we have deployed. JULIE BENTZ: Brilliant. So really what

I think I would be very, very interested in having come out of this teleconference is exactly as you said. or whatever you call it is two things. One, Hal,

The USAID's program, or protocols for how you're going to manage

the dose information from the responders that are coming in. I think that's the first one. The second

one is stone.

the DoD plan, and you guys already have that in So you just have to lead me to the right DoD

directive, or whatever it is that shows the process that you guys use. I'm not so much concerned about DoD, only

because I came out of that community.


C.J.: Well, there is -Julie, we have

the plan to get the Navy folks that are getting on the NEAL R.GROSS
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36 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 aircraft in and out, but I was hoping that now that we have Major Matthews, maybe we could get back to those
--

questions that we started with JULIE BENTZ: C.J.: the Navy guys. JULIE BENTZ: CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: identified that we've got, Right. -Okay.

for the other folks outside of

So

--

Julie? -- the question is that we've you know, C.J., 209 DART. is it We've

identified the Navy response. or is it non-military? C.J.: It's

non-Navy,

non-Navy, Okay.

right?

JULIE BENTZ: C.J.:

The other folks that are there that and rescue, if DoD sees a

might be used for search

requirement or has plan to put dosimetry on the other folks. JULIE BENTZ: Got it. So I do know that will have

those that are coming forward from the U.S. dosimetry.

So the CCMRF has dosimetry, but if they call

other military from around the region of the, like the U.S. Forces Japan -C.J.: That's right.

23
24 25

JULIE BENTZ: -- whether they have dosimetry. NEAL R.GROSS


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37 1 2 C.J.: Or if it's required. I mean, DoD

might make the determination that based on where they are and where they're going to use them
--

4 5 Matthews, 7 8 9 10 11 12
1

JULIE BENTZ:
C.J.: -it's

Right.
not required. But Major

you have anything on that? MAJOR MATTHEWS: No decision's been made. or ground forces, should

All deployable Army Forces,

have dosimetry in their CMPCO unless there's some, like, agency type that pulled out, you should have some sort of dosimetry or a way to get to get to it.
CINDY JONES: the Cindy from the NRC, If I could just add -this

again --

14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22
2

AUTOMATED ANNOUNCEMENT:

Your conference

has been extended an additional 25 minutes. JULIE BENTZ: CINDY JONES: Hello? Go ahead. KI should be case the

That's okay.

also made available or at least have on hand in it's needed. That was raised this morning on

conference call with federal agencies, TLDs in case it deployed in is

in addition to

needed to be used by people who are

that area.
JULIE BENTZ: Okay. So again --

24 25

LEE SMITH: JULIE BENTZ:

Julie? Go ahead.

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38 1
2

LEE SMITH:

This is

Lee Smith.

If

I could

3
4

JULIE BENTZ:
LEE SMITH: --

Yes.
sit in for a second.

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 2 24 25 taking KI,

JULIE BENTZ: LEE SMITH:

Yes. Cindy, can you provide

perspective on how you would expect these field teams to know when they should take their KI? CINDY JONES: Well, as is happening now,

we have protective measures out to 20 and 30 kilometers, 20 to evacuate and 30 to shelter. were to get measurably higher, If the radiation doses there would be also an I think

indication that children should be taking KI.

the Japanese government has indicated that children are receiving KI right now. be a much higher dose. as well. As faras adults, itwould

But there is guidelines for that, It's 5 rem for for

And that would be 5 and 25. and 25 rem doses for

evacuation,

thyroid

administration of iodide.
JULIE BENTZ: And --

CINDY JONES:

So it's

quite high, but it's

just a precaution to have it JULIE BENTZ:

available~if need be.

Cindy, is everybody in Japan

or just those within a certain distance of

the reactors? NEAL R.GROSS


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39 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 2 24 25 in on how, distance, CINDY JONES: Just those within a certain only for children. But

and right now it's

the people that have come out from DOE, and I know that all the people from NRC, in addition to TLDs have a supply of potassium iodide for themselves. LEE SMITH: for example, So do you have any perspective

the DART teams would understand

whether or not they are encountering a boom that would require them to take KI? going to assess the In other words, thresholds for how are they taking KI

(indiscernible)? CINDYJONES: Well, this goes backto Julie's

original comment about having a protocol in place for managing the does information for individuals. see that people are receiving in If you

excess of a certain

level, for example, we heard earlier that the Navy control level was 300 millirem for a day, and then beyond that they would evaluate it. That incident commander or health physicist charge of those personnel dosimeter would provide and it would be

that information to the individuals,

certainly announcedwidespread as an emergency news-radio media, so forth, that it's advisable to take KI because for example.

the doses are in excess of x rem, So that's why it's

very important to have

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40 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Reactors. JULIE: Okay. So Naval Reactors. Within now? LEE SMITH: This is Lee Smith at Naval responders -CINDY JONES: Oh, I'm sorry, you're telling a person that's in charge of the dosimetry and of the potential health effects met when that person would give the team the KI. LEE SMITH: Understand. And for complete

protection, the folks that we have that will be approaching within 100 miles will also be taking KI. CINDY JONES: They do not need to take KI important. Nobody's

at this point, not even with-- it's required to take KI right now if LEE SMITH: Okay.

you're an adult.

The guidance that we're

giving to our responders 100 miles. CINDY JONES:

that are approaching within

Yes.

There's

not

requirement to do that. LEE SMITH: We are issuing guidance for our

me that's what you're doing? LEE SMITH: JULIE BENTZ: Yes. Yes.

And who is this speaking right

a hundred miles you have take KI for all your Navy folks. NEAL R. GROSS
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41 1 2 LEE SMITH: Right, and that goes

hand-in-hand with exposure monitoring

for the people So the

being maintained at less than 300 millirems. 4 5

TLDs and the Radiacs employed in the region, only monitors can report the whole-body gamma field that they're in, that doesn't give you a complete picture as to the

7 8

radioiodine exposure that they're going to receive. JULIE BENTZ: LEE SMITH: Right. So an important component is

10 11 12 1

takingKI in order toprevent the thyroiddose frombecoming a limiting dose for these people. have, you know -it's And since they don't

impossible to deploy monitors

on the flight crews with them that could assess that we're issuing KI before -JULIE BENTZ: LEE SMITH: miles. JULIE BENTZ: is a one-time dose? And am I right in saying KI's -Sure. they're going within 100

14
15 1 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25

I mean, you just take it once, right? Yes. per day. One pill per

CINDY JONES: LEE SMITH: day. JULIE BENTZ:

One pill

Okay.

So the last thing I

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42 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 bioassay. say? DAVE BOWMAN: I was asking how you define Is it is, it's whole issue of bioassay. Cindy, is there any assets

there that could do a bioassay if

needed?

Forthoseofyouwhodon't knowwhatabioassay after you've been exposed to a, you know, to

a significant dose there is a -- they take a urine sample for analysis for a dose rate, or a whole-body dose. And I don't -- please speak up loud and vociferously if you

don't believe we need totalkabout this in this situation. Cindy or Dave? CINDY JONES: prepared for that. Well, I think you need to be but

We're not at that stage yet,

there should be an ability to that. (Crosstalk) JULIE BENTZ: Okay, okay. I've got a lot Maybe I

of people talking on this phone, can help us out if what is it? Is it

right now.

those folks who are not -- maybe use, Pound 6 that puts you on mute or I Star 6 will get you back. what is it that you wanted to

think it's

Pound 6.

But Dave Bowman,

Let me ask a more specific question.

just collecting the samples, or are you asking if someone could do an analysis as well? JULIE BENTZ: No. Just collect the samples

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43

1 2 3 4 5

and send it

back. DAVE BOWMAN: JULIE BENTZ: Okay. And FEMA, Don, were you trying

to say something? DON DAIGLER: No, I was just going to say

that the DOE's out there and they might have that capacity. 7 8 Dave's the right guy to answer that question. JULIE BENTZ: CINDY JONES: 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 with, Julie, is CDC is, Okay. And the other thing to check is the agency So

in this country,

required for population monitoring after an event.

they may have a stockpile or a facility that can send a lot samples to an area, a lot of specimen containers to be collected and then sent back. at CDC is that point of contact. JULIE BENTZ: Right, and I had Nicky Dr. Charles Miller

(phonetic) Lurie tellme that, you know, there isabioassay piece to this. the phone, see just, And unfortunately, HHS had to jump off

but we'll pick that back up with them and again, have it in the back of our minds. you know,

Hopefully we will not have to use that but,

better for us to have the discussion today than in the after impact where everybody's yelling at us where are bioassays capability is. WARREN STERN: Hi, Julie. It's Warren.

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44 1 2 There are actually two things. There's cytogenetic

biodosimetry and then there's a bioassay urine as you're suggesting, to find out if someone's been contaminated.

4 5

And I think we actually ought to start thinking about both, andwhat are the networks that exist and capabilities that exist for, again, both cytogenetic biodosimetry,

7 8

which is,

I believe, a blood sample and measures damage And then

to chromosomes directly and indirectly dosed. there's the bioassay, which is, materials, again, what if is

you consume your body's

1 11 12 1 14 15 1 17 18 1 20 21 22 2 24 25

somehow

radioactive

examination like? CINDY JONES: for doses above 10 rad. Cytogenetic is typically used That would be 10,000 millirad, Bioassay is done for routine

which we're not there yet.

determination of inhalation or ingestion event. JULIEBENTZ: Okay. So what would be useful

is for some group of folks, or maybe one or two individuals to start with some protocols that look at, who gets dosimetry? you know, I

Who should be using dosimetry?

think we've already defined that, you know, any responder that goes into the area of concern should have some, there should be some method that we can record the dose. It doesn't have to be on the person, but if he's in grab one

a group or she's in a group, we can, you know, and average it out.

But I think that's probably what NEAL R.GROSS

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45 1 2 3 4 5 in for I'm hearing folks say. We should look at when is potassium iodide, you know, it that you put about

thoughts

bioassays and then thoughts about a dosimetry manager, just for this specific. And really, the person that

probably needs to start this is going to be, Chris, it's 7 8 going to be you guys with your USAID hat to figure out how you guys want to do that. I will tell 10 11 12 1 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 you know, fleshing it a little you, we've got some absolute

brains on this phone call who can assist with that, Dave Bowman, Cindy Jones, Don Daigler. I'm going to ask the

DoD folks to do something similar for them to send to me, just so that I can clarify to the upper management

here how the U.S. Government is taking care of our folks that we're pushing out there. And it doesn't have to be anything elaborate, a couple bullet points for us. But then a

out so that your operations over there have

bit better understanding of the requirements.

Does that make sense? CINDY JONES: Yes. Yes. This is Chris. It

CHRIS LEONARDO: makes sense, and it's We have some,

something we've been thinking about. place,

obviously we have protocols in

already for the USAR teams.

But again, we're going to

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46 1 2 get together with our, we have colleagues here from NRC, DOE and HHS who are working with us on the Response Management Team, 4 5 it and we'll put something together. Thatwouldbegreat. Andwould even

JULIEBENTZ: possible, you guys,

to just send me something,

if it's 7 8 Julie. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 that? Kozal.

really draft and just a 60 percent solution sometime Is that doable? Yes, we can send you something,

before 6:00 p.m.?

CINDY JONES:

JULIE BENTZ: JASON KOZAL: I take it

Okay. Hey, Cindy Jones, this is Jason

you're available to consult on this? I'm sorry? Can you repeat

CINDY JONES:

JASON KOZAL:

I say,

this is

Jason Kozal.

I'm down here with the USAID folks. CINDY JONES: JASON KOZAL: on this? CINDY JONES: Yes, I'm going to have the Yes. You're available to consult

PMT put up a couple bullets on that. JASON KOZAL: CINDY JONES: C.J.: Very good.. Thank you. And we'll send it to Julie.

And will the Joint Staff be sending

in the consolidated input for -- the Naval Reactors talk NEALR. GROSS
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47 1 2 3 4
5

quite a bit on the phone call.

Are you guys sending

in everything for both the air assets off the ships in the Navy and the forces that are already deployed there, that are stationed there,
JULIE BENTZ:

I should say?
Jimmy, can you --

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 as we speak. I'll

MAJOR MATTHEWS:

We'll get in

touch with

you on that in detail to get you guys what you're after. C.J.: Okay. That wouldbe great. So Jimmy, to

JULIEBENTZ:

just expect something from JCS, You'll pull it MAJOR MATTHEWS: JULIE BENTZ: CINDY JONES:

Joint Staff,

come my way?

all together? Roger. awesome, awesome.

Awesome, Hey,

Julie.

You can help us

out on a little

different thing. We're still

I have to leave in

about five minutes.

urgently needing those We have

Qs and As that were mentioned this morning. a lot of calls in

from the public on who's notifying Do you know when

people on the West Coast about doses.

those can be shaken loose and given to our Public Affairs and us? JULIE BENTZ: We're shaking them loose even

I've been seeing a lot of that stuff going So also, Cindy, you

across my email back-and-forth.

guys have developed quite a few Qs and As yourselves

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48 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 1 20 21 22 2
--

that I'm hoping that you put on your website. CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: guys probably gave us, I will check that.

Have you?

Check on that, because you if not the bulk you

you know,

gave us quite a bit of what we're passing around. CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: from the above, out yesterday. CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: Yes. Good. All right, 6:00 p.m. as well, Right. Yes. We're being pushed up

so we're hoping to get that

did I say 6:00 p.m. tonight? CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: To you, Okay, yes. to me. If anybody

doesn't know how to get ahold of folks on this phone call, first off I don't think I have all of your email I do have your Ops Centers if that's helpful, just send me a quick email, jbentz,

addresses. but

otherwise

j-b-e-n-t-z at nss dot eop dot gov. me a quick email just saying, hey, call,

If you want to send I was on the phone but I have no Unless, Chris,

and I offered to do such-and-so,

way to get in contact with Chris Leonardo. you want to give us your phone number. CHRIS LEONARDO:

24
25

Phone number is 20 -- it's 202-712-0039.

the Response Management Team number, NEAL R. GROSS

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49 CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: Okay, Okay. I got to run, Thanks Cindy. Julie. You'll

know how to get ahold of Chris. CINDY JONES: JULIE BENTZ: Thank you. Okay, bye. Yes. Bye.

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