You are on page 1of 6

Conceptual Overview Art

Cross-cutting concepts: IDENTITY and RELATIONSHIPS POWER and FREEDOM Disciplinary thinking concepts: Design Concepts Forms of Art Functions & Purposes of Art Studio-Based Processes Art Movements and History Critical Thinking: Clarity Accuracy Precision Relevance

Cross-Cutting Conceptual Understandings IDENTITY and RELATIONSHIPS: 1st and 3rd quarter An artists identity is revealed, asserted and interpreted through the lens of ones point of view (gender, race, ethnicity, age, life experience, etc.), through their aesthetic preferences or choices (uses of form, composition and design) and decisions made about the purpose and function of art.

Art engages artists and art patrons (viewers) in relationships and conversations that transcend the limits of spoken and written language, geography, culture and time. Art is always a function of the identity. Artists use relationships as a tool to create, design, and express personal identity.

POWER and FREEDOM: 2nd and 4th quarter Self-agency and power is realized when people produce meaning and messages through artworks that deal with personal, community or global concerns.

Art is a powerful tool for social change has been evident throughout human history. Contemporary examples include the use of graffiti, public mural art and installations, videography, social media, and performance art.

Disciplinary Thinking Conceptual Understandings


Students will understand that the creation of an artwork is a process that is influenced by five areas of knowledge and skill. Students will understand how each of these areas inform and strengthen the creation and interpretation of art. These areas, described in more detail below, include formal visual design concepts, the variety of art forms, an awareness that the purposes and motivations for art production vary, historical contexts and influences on art, and that studio-based learning involves specific methods and skills for planning and the use of tools and materials.

Design Concepts: Formal concepts are employed in the composition, production and criticism of art. Traditional design concepts include the Elements of Design (line, shape value color, form, space and texture) and the Principles of Design (balance, contrast, emphasis, rhythm, pattern movement and unity). Recently, postmodern ideas about design relate art more directly with the artists contemporary life experience, and include concepts like juxtaposition, hybridity, appropriation and interaction. Forms of Art: The visual arts encompass many forms, and may be broadly grouped as two-dimensional (painting, printmaking, photography), three-dimensional (pottery, fiber, masks, found object sculpture) and new media (digital, interactive, internet-based, etc.). Art may also be organized as functional art, as seen in indigenous and folk art traditions as well as in applied art such as graphic design and architecture, and fine art. Functions and Purposes of Art: Artists communicate content and meaning through their art. It may deal with purely aesthetic concerns, or address personal, physical, social, political or spiritual ideas. Studio-Based Processes and Studio Thinking: Artists create art by using an iterative series of steps to organize ideas and explore various techniques and process and to produce art. Artists develop critical and creative thinking skills as well as craftsmanship in order to understand and master the processes involved in the object-based (as opposed to written or performed) physical production of an artwork. Art Movements and History: Throughout history the human experience is reflected in the art and culture it produces, which are unique to each period and condition. Movements such as the Impressionist period, or the Modern or Pop Art movements provide insight into these periods. Contemporary artists draw inspiration and ideas from these movements and from the work of master artists from these times.

Critical Thinking Conceptual Understandings


Q1: Clarity: My thinking is clear when everything about it is understandable. There is no room for misinterpretation. Q2: Accuracy: My thinking is accurate when all the details are true and verifiable. Q3: Precision: My thinking is precise when it contains the details necessary to solving the problem or addressing the topic. Q4: Relevance: My thinking is relevant when it relates directly to the matter at hand.

Quarter 1 & 3 : Identity & Relationships

Unit 1: Identity & Relationships in the Context of Disciplinary Thinking Topical understanding: There are five categories that artist pull from to understand and produce art. Cross-cutting concept: Identity & Relationships An artists identity is revealed, asserted and interpreted through the lens of ones point of view (gender, race, ethnicity, age, life experience, etc.), through their aesthetic preferences or choices (uses of form, composition and design) and decisions made about the purpose and function of art. Art engages artists and art patrons (viewers) in relationships and conversations that transcend the limits of spoken and written language, geography, culture and time. Disciplinary thinking concepts: Intro to all concepts Design Concepts Forms of Art Functions and Purposes of Art: Studio-Based Processes and Studio Thinking Art Movements and History Performance task: Students will create a work of art that demonstrates their understand of the artist process.
Activities: Create a graphic organizer for each individual artist they learn about recognizing how each artist uses each one of the 5 concepts Idea map experiment and create exemplar of various techniques and materials Creative exercises:noodle and doodle, zentangle, Drawing from Pre-visualization,Verbal To Visual

Unit 2a: Identity & Relationships in the Context of 2 Dimensional Art Topical understanding: Artists assemble collage using a variety of materials and processes. Artists use symbols, images and text through collage to represent identity creatively. Cross-cutting concepts: Identity & Relationships Art is always a function of the identity. Artists use relationships as a tool to create, design, and express personal identity. Disciplinary thinking concepts: Design Concepts Studio-Based Processes and Studio Thinking Art History & Movements Performance task: Students will create a self-biographical 2D collage that employs strong application of balance and space in the style of a specific collage artist (Bearden). Students will complete a written selfcritique that addresses both formal art concepts and creative processes.
Activities: Visual representation of yourself in collage form using the elements of design Creative writing exercise dealing with identity Formula Critique

Literacy: Explanatory Writing

Critical Thinking: Clarity & Precision

Literacy: Explanatory Writing

Critical Thinking: Clarity & Precision

Quarter 1: Identity & Relationships

Unit 2b: Identity & Relationships in the Context of 2 Dimensional Art: Drawing Topical understandings: In art line can be used to create the illusion of depth and texture. In drawing the illusion of dimension can't be created without the use of value. In drawing realism is replicated through the precise measurement, placement, and judgment of proportion and symmetry Cross-cutting concepts: Identity & Relationships An artists identity is revealed, asserted and interpreted through the lens of ones point of view (gender, race, ethnicity, age, life experience, etc.), through their aesthetic preferences or choices (uses of form, composition and design) and decisions made about the purpose and function of art. Disciplinary thinking concepts: Design Concepts: Symmetry Value Line Performance task: Students will complete a written self-critique that addresses both formal art concepts and creative processes. Students will connect factual and procedural knowledge about drawing to create an original work of art that represents personal identity. Activities: Perspective drawings Portraiture Grid-drawing Contour drawings Value scale exercises
Literacy: Explanatory Writing Critical Thinking: Clarity & Precision

Unit 2c: Identity & Relationships in the Context of 2 Dimensional Art: Painting Topical understandings: Color theory is used by artist as the foundation of color Tints and shades are used to create mood, depth, and contrast in a work of art Painting techniques can be used to create texture in a painting. Cross-cutting concepts: Identity & Relationships Art is always a function of the identity. Artists use relationships as a tool to create, design, and express personal identity. Disciplinary thinking concepts: Design Concepts: Tone Contrast Color Performance task: Students will complete a written selfcritique that addresses both formal art concepts and creative processes. Student will create a personal narrative that expresses personal identity in visual and literary form. Activities: color wheel landscape abstract painting realism in various forms.

Literacy: Explanatory Writing Critical Thinking: Clarity & Precision

Quarter 2 & 4 : Power & Freedom Unit 3: Power & Freedom in the Context of 3 Dimensional Art /Sculpture Topical understandings: Ceramics is one of the oldest art form known to man. Historically ceramics is one of the most cross cultural forms of art. Form, shape, and balance are the foundation of ceramic art. Cross-cutting concepts Power & Freedom: Selfagency and power is realized when people produce meaning and messages through artworks that deal with personal, community or global concerns. Disciplinary thinking concepts: Function Design Concept: Balance Performance task: Create a 3-D work of art that is balanced, functional, and represents personal culture and the elements of design. Students will complete a written selfcritique that addresses both formal art concepts and creative processes. Activities: Pinch pots coil pot relief sculpture Mask Unit 3: Power & Freedom in the Context of 2D/3-D Printmaking Topical understandings: Printmaking is a functional art form used to produce multiple copies of an original work of art The value of an original work of art depreciates each time a print of it is made and sold. Printmaking completely changed fashion, literacy, art and communication. Cross-cutting concepts- Power & Freedom: Art as a powerful tool for social change has been evident throughout human history. Contemporary examples include the use of graffiti, public mural art and installations, videography, social media, and performance art. Disciplinary thinking concepts: Function Design Concepts: Composition & Space Performance task: Design and delicate a poster that expresses a feeling about a political issue and display it in a public space. Students will complete a written selfcritique that addresses both formal art concepts and creative processes. Activities: Block prints Mono print Relief print Literacy: Argumentative Writing Critical Thinking: Accuracy & Relevance

Literacy: Argumentative Writing Critical Thinking: Accuracy & Relevance

Unit 4: Freedom & Power in the context of FINAL PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT Topical understanding: Artists use specific processes to create works of art that express visually their artistic voice. The formal critiquing process is an important editing and production developing tools used by artists. Cross-cutting concepts: Self-agency and power is realized when people produce meaning and messages through artworks that deal with personal, community or global concerns.

Art as a powerful tool for social change has been evident throughout human history. Contemporary examples include the use of graffiti, public mural art and installations, videography, social media, and performance art.

Disciplinary thinking concepts: Design Concepts: Function & Composition Performance task: An independent end of the semester project that demonstrates students understanding of the: Formal personal Critique Activities: Review of artistic processes One on one teacher critiques of student project Literacy: Argumentative Writing Critical Thinking: Accuracy & Relevance