World Missile Chart - Countries Possessing Ballistic Missiles

http://www.carnegieendowment.org/npp/resources/ballisticmissilechart.htm

This table represents the Carnegie Non-Proliferation Project’s best assessment of the world's ballistic missile arsenals. The Project counts 35 nations as fielding some type of ballistic missile. Missiles reported to be in development are listed in italics. Endnotes and a key are provided below. 1

COUNTRY SYSTEM NAME STATUS RANGE (KM) PAYLOAD (KG) ORIGIN NOTES

USSR Afghanistan Scud-B O 300 1,000 Domestic Argentina Alacran O 150 400 Russia Armenia 2 Scud-B O 300 1,000 USSR Azerbaijan Scud-B O 300 1,000 USA Bahrain MGM-140 (ATACMS) P 165 560

Operational status questionable.

USSR Belarus SS-21 O 120 480 USSR Scud-B O 300 1,000 USSR Bulgaria 3 Scud-B O 300 1,000 USSR SS-23 China CSS-8 O O 500 230 450 I
Prohibited by INF Treaty.

4

Two stage, first solid, second liquid. Road-mobile. Solid fuelled. Road-mobile.

CSS-X-7

O

300

500

I

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CSS-6

O

600

500

I

Solid fuelled. Road-mobile.

For China's other ballistic missiles, visit China's Nuclear Numbers. Iran Congo Scud-B O? 300 1,000
According to press reports.

5

USSR/DPRK Egypt Scud-B O/U 300 1,000 I/DPRK Project T O 450 1,000 DPRK Scud-C O 500 600 I/DPRK Vector D 685 ?
Initial project (with Argentina, Iraq) by this name terminated. Some work continues with North Korea? Improved Scud.

France

For France's ballistic missiles, visit France's Nuclear Numbers. USSR

Georgia

Scud-B

O

300

1,000 USA

Greece

MGM-140 (ATACMS)

O

165

560

I/USSR India Prithvi-150 O 150 1,000

From Russian SA-2. Army missile. Tested on March 26, 2003 on the same day as Pakistan tested Abdali missile system. 29 Last tested on April 29, 2003 from a site in eastern Orissa state. A defense ministry spokesman deemed it successful. This version of the missile has "the latest on-board computer and navigation system and can use both solid and liquid propellant." 31

I/USSR Prithvi-250 O 250 500

From Russian SA-2. Air Force missile.

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I Dhanush D/O? 250 500

From Prithvi. Last tested September 2001. India says it will soon be "operationalized" 6

Bramhos

D?

300?

225?

I/Russia

Launched from either ships or aircraft. From Prithvi.

I Sagarika
7

D?

250-350?

500? I/USSR
From Russian SA-2.

Prithvi-350

D

350

500 I/US/France

Agni-I

T

600-750

1,000

From Scout; tested 18 February 1994. Tested on January 25 2002. Last tested on January 9, 2003. To be fired from road-based or rail-based mobile launchers. 27

I/US/France Agni-II O/P 2,000/2,500 1,000

Last tested January 2001; India says missile limited production has begun 8

Agni-III

D

3,000

?

I I
From Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle and Agni-2.

Surya

9

D?

3250+?

?

back to top COUNTRY SYSTEM NAME Iran
10

STATUS

RANGE (KM)

PAYLOAD (KG)

ORIGIN

NOTES

Modified SA-2.

M-7 (CSS-8)

O

150

190

PRC

Scud-B

O/U

300

1,000

N.Korea/Domestic production

Scud-C

O

500

600 -700

DPRK
From Nodong. U.S. intelligence says Iran has a

Shahab III

T /D?

1,300

800-1000?

I/DPRK/Russia

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"small number ... available for use in a conflict." Tested in May 2002. 24 Failed test in July 2002. 25 Successfully tested in July 2003. This test was the first of eight tests to successfully achieve the range of 1300km. Israeli intelligence indicated that the missile was powered by a North Korean liquid-fuel engine. 32

Shahab IV

D

2,000

?

I/Russia

From Russian SS-4?

Shahab V 11

D?

3,000-5,500?

?

I/Russia
Liquid-fuel missile. From Scud B. 12 Solid-fuel missile from Scud B.

Iraq

Al Samoud Ababil-100

D

150

200

I

D

150

200

I

From Scud B.

Al Hussein

Hidden?

650

500

I

Israel

Lance

O/S

130

450

US
Road-mobile.

Jericho I

O

500

1,000

France
Road-mobile.

Jericho II

O

1,500

1,000

France/I

Jericho III Scud-B Kazakhstan Tochka-U (modified SS-21)

D O

2,500 300

1,000? 1,000

I USSR

O

120

480

USSR

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Libya

Scud-B

O/U

300

1,000

USSR

Operational status questionable.

Al Fatah

13

D/T

950?

500

I/?

North Korea

Scud-B

O/P

300

1,000

USSR

Scud-C Variant

O/P

500

600-700

I
Single-stage, liquid fuel missile. Tested May 1993. Combined Nodong and Scud; tested 31 14 August 1998.

Nodong

D/T

1,300

700-1,000

I

Taepodong I

T

1,500-2,000

1,000

I

Taepodong II

D

3,500-5,500

1,000

I

Pakistan

Hatf I

O

80

500

I
First test-fired in 2002. Last tested on March 26, 2002 on the same day as India's Prithvi test. 30 2001 NIE lists the Hatf III to be an M-11. May 2002 test revealed a 280 km range. Tested on October 3, 2003. M-9 derivative? Tested April 1999. Solid fuel missile. Pakistan announced "serial production" of missile October 2000. Tested again in October 2002. 23 Tested on October 7 2003.

Hatf II/Abdali

15

O

180

500

I/PRC?

Hatf III /Ghaznavi/M-11

O

290

500

I/PRC

Shaheen I

P/O

700/750

500

I/PRC?

,

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Ghauri I/Hatf V/Nodong

O

1,300

500-750

I/DPRK

2001 NIE lists the Ghauri to be a Nodong; tested 6 April 1998. 16 Last tested May 2002 January 8, 2003 Handed over to Pakistan's army from research facility. 28 From Nodong; tested April 1999.

Ghauri II

D/T

2,000?

700

I/DPRK

Shaheen II

17

D/P

2,000/2,500

1,000?

I/DPRK?

Road mobile, two-stage weapon displayed in March 2000 parade. Engines tested 23 July 1999 and 29 September 1999. 18

Ghauri III

D/T

2,700-3,500

?

I/DPRK

back to top COUNTRY SYSTEM NAME Russia Scud B (SS-1c Mod 1) SS-21 SS-X-26 Iskander-E STATUS RANGE (KM) 300 PAYLOAD (KG) 1,000 ORIGIN NOTES

O

I

Liquid fuel.

O O O

100-120 300 275

I I I

Solid fuel.

Solid fuel.

For export. Solid fuel.

For Russia's nuclear-capable ballistic missiles, visit Russia's Nuclear Numbers. Saudi Arabia Dong Feng-3 (CSS-2) Slovakia SS-21 Scud B O 2,600 2,150 PRC
Purchased from China in 1987.

O O

100-120 300

480 1,000

USSR USSR
Modified SAM.

South Korea

Nike-Hercules-1

O

180

300

US/I

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Nike-Hercules-2

D

250

500

US/I

Modified SAM; Tested at reduced range. Currently fields Block I. Contract for Block IA sale approved, will receive full shipment in 2004. This yet unnamed missile was tested on November 22, 2001. 19 Transferred 1983.

MGM-140 (ATACMS)

165/300 O

560

US

?

D/T

300

500

I

Syria

SS-21

O

120

480

USSR

Scud-B

O

300

1,000

USSR
Tested September 2000. Syria prepared to begin production of a new extended version of the Scud-C. With the assembly line for the weapon complete, Syria is expected to be capable of producing 30 missiles annually. 26 Tested September 2000.

Scud-C

20

O

500

600

DPRK IRAN

Scud-D 21

T 600-700 ? DPRK

From Lance.

Taiwan

Ching Feng

O

130

270

I/Israel?
Modified SAM.

Tien Chi

22

D

300

500

I

Turkey

MGM-140 (ATACMS)

O

165

560

USA

Turkmenistan

Scud-B

O

300

1,000

USSR

Ukraine

SS-21

O

120

480

USSR

Scud-B United Arab Emirates

O O

300 300

1,000 1,000

USSR Russia?

Scud-B

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United Kingdom United States

For the United Kingdom's ballistic missiles, visit United Kingdom Nuclear Numbers.

MGM-140 (ATACMS)

O

165

560

I

For the United States' nuclear-capable ballistic missiles, see United States Nuclear Numbers.

Vietnam

Scud-B

O

300

1,000
Transferred 1988.

Yemen

SS-21 Scud-B

O O/U

100-120

480 1,000

USSR USSR
Transferred to South Yemen in 1979.

300

DPRK Scud (unknown)

12-15 Scuds intercepted by Spanish Military in the Arabian Sea en route to Yemen from North Korea

back to top
KEY: Status

D: in Development

O: Operational

P: in Production

S: in Storage

T: Tested

U: Used

RANGE

SRBM

Short-range ballistic missile (<1,000 km)

MRBM

Medium-range ballistic missile (1,000-3,000 km)

IRBM

Intermediate-range ballistic missile (3,000-5,500 km)

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Origin

I: Indigenous

Notes

INF Treaty: Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty

SAM: Surface-to-air missile

News: Agni, Prithvi Will be Inducted Soon - Two variants of the Agni group of ballistic missiles and the IAF and Navy versions of the tactical Prithvi missile are in the process of being inducted into the armed forces, according to Defense Secretary George Fernandes. While the Pakistan-specific, 700 to 800-km range Agni-I and 2,000-km-plus Agni II are now being inducted, officials say India also plans to test-fire the Chinaspecific, 3,000-km-plus Agni-III by year end. Additionally, Fernandes said that India had undertaken 20 test flights of seven types of missiles from January 1 to June 30 of this year. The Times of India, 31 July 2003 . Endnotes
1. Principle sources for this table include: National Air Intelligence Center, Ballistic and Cruise Missile Threat (National Air Intelligence Center, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, September 2000); International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS), "Ballistic and Cruise Missiles," The Military Balance 1999-2000 (London: Oxford University Press, 1999), pp. 309-11; National Intelligence Council, Foreign Missile Developments and the Ballistic Missile Threat to the United States Through 2015, Unclassified National Intelligence Estimate, September 1999; US Department of Defense (DOD), Proliferation: Threat and Response (Washington, DC: GPO, November 1997); Center for Defense and International Security Studies, "Ballistic Missile Capabilities by Country,"; and Tracking Nuclear Proliferation: A Guide in Maps and Charts, 1998 (Washington, DC: Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, 1998). Information of China's missile capabilities also draws on the 1999 Report of the Select Committee on U.S. National Security and Military/Commercial Concerns with the People's Republic of China (also known as the "Cox report").

2. Russia is thought to have shipped 8 Scud launchers and 24 missiles to Armenia between 1992 and 1995. See Nikolai Novichkov, "Russia Details Illegal Deliveries to Armenia," Jane's Defence Weekly, 16 April 1997, p. 15.

3. Bulgaria and the United States have signed an agreement in May 2002 which commits Bulgaria to destroy its short- and medium-range missile stockpiles. The destruction of Soviet-designed SS-23, Scud, and FROGs will be financed through the U.S. Department of State. "Bulgaria Agrees to U.S. Request to Destroy Missiles" AFP, 31 May 2002.

4. IISS lists 8 SS-23 launchers in Bulgaria, despite prohibition of SS-23 missiles by the INF Treaty.

5. Iran reportedly delivered Scud-B and Scud-C missiles to the Democratic Republic of Congo in November 1999. See "DRC Receives Iranian 'Scud' Missiles," Jane's Defence Weekly, 1 December 1999, p. 5; and Bill Gertz, "Tehran Sold Scud Missiles to Congolese," Washington Times, 22 November 1999.

6. The Dhanush is the naval version of the Prithvi series."Dhanush Missile Test-Fired" Times of India, September 21, 2001

7. The Indian government first acknowledged the existence of the Sagarika in October 1998, identifying it as a 250-350 kilometer sea-launched cruise missile derived from the Prithvi. Other sources maintained that the Sagarika program also contained a ballistic missile division. The intended range and role of the Dhanush, however, suggest that it may in fact be the new name for the Sagarika ballistic missile program. See Rahul Bedi, "India Confirms Plans for Improved Agni and Naval Cruise Missile," Jane's Missiles and Rockets, October 1998; "In Search of the Real Sagarika," Jane's Intelligence Review, July 1998; and T.S. Gopi Rethinaraj, "Navalised Prithvi Causes Confusion," Jane's Intelligence Review, January 1999.

8. The Agni-2 test missile traveled over 1,250 kilometers in an April 1999 test. It was successfully tested (apparently in its final configuration) a second time on 17 January 2001, reportedly to a length of approximately 2,000 kilometers following its firing from a mobile launcher. It is a road-mobile, two-stage missile with a "solid propulsion booster and liquid propulsion upper state" ("Agni-II Testfired in Final Configuration," Times of India, 17 January 2001). In a March 7, 2000 letter to

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Parliament Defense Minister George Fernandes wrote that the Agni-2 had "achieved operationalization stage ... The government has decided to induct the missile system based on security needs" ("Indian Missile Set For Production," International Herald Tribune, 8 March 2001). On May 31, 2001, The Times of India reported that the government approved the induction of the Agni-2 in 2001-2002 and the development of a longer range missile. In June of 2001, India announced it had begun limited production of the Agni II and that it would be under the control of the Army ( Rahul Bedi, "Indian Army Will Control Agni II" Jane's Defence Weekly" August 22, 2001, p. 15).

9. Estimates of the range of this new missile vary widely. The National Air Intelligence Center projects a range of 3250 kilometers, Indian scientists have claimed the range will exceed 5000 kilometers, and some Western analysts estimate 8,000-12,000 kilometers. See Vivek Raghunvanishi, "India to Develop Extensive Nuclear Missile Arsenal," Defense News, 24 May 1999; Institute for Foreign Policy Analysis, Exploring U.S. Missile Defense Requirements in 2010: What Are the Policy and Technology Challenges?, April 1997,; and David Tanks, "Ballistic Missiles in South Asia: Are ICBMs a Future Possibility?" Commission to Assess the Ballistic Missile Threat to the United States, Appendix III: Unclassified Working Papers.

10. The DOD reported that Iran also produces a 200-km "Zelzal" missile and a 150-km "Nazeat" missile, which may be variations of its "Mushak" series. Iran has also tried to acquire a complete North Korean Nodong system and the Chinese M-9 and M-11 missiles.

11. Estimates of the range of this new IRBM are only speculative, drawing upon remarks by the Iranian Defense Minister, who identified the missile as the "Shahab-5". Kenneth Timmerman also suggested that Iran might be developing an IRBM (which he called the "Kosar") on July 13, 1999 during hearings on the Iran Nonproliferation Act of 1999. See Hearings of the Subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics, US House Committee on Science, ; and Bill Gertz, "Tehran Increases Range on Missiles," Washington Times, 22 September 1999.

12. One intelligence report called the Al Samoud a "scaled down Scud." See "Iraq's Weapons of Mass Destruction Programs," US Government White Paper No. 3050, released February 17, 1998. While this missile has a range of about 150km (the maximum range allowed for Iraqi missiles by UN Security Council resolutions), there are concerns that Iraq continues to devote resources to the Ababil and Al Samoud programs with the intention of quickly transferring these resources back to missiles with longer ranges following the end of sanctions. These concerns are reiterated in the DoD's January 2001 "Proliferation: Threat and Response": "the Al-Samoud is essentially a scaled-down SCUD ... We believe that the Al Samoud missile ... has an inherent potential to exceed the 150-km range restriction imposed under UNSCR 687." The report also registers similar concerns about the Ababil-100. The 2001 NIE noted that a December 2000 parade showcased the Al Samoud on new trasnporter-erector-launchers, and that it will, "be deployed soon."

13. Though intended to have a range of 950 kilometers, the Al Fatah has been successfully tested to only 200 kilometers. See Department of Defense Proliferation: Threat and Response 2001, p. 47-48. The CIA's Unclassified Report to Congress on the Acquisition of Technology Relating to Weapons of Mass Destruction and Advanced Conventional Munitions, 1 January Through 30 June 2000 notes that "Libya's current capability remains limited to its aging Scud B missiles, but with continued foreign assistance it may achieve an MRBM capability-a long-desired goal." There are unconfirmed reports that Libya has attepmted to purchase longer range missiles from North Korea (Scud-C and Nodong models have been mentioned).

14. The missile impacted 1,320 kilometers from the launch point. It attempted and failed to put a small satellite into orbit, demonstrating some progress in staging technology.

15. The Hatf-2 was once thought to be a variant of the M-11 missiles transferred by China. The most recent test of this missile in May of 2002 revealed it to have a significantly shorter range than the M-11. An alternative view supplyed by one analysis suggests that Pakistan developed the Hatf-2 based on French sounding rocket engines that it obtained. See S. Chandrashekar, "An Assessment of Pakistan's Missile Capability," Jane's Strategic Weapon Systems, March 1990, p. 4.

16. Pakistan claimed that the missile impacted 1,100 kilometers from its launch point. The Ghauri (liquid fuel) and Shaheen (solid fuel) projects are run by different laboratories.

17. See Atul Aneja, "Pakistan Begins Work on Shaheen-II," The Hindu, 27 September 1999. Proliferation: Threat and Response 2000 notes that Pakistani officials have mentioned the Shaheen-II and Ghaznavi, but does not comment on the projects themselves.

18. See "Pakistan Tests Ghauri 3 Engine; Says New Shaheen Missile in Development," Current Missile News, Center for Defense and International Security Studies, 9 July 1999 ; "Pakistan Tests Ghauri III Engine," Jane's Defence Weekly, 13 October 1999, p. 6.

19. See "South Korea Launches Missile in Its First Test Since Last Year" New York Times, November 22, 2001.

20. The Jerusalem Post reported development of an advanced Syrian modification of the Scud-C (possibly the Scud-D tested September 2000?), but this report has not been confirmed by Western sources. See Arieh O'Sullivan, "Syrian Super Scud Ready Soon-Source," Jerusalem Post, 16 September 1999.

21. There is some debate regarding the origins of the 700 km Scud-D that Syria tested in September 2000. The term Scud-D generally refers to extended range Scuds developed and exported by North Korea. According to U.S. and Israeli officials, the Syrian Scud-D is not a North Korean missile, but rather an extended-range Scud-C that Syria developed indigenously. This missile uses a motor similar to the Scud-C but has a larger fuselage that allows it to carry more fuel. Syria now may have serial production capability of this missile. See "Syria Preparing to Build Extended-Range 'Scud'" Jane's Defence Weekly, 19 June 2002.

22. This program was reportedly initiated in autumn 1995 and is based on the Sky Bow II SAM.

23. See "India Follows Pakistan In Test-Firing Missile." Washington Post, 5 October 2002, p.13

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24. See "Iran: Tehran Confirms Successful Shahab-3 Test." Global Security Newswire, 28 May 2002. Iranian Defense Minister, Ali Shamkhani, indicated that the test did not signify the start of production or any increase in the missile's present range, 800-miles. He also suggested that Iran has no plans of developing a Shahab-4 or Shahab-5.

25. See: "Shahab-3/Zelzal-3" GlobalSecurity.org. This failed test is thought to be the fourth or fifth flight test of the Shahab-3 missile, which was to be ready for deployment by the end of 2002.

26. See: "Syria Preparing to Build Extended-Range 'Scud.'" Jane's Defence Weekly. By Steve Rodan. June 19, 2002.

27. See "India Successfully Test-Fires Agni-I Missile," Times of India Online. By Rajat Pandit. January 9, 2003

28. See "Pakistan Blasts Indian Missile Test." CNN News Online. January 9, 2003

29. See "India, Pakistan Trade Tit-for-Tat Missile Tests." Arms Control Today. By Rose Gordon. April 2003

30. See "India, Pakistan Test-Fire Missiles." PakTribune. March 27, 2003

31. See "India Test Fires Medium Range Prithvi Missile." Space Daily. April 29, 2003

32. See "Iran Successfully Tests Shahab III." Jane's Defence Weekly. July 9, 2003

Missile Types: Ballistic missiles differ from military rockets, such as the widely proliferated FROG system, because they have guidance systems. Click here for a list of countries possessing FROGs. The development of accurate guidance systems remains one of the most challenging engineering obstacles facing states wishing to indigenously develop ballistic missiles. Only 11 nations have missiles with ranges over 1000 km; all the rest have only short-range, Scud-type missiles. Only 8 nations have been able to devleop nuclear weapons that could be fitted as warheads on these missiles. Ballistic missiles are sometimes confused with cruise missiles. A ballistic missile is one whose payload reaches its target by way of an initial powered boost and then a free flight along a high arcing trajectory. Part of the flight of longer-range ballistic missiles may occur outside the atmosphere and involve the "reentry" of a warhead or the missile. A cruise missile, as defined by the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, is "an unmanned, self-propelled vehicle that sustains flight through the use of aerodynamic lift over most of its flight path." Such a missile may carry either a nuclear or conventional warhead (definitions are taken from an arms control glossary provided by the U.S. State Department). The U.S. National Air Intelligence Center further stipulates that cruise missiles are "usually categorized by intended mission and launch mode" e.g. anti-shipping cruise missile, land-attack cruise missile, air-launched cruise missile, submarine-launched cruise missile. Click here for information on land-attack cruise missiles. For more resources, please visit our pages devoted to Missile Proliferation and Missile Defenses.
We welcome your comments. If you are aware of information that could update this table, or of sources that could expand the information on this page, please e-mail the Project.

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