C

March 2014

OLISEUM Innovation Gateway ITY
Preliminary Infrastructure Investment, Market Data Analysis – Phase I, and Land Assembly Strategy

COLISEUM CITY ENA TEAM Bay Investment Group JRDV Urban International HKS

TA B LE O F CO N TE N TS

1. 2. 3.

Infrastructure Investment Anaylsis Market Data Analysis Phase I Land Assembly Strategy

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I NF R A ST R U C TURE I N VE ST M E NT ANALYS I S

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I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTM E N T A NA LYSIS Infrastructure summary

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This report is a review of the required infrastructure and cost that the ENA team envisions will need to be provided in order to effectively develop the master plan for Coliseum City. This report is focused primarily on Site A of the comprehensive master plan as defined in the Specific Plan. This is the primary development area for the new sports venues and foreseeable phases of the development. The costs which are outlined in this report are preliminary and will need to be refined with more engineering detail as the master plan is further developed. Preliminary Costs are established that are base hard-costs (HC) cost to construct, and assumed soft-costs (SC) cost to design, engineer and permit. The cost basis that is assumed in this report assumes that the infrastructure will be developed integrally with the construction of the rest of project – and NOT as a series of independent projects. The ENA team is assuming that cost efficiencies will be gained through: 1) optimal construction sequencing that eliminates any re-building or backtracking, 2) integrated design and engineering, 3) integrated management and private delivery of the design and construction that uses best-practice design-bidding-delivery methods, and 4) efficient finance that lowers overall cost to the project.

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General Infrastructure Requirements

The Coliseum City Site is an inner-urban location that generally has good infrastructure from the surrounding area that comes to the site. In fact, it can be viewed that the site has unprecedented infrastructure to this development location. This is one of the factors that make this site such a unique target for significant new high-density development. This is particularly true with the transportation infrastructure – including a dedicated BART station and two I-880 Freeway interchanges that feed directly into the site. Electrical capacity to the site is significant and should be capable of handling the proposed development capacity. Water and sewer capacity to the site from the surrounding urban area are also significant and are estimated at this time to be capable of handling the proposed new development.

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However, because the site has been used primarily for the Oakland Coliseum, Arena, and related parking lots, the site does not have the on-site infrastructure necessary to support the scale and uses of the development envisioned. Therefore, significant infrastructure investment will need to be completed before the first phase can be completed.

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1.1 Site Leveling and Demolition
The Coliseum City Site (indicated as Area A in the Specific Plan area description), does not meet current site drainage requirements, and will therefore need to be completely re-graded to suit current code and environmental requirements. The site currently has significant site run-off which drains the surface parking lots directly into the Damon Slough and Elmhurst Creek directly. This is not current site development practice nor environmentally sustainable. The site will need to be re-graded according to an approved Storm Water Protection Plan (SWPP) that manages the site water run-off into approved filtration systems before migrating into the City storm water drains or the Bay directly. This infrastructure improvement will need to be coordinated with redevelopment of the both Creeks and the long term urban development plan. This work will need to be completed in the initial phase of construction comprehensively across the site to maintain effectiveness and cost efficiency.

1.2 Incidental Site Demolition
Surface parking lots and other incidental structures will need to be demolished prior to site grading.

1.3 Stadium Demolition
The existing stadium will be left standing and will be used until the future stadium and potentially new ballpark are completed in 2018. This stadium is a concrete stadium that extends significantly below existing grade. This below grade area is protected by a concrete “bowl” that will have to be removed along with the existing superstructure. The demolition process will be very complex and could be required to be complete

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I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTM E N T A NA LYSIS

post-occupancy of the new stadium, adding more cost and complexity. At this time, these costs have not been estimated. However, it is understood that these costs will only marginally affect the overall costs of the new facility.

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1.4 Infrastructure Realignment - Electrical Line Relocation
The site currently has dual 115 KV overhead lines running along Damon Slough and along the south end of the Coliseum City site. These lines run in a path that interferes with the site location of the new stadium. It is proposed that these lines be relocated in order to facilitate urban development to the site. It is also proposed that these lines should be permanently undergrounded for both environmental safety and to ensure that a quality of development be established to support higher density urban uses.

PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE AND SERVICES
The strategy will be to work with PGE to get a temporary line relocation that will allow the new footprint of the Stadium to be built. This will require moving the line less applicable law, the Regional Water Qualiflow areas, begin to reduce infiltration/inflow than 100’ to the south as it cuts across the Coliseum City site – along an area owned ty Control Board (RWQCB) issued an order through private sewer lateral improvements, by the City. prohibiting further discharges from EBMUD’s and lay the groundwork for future efforts to
Wet Weather Facilities. In addition, on July 22, eliminate discharges from the Wet Weather The long-term willRelief be to underground the PGE line along the original align2009, a Stipulated Order forstrategy Preliminary Facilities. ment, which runs North-South from 66th Currently, Ave bridge to the Coliseuminformation Way at Hegenissued by EPA, SWRCB, and RWQCB became efthere is insufficient fective. This order requires EBMUD to performat a later phase berger. This can be completed of the project as the urban developto forecast how these changes will impact work that will identify problem infiltration/inment is being complete. This allows time to work with PGE to plan, approve and allowable wet weather flows in the individual

engineer this solution.

Figure 6.5: PG&E Diagram March 2014 Page 6
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The solution is in the preliminary planning stages. The current strategy is to start the undergrounding at the last vertical pylon north of 66th Ave. This would then cross the Damon Slough in a secure containment channel on improvements or replacement of the 66th Ave bridge entrance to Coliseum City. The line alignment would then proceed in a containment structure running parallel to the EBMUD storm drain easement – parallel easements. The urban development master plan is locating its primary north-south road spine along this easement to ensure ease of access and to protect these utility easements.

1.5 Creek Improvements
To meet environmental and drainage require¬ments, the new creek alignment will have two components: 1) A new earthen channel connecting to Damon Slough, designed to convey low flow and tidal flows to and from Elmhurst Creek upstream of the realignment, and 2) An underground culvert designed as an overflow facility to convey the 100-year flow to the existing Elmhurst Creek alignment and outlet to San Leandro Bay. This underground culvert will act as a bypass during high flows, and will require a weir structure to be constructed at the point of the realignment. Engineering is currently being done to evaluate the options and to engineer the optimal solution that achieves the environmental and development goals of the project. The current stadium footprint is designed to not require the creek realignment in order to start construction. However, optimal location of the stadium will require revised alignments of Elmhurst Creek, which are being evaluated for future consideration. The timing of this work will be determined at a later date. Both of these creek improvements can be phased independently, and are not integral to the first phases of development of either the Stadium or urban development.

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I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTM E N T A NA LYSIS
1.6 Sea Level Rise Improvements

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BCDC recommends the consideration of the following sea level rise scenarios for planning purposes in the San Francisco Bay Area region and California as a whole: - Year 2050 scenario – 16-inch rise (equivalent to 1.3 feet or 0.4 meters) - Year 2100 scenario – 55-inch rise (equivalent to 4.6 feet or 1.4 meters) These scenarios have been adopted as policy by the California State Coastal Conservancy, and are used by the BCDC and other regional and state agencies for planning purposes. The current Base Flood Elevation (BFE) for the Planning Area was established based on the 100-year tide (established from 1983 data) and is elevation 9.8’ NAVD (1988) Datum. The sea level rise strategy for the Coliseum City – Area A includes the following elements: -Address an 16 inch SLR above current Base Flood Elevation (BFE) for mid- term (2050) planning and design (2050 BFE) -Provide an adaptive approach to addressing SLR greater than 18 inches; -Design gravity storm drain systems for 16 inches of SLR -Provide an adaptive management strategy to protect against long-term SLR including The infrastructure plan is evaluating multiple strategies: 1) building an elevated levee along these impacted edges, and 2) raising the development parcel along these edges, and 3) some combination of both strategies. This same strategy can be evaluated for the development areas along Area B, west of I-880. These are future planned areas and not considered in these costs. These improvements will be phased as appropriate. The timing of these improvements will not impact the work in phase 1 development.

1.7 Coliseum BART Intermodal Station Improvements
The Coliseum BART station improvements and the improved pedestrian bridge connection to Coliseum City will be critical for the success of the new Coliseum City development project. The transit infrastructure is one of the key assets that make this development project a feasible and viable project. However, the current underdevelopment of these assets is a liability that needs to be addressed in tandem with the first phase of development. The ENA team and the City are currently working together with BART to develop a mutually agreed to long-term solution. The plan is to create a state-of-the-art intermodal station that effectively connects BART, Capitol Corridor/Amtrak, AC Transit, the
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Oakland Airport Connector, and future streetcar connector system. This intermodal hub will be designed to accommodate the long-term increased transit traffic generated by the site – which could generate over 34,000 daily trips. This increased traffic will justify significant transit investment and improvement in this site. It can also be stated that insufficient improvement in the transit infrastructure will inhibit any significant development of this site. Transit improvement is critical for the success of the overall development – and much of this improvement must be available in the early stages of development. The ENA team, in discussion with BART, has proposed a prototype solution in order to begin to develop a cost analysis of these improvements. BART is currently completing its independent planning and engineering analysis of these improvements. The current pedestrian bridge will be used as long as the existing stadium is in use. The new stadium will require a new pedestrian connection along 73rd Ave ROW. This will be constructed as part of an integrated shared parking garage and potential new vertical develop along public owned parcels of land. The preliminary costs for these comprehensive transit improvement are contingent on design and engineering work that is being completed with BART. These transit costs are not available at this time.

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I N TE R MO DA L AT NSIT H UB I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTMTR EN A NA LYSIS Intermodal Transit Hub Massing
Current Condition
Not functional for peak travel during games.

2.5 1.0

Phase 1
Clean up current platform to increase usable area and improve flow.

Phase 2
Create a Side Platform – doubles platform capacity without disruption to existing operations.

Master Plan Report

July 2013 Page 62 March 2014 Page 10

I N TE R MO DA L AT NSIT H UB I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTMTR EN A NA LYSIS Intermodal Transit Hub Massing
Phase 4

2.5 1.0

Add structure that is independent of the current station operations and create continuous raised connection with expanded fair-gate zone to connect to Coliseum City - Don’t go ‘down’ to go ‘up.’ Redevelopment of San Leandro Street.

Phase 4 Alternative
Expanded upper platform to create better circulation.

Phase 5
Cover the station and bridge.

Master Plan Report

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I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTM E N T A NA LYSIS

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1.8 Off-site Roadway and Intersection Improvements
The full analysis of off-site roadway and intersection improvements will be determined as the EIR traffic analysis is fully developed. Currently the ENA team is assuming that improvements will need to be made to the immediate roadway access points to the site. These improvements include the following: A. Edes Ave. Provide one additional left-turn lane on northbound Edes Ave and on southbound Coliseum Way and modify signal. B. Hegenberger Traffic Signals. Reconfigure – stadium to align access to project area with existing signal across Baldwin Street and modify signal. C. Balwin Street. Provide access between project area and Baldwin Street with the existing undercrossing of Hegenberger Road. D. Provide access between project area and Baldwin St. with the existing under crossing of Hegenberger Road. E. 73rd Avenue. Move driveway for Amtrak station to north of the station at the existing signalized at-grade pedestrian crossing F. 66th Avenue. Reconstruct 66th Avenue east of Coliseum Way to provide a four lane cross-section with two 300-foot left-turn lanes.

CC

COLISEUM CITY

Off-Si te Roadway Improvements
IMPLEMENTATION

5
D C B

A – Provide one additional left-turn lane on northbound Edes Ave and on southbound Coliseum Way and modify signal. B – Reconfigure – stadium to align access to project area with existing signal across Baldwin Street and modify signal. C – Eliminate this access on Hegenberger Road and remove existing signal. D – Provide access between project area and Baldwin Street with the existing undercrossing of Hegenberger Road. E – Move driveway for Amtrak station to north of the station at the existing signalized at-grade pedestrian crossing F – Reconstruct 66th Avenue east of Coliseum Way to provide a four lane cross-section with two 300-foot left-turn lanes.

E

F

A

City of Oakland

HKS

Forest City

AMP

JRDV Urban International

uly, 2012 March J2014

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These roadway improvements will be completed concurrent with the phase 1 project construction completion.

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1.9 Utility Backbone and Primary Roadway Circulation

The development of urban uses on the site will depend on the development of a primary infrastructure backbone that distributes water, power, telecommunications, storm drain and sanitary waste to each of the development parcels. This backbone will need to be completed concurrently with the first phase of development. The master plan has located this backbone along the north-south boulevard connecting 66th Ave and Coliseum Way at Hegenberger, and along the primary loop road that rings the perimeter of the site. This backbone boulevard also contains the EBMUD and future PGE utility right-of-ways. This primary utility backbone and primary street connector is planned to become a major urban design element of the new Coliseum City. The loop road and boulevard will allow 4 traffic lanes and will be landscaped and contain bike lanes, pedestrian sidewalks. It will be designed to accommodate new secondary streets as they are required per the development phasing. This infrastructure will be required in phase 1 of the new development.

PER 1

Chapter 6

hen turns north, transecting operty where it leaves the e 66 th Avenue entrance to the (See Figure 6.4) This South e will need to remain in place on at all times. Roads, surface trian areas and landscape be constructed within this building structures will be MUD has indicated there is weather capacity to serve the ment within the Plan Area. eather capacity is currently not s under review by EBMUD.

er collection system collects d conveys it to the EBMUD es. Within the City, this system to basins and sub-basins with es of pipes ranging in size from -inches, 31,000 structures and ations. The majority of the frastructure is over 60 years old. stems are susceptible to Inflow &I). I&I is primarily the result and/or groundwater entering wer system through fractured efective pipe joints, manholes ed storm drain connections,

Figure 6.4: Utility Backbone Diagram

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6.4.2 Wastewater Generation & Treatment

gallons per day (mgd) capacity in dry weath-

I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTM E N T A NA LYSIS

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1.10 Local Streets and Site/Block Development
Local street and block development will be phased to support the timing requirements of vertical development. These infrastructure improvements include adequate utilities to accommodate the future vertical development of the associated parcels. These typical 2 lane roadways include water, power, telecommunications, storm drain and sanitary waste. The streetscapes are designed to accommodate the specific plan urban design requirements including a 60’ right-of-way that includes: landscape and street trees, pedestrian sidewalks, street lighting and site drainage. Block development improvements includes pad grading, erosion control, power, telecommunication, waste and water connections to building pads. The NFL pad development and surface parking area is also assumed to be an integral element of the infrastructure development.

CHAPER 1
This policy ensures adequate roadway facilities while providing flexibility for future design configurations. • Separate local- and freeway-destined traffic on the Loop Road between Hegenberger Road and 66th Avenue and improve the Loop Road for a two-way street. This policy facilitates a two-way circulation road so that vehicle traffic can be distributed to the local streets within the Plan Area. • Provide a Loop Road around the site connecting Baldwin Street at the east with Hegenberger Road at the west. The road would generally have a five lane cross-section on the west side of the site, reduce to a twolane cross-section around the major league baseball stadium site, and then accommodate three lanes as it passes under the Pedestrian Hi-Line and the Hegenberger Road overpass. This policy facilitates two-way circulation around the perimeter of the site so that other streets within the site foster a more pedestrian friendly setting and can be closed for special events such as sporting events, farmer’s markets, festivals, and so forth. • Replace the Coliseum Way channel overcrossing with a new crossing that has 6 travel lanes and provisions for bike lanes and sidewalks on both sides. This policy provides an improved intersection alignment at 66th Avenue and accommodates the needed multi-modal facilities to serve the site. • Design slow speed (e.g., 25 mph) and flexible streets, such as on-street bike lanes and

Chapter 5

Figure 5.1: Sub-Area A Street Circulation
(Coliseum City Master Plan)

Coliseum Area Specific Plan Oakland, CA

83

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I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTM E N T A NA LYSIS Phased Infrastructure Development
2.1 General Phasing Strategy

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The phasing strategy is designed to deliver a new NFL stadium and MLB ballpark for the respective 2018 seasons. It is assumed that the existing Coliseum will remain in place during the construction period to allow the A’s to play their season games there. The existing stadium will force most significant new development to a subsequent phase following the 2018 opening of the new sports venues. The transit hub improvements will also need to be concurrent with the 2018 opening of the new sports venues commercial and residential development. It will be critical that the new transit have the capability to accommodate both the increase in transit ridership and improve significantly the quality of service in order to justify the investment that is required by the new vertical development. 2.2 Phase 1A – This phase will be the new transit hub and BART station area improvements, new NFL Stadium, new MLB Ballpark, new pedestrian concourse connector and associated retail and entertainment. This phase could include the proposed airport hotel, which will have a direct connection to the OAC (Airport Connector). 2.3 Phase 1B – This phase will follow the demolition of the old Coliseum structure and the redevelopment of the sports village between the new stadium and ballpark. This will require the utility backbone and the first phase of surface street infrastructure development. This phase of development will need to be completed as quickly as possible in order to ensure that there is sufficient critical mass of new sustainable development to establish Coliseum City as a defined urban place. 2.4 Phase 2 – This phase will be timed to be dependent on the market absorption and demand of the Phase 1A. This phase will begin to fill in the remaining parcels of the sports village. It will require continued improvements of surface streets and public space improvements. 2.5 Phase 3 – This phase will focus on more commercial development along the I-880 frontage. The phase will require additional surface street improvements. The longterm build out of the site will be phase based on market demand. However, it is envisioned that the infrastructure will be completed by the beginning of the phase 3 vertical development.

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I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTM E N T A NA LYSIS

1.0

Phase 1a

Phase 1b
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Phase 2

Phase 3-4
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I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTM E N T A NA LYSIS Infrastructure Dependencies
3.1 PGE Engagement

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General Requirements Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) owns and operates both transmission and distribution lines for gas and electricity serving and pass¬ing through the Plan Area. Comcast and ATT own and operate the main cable and tele¬communication infrastructure within the Plan Area. The overhead electric transmission lines and underground gas transmission mains are contained within easements crossing the Plan Area. Four options for relocation of the PGE transmission lines have been considered conceptually. (See Diagram) The new stadium footprint location and the new development will require the temporary and permanent relocation of the PGE dual 115KV overhead lines that currently run along Damon Slough and cut across the south end of the Coliseum site. It is assumed that the City of Oakland will be the lead sponsor in requesting these changes. Temporary Phase 1 This phase will require the temporary partial relocation of the PGE overhead lines to accommodate the new stadium footprint. This relocation will relocate the lines that cut across the Coliseum parking lot site – and move them further south. This temporary relocation will require an easement across existing parcels on the site. Long Term Strategy The long-term strategy will be to underground the PGE line along the original alignment, which runs North-South from 66th Ave bridge to the Coliseum Way at Hegenberger. This can be completed at a later phase of the project as the urban development is being complete. This allows time to work with PGE to plan, approve and engineer this solution. PGE Engagement Preliminary meeting have be held with PGE planners. The next steps will be for the City of Oakland to initiate an initial project application with PGE. This will require an application fee which is estimated to be $50,000. PGE is responsible for approving the project plan, engineering and permitting. It is usual for PGE to be the responsible party for the analysis of alternatives and the preliminary and final engineering. However, it is recommended that due to the complexity of this master plan and the integration of the power distribution in the overall infrastructure that the City and ENA

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I NF R AST RUCT U R E I N V ESTM E N T A NA LYSIS

team bring an independent engineering expert to provide the analysis and engineering. This will allow the project to proceed at more expedited pace. It will also create the most integrated and therefor most cost effective solution for both the temporary and permanent relocation.

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3.2 Creek Relocation
The Creek improvement and relocation will require the review and approval of multiple City, County, State and Federal regulatory agencies. This creates a long time horizon to determine the feasibility and the approval of Creek changes. The City has been supportive of the master plan improvement plan, and will be the lead agency filing the Creek application. However, to initiate this process, there will need to be a detailed engineering and hydrodynamic analysis. From this the Creek improvement plan design will be developed. These engineering documents will be the basis for the next stage of regulatory review and approval. This process will require an initial $70,000 civil engineering preliminary plan documentation. This process has not been initiated at this point.

3.3 Corporation Yard
The relocation of the Corporation Yard will be an extensive effort that is imperative before development can begin on the Area B side of I-880. The City will initiate an analysis of internal requirements and location alternatives for the relocation. This study has yet to be initiated. It will also be critical that a comprehensive environmental review of the Corporation Yard with associated clean-up costs be undertaken before the feasibility of the yard relocation is fully understood. The cost of this study is to be determined. This study should be initiated as soon as practical.

3.4 FAA Requirements
The current height regulations for Area A allow up to 160’ high structures without regulatory FAA review. The proposed new stadium could require a roof structure which is 350’ in height. It is also envisioned in the master plan that high-rise structures be an integral part of the new development that are at least that height and possible higher. In order to better evaluate the ultimate height limits and potential FAA mandated improvements to these taller structures, it will be necessary to have an aviation expert consultant perform a memo to the EIR. This document can be completed in 30 days and the cost is approximately $35,000. This study should be initiated as soon as practical.

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M A RKET DATA A NA LYS I S – PH ASE I

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MAR K ET DATA A NA LYSIS - PH AS E I
1.1 Issue Overview

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Currently the Raiders, the City of Oakland, and Alameda County are in negotiations of developing a new stadium for the Raiders, which will be the anchor tenant for Coliseum City. Without a comprehensive, thorough revenue analysis that encompasses the full range of alternatives for the sports venues and full development of Coliseum City, no long-term fiscally prudent decisions can be made nor can a realistic and equitable term sheet with Raiders be developed. The recently formed private investment group, Bay IG, has commissioned AMP and their partners to produce an investment case on the overall opportunity of Coliseum City. Currently, AMP and their partners are in progress of completing their analysis and have completed specific scopes of work that will allow Bay IG, the Oakland Raiders, the City of Oakland, and Alameda County to take the next steps in formalizing specific terms regarding a new professional sports stadium and the overall development of Coliseum City.

1.2 AMP Analysis Progress
Currently, AMP has completed a significant portion of their research and investment case analysis regarding the potential of a new Raiders stadium, including fan segmentation, comparable market analysis, and in person season ticket holder focus groups. The preliminary analysis has revealed a number of key indicators that reflect a much different conclusion than the two previous revenue studies due to AMP’s approach and the actual segmentation of the Raiders current season ticket holders. Segmentation of the season ticket holders revealed some telling facts about who is currently in the season ticket holder base. Statistical analysis grouped season ticket holders with similar economic/demographic characteristics into distinct Fan Groups. The model estimated 9 clusters to optimally fit the diverse characteristics of the season ticket base. The four highest income economic clusters were sub-segmented, in order to allow for optimal premium targeting. This segmentation process revealed statistically significant key indicators: - Initial segmentation analysis reveals that unlike previous studies - there is substantial market demand for a premium seat buyers in a new stadium. - There is a high concentration of high net worth and high salaried season ticket holders among current Raiders season ticket holders. This concentrat ion is significantly higher than AMP’s analysis of previous NFL fan bases that have had high degrees of success with an aggressive number of premium seating products in their new facilities. - There is already a significant number of season ticket holders in the building that match the profile of premium seat buyer. The premium segments of existing season ticket holders are actually wealthier and have higher incomes than their counterparts in other markets.

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MAR K ET DATA A NA LYSIS - PH AS E I

2.0

- There is no signal in the premium season ticket holder’s consumer behavior to indicate these fans will not buy similar priced seating products that have been introduced in other new NFL stadiums. - The fan base is geographically diverse. Residents of Alameda, Contra Costa, Solano and San Joaquin counties are most likely to be season ticket holders, but they account for only half of ticket sales. - There are more than 125,000 target households in just a four county area and 400,000 in the extended region. This data point is 2.5+ times more than the Dallas market. - There are significantly more populations of fans than previously perceived coming from:

Sacramento Reno Los Angeles Phoenix Las Vegas - There are high volumes of fans coming from the West, North and South Bay than previously considered. - The four counties immediately around the site (East Bay) exceed the population of target households in Minneapolis. Minneapolis’s new venue which is currently being built will have 68,000 seats and 7,500 club seats. - Recently completed in person season ticket holder focus groups confirmed that the Raiders’ premium segments should behave comparable to the same consumer segments in other markets.

The results of this initial phase of analysis has provided Bay IG with enough confidence of the feasibility of this development to begin to formalize specific terms with the Raiders, City of Oakland, and Alameda County.

1.3 Key Steps That Can Commence Due to Initial AMP Analysis
- Complete full investment case analysis and development financial models - Begin initial term sheet negotiations with the Oakland Raiders. - Start negotiations with the City of Oakland and Alameda County on formalizing agreement regarding their land and infrastructure contributions to the Oakland Raiders stadium and Coliseum City.

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PRE LI M I NARY L AND A S SE M B LY ST R ATE GY

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PR EL I MI NARY L A N D ASS E M B LY STR ATEGY
1.0 Strategies for Land Assembly

3.0

This outline addresses land in Area A only. Strategies for land assembly in other Parcels will be the subject of later, confidential discussions with the City. The ENA Team is in discussions with the City regarding acquisition of the properties owned by the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Authority as well as properties owned by the City within Area A. The publicly owned properties will be transferred to the Developer, pursuant to the DDA to be negotiated, conditioned on the Developer demonstrating financial and legal ability to construct and operate a multi-purpose football stadium on the site and possibly a baseball facility, along with ancillary commercial developments. It is expected that some of the privately owned properties within Parcel A will need to be acquired. The ENA Team has reviewed and catalogued these privately owned properties. This review has included a preliminary assessment of the need for each parcel as well as a review of market prices in the area. This review has consisted of discussions with real estate brokers, examination of comparable sales in the area, and discussions with public entities regarding the need for some of these parcels. The specific properties to be acquired will depend upon the resolution of discussions and design decisions between the ENA Team and the Raiders, along with input from the City and the County. The methods of acquisition are expected to be a combination of private purchase and public acquisition with funds provided by the Developer, dependent upon determination of transportation and parking needs for the project which determination cannot be completed until the design of the facility is approved. Some of these parcels may only require easements or temporary occupancy during construction. The ENA Team is continuing to review market conditions as part of its due diligence and its land acquisition strategy. The identification of private properties to be acquired and the timing of acquisition in Areas A and B is the subject of confidential negotiations, including the City, pursuant to government regulations. and standard practices regarding real estate transactions by public agencies.

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