You are on page 1of 94

1

Examining the Effectiveness of the


Elementary GoodWork Toolkit
Amy Hoffman
Teachers College, Columbia University
December, 2013





















2

Table of Contents
Introduction ......................................................................................................................... 3
Literature Review ................................................................................................................ 4
Methodology and Work Plan ............................................................................................ 11
The Study .......................................................................................................................... 15
Data Collection ................................................................................................................. 16
The Findings ..................................................................................................................... 18
Results and Discussion ..................................................................................................... 20
References ......................................................................................................................... 23
Appendices ........................................................................................................................ 24
A- Toolkit Narratives .................................................................................................... 24
B- Introductory Lessons ................................................................................................ 27
C- Word Mapping Lesson ............................................................................................. 47
D- Video Discussion Lesson ......................................................................................... 53
E- Quandary Game Lesson ........................................................................................... 57
F- Pre- and Post-assessment On-Demand Assessment ................................................. 61
G- Student Work Samples ............................................................................................ 64
H- Student Work Samples ............................................................................................ 68
I- Student Work Samples .............................................................................................. 73
J- Student Work Samples .............................................................................................. 77
K- Student Work Samples ............................................................................................ 82
L- Student Work Samples ............................................................................................. 86
M- Partner Ethical Narratives Lesson ........................................................................... 91



















S

Introduction
As described on the GoodWork website (http://www.thegoodproject.org), the
GoodWork Toolkit was developed as an approach to engage individuals and groups in
conversation and reflection about good work. Published in 2010, the Toolkit Guidebook
contains narratives and dilemmas faced by workers, young and old, which are
accompanied by activities and opportunities for reflection. The Toolkit comes with a
collection of 50 of these narratives derived from stories of individuals from different
professions. The Toolkit also has a deck of Value Cards--a set of cards with varying
values on each intended to be sorted into most to least important as each value relates to
the individual. To date, the Toolkit has been used in a variety of settings, including
professional settings, employee development, and in high school and college classrooms
across the globe.
Despite the versatility of the Toolkit, one space it was not able to influence was in
elementary classrooms. At the annual Project Zero Summer Institutes, elementary school
teachers would frequently ask the project researchers if there were any materials for
young students. It was realized then that there was a need to adapt the Toolkit for a
younger audience, as the message of carrying out responsible, high quality, and honest
work is important at any age because the younger students begin to appreciate ethics,
excellence, and engagement as workers and citizens, the more powerful their
understanding will be.
So, in the summer of 2011, my mother, Jo Hoffman, who is a faculty researcher in
early childhood and elementary practices for 21
st
century learning and teaching,
contributed to the GoodWork Toolkit blog with an entry titled, Will young children
4

learning about choices and purpose better prepare them for navigating adolescence in a
digital world? tying her current research to the concept of the 3 Es (ethics, excellence,
and engagement) to the early childhood classroom. Given our frequent conversations
about the choices that learners face in the digital age, I posted a response about looking to
apply some of the concepts presented for older students in the upcoming school year.
Thus the process of developing the GoodWork Toolkit for Elementary Grades started. I
began writing curriculum to implement with my students with the goal of preparing
young students with the base understanding needed to ethically navigate using the
principles of good work in the digital age.
For the purpose of this study, I chose to analyze student assessment data before
and after the implementation of the curriculum that I have written. In doing so, my aim is
to understand the effects and prove the validity in beginning the complex conversation of
ethics, excellence, and engagement with young students.

Literature Review
Research surrounding social skills and early childhood development points to the
need for young students to be exposed to concepts of moral reasoning at a young age. M.
Eugene Gilliom (1981) began a discussion of the interdependence of the global society.
In his paper, Global Education and the Social Studies, Gilliom outlines the increasing,
even in 1981, need for understanding amongst students of the fact that no society has a
corner on truth and wisdom and that no nations view of the world is universally shared
(p. 170). He asserts that global education as:
S

those educational efforts designed to cultivate in young people a global
perspective and to develop in them the knowledge, skills, and attitude
needed to live effectively in a world possessing limited natural resources
and characterized by ethnic diversity (p. 170).
If this is the case, it is imperative in the digital age, where students will be working with
the global community on a frequent basis come entering the work force, that students
learn skills and strategies for working with members of a different culture with direct
ideas and morals.
Another study based around moral development and the social realm came out of
the Journal of Philosophy of Education and Gert Biesta of the University of Luxembourg.
This study focuses on the use of developing knowledge of philosophy with young
students to foster thinking skills as well as develop a community of enquiry. When
engaging young students in developing the social skills necessary to navigate the digital
world, Biesta emphasizes the work of Hannam and Echeverria (2009). This work focuses
on the use of philosophical reasoning with teenagers. Biesta says the use of a
community of philosophical enquiry the purpose is to construct
knowledge together and the aim is to promote cooperation in
illuminating a path to come closer to the truth of things (Hannam and
Echeverria, 2009, p. 8) (Biesta, 2011, p. 307).
In work with early childhood students, this concept remains true. In creating a
community of philosophical thinkers, the students are able to develop skills such as
thinking critically, reflectively, and reasonably (Biesta, 2011, p. 306). Furthermore,
6

Biesta claims that in fostering this type of social community, the development of moral
reasoning and reflection can occur (2011).
While working with the concepts and activities of the Elementary GoodWork
Toolkit curriculum, students are being afforded the opportunity to construct a community
of reflective, philosophical thinkers. In creating this environment at a young age, the aim
is to allow these students to have the skills needed to work with and value the opinions of
others both globally and locally.
Another sub-topic worth exploring is the implication of this type of instruction on
early childhood development. Minkang Kim and Derek Sankey of Seoul National
University in Korea present an argument in their article entitled, Toward a Dynamic
Systems Approach to moral development and moral education: a response to the JME
Special Issue, September 2008, about the Dynamic Systems Approach (DSA) and its
connection to possible moral reasoning development (2009). Kim and Sankey look at the
information presented in a special edition of The Journal of Moral Education to mark the
50
th
anniversary of Lawrence Kohlbergs dissertation, which is seen as pioneering work
in the field of moral education. The work published in this issue speaks to the need to
move past the standard model of moral education that Kohlberg outlined in his
dissertation to a model that encompasses the whole child, not just the personality of a
child (2009).
Kim and Sankey outline a paradigm [that declares that] moral development
shares the same dynamic processes found within the whole of human development,
including cognitive and motor development (Kim & Sankey, 2009, p. 284). This
conversation that is presented in the basis of the GoodWork Toolkit curriculum-
7

providing teachers with activities and discussions for students that encompass the whole
person, allowing young students to construct meaning of moral reasoning and
development through the use of different learning styles and metacognitive processes.
But how is this accomplished?
Howard Gardner published a book entitled The Unschooled Mind: How Children
Think and How Schools Should Teach in 1991 and makes compelling arguments based
around the role of the adult or teacher in helping young students to construct their
understanding of the world around them.
The young child masters a great deal of information and appears highly
competent in her circumscribed world. As we have seen, the child can use
and comprehend symbol systems fluently and can also offer workaday
theories and explanations of the worlds of mind, matter, life, and self.
Because of the ease with which there performances are expressed, I shall
term them performances of intuitive (nave or natural) understanding. It
should be emphasized that these understandings are often immature,
misleading, or fundamentally misconceived; this is certainly the case with
many of the protoscientific understandings embraced by young children
(p. 9).
Gardner makes a valid point about the need for apprenticeships, because of the
understandings of young students being immature, misleading, or fundamentally
misconceived, within the development of cognitive process of young children and goes
on to say,
8

apprenticeships may well be the means of instruction that builds most
effectively on the ways in which most young people learn. Such forms of
instruction are heavily punctuated with sensorimotor experiences and with
the contextualized use of first-order forms of symbolization, such as
natural language and simple drawings and gestures (p. 134).
This is the basis of early childhood developmentally appropriate practice and an
argument can be made about the connection to developmentally appropriate practice and
the unique topics being addressed with instructing the conceptualization of moral
reasoning through the guise of the GoodWork Toolkit and the understanding of ethics,
excellence, and engagement.
Recent research, in A Developmental Approach to Educating young Children by
Denise H. Daniels and Patricia K. Clarkson (2010), outlines the need for consideration of
the whole environment of the young child.
Developmental scientists examine connections between the different
settings (mesosystems), such as how parents, teachers, and peers relate to
one another. Interactions in these multiple settings shape the childs
development, and as the child changes, the interactions change. In
addition, researchers consider how elements of the broader social and
cultural contexts affect these interactions (exo- and macrosystems not
shown), for example, how the No Child Left Behind Act influences school
practices, and in turn, teacher-child interactions in the classroom (p. 10).
This excerpt shows the need, when thinking about early childhood development, to take
into account the whole environment. In the classroom, developmentally appropriate
9

practice with early childhood development needs to be focused in a learner-centered
classroom. According to Daniels and Clarkson, learner (child)-centered practices are
educational practices based on understanding of developmental and psychological
processes. [It] involves the teacher assuming a facilitator or partner role and
encouraging children to take responsibility for their leaning (p. 183). This learner-
centered approach to the primary classroom is the basis of the Elementary GoodWork
Toolkit.
The activities presented to young students within the curriculum of the toolkit,
encompass the idea of the teacher being the facilitator and introducing concepts to
students, then within the context of small group work, the students are guided in inquiry
toward constructing their understanding of the concepts of moral reasoning, ethics,
excellence, and engagement. This idea encompasses what Vygotsky called The Zone of
Proximal Development- basing instruction on what a child cannot accomplish
independently, but with minimal assistance (Lui, 2012). The activities presented range
from introductory lesson based around the vocabulary words of ethics, excellence, and
engagement with discussion- concepts that are, at the beginning of the discussion, too
difficult for young children to comprehend on their own- to students being able to
synthesize their understanding of the concepts of moral reasoning and good work to
create and author their own ethical narratives.
Within this understanding, it is important to consider what researchers such as
Roland Tharp, Ron Gallimore, and William Doherty (Daniels & Clarkson, 2010, p. 96)
have identified as The Five Standards:
1u

1. Learning is facilitated when teachers and students work together in
joint productive activity. 2. Students must develop competence in the
language and literacy of instruction. 3. Curriculum must be meaningful,
based on previous knowledge, and connected to students lives (e.g.,
home, community). 4. Learning activities must be challenging, requiring
complex thinking. 5. Teachers need to engage children through dialogue,
especially instructional conversations (p. 97).
The activities presented to students within the toolkit curriculum, is based on these
standards, as the teacher facilitates, students are engaged in meaningful, challenging
instruction and conversations based on their constructs of the moral world they have been
exposed to.
It is important to remember, though, that the curriculum of the Elementary
GoodWork Toolkit is unique in its topics and concepts being presented to such a young
age. Literature that I have reviewed for the purpose of this study has focused on the
construction of moral reasoning in students ranging from early childhood to secondary
education. All studies have shown compelling research toward the need for a set
curriculum, but I have not found any set curriculum to facilitate this. Cath Milvain
outlines a program to teach moral reasoning in the primary school setting in his paper
Moral Reasoning as Part of a Primary School Programme (1997). Milvain outlines
what he would like to include in a curriculum to address moral reasoning:
I looked at establishing a classroom programme which combined
elements suggested above:
Development of processes of rational reasoning
11

Engagement in Socratic dialogue
Recognition of the conceptual inadequacies of the lower level of
understanding
Adoption of a higher, more rationally defensible conceptual level
The aim was for students to explore realistic, or probable, circumstances
depicted in picture story books through philosophical dialogue in a
community of inquiry (p. 19).
Milvains ideas are similar to the basis of instruction of the toolkit. The curriculum
presented in this paper aims to develop thinking and reasoning skills, engage students in
dialogue, and a higher level of critical thinking skills surrounding the development of
moral reasoning and the synthesis of the ideas of ethics, excellence, and en
Methodology and work plan
I began writing curriculum describing the 3 Es to young children, the thought
about the abstract concept of ethics, excellence, and engagement was in the forefront of
our minds with thinking about one simple question: Will
young children really be able to visualize these concepts? To
begin, I decided to create narratives of the 3 Es from the
perspective of a young child using authentic classroom
situations from our past experiences (see Appendix A). The first one I wrote was the
narrative for engagement. I planned the lessons for my classroom stemming from this
narrative using a discussion surrounding concepts that they would encounter in their own
lives. After I read the narrative in class, I expected that I would need more schema
building around this concept, but my students surprised me by how quickly they picked
!"#$%& (
12

up on the connection between liking what youre learning about, what theyre good at,
and engagement (Figure 1). From there, using the connections that the students had made,
I continued with the discussions of excellence and ethics. At the end of each introductory
lesson of one of the 3 Es (Appendix B), we created a concept map or a word map.
I began using word-mapping activities to research definitions and meanings for
each of the 3 Es and then construct a word web of their understanding. According to the
organization Reading Rockets, a word map is a visual organizer that promotes
vocabulary development (Reading Rockets, 2012). Word maps are used in classrooms to
assist students in understanding abstract words and concepts. The use of word mapping in
this activity allows students to construct a spatial mental model of the content being
presented (Hegarty, Stull 2012). For students first encountering a complex concept such
as Good Work, visuospatial thinking provides a means for grasping the concept that is
accessible and age-appropriate for students.
As I mentioned, the students in my classroom engage in a word mapping activity
to help them further explore their understandings of Good Work terminology. I was able
to develop a webquest (lesson plan is found in Appendix C and online-
http://questgarden.com/146/51/5/120716111216/) for student use and to assist in keeping
a structured eye on the content being searched. The webquest and modeling leads the
students to work in small groups to research multiple definitions of excellence, ethics and
engagement and jot down notes of their thoughts surrounding what they were
discovering. From there, the small groups of students are asked to turn their thoughts into
word maps- creating a visual representation of their thoughts- the goal being a series of
1S

connected words surrounding each one of the
3Es. Figure 2 is an example of a student
groups word map.
In this example, when these young
students were faced with the task of creating
their own thoughts surrounding these complex ideas, they were at first apprehensive. For
many, this was their first independent experience with exploring a concept using the
Internet. Through continued discussion during the activity, I supported their research by
guiding questions, Can you make a personal connection to words? Are there any
group members that have a different connection? Students were given the opportunity
to discuss their experiences and explorations with each other; they were able to learn
about multiple perspectives and eventually, they moved beyond their initial hesitations.
At this young age, the students have had success in constructing meanings through
guided partnership discussion and activities. The students have been able to find clear
connections between themselves and others, discuss the meaning of true social and
academic success, and begin to become excited about their future possibilities.
Visuospatial thinking skills are an essential part of a young childs development.
In giving students the opportunity to work on this development through discussion and
activities, students are able to utilize their creative thinking to construct meaning of
vocabulary as related to Good Work.
Next, the students engage in an activity where they are encouraged and exposed to
identifying the characteristics of ethics, excellence, and engagement in real world
situations- specifically a video of students in the country of Bhutan working with the
!"#$%& )
14

Design for Change initiative (Appendix D). Linda Elder and Richard Paul describe the
practice of recognizing learning in different settings and situations leading to becoming a
practicing thinker in what they describe as the stages of thinking (2013).
According to Elder and Paul, students go through stages of
thinking: The Unreflective Thinker, The Challenged Thinker, The
Beginning Thinker, The Practicing Thinker, The Advanced
Thinker, and The Accomplished Thinker. In the Practicing Thinker stage, students
should now be developing the habit whenever they are trying to figure something out
of focusing on: purpose, question, information, inferences, assumptions, concepts,
point of view, and implications. The result of this emphasis in instruction is that students
begin to see connections between all the subject matter they are learning (Elder and
Paul, 2013). The practice of using a real life video to discuss the concepts of
GoodWork helps the students to focus on the skills described above, see figure 3 for an
audio recording of student discussions.
Following the discussion of GoodWork in the real world, students are exposed to
a web-based game where they can focus on using their knowledge of ethics, excellence,
and engagement to make informed decisions in a role playing scenario. Quandary Game
was developed by Learning Games Network to provide children ages 8-14 with a forum
to experience making ethical decisions in scenarios that dont have a right or wrong
answer (see the lesson plan in appendix E).
From my experience, in implementing this activity, the students are engaged in
this kind of activity because they feel empowered as leaders. I
notice that with young children, especially, being given the
!"#$%& *
!"#$%& +
!"#$%& ,-
1S

opportunity to put their knowledge into practice, they feel a sense of accomplishment.
With the use of Quandary game (see figure 4 for a screen shot of the game) and class
discussion and debriefing (figure 4a), students are given a controlled environment to
practice their application of GoodWork themes. Finally, this work leads to the writing of
student ethical narratives with a partner and posting them as blogs.
Each lesson set is assessed using rubrics developed specifically for the said lesson
set for teachers to monitor student understanding through the process of discussing the 3
Es. I also have developed a pre and post on-demand assessment (appendix F) that the
students are given prior to the conversation starting and also after the conversation has
culminated to gage student understanding and growth in critical thinking surrounding the
synthesis of ethics, excellence, and engagement- this is the point of discussion of this
study.
The Study
The context of this study surrounds looking at the progress young students make
in developing their understandings of the terms ethics, excellence, and engagement- the
basis of The GoodWork Toolkit curricula. After developing the curricula used to teach
young students about the importance character education concepts of self-reflection of
good work, it is clear that there is a necessity to analyze student understanding- mainly,
are students able to synthesize the information they have learned about community
citizenship and good work by recognize the implication and characteristics through a
literary guise?
This study has been conducted in a first and second grade, single teacher,
multiage classroom with 18 students at a small charter school, Unity Charter School, in
16

Morristown, New Jersey. Unity Charter School pulls from 47 sending districts, with 39%
of the population coming from the Morris School District. Nineteen of the 196 students at
Unity are special education classified, 14.7%. The students in the class range from ages 6
to 8 and come to Unity from many different cultural and socio-economic backgrounds
and varying abilities. The reading levels of the students range from a DRA
(Developmental Reading Assessment) level 10 (first grade) to 40 (fourth grade) with
0.04% of the class classified as needing accommodations.
The situation of the students in this particular class, as pertaining to their
knowledge of the GoodWork Toolkit, is unique- 23% of the population is in their second
year of working with the ideas and content of The GoodWork Toolkit. These five
students are going into this study with a base understanding of the concepts of ethics,
excellence, and engagement and are designated with an asterisk in the data.

Data Collection
The data that has been collected and analyzed comes from a pre and post on-
demand writing assessment (Appendix F) specifically looks at three realms of student
learning- relationships and role models, individual background, expertise, beliefs, and
values, and responsibility- through student writing based on their reflections of the
treatment of the main character in Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes. The students are
first read the story with no discussion from the teacher, then students are asked and
expected to write about:
What do you think about what happened in the story? Can you write about your feelings
about this story? How do you think Chrysanthemum feels about her name now? Why?

17

As noted above, the pre and post on-demand writing assessment is designed to provide a
concrete assessment measure to gage student creation of understanding about GoodWork-
therefore the assessment was given before lessons and discussions begin and, for the
purposes of this study, upon culmination of the initial introduction of the concepts of
GoodWork.
The use of the same pre- and post-assessment is rooted in the idea that the
reliability of data obtained from an assessment is evident in how consistently the
assessment produces the same information about a child (Moon p. 227). This being said,
the assessment that has been created asks students to use the information they have
gained about the concepts of good work in reflecting about a potential real-world
situation they may face. The students are expected to be able to use their synthesis of the
ideas to discuss this dilemma and their reflections about how Chrysanthemum is treated.
For the purpose of this study, the time of the curriculum follows a strict time line.
Day 1: Pre-assessment is given
Day 2-4: Introduction to Student Engagement Lesson (appendix B)
Day 5-6: Introduction to Excellence Lesson (appendix B)
Day 7-9: Introduction to Ethics Lesson (appendix B)
Day 10-16: Word Mapping/Webquest Activity (appendix C)
Day 17: Post-assessment is given




18

The findings
Upon analysis of the results of the pre- and post-assessments, it is clear that the
majority of students begin to gain an understanding of the theories of good work and
moral reasoning. I chose to separate the three content strands and analyze each one
individually for student understanding. First, lets look at the students understanding of
the importance of
peer/adult relationships
and the role of these
individuals as role models
(strand one). During the
pre-assessment (figure 5),
the data showed an overwhelming lack of knowledge about the role of peers/adults in a
successful classroom environment. Many students responses, 72%, showed an
understanding of how the treatment of Chrysanthemum affects their feelings, but were
unable to discuss the role of the peers/adults in the situation. For example, student LS
commented that I feel bad when the other kids made fun of her (Appendix G). This
response shows that this student is able to understand how negative treatment of a
classmate or peer affects herself, but does not understand the role of the peer/adult in
standing up for one another. Upon completion of the activities and discussions about
good work and ethics, excellence, and engagement, this particular student showed a
response that demonstrates her understanding of the role of the peers and adults in
Chrysanthemums social/emotional state, I felt really good when Miss Twinkle said that
!"#$%& +
19

she was named after a flower too and she made Chrysanthemum feel better and I like
how Chrysanthemums mom and dad tried to make Chrysanthemum feel better and if I
was Chrysanthemum Ill say to the bullies treat others the way you want to be treated
(Appendix H).
The second strand looks at the students understanding of the individuals
background, expertise, beliefs, and values, asking students to comment on how the main
character, Chrysanthemum feels about the situation. During the pre-assessment, 88% of
the student did not comment on this strand (figure 6). One example, student ZH, stated, I
felt sad when Victoria, Jo, and Rita made fun of Chrysanthemum because its not nice to
make fun of some one (Appendix I). This response doesnt speak about how
Chrysanthemum potentially feels and this characters background, but shows the
development of a 7 year old by speaking only of their own feelings. This strand is
looking for the student to speak about how someone else may experience a situation,
seeing the situation from someone elses shoes. This particular students post-
assessment showed improvement in strand two by discussing how she felt about
Chrysanthemums change in understanding, at the end, I felt happy for
Chrysanthemum because she knew her name was absolutely perfect and Chrysanthemum
was happy! (Appendix J). Over all, 50% of students understanding of strand two
improved by at least one point from the pre- to the post-assessment.
Strand three focuses on an individuals responsibility to create a positive environment
within the social realm. When responding on the pre- and post-assessment and the story
of Chrysanthemum, students are expected to comment on how Chrysanthemums peers
and teachers can support each other. As you can see from the data chart (figure 7), there
2u

was a wide arrange of
improvement/ lack of
improvement in
understanding of community
responsibility when
discussing good work.
The data shows that
many students developed a fair understanding of their role and potential impact on the
classroom community as a whole. For example, student NL, did not comment on strand
three in the response, I liked the story because I like mice and flowers and I am a girl of
course (appendix K). This response shows that this student understands what is being
asked of them- to respond about their feelings of the story- but doesnt understand the
concepts of good work. After engaging in the activities and discussions of the portions of
the curriculum presented, this same student was able to show a full understanding of the
individual responsibility and implications on the classroom community, I think
Chrysanthemum would feel happy if I stood up for her when Rita, Jo, and Victoria teased
her (appendix L).

Results and Discussion
In the previous section, I highlighted the successful students experiences with the
pre- and post-assessments in particular strands, but based on the students overall scores
on the assessments, the findings of this study show that many students need more work
with activities and discussions based around the concepts of ethics, excellence, and
!"#$%& .
21

engagement (figure 8). I
believe that with more
experiences surrounding the
conscious reflection and
discussion of ethics,
excellence, and engagement,
many student would be able
to fully show their
understanding of moral reasoning in relation to their individual conscious and their
responsibility to the community.
As outlined in the curriculum described in the Methodology and Work Plan, I will
continue this study for the duration of this school year by implementing the activities of
the Bhutan video discussion, use of Quandary game by the Learning Network, and
culminating narrative writing activity. I propose conducting the narrative writing activity
with a partner class who is also involved in the conversation of good work. The lesson
plan that is found in Appendix M outlines the discussion of ethics, excellence, and
engagement along with using the website called Ensemble to distantly write ethical
narratives with students located in another part of the world. This work will culminate in
June with a final activity of the same on-demand writing prompt based around
Chrysanthemum by Kevin Henkes.
The hope of this study is to bring to light, for other teachers and educators, the
potential of young student understanding of the important concept of good work and
moral reasoning. For students to successfully and morally conduct themselves later in life
!"#$%& /
22

in the digital age, it is necessary for them to develop an understanding and conscious self
reflection about what it means to been a community citizen, the essential, over-arching
question of this curriculum. Through the implementation of the Elementary GoodWork
curriculum, students are given the opportunity to begin formulating their understanding
of the importance of moral reasoning in social and individual situations.


















2S

References
Biesta, G. , (2011). Philosophy, Exposure, and children: How to Resist the
Instrumentalisation of Philosophy in Education. Journal of Philosophy of
Education. 45 (2), pp.305 319

Daniels, D. & Clarkson, P. , (2010). A Developmental Approach to Educating Young
Children. 1st ed. Thousand Oaks, California: Division 15 (Educational
Psychology) of the APA.

Frederiksen N., (1984). Implications of Cognitive Theory of Instruction in Problem
Solving. Review of Educational Research. 54 (3), pp.363-407.

Gardner, H. , (1991). The Unschooled Mind: How Children Think and How Schools
Should Teach. 1st ed. NY: Basic Books.

Gilliom, M. Eugine, (1981). Global Education and the Social Studies. Theory into
Practice. 20 (2), pp.169 - 173

Hannam, P. & Echeverria, E., (2009). Philosophy with Teenagers: Nurturing a Moral
Imagination for the 21st Century. 1st ed. NY: Continuum International Publishing
Group.

Hegarty, M., & Stull, A., (2012). 'Visuospatial Reasoning'. In: Holyoak, K., & Morrison,
R. (ed), The Oxford Handbook of Thinking and Reasoning. 1st ed. New York:
Oxford University Press. pp.606 - 630.

Kim, M. & Sankey, D. , (2009). Toward a Dynamic Systems Approach to moral
development and moral education: a response to the JME Special Issue,
September 2008. Journal of Moral Education. 38 (3), pp.283 - 298

Lui, Angela (2012). Teaching in the Zone: An introduction to working within the Zone of
Proximal Development (ZPD to drive effective early childhood instruction.
[ONLINE] Available at: http://www.childrensprogress.com/wp-
content/uploads/2012/05/free-white-paper-vygotsky-zone-of-proximal-
development-zpd-early-childhood.pdf. [Last Accessed 10 December, 2013].

Marzano, Robert J. (1998). A theory-based meta-analysis of research on
instruction. Aurora, CO: Mid-continent Educational Research
Laboratory. Retrieved June 28, 2013, from
http://www.mcrel.org/PDF/Instruction/5982RR_InstructionMeta_Analysis.pdf

Milvain, C., (1997). Moral Reasoning as Part of a Primary Programme. Analytic
Teaching. 17 (1), pp.17 - 28


24

Appendix A

Ethics Narrative
Maria is a third-grader and one time her friend, Belinda called her Messy Maria when
they were working on a project at school. Other classmates were in their group and the
project was to do research and find facts about where the water came from that comes
out of the water faucet in the classroom. Marias research folder was raggedy and her
papers were usually just shoved into the folder so they always looked wrinkled. Maria
wanted to have everything neat and tidy like her friend Belinda, but she was always in a
hurry to clean up. Maria always felt like she was being told to hurry up by
everyone. Belinda has been her friend since kindergarten and Maria liked that she
helped her to hurry up and clean up- this made Maria feel like Belinda really cared about
her. But since theyve been in 3
rd
grade, Maria feels like Belinda has started picking on
her. After she called her Messy Maria, everyone else in the class started calling her that
name too. Maria thinks that Belinda is bossy and feels like calling her Bossy Belinda to
get back at her. Maybe the kids will start calling her that too and she would know how it
would feel to be called something that others laugh about.

One day, Marias mom asked her if she would like to invite Belinda to go to the beach
with them in the morning. Maria thought about it for a moment and said, no, I dont
want to be friends with Belinda anymore. Marias mom was confused and asked Maria
to tell her why. Maria explained how Belinda was bossing her around and Marias mom
was surprised, the girls had always seemed like such good friends. Marias mom
reminded her of the conversation they had had after reading Clara and the Bossy by Ruth
Ohi. Maria and her mom had talked about how its okay to let your friend know how you
feel in a polite way, to be the bigger person.

So the next week at school, Maria and Belinda were working on a project together when
Belinda started picking on Maria and bossing her around. What would you do?

Excellence Narrative
Alex is in third grade and he is a very good soccer player for someone who is 9 years old.
He has heard adults say this about him. His soccer coach and the Phys Ed teacher at
school always tell Alex that he is a natural athlete. Alex is not sure what that means,
except that it must mean hes good at sports. He is glad that they tell him that because
everyone seems happy that he plays sports, especially soccer and that he scores a lot of
goals during a season. His traveling soccer team just won the state championship in
their age level and he was awarded the Excellent Player award.

Alex likes soccer, but he doesnt have to try very hard at it to score goals. Alex also likes
school and is really interested in the science unit they are doing right now about animal
habitats. Hes so glad that soccer season is over for a couple of months so that he can
play outside with his friends when he is home from school. One of his favorite things to
do is to go down by the little creek near his house and turn over rocks to see what
creatures live underneath. So when his class started exploring the habitats that were in
their state, he was excited that his teacher let him work on researching the woodlands
2S

habitat. The problem for Alex was that he had to present what he learned about his
habitat to his class, and Alex never was very excellent in making things with his hands.
His friend Chris was also researching the woodlands habitat and so they decided to work
together. Chris showed Alex how to use the software for their class smartboard to create
pages with photos and facts that they learned from searching the web. Alex worked for
hours at school and at home to find photos and facts about the animals found in
woodland habitats and Chris did the research for the kinds of trees and flowers. Alex
created 5 great pages about the five most common animals found in the woods of their
state. They were the first partners to present their habitat. They stood at the smartboard
and made their presentation. When they were done, everyone cheered and clapped and
the teacher had the other second grade classes come in and see their presentation. She
told the other partner groups that Alex and Chriss presentation was excellent and that it
was a great model of the kinds of presentations shes hoping to see from the other
groups. Alex was so proud! When he was talking to his grandma about what the teacher
had said and how happy he felt, she told him that he was feeling proud because he did an
excellent job on something he worked really hard at.

Guiding Questions:
What is something that you are really great at doing? How do you know ?
What is something that you are OK at doing? How do you know ?
What is something that you are not good at doing? How do you know ?
Who do you know that is excellent at doing something? How do you know ?


Engagement Narrative
Before he was in second grade, Kyle never liked school. He didnt think he was very
good at it. Thats what his older sisters had always told him. His kindergarten and first
grade teachers said his name a lot and they seemed to really want him to be able to read
books and to write words in his journals and for stories. His kindergarten and first grade
teachers said his name a lot- Kyle knew he was probably not very liked. Kyle also felt
that his teachers really wanted him to be able to read and write and so did he, but they
never let him write about what he wanted to. Kyle wanted to read and write about
baseball. When he wasnt in school, he watched and played baseball a lot. His sister
even found a baseball game on the computer that he played whenever one of them would
let him use the computer. His favorite team was the Boston Red Socks and he knew all of
the players names and batting averages. He loved to learn everything about the other
teams too. When he saw his Dad on the weekends, they played baseball and went to
games and his Dad was one of the coaches for his town team. In the winter, his Dad took
him to batting cages and this winter they are going to Florida to see some games during
Spring Training.

School changed for Kyle in second grade. He went to a new school and his teacher
listened to him and found out right away how much he liked baseball. At first, Kyle was
still acting like he didnt like school, but then the very first time that his teacher read with
him it was a book about baseball. Over the next few weeks, the teacher showed Kyle that
he knew how to read and write a lot of baseball words. Kyles teacher was really good at
26

showing him lots of school things that he could do. In fact, she worked hard to find
books for him to read about baseball--stories about kids who played baseball and real
stories about baseball players. She even let him talk about baseball at morning meeting
and it turned out that there were a group of his class friends that also loved
baseball. She let them form a club that she called a book club. When they had to do a
research project, she let them all work together and research the size of a professional
baseball field and then they made a scale model of one. One day, when he was working
with a friend, measuring the infield of their scale model, Kyle looked up at his teacher
and said, I love you, Ms. H. His teacher said she loved him too, but that she thought
the happy feeling he was having was because he was having fun while he was learning!


Appenuix B

Grade: 1]2 Mu|t|age
Un|t: C|t|zensh|p |n our Commun|ty
Lesson: 1he GoodWork 1oo|k|t- Lth|cs


Lesson Cverv|ew
1hls lesson ls deslgned Lo connecL Lhe 3 L's of Lhe CoodWork ro[ecL (engagemenL,
eLhlcs, and excellence). SLudenLs wlll have Lhe opporLunlLy Lo explore eLhlcs and
frlendshlp. Ethics is what you believe makes you a good friend, brother or sister, or
classmate. Ethics is being with others and respecting whoever youre with so that
everyone is working together in a happy way to get things done.


Number of C|ass er|ods: Lhree-40 mlnuLe perlods

Standards
State Standards (2009)
6.1.l.A.J- clvlcs, Covetomeot, ooJ nomoo klqbts uemonsLraLe
approprlaLe behavlor when collaboraLlng wlLh oLhers.
6.J.4.A.J- Actlve cltlzeosblp lo tbe 21
st
ceototy SelecL a local lssue and
develop a group acLlon plan Lo lnform school and/or communlLy
members abouL Lhe lssue.
9.1.4.A.1- ctltlcol 1blokloq ooJ ltoblem 5olvloq 8ecognlze a problem and
bralnsLorm ways Lo solve Lhe problem lndlvldually or collaboraLlvely.
9.1.4.A.2- ctltlcol 1blokloq ooJ ltoblem 5olvloq LvaluaLe avallable
resources LhaL can asslsL ln solvlng problems.
9.1.4.8.1- ctltlcol 1blokloq ooJ ltoblem 5olvloq arLlclpaLe ln
bralnsLormlng sesslons Lo seek lnformaLlon, ldeas, and sLraLegles LhaL
fosLer creaLlve Lhlnklng.

Nat|ona| Standards (2012)
27

keoJloq. lltetotote key lJeos ooJ uetolls CtoJe 2 1. Ask and answer such
quesLlons as who, whaL, where, when, why, and how Lo demonsLraLe
undersLandlng of key ldeas and deLalls ln a LexL.
keoJloq. lltetotote key lJeos ooJ uetolls CtoJe 2 3. uescrlbe how
characLers ln a sLory respond Lo ma[or evenLs and challenges.
5peokloq ooJ llsteoloq comptebeosloo ooJ collobototloo CtoJe 2 1.
arLlclpaLe ln collaboraLlve conversaLlons wlLh dlverse parLners abouL
grade 2 Loplcs and LexLs wlLh peers and adulLs ln small and larger groups.
5peokloq ooJ llsteoloq lteseototloo of koowleJqe ooJ lJeos CtoJe 2 6.
roduce compleLe senLences wlLh approprlaLe Lo Lask and slLuaLlon ln
order Lo provlde requesLed deLall or clarlflcaLlon.

LfS Standards (add performance |nd|cators and narrat|ves |f app||cab|e)
n. Moltlple letspectlves 7. Pow can l undersLand and work wlLh oLhers Lo
achleve a common goal?

Lssent|a| uest|on: WhaL makes a good communlLy?

Gu|d|ng uest|ons:
WhaL does CoodWork mean Lo you?
Can you Lhlnk of any examples of someLhlng you would call CoodWork?
Why ls CoodWork lmporLanL?
WhaL does eLhlcs mean?
WhaL does Lhe word enemy" mean Lo you?
Why do you Lhlnk chlldren have enemles?
Why was !eremy 8oss on hls enemy llsL"?
WhaL dld Lhe boy learn from spendlng Lhe enLlre day wlLh hls number one
enemy?
Pow dld he manage Lo Lurn hls enemy lnLo a frlend?
Pow can we help Lhe communlLy?

kesources]mater|a|s for th|s |esson:
LLhlcs narraLlve
Lnemy le by uerek Munson (elLher on 1umblebooks or paper copy)
lrlendshlp le reclpe sheeL (see below)
ur. ueSoLo by Wllllam SLelg
CharL paper

Learn|ng Cpportun|t|es, Act|v|t|es, and rocedures:
Day 1:
8ead Lo Lhe sLudenL Lhe LLhlcs narraLlve found below. Ask Lhe sLudenL whaL Lhey
Lhlnk eLhlcs means- dlscuss wlLh Lhe sLudenLs how belng an eLhlcal person means
you are a good frlend, famlly member, and classmaLe. Pelp Lhe sLudenLs see Lhe
28

connecLlon beLween good clLlzenshlp, excellence, engagemenL, and eLhlcs. Cnce
Lhe connecLlon ls made, ask WhaL does CoodWork mean Lo you?
1hen, Lell sLudenLs LhaL, ln Lhlnklng abouL eLhlcs, a reclpe for creaLlng greaL
frlends wlll be made.
Ask sLudenLs Lo help bralnsLorm lngredlenLs for a secreL reclpe for creaLlng greaL
frlends.
1hen, read Lhe book Lnemy le by uerek Munson (or show lL vla 1umblebooks
on Lhe lnLerneL).
Cnce flnlshed readlng, ask Lhe sLudenLs:
o WhaL does Lhe word enemy" mean Lo you?
o Why do you Lhlnk chlldren have enemles?
o Why was !eremy 8oss on hls enemy llsL"?
o WhaL dld Lhe boy learn from spendlng Lhe enLlre day wlLh hls number
one enemy?
o Pow dld he manage Lo Lurn hls enemy lnLo a frlend?
o uo you Lhlnk LhaL Lhey wlll sLay frlends?
o WhaL does Lhe word frlend" mean Lo you?
Show sLudenLs a charL wlLh an example of a reclpe for lrlendshlp le". ulscuss
wlLh Lhe sLudenLs how Lhelr ldeas abouL belng a good frlend and Lhe ldeas Lhey
have been comlng up wlLh durlng Lhls unlL wlll help Lo gulde Lhem lnLo Lhe
perfecL reclpe for frlendshlp ple.
SpllL sLudenLs lnLo small groups, glve Lhem a reclpe sheeL (aLLached) and ask
Lhem Lo creaLe Lhelr own lrlendshlp le" reclpe uslng Leamwork.
Pang sLudenL work ln Lhe hall.

Day 2:
ulscuss wlLh sLudenLs Lhelr ldeas abouL eLhlcs and frlends from Lhe prevlous day.
8ead Lo Lhe sLudenLs Lhe book, ur. ueSoLo by Wllllam SLelg. Ask Lhe sLudenLs Lo
descrlbe how ur. ueSoLo behaved eLhlcally.
1ogeLher, make a llsL of way we, as sLudenLs, can asslsL and help ln Lhe
communlLy- why?
Can people have frlends ln Lhe communlLy LhaL Lhey don'L know very well? Look
aL our ldeas for whaL Lhe word frlend" means Lo us from yesLerday-do some of
Lhose words descrlbe how we mlghL do frlendly Lhlngs for people ln our
communlLy? (make a llsL of words LhaL descrlbe how we show frlendshlp ln our
communlLy.)
Day 3:
8emlnd Lhe sLudenLs of Lhelr llsL from Lhe prevlous day abouL how we can help
Lhe communlLy.
SpllL Lhe sLudenLs lnLo small groups and ask Lhem Lo Lhlnk abouL Lhelr
suggesLlons on how we can help Lhe communlLy and Lo also Lhlnk abouL Lhlngs
wlLhln Lhe communlLy LhaL concern Lhem. Cne sLudenL from each Leam wlll
share Lhelr llsL wlLh Lhe class. WrlLe all ldeas for each communlLy on Lhe board.
29

Co Lhrough Lhe llsL and have sLudenLs make suggesLlons for soluLlons Lo Lhelr
concern- connecLlng concerns Lo helplng. Lmphaslze dlscusslng Lhe commons
and ensurlng lL's Lhrlvlng.
1ogeLher, declde on one lssue Lhe class would llke Lo work on solvlng. Make a llsL
of soluLlons.
ueslgn a plan.

Instruct|ona|]Lnv|ronmenta| Mod|f|cat|ons]D|fferent|ated Strateg|es
Small group lnsLrucLlon serves as a scaffold

LfS Assessment]Scor|ng Cr|ter|a
WhaL do l need Lo collecL or admlnlsLer Lo prove LhaL sLudenLs have grown Lowards
and/or achleved deslred ouLcomes/sLandards? WhaL crlLerla wlll l use Lo
assess/evaluaLe sLudenL work?


*** |ease see kU8kIC
LfS/SLaLe
SLandard
(name)
LfS/SLaLe erformance
lndlcaLor
(leLLer and number)
LfS/SLaLe
AssessmenL
lnsLrumenL
LfS/SLaLe Scorlng
CrlLerla
Clvlcs,
CovernmenL,
and Puman
8lghLs
6.1..A.3 1eacher
CbservaLlon
Are sLudenLs able Lo
collaboraLe
LogeLher?
AcLlve
ClLlzenshlp ln
Lhe 21
sL

CenLury
6.3.4.A.3 1eacher
CbservaLlon
Servlce Learnlng
ro[ecL
CrlLlcal
1hlnklng and
roblem
Solvlng
9.1.4.A.1 1eacher
CbservaLlon
Are sLudenLs able Lo
collaboraLe
LogeLher?
CrlLlcal
1hlnklng and
roblem
Solvlng
9.1.4.A.2 1eacher
CbservaLlon
Are sLudenLs able Lo
collaboraLe
LogeLher?
CrlLlcal
1hlnklng and
roblem
Solvlng
9.1.4.8.1 1eacher
CbservaLlon
Are sLudenLs able Lo
collaboraLe
LogeLher?
8eadlng:
LlLeraLure key
ldeas and
C2. 1 1eacher
CbservaLlon
Are sLudenLs able Lo
respond Lo LexL?
Su


ueLalls
8eadlng:
LlLeraLure key
ldeas and
ueLalls
C2. 3 1eacher
CbservaLlon
Are sLudenLs able Lo
respond Lo LexL?
Speaklng and
LlsLenlng
Comprehenslon
and
CollaboraLlon
C2. 1 1eacher
CbservaLlon
Are sLudenLs able Lo
collaboraLe wlLh
oLhers
approprlaLely?
Speaklng and
LlsLenlng
knowledge and
ldeas
C2. 6 1eacher
CbservaLlon
Are sLudenLs uslng
approprlaLe
convenLlons ln
conversaLlon?
MulLlple
erspecLlves
P 7 1eacher
CbservaLlon
Are sLudenLs abouL
Lo collaboraLe wlLh
oLhers Lo plan Lhe
servlce pro[ecL?
S1

L1PlCS nA88A1lvL
Motlo ls o tbltJ-qtoJet ooJ ooe tlme bet ftleoJ, 8elloJo colleJ bet Messy Motlo wbeo
tbey wete wotkloq oo o ptoject ot scbool. Otbet clossmotes wete lo tbelt qtoop ooJ tbe
ptoject wos to Jo teseotcb ooJ floJ focts oboot wbete tbe wotet come ftom tbot comes
oot of tbe wotet foocet lo tbe closstoom. Motlos teseotcb folJet wos toqqeJy ooJ bet
popets wete osoolly jost sboveJ loto tbe folJet so tbey olwoys lookeJ wtlokleJ. Motlo
wooteJ to bove evetytbloq oeot ooJ tlJy llke bet ftleoJ 8elloJo, bot sbe wos olwoys lo o
botty to cleoo op. Motlo olwoys felt llke sbe wos beloq tolJ to botty op by
evetyooe. 8elloJo bos beeo bet ftleoJ sloce kloJetqotteo ooJ Motlo llkeJ tbot sbe
belpeJ bet to botty op ooJ cleoo op- tbls moJe Motlo feel llke 8elloJo teolly coteJ oboot
bet. 8ot sloce tbeyve beeo lo J
tJ
qtoJe, Motlo feels llke 8elloJo bos stotteJ plckloq oo
bet. Aftet sbe colleJ bet Messy Motlo, evetyooe else lo tbe closs stotteJ collloq bet tbot
oome too. Motlo tbloks tbot 8elloJo ls bossy ooJ feels llke collloq bet 8ossy 8elloJo to
qet bock ot bet. Moybe tbe klJs wlll stott collloq bet tbot too ooJ sbe woolJ koow bow lt
woolJ feel to be colleJ sometbloq tbot otbets looqb oboot, bot Motlo koew tbot sbe
woolJot Jo lt.

Ooe Joy, Motlos mom oskeJ bet lf sbe woolJ llke to lovlte 8elloJo to qo to tbe beocb
wltb tbem lo tbe motoloq. Motlo tbooqbt oboot lt fot o momeot ooJ solJ, oo, l Joot
woot to be ftleoJs wltb 8elloJo ooymote. Motlos mom wos coofoseJ ooJ oskeJ Motlo
to tell bet wby. Motlo exploloeJ bow 8elloJo wos bossloq bet otoooJ ooJ Motlos mom
wos sotptlseJ, tbe qltls boJ olwoys seemeJ llke socb qooJ ftleoJs. Motlos mom
temloJeJ bet of tbe coovetsotloo tbey boJ boJ oftet teoJloq cloto ooJ tbe 8ossy by
kotb Obl. Motlo ooJ bet mom boJ tolkeJ oboot bow lts okoy to let yoot ftleoJ koow
bow yoo feel lo o pollte woy, to be tbe blqqet petsoo.

5o tbe oext week ot scbool, Motlo ooJ 8elloJo wete wotkloq oo o ptoject toqetbet wbeo
8elloJo stotteJ plckloq oo Motlo ooJ bossloq bet otoooJ.

wbot sboolJ Motlo Jo? wbot woolJ yoo Jo? nove yoo evet felt tbe woy tbot Motlo
Joes? uo yoo evet feel llke yoo ote beloq bossy llke 8elloJo?






S2












IkILNDSnI IL

Mlx Lwo quarLs of respecL
SLlr ln 3 Lablespoonfuls of smlles for our classmaLes
Add one cup of sharlng
SLlr ln Lhree gallons of compllmenLs
Mlx one llLer of llsLenlng Lo our frlends
SLlr ln 2 cups of Laklng Lurns
8ake aL 323 for 43 mln.
CuL lnLo 23 sllces and share wlLh your class
SS

8ubrlc- 1he CoodWork ro[ecL- LLhlcs

name:
_____________________________________________

Advanced rof|c|ent 8as|c
1eamwork
6.1..A.3
9.1.4.A.1
9.1.4.A.2
9.1.4.8.1
SLCCC21
P.7
AcLlvely collaboraLes
Lo seeks and suggesLs
soluLlons Lo problems.
CollaboraLes Lo
lmprove on soluLlons
suggesLed by oLher
group members.
uoes noL parLlclpaLe.
ConvenLlons of
Speaklng and
LlsLenlng
SLCCC21
SLklC26
uemonsLraLes
convenLlons of a
proflclenL llsLener and
speaker wlLh flexlblllLy
approprlaLe Lo
audlence and purpose
uses approprlaLe
pragmaLlc feaLures of
dlscourse and
senLence sLrucLure
and grammar errors
are mlnor.
uoes noL use Lngllsh
language
convenLlons.
1hlnklng AbouL 1exL
8LkluC21
8LkluC23
8esponds wlLh lnslghL
Lo LexL.
8esponds Lo LexL on
Lhe surface level
uoes noL parLlclpaLe.
Servlce Learnlng
6.3.4.A.3
P7
SLudenL ls able Lo
share, produce, and
reflecL on servlce
lndlvldually and wlLh
group members.
SLudenL ls able Lo
share, produce, and
reflecL wlLh group
members only.
uoes noL parLlclpaLe.





















S4

Grade: 1/2 multiage
Unit: Citizenship in the classroom and community
Lesson: The Good Work project- Engagement


Lesson Overview
This lesson is designed to begin the conversation with young children about being
engaged in what they are learning. Engagement is when you care about and are really
interested in the work you are doing and what youre learning. Engagement feels like
happy or joyful learning.


Number of Class Periods: three 40-minute periods

Standards
New Jersey State Standards (2009)
21
st
Century Life and Career Skills
o A: Critical Thinking and Problem Solving- 9.1.4.A.5 Apply
critical thinking and problem-solving skills in classroom and
family settings.
o B: Creativity and Innovation- 9.1.4.B.1 Participate in
brainstorming sessions to seek information, ideas, and strategies
that foster creative thinking.
o C: Collaboration, Teamwork, and Leadership- 9.1.4.C.1
Practice collaborative skills in groups, and explain how these skills
assist in completing tasks in different settings.
o D: Cross- Cultural Understanding and Interpersonal
Communication
! 9.1.4.D.1 Use effective oral and written communication in
face-to-face and online interactions and when presenting to
an audience,
! 9.1.4.D.2 Express needs, wants, and feelings, appropriately
in various situations.

National Standards (2012)
Language Arts- Reading: Literature
o Key Ideas and Details- Grade 2. 3. Describe how characters in a
story respond to major events and challenges.
Speaking and Listening- Comprehension and Collaboration- Grade 2
1. Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about
grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

EfS Standards (add performance indicators and narratives if applicable)
! I: Sense of Place 22. Engage in goal setting/future visioning.

Essential Question: What makes a good community?
SS


Guiding Questions:
Why do you think its important to like what you are learning about?
How can we help each other be engaged in what we are learning?
What expertise do you have to teach your peers?
Why is it important to understand your likes and dislikes?
What can you do if youre feeling un-engaged?
What does GoodWork mean to you?
Can you think of any examples of something you would call GoodWork
Why is GoodWork important?


Resources/materials for this lesson:
Crayons and/or colored pencils
Pencils
Altogether Me (student working sheet)
Altogether Us (Venn diagram working sheet)
Book: The Ok Book by Amy Kraus Rosenthal

Learning Opportunities, Activities, and Procedures:
Day 1:
Read the students the Engagement narrative from The Good Work Project (see
below). The narrative is about a young boy who finally finds that he can write and
read after discovering his love of baseball. After reading the story to the students,
ask- Why do you think its important to like what you are learning about?
Tell the students that they will be exploring good work as part of their
explorations into classroom community. Ask the students, what does GoodWork
mean to you? Can you think of any examples of something you would call
GoodWork? Why is GoodWork important?
Explain to the students that they are going to explore their likes and dislikes and
share their findings with their classmates. Discuss with the students the facts they
all fill a different role in the classroom. Point out that some may be the expert in
baseball, like Kyle from the story, while others may be the expert in adding.
Ask students to tell about the different roles they fill in the classroom community.
Add all responses to a list entitled, 1/2 expertise.
Distribute copies of the Altogether Me sheet and have students draw pictures to
show some of the different roles they fill within the classroom community. For
help labeling their pictures, students can refer to the list created earlier.

Day 2:
Read The Ok Book by Amy Kraus Rosenthal
Ask students to refer to the conversation from the previous day and have the
students look at their Altogether Me pictures and the list created yesterday. Give
students time to finish their Altogether Me sheets if necessary.
S6

Arrange students in pairs. Give each pair an Altogether Us Venn Diagram. Have
them compare their Altogether Me lists and complete the Venn diagrams.
Discuss the results as a class. How can we each help each other be engaged in
what we are learning? Think about the person you just worked with, what can you
teach them?

Day 3:
Explain to the students that today they will be making trading cards about
themselves. Ask, why is it important to understand your likes and dislikes? Guide
students to connect likes and dislikes with their engagement in the classroom-
What can you do if youre feeling unengaged? Discuss with students finding
something to like about the topic, whether it be getting help from a friend or using
one of their expertise to find the purpose and meaning. Explain that by making
trading cards to display in the classroom, the students are creating a way to share
their expertise with each other all year.
Have each child measure and cut out an index or oaktag card, 2 ! inches by 3 !
inches.
Each student should paste his or her photograph on one side of the card. Have
children write information about themselves on the backs of the card.
Have students decorate the cards. Laminate the cards for longevity.
Then, have the students share their cards with one another.


Instructional/Environmental Modifications/Differentiated Strategies
Class discussions serve as a modification; teacher examples are provided for visual
guidance.

EfS Assessment/Scoring Criteria
What do I need to collect or administer to prove that students have grown towards and/or
achieved desired outcomes/standards? What criteria will I use to assess/evaluate student
work?

EfS/State
Standard
(name)
EfS/State Performance
Indicator
(letter and number)
EfS/State
Assessment
Instrument
EfS/State Scoring
Criteria
Critical
Thinking and
Problem
Solving
9.1.4.A.5 Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
critically think about
ethics and service
learning?
Creativity and
Innovation
9.1.4.B.1 Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
brainstorm
collaboratively?
Collaboration,
Teamwork, and
Leadership
9.1.4.C.1 Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
brainstorm
collaboratively and
work collaboratively
S7














Engagement Narrative

Before he was in second grade, Kyle never liked school. He didnt think he was very
good at it. Thats what his older sisters had always told him. His kindergarten and first
grade teachers said his name a lot and they seemed to really want him to be able to read
books and to write words in his journals and for stories. Could this be reworded? Maybe
split the sentence up- His kindergarten and first grade teachers said his name a lot- Kyle
knew he was probably not very liked. Kyle also felt that his teachers really wanted him to
be able to read and write and so did he, but they never let him write about what he
wanted to. Kyle wanted to read and write about baseball. When he wasnt in school, he
watched and played baseball a lot. His sister even found a baseball game on the
on a project?
Cross Cultural
Understanding
and
Interpersonal
Communication
9.1.4.D.1 Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
communicate their
thoughts
effectively?
Cross Cultural
Understanding
and
Interpersonal
Communication
9.1.4.D.2 Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
communicate their
thoughts
effectively?
Reading:
Literature
RLKID 3 Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
discuss text?
Speaking and
Listening
SLCC 1 Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
communicate their
thoughts
effectively?
Sense of Place I 22 Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
communicate their
ideas about the
future of the service-
learning project?
S8

computer that he played whenever one of them would let him use the computer. His
favorite team was the Boston Red Socks and he knew all of the players names and
batting averages. He loved to learn everything about the other teams too. When he saw
his Dad on the weekends, they played baseball and went to games and his Dad was one
of the coaches for his town team. In the winter, his Dad took him to batting cages and
this winter they are going to Florida to see some games during Spring Training.

School changed for Kyle in second grade. He went to a new school and his teacher
listened to him and found out right away how much he liked baseball. At first, Kyle was
still acting like he didnt like school, but then the very first time that his teacher read with
him it was a book about baseball. Over the next few weeks, the teacher showed Kyle that
he knew how to read and write a lot of baseball words. Kyles teacher was really good at
showing him lots of school things that he could do. In fact, she worked hard to find
books for him to read about baseball--stories about kids who played baseball and real
stories about baseball players. She even let him talk about baseball at morning meeting
and it turned out that there were a group of his class friends that also loved
baseball. She let them form a club that she called a book club. When they had to do a
research project, she let them all work together and research the size of a professional
baseball field and then they made a scale model of one. One day, when he was working
with a friend, measuring the infield of their scale model, Kyle looked up at his teacher
and said, I love you, Ms. H. His teacher said she loved him too, but that she thought
the happy feeling he was having was because he was having fun while he was learning!























S9

A|together Me

Pere are plcLures and words abouL Lhlngs l llke.











































4u

A|together Us
Cur names:
_________________________________________________________________

41

Name: ______________________________________________________________
re-assessment GoodWork 1oo|k|t kubr|c


Gu|d|ng
uest|ons
4 3 2 1
wbot Joes
CooJwotk
meoo to yoo?

NICCCS
9.1.4.A.S
9.1.4.D.2

SLudenL ls able
Lo descrlbe
her/hls feellngs
abouL good
work- WhaL
does good
work mean Lo
you- ln Lhe
conLexL of
speaklng abouL
Lhe group.
SLudenL ls able
Lo descrlbe
her/hls feellng
abouL good
work ln Lhe
conLexL of
speaklng abouL
herself/hlmself.
SLudenL ls
unsure or
unable Lo
express her/hls
LhoughLs abouL
good work.
SLudenL ls
unwllllng Lo
parLlclpaLe.
coo yoo tblok
of ooy
exomples of
sometbloq yoo
woolJ coll
CooJwotk?

NICCCS
9.1.4.A.S

SLudenL ls able
Lo glve aL leasL
3 examples of
her/hls
percepLlon of
good work.
SLudenL ls able
Lo glve 2
examples of
her/hls
percepLlon of
good work.
SLudenL ls able
Lo glve 1
example of
her/hls
percepLlon of
good work.
SLudenL ls
unwllllng Lo
parLlclpaLe.
wby ls
CooJwotk
lmpottoot?

LA: k-L kIDG2.1
9.1.4.A.S
LfS I 22


SLudenL ls able
Lo show hls/her
crlLlcal Lhlnklng
by explaln why
good work ls
lmporLanL Lo
Lhe classroom
communlLy-
prlde.
SLudenL ls able
Lo show hls/her
crlLlcal Lhlnklng
by explalnlng
why good work
ls lmporLanL for
hlm/her.
SLudenL ls
beglnnlng Lo
undersLand Lhe
lmporLance of
good work.
SLudenL ls
unwllllng Lo
parLlclpaLe.
NICCCS
9.1.4.8.1
9.1.4.C.1
9.1.4.D.1
SLudenL works
well and
collaboraLe Lo
asslsL oLhers ln
belng engaged
ln learnlng.
SLudenL works
well wlLh oLhers
buL doesn'L
asslsL oLhers.
SLudenL does
noL collaboraLe
wlLh peers
uslng respecL.
SLudenL ls
unwllllng Lo
parLlclpaLe.


42


Grade: 1]2 Mu|t|age
Un|t: C|t|zensh|p |n our Commun|ty
Lesson: 1he GoodWork ro[ect- Lxce||ence


Lesson Cverv|ew
1hls lesson seL beglns Lhe dlscusslon abouL excellence. SLudenLs wlll have Lhe
opporLunlLy Lo recognlze excellence ln Lhemselves and Lhelr work. Excellent work is
work that youve tried hard on and have done your best. Excellence makes you
feel satisfied, proud, and happy.


Number of C|ass er|ods: 2-40 mlnuLe perlods

Standards
State Standards (2009)
6.1.l.u.1- nlstoty, coltote, ooJ letspectlves- uescrlbe characLerlsLlcs of
oneself, one's famlly, and oLhers.
9.1.4.A.5- ctltlcol 1blokloq ooJ ltoblem 5olvloq- Apply crlLlcal Lhlnklng
and problem-solvlng skllls ln Lhe classroom and famlly seLLlngs.
9.1.4.8.1- cteotlvlty ooJ looovotloo- arLlclpaLe ln bralnsLormlng sesslons
Lo seek lnformaLlon, ldeas, and sLraLegles LhaL fosLer creaLlve Lhlnklng.

Nat|ona| Standards (2012)
keoJloq. lltetotote- CtoJe 2 1. Ask and answer such quesLlons as who,
whaL, where, when, why, and how Lo demonsLraLe undersLandlng of key
deLalls ln a LexL.
keoJloq. lltetotote- CtoJe 2 3. uescrlbe how characLers ln a sLory
respond Lo ma[or evenLs and challenges.
5peokloq ooJ llsteoloq- CtoJe 2 1. arLlclpaLe ln collaboraLlve
conversaLlons wlLh dlverse parLners abouL grade 2 Loplcs and LexLs wlLh
peers and adulLs ln small and larger groups.
5peokloq ooJ llsteoloq- CtoJe 2 3. Ask and answer quesLlons abouL whaL
a speaker says ln order Lo clarlfy comprehenslon, gaLher addlLlonal
lnformaLlon, or deepen undersLandlng of a Loplc or lssue.
5peokloq ooJ llsteoloq- CtoJe 2 6. roduce compleLe senLences when
approprlaLe Lo Lask and slLuaLlon ln order Lo provlde requesLed deLall or
clarlflcaLlon.

LfS Standards (add performance |nd|cators and narrat|ves |f app||cab|e)
n. Moltlple letspectlves- 4. WhaL are Lhe slmllarlLles and dlfferences
beLween myself and oLhers?
4S

n. Moltlple letspectlve- 3. Pow can my dlfferences help me undersLand
myself and how can Lhey help oLhers?

Lssent|a| uest|on: WhaL makes a good communlLy?

Gu|d|ng uest|ons:
WhaL ls someLhlng LhaL you are really greaL aL dolng? Pow do you know ?
WhaL ls someLhlng LhaL you are Ck aL dolng? Pow do you know ?
WhaL ls someLhlng LhaL you are noL good aL dolng? Pow do you know ?
Who do you know LhaL ls excellenL aL dolng someLhlng? Pow do you know ?
WhaL acLlons can you do Lo show excellence?
WhaL does CoodWork mean Lo you?
Can you Lhlnk of any examples of someLhlng you would call CoodWork?
Why ls CoodWork lmporLanL?

kesources]mater|a|s for th|s |esson:
CharL paper
8ook- Snowflake 8enLley by !acquellne 8rlggs MarLln
CharL made ln prevlous lesson- 1/2 LxperLlse

Learn|ng Cpportun|t|es, Act|v|t|es, and rocedures:
uay 1: Ask sLudenLs Lo Lhlnk abouL whaL good work means Lo Lhem and why lL's
lmporLanL. 8ead Lhe Lxcellence narraLlve Lo Lhe sLudenLs. ulscuss wlLh Lhe sLudenLs
Lhlngs Lhey feel Lhelr experLs" aL. Ask sLudenLs how belng excellenL aL someLhlng
connecLs Lo Lhe concepL of good work. ulscuss how you know when someLhlng ls
excellenL- when Lhe person has Lrled very hard and has done Lhelr besL work, hence-
good work. lnvlLe Lhe sLudenLs Lo refer Lo prevlous conversaLlons durlng Lhe lessons on
engagemenL. 8efer Lo Lhe 1/2 LxperLlse" charL made durlng Lhe engagemenL lessons.
Ask sLudenLs Lo Lhlnk of a Llme LhaL Lhey Lrled Lhelr hardesL on someLhlng. Add Lhese
examples Lo Lhe charL- sLress Lo Lhe sLudenLs LhaL Lrylng your hardesL means showlng
excellenL work and experLlse.

uay 2: 8ead Snowflake 8enLley by !acquellne 8rlggs MarLln. AfLer readlng, ask Lhe
sLudenLs why 8enLley could be consldered as dolng excellenL work. ulscuss wlLh Lhe
sLudenLs how Lhe characLer puL forLh a loL of efforL ln lnvesLlgaLlng someLhlng he loved-
snowflakes. 1hen, have sLudenLs Lhlnk abouL someLhlng Lhey would llke Lo lnvesLlgaLe
because of Lhelr lnLeresLs. Make a llsL of sLudenL responses- encourage sLudenLs Lo Lhlnk
abouL Lhlngs such as wrlLlng, learnlng Lo read, Lhe envlronmenL, eLc. 1bls cbott wlll be
soveJ fot Jlscossloos oboot tbe stoJeots petsoool leotoloq ploos (lll). 1hen, ask Lhe
sLudenLs Lo Lhlnk abouL how Lhey can be excellenL. Make a charL wlLh Lhe sLudenLs'
responses enLlLled- Pow We can be LxcellenL. Ask sLudenLs how excellence shows good
work.

44

Instruct|ona|]Lnv|ronmenta| Mod|f|cat|ons]D|fferent|ated Strateg|es
Croup dlscusslons serve as a scaffold.

LfS Assessment]Scor|ng Cr|ter|a
WhaL do l need Lo collecL or admlnlsLer Lo prove LhaL sLudenLs have grown Lowards
and/or achleved deslred ouLcomes/sLandards? WhaL crlLerla wlll l use Lo
assess/evaluaLe sLudenL work?


*** |ease see kU8kIC
LfS/SLaLe
SLandard
(name)
LfS/SLaLe erformance
lndlcaLor
(leLLer and number)
LfS/SLaLe
AssessmenL
lnsLrumenL
LfS/SLaLe Scorlng
CrlLerla
PlsLory,
CulLure, and
erspecLlves
6.1..u.1 1eacher
observaLlon
SLudenL dlscusslon-
are sLudenLs able Lo
dlscuss Lhemselves
CrlLlcal
1hlnklng and
roblem
Solvlng
9.1.4.A.3 1eacher
CbservaLlon
SLudenL
parLlclpaLlon ln
dlscusslons
CreaLlvlLy and
lnnovaLlon
9.1.4.8.1 1eacher
CbservaLlon
SLudenL
parLlclpaLlon ln
dlscusslons
8eadlng:
LlLeraLure
1 1eacher
CbservaLlon
SLudenL dlscusslon-
parLlclpaLlon ln
dlscusslon abouL
LexL
8eadlng:
LlLeraLure
3 1eacher
CbservaLlon
SLudenL dlscusslon-
ls sLudenL able Lo
dlscuss Lhe maln
characLer's
response Lo
challenges
Speaklng and
LlsLenlng
1 1eacher
CbservaLlon
SLudenL
parLlclpaLlon ln
dlscusslons
Speaklng and
LlsLenlng
3 1eacher
CbservaLlon
SLudenL
parLlclpaLlon ln
dlscusslons
Speaklng and
LlsLenlng
6 1eacher
CbservaLlon
SLudenL
parLlclpaLlon ln
dlscusslons
MulLlple P: 4 1eacher SLudenL dlscusslon-
4S

EXCELLENCE NARRATIVE:
Alex is in third grade and he is a very good soccer player for someone who is 9
years old. He has heard adults say this about him. His soccer coach and the
Phys Ed teacher at school always tell Alex that he is a natural athlete. Alex is not
sure what that means, except that it must mean hes good at sports. He is glad
that they tell him that because everyone seems happy that he plays sports,
especially soccer and that he scores a lot of goals during a season. His traveling
soccer team just won the state championship in their age level and he was
awarded the Excellent Player award.

Alex likes soccer, but he doesnt have to try very hard at it to score goals. Alex
also likes school and is really interested in the science unit they are doing right
now about animal habitats. Hes so glad that soccer season is over for a couple
of months so that he can play outside with his friends when he is home from
school. One of his favorite things to do is to go down by the little creek near his
house and turn over rocks to see what creatures live underneath. So when his
class started exploring the habitats that were in their state, he was excited that
his teacher let him work on researching the woodlands habitat. The problem for
Alex was that he had to present what he learned about his habitat to his class,
and Alex never was very excellent in making things with his hands. His friend
Chris was also researching the woodlands habitat and so they decided to work
together.

Chris showed Alex how to use the software for their class smartboard to create
pages with photos and facts that they learned from searching the web. Alex
worked for hours at school and at home to find photos and facts about the
animals found in woodland habitats and Chris did the research for the kinds of
trees and flowers. Alex created 5 great pages about the five most common
animals found in the woods of their state. They were the first partners to present
their habitat. They stood at the smartboard and made their presentation. When
they were done, everyone cheered and clapped and the teacher had the other
second grade classes come in and see their presentation. She told the other
partner groups that Alex and Chriss presentation was excellent and that it was a
great model of the kinds of presentations shes hoping to see from the other
groups. Alex was so proud! When he was talking to his grandma about what the
teacher had said and how happy he felt, she told him that he was feeling proud
because he did an excellent job on something he worked really hard at.
erspecLlve CbservaLlon are sLudenLs able Lo
dlscuss Lhemselves
MulLlple
erspecLlves
P: 3 1eacher
CbservaLlon
SLudenL dlscusslon-
are sLudenLs able Lo
connecL Lhelr
dlfferences Lo
oLhers'?
46

8ubrlc- 1he CoodWork ro[ecL- Lxcellence

name:
______________________________________________

Advanced roflclenL 8aslc
SLraLegles of
Speaklng and
LlsLenlng

All sLandards
uemonsLraLes
sLraLegles of a
proflclenL llsLener
and speaker, wlLh
flexlblllLy approprlaLe
Lo varylng audlences
and purposes.
uemonsLraLes
sLraLegles of
proflclenL llsLener
and speaker, buL
lacks ablllLy Lo creaLe
flexlblllLy- unable Lo
undersLand reasonlng
behlnd.
Confuses Lhe purpose
and message of Lhe
spoken work,
heslLanL Lo speak
wlLh a group,
presenLs lnformaLlon
as random facLs,
omlLs lnformaLlon
when recalllng a
sLory.
ConvenLlons of
Speaklng and
LlsLenlng

All sLandards
uemonsLraLes
convenLlons of a
proflclenL llsLener
and speaker wlLh
flexlblllLy approprlaLe
Lo audlence and
purpose.
May use approprlaLe
pragmaLlc feaLures of
dlscourse and
senLence sLrucLure
and grammar errors
are mlnor.
Confuses sLandard
Lngllsh convenLlons
whlch lmpalr
meanlng,
speech/language
dlfflculL Lo
undersLand.
lnLrapersonal
knowledge

All sLandards
Lxpresses knowledge
of ones self
arLlculaLely and wlLh
sLrong confldence.
Lxpresses knowledge
of ones self raLher
arLlculaLely and wlLh
some confldence.
ln unable Lo express
knowledge of ones
self.
MulLlple erspecLlves

P7
ls able Lo use
knowledge of ones
self Lo connecL wlLh
oLhers easlly.
ls able Lo use
knowledge of ones
self Lo connecL wlLh
oLhers wlLh
asslsLance.
ls unable Lo use
knowledge of ones
self Lo connecL wlLh
oLher afLer prompLs.











47

Appendix C

Grade: 1/2 Multiage
Unit: The GoodWork Project- series of Word Mapping
Lesson: Word Mapping

Lesson Overview

These series of lessons are designed to help students internalize vocabulary through the
use of a word map. The use of word mapping in this lesson is to allow the students to
continue assimilating into their development the concepts of good work and allow them
to build upon this knowledge as they navigate the digital world.

Number of Class Periods (e.g. 3 45-minute periods): 7-40 minute periods

Standards
NJ State Standards (2009):
9.1.4.F.1 Explain the meaning of productivity and accountability, and
describe situations in which productivity and accountability are important
in the home, school, and community.
9.1.4.F.2 Establish and follow performance goals to guide progress in
assigned areas of responsibility and accountability during classroom
projects and extra-curricular activities.

National Standards (2012):
2.3.2.B.RI.2.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases in a text
relevant to a grade 2 topic or subject area.
2.3.6.C.L.2.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-
meaning words and phrases based on second grade reading and content

EfS (Education for Sustainability) Standards (add performance indicators
and narratives if applicable)
H: Multiple Perspectives 7. How can I use my knowledge of others
differences to understand their views and actions and achieve a common
goal?
G: Inventing and Affecting the Future 6. Demonstrate the habit of turning
problems into opportunities to make positive change.

Essential Question: What are the 3 Es?

Guiding Questions:
What is a word map?
Can you make a personal connection to words?
How do you write a sentence based on a word?

Resources/materials for this lesson:
48

Webquest: http://questgarden.com/146/51/5/120716111216/
Chart paper
SMARTboard if available or projector
Amber on the Mountain by Tony Johnson
The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf
Zoozical by Judy Sierra
LucidChart or Kidspiration (whatever your district has access to)
Word Cloud website: http://www.abcya.com/word_clouds.htm
Rubric for assessment

Learning Opportunities, Activities, and Procedures:
Day 1:
Activate students prior knowledge by discussing the three Es (engagement,
excellence, and ethics). Can students remember anything about the previous
conversations had? What were the definitions that the class came up with?
Tell the students that they came up with a great definition for the 3 Es, but
theyre going to refine those definitions by looking at engagement a little more in-
depth.
Ask students to name various ways of learning vocabulary. Approaches may
include flash cards, crossword puzzles, acting out word meanings, Spelling Go
Fish, etc.
Split the class into two teams. Team A may use only 5 words to describe what
makes someone engaged and Team B may use an unlimited number of words.
As the teams collaborate, point out the use of various senses in approaching this
task. The choice of only five words for Team A will be more challenging and
require a strong sense of vocabulary.
Bring the whole class together, and have groups compare their experiences while
working on this activity. Team collaboration will play a key role, particularly for
Team A, because each student in the group will have contributed different
associations and examples for descriptive words for engagement before reaching a
consensus.

Day 2:
Then, tell the students that one way to strengthen their vocabulary and learn more
about a word is to create a word map. Follow the following steps to introduce
this concept.
o STEP 1: Write the word work in the center of the page or
SMARTboard.
o STEP 2: Using a dictionary (www.dictionary.com), look up the word and
locate the correct definition. Employ a think aloud to ask, Does this make
sense based on what I already know about the word? Record the correct
definition on the word map page you create in either LucidChart or
Kidspiration.
o STEP 3: Use the dictionary to find a synonym for the word. Record this on
the map.
49

o STEP 4: Use the thesaurus to find other forms of the word (remind the
students this process was learned during writers workshop)
o STEP 5: Make connections to the word. Its also important, at this point,
to ask students to verbalize their own connections to the word. This is a
key step toward ownership of the vocabulary.
o STEP 6: Create a sketch of the word.
o STEP 7: Develop a sentence using the word.
Elicit critical thinking skills by asking students why the sequence of these steps is
important- chart responses.


Day 3:
Invite students to again think about word mapping. Question students to repeat the
methods of formulating a definition through the process of concept mapping.
Lead the students to becoming excited about independently formulating
definitions about the 3 Es.
Tell students that they will be working in small groups to conduct an investigation
of the meaning of ethics, excellence, and engagement. Using the SMARTboard or
another projector, begin showing students the Webquest- The 3 Es. Be sure to
walk students though each step of the Webquest process explicitly showing
students how to access information.

Day 4:
Have students get into their small, collaborative groups and create their own word
map for engagement using the Webquest. Be available to assist students who are
struggling and provide verbal prompting is necessary.
When finished, invite students to share their word maps.
Read to the students, Amber on the Mountain by Tony Johnson and discuss with
the students how the main character shows good work by being engaged- is there
anything the students would like to add to their word maps of engagement?

Day 5:
Have students get into their small, collaborative groups and create their own word
map for ethics using the Webquest. Be available to assist students who are
struggling and provide verbal prompting is necessary.
When finished, invite students to share their word maps.
Read to the students, Zoozical by Judy Sierra and discuss with the students how
the main character shows good work by being an ethical person- is there anything
the students would like to add to their word maps of ethics?

Day 6:
Have students get into their small, collaborative groups and create their own word
map for excellence using the Webquest. Be available to assist students who are
struggling and provide verbal prompting is necessary.
When finished, invite students to share their word maps.
Su

Read to the students, The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf and discuss with the
students how the main character shows good work by being an excellent person-
is there anything the students would like to add to their word maps of excellence?

Day 7:
Before students enter the class, take the student groups word maps and enter each
groups ideas about each E into a word cloud
(http://www.abcya.com/word_clouds.htm). Word clouds take a list of words and
create a picture out of it emphasizing the most used words.
Gather students on the carpet and show them each of the 3 Es word clouds- one
at a time. Discuss with students their reactions to the clouds. Why do they think
certain words were used most often?
Be sure to post the word maps and word clouds in a prominent place so students
can refer to their ideas throughout the year.


Instructional/Environmental Modifications/Differentiated Strategies
Teacher modeling, small group collaborative work, and prompting serve as a scaffold

EfS Assessment/Scoring Criteria
What do I need to collect or administer to prove that students have grown towards and/or
achieved desired outcomes/standards? What criteria will I use to assess/evaluate student
work?

EfS/State
Standard
(name)
EfS/State Performance
Indicator
(letter and number)
EfS/State
Assessment
Instrument
EfS/State Scoring
Criteria
9.1.4.F.1 21
st
Century Life Skills Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
describe ethics?
9.1.4.F.2 21
st
Century Life Skills Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
describe how their
views of
engagement have
changed?
2.3.2.B.RI.2.4 Reading: Informational
Texts
Student Word Map Do student word
maps show an
understanding of the
meaning of
engagement?
2.3.6.C.L.2.4 Language Use Student Word Map Do student word
maps show an
understanding of the
meaning of
engagement?
Multiple
Perspectives
H7 Teacher
Observation
Are students able to
work with a group?
S1






Inventing and
Affecting the
Future
G6 Teacher
Observation
Do student
discussions show a
positive change in
their thinking about
engagement?
S2

Name: _______________________________ Date: _________


Expert
4
Secure
3
Developing
2
Beginning
1
Oral discussions
The speaker
provides a variety of
types of content for
understanding good
work- speaker is
able to clearly
discuss good work
and differentiate
for others when
explaining.
The speaker focuses
primarily on relevant
content- good work.
The speaker sticks
to the topic. The
speaker adapts the
content of good
work in a general
way to the listener
and the situation.
The speaker
includes some
irrelevant content.
The speaker is
obviously confused
by the concept of
good work.
The speaker says
practically nothing.
The speaker focuses
primarily on
irrelevant content.
The speaker appears
to ignore the
listener and the
situation.
Group Work
The student almost
always listens to,
shares with, and
supports the
efforts of others.
Tries to keep people
working well
together.
The student usually
listens to, shares,
with, and supports
the efforts of
others. Does not
cause "waves" in the
group.
The student often
listens to, shares
with, and supports
the efforts of
others, but
sometimes is not a
good team member.
The student rarely
listens to, shares
with, and supports
the efforts of
others. Often is not
a good team player.
Positive Change
Student discussion
shows a positive
change in their
thinking about good
work. The student
can also explain how
their thinking has
changed.
Student discussion
shows a positive
change in their
thinking about good
work, but they
cannot explain this
change.
Student discussion
does not show a
positive change in
their thinking about
good work.
Student is not
showing respect for
the discussions in
the classroom.
Final Product
The student
provides work of the
highest quality.
The student
provides high quality
work.
The student
provides work that
occasionally needs
to be
checked/redone by
other group
members to ensure
quality.
The student
provides work that
usually needs to be
checked/redone by
others to ensure
quality.

Notes:






SS

Appendix D

Grade: 1/2 Multiage
Unit: Good Work - Continuing the Discussion
Lesson: Video and Discussion of Good Work

Lesson Overview
In bringing the Cultural Unit to a close, students will be guided to compare their Good
Work and the 3Es to children in Bhutan.

Number of Class Periods (e.g. 3 45-minute periods): 3 morning meetings (20-30
minute sessions)

Standards
State Standards (2009)
6.1.P.A.3- Civics, Government, and Human Rights Demonstrate
appropriate behavior when collaborating with others.
9.1.4.B.1- Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Participate in
brainstorming sessions to seek information, ideas, and strategies that foster
creative thinking.

National Standards (2012)
Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration Grade 2 1.
Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about
grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
Speaking and Listening Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 2 6.
Produce complete sentences with appropriate to task and situation in order
to provide requested detail or clarification.

EfS Standards (add performance indicators and narratives if applicable)
B: Responsible Local and Global Citizenship
o 1. Articulate the rights and responsibilities of democratic
participation and leadership in both local and global contexts.
o 4. Form an opinion about the requirements of responsible local,
national, and global citizenship by synthesizing diverse
perspectives on participation and governance.
o 7. Demonstrate individual and collective respect for themselves
and the Commons.
o 10. Use their own choices as exemplars that demonstrate
awareness that all human choices contribute to sustainable or
unsustainable consequences.
G: Inventing and Affecting the Future 1. Develop visioning skills to create
a healthy and sustainable future.
H: Multiple Perspectives 7. How can I understand and work with others to
achieve a common goal?
I: Sense of Place 22. Engage in goal setting/future visioning.
S4


Essential Question: How are students doing Good Work?

Guiding Questions:
Before first viewing of video:
Lets think back over our culture unit what have we done? Projects? Activities? Good
Work?
What are our 3 Es?
Where in the world is Bhutan?
Lets watch the video of a project that school children around your age in Bhutan did:
How are they the same as us and our service learning project? How are they different
than us?

Resources/materials for this lesson:
Say no to package food! (video created by children in Bhutan working with Design for
Change) http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=iQ17BcL8wzc

Learning Opportunities, Activities, and Procedures:
Day 1:
Guide children in discussion during morning meeting using the guided questions
above.
On first day, have them actively view the video for purpose of looking for
engaged students what does engagement look like?
After the video, record their thoughts and comparisons
Day 2:
Guide children in discussion during morning meeting using the guided questions
above.
On second day, have them actively view the video for purpose of looking for
characteristics of excellence what is excellent about the Bhutan childrens
work?
After the video, record their thoughts and comparisons
Day 3:
Guide children in discussion during morning meeting using the guided questions
above.
On third day, have them actively view the video for purpose of looking for
ethical citizenship what does it look like?
After the video, record their thoughts and comparisons
Day 4:
As a class, research with students the country of Bhutan to provide an
understanding of the differences in culture and thought.
Ammended. I have received a video from a teacher in Bhutan of her students
explaining their classroom and daily routine- show this and compare and contrast
our classroom.

Instructional/Environmental Modifications/Differentiated Strategies
SS

Many multiple intelligences are touched upon in this lesson from auditory participation
and visual cues for discussion.

EfS Assessment/Scoring Criteria
What do I need to collect or administer to prove that students have grown towards and/or
achieved desired outcomes/standards? What criteria will I use to assess/evaluate student
work?







EfS/State
Standard
(name)
EfS/State Performance
Indicator
(letter and number)
EfS/State
Assessment
Instrument
EfS/State Scoring
Criteria
** Please see rubric
S6
















+ , * ) (
0$-1"23 45
6477&829
Timely anu
appiopiiate
comments,
thoughtful anu
ieflective,
iesponus
iespectfully to
othei stuuent's
iemaiks, piovokes
questions anu
comments fiom
the gioup
volunteeis
comments, most aie
appiopiiate anu
ieflect some
thoughtfulness,
leaus to othei
questions oi
iemaiks fiom
stuuent anuoi
otheis
volunteeis
comments but
lacks uepth, may
oi may not leau to
othei questions
fiom stuuents
Stiuggles but
paiticipates,
occasionally offeis a
comment when
uiiectly questioneu,
may simply iestate
questions oi points
pieviously iaiseu, may
auu nothing new to the
uiscussion oi piovoke
no iesponses oi
question
Boes not
paiticipate
anuoi only
makes
negative oi
uisiuptive
iemaiks,
comments
aie
inappiopiiate
oi off topic
:&94$%;&<=4;$7&82
:&5&%&8;&
Cleai iefeience to
text being
uiscusseu anu
connects to it to
othei text oi
iefeience points
fiom pievious
ieauings anu
uiscussions
Bas uone the
ieauing with some
thoioughness, may
lack some uetail oi
ciitical insight
Bas uone the
ieauing; lacks
thoioughness of
unueistanuing oi
insight
Bas not ieau the entiie
text anu cannot sustain
any iefeience to it in
the couise of
uiscussion
0nable to
iefei to text
foi eviuence
oi suppoit of
iemaiks
>;2"?& @"92&8"8#
Postuie, uemeanoi
anu behavioi
cleaily
uemonstiate
iespect anu
attentiveness to
otheis
Listens to otheis
most of the time,
uoes not stay
focuseu on othei's
comments (too busy
foimulating own) oi
loses continuity of
uiscussion. Shows
consistency in
iesponuing to the
comments of otheis
Listens to otheis
some of the time,
uoes not stay
focuseu on
othei's comments
(too busy
foimulating own)
oi loses
continuity of
uiscussion. Shows
some consistency
in iesponuing to
the comments of
otheis
Biifts in anu out of
uiscussion, listening to
some iemaiks while
cleaily missing oi
ignoiing otheis
Bisiespectful
of otheis
when they
aie speaking;
behavioi
inuicates
total non-
involvement
with gioup oi
uiscussion
A49"2"?& 6B-8#&
Stuuent uiscussion
shows a positive
change in theii
thinking about
goou woik. The
stuuent can also
explain how theii
thinking has
changeu.
Stuuent uiscussion
shows a positive
change in theii
thinking about goou
woik, but they
cannot explain this
change.
Stuuent
uiscussion uoes
now show a
positive change in
theii thinking
about goou woik.
Stuuent is not showing
iespect foi the
uiscussions in the
classioom.
Stuuent is
unable to
paiticipate.
S7

Appenuix E

Grade: 1/2 Multiage
Unit: The GoodWork Toolkit
Lesson: Quandary Game

Lesson Overview
Students will have the opportunity to explore the ideas of ETHICS through a discussion
of simulated ethical dilemmas. The discussion of choices and making smart choices
with young children, from the research that I have done with my class, opens a deeper
conversation and deeper critical thinking about 21
st
century skills. This lesson is adapted
from a lesson based on Quandary Game by The Learning Group Network.

Number of Class Periods (e.g. 3 45-minute periods): 10-40 minute periods then
periodically during centers time in small groups to continue the discussion.

Standards
Core Standards
- Reading Standards for Literature 1-7
- Reading Standards for Information Text 1-9
- Speaking and Listening Standards 1-4
- P21: Critical thinking and Problem Solving
o Reason Effectively
o Use Systems Thinking
o Make Judgments and Decisions
o Solve Problems
o Identify and ask significant questions that clarify various points of
views and lead to better solutions.
- P21: Communication and Collaboration
o Communicate Clearly
o Collaborate with Others
EfS Standards (add performance indicators and narratives if applicable)
- Multiple Perspectives H:7
- Strong Sense of Place I:22

Essential Question: What makes a good community?

Guiding Questions:
- What was your role in the game?
- What did you have to do?
- What is the difference between a fact, an opinion, and a solution?
- What opinions did you have for solving the colonys problem?
- What made you choose the solution you chose?
- Did you find it hard to choose a solution? If so, why?
- That game encouraged you to find out other peoples points of view, but did you
listen to them when making your decision?
S8

- Why did you think its important to understand other points of views?
- Did you try another solution? If so, what and why? If not, what else might have
worked?
- How well did your colony do overall? What do you think the success of the
colony depends on? Try to think of some words to describe how youd measure
success.
- What was good about the outcome of your solution?
- Have you ever faced a similar problem in your own life- a problem where theres
no clear answer and you dont know what to do? If there anything that you
learned form the game that would help you make decisions when you face similar
problems?


Resources/materials for this lesson:
- SMARTboard or projector
- Internet
- You Tube video: http://youtu.be/XjL3M6y6T0E
- Exit Ticket (see below)
- Writing Prompt (See below)
- Computers/laptops (at least 1 for every 3-4 students)
- Quandary Game: http://www.quandarygame.org/
- Chart paper/markers
- White paper for drawing
- Crayons/markers for students


Learning Opportunities, Activities, and Procedures:
Day 1: Introduce the game
In a whole group session, ask the students Do you know what the games title means?
What is a quandary? Elicit responses from the students; accept all responses that the
students can justify- chart ideas. Using the classroom SMARTboard for projector, look
up the definition of the word using at least 2-3 sources and then ask the question again-
What is a quandary? Chart all responses that students can justify again. Show students the
You Tube video explaining what a quandary is: http://youtu.be/XjL3M6y6T0E. EXIT
ticket: Students will write a sentence about what they believe a quandary is.

Day 2 and 3: Continuation of the Introduction
In a whole group session, show students the website for the game
(www.quandarygame.org). Tell the students that they will have the opportunity to play
the game in small groups in the upcoming days. Summarize by telling students: this
game challenges you to make tough decisions about how to build a colony on a new
planet. Walk students through the start page on the game and discuss that they can sign
up for a log in to save their games at home, but for the purposes of class, each student
will be playing at a guest. ** Be sure to show the students how each set of words can be
read to them.

S9

Walk through the steps together- vote as a class each decision to be made:
- Choose a character
- Choose an episode
o Lost Sheep
o Water War
o Fashion Faction
Within the episode there will be choices to be made- discussing each decision with the
whole class without commenting from the teachers perspective.

When finished playing, discuss the experience while weaving the following questions
into the discussion:
Players role
- What was your role in the game?
- What did you have to do?

Making decisions
- What is the difference between a fact, an opinion, and a solution?
- What opinions did you have for solving the colonys problem?
- What made you choose the solution you chose?
- Did you find it hard to choose a solution? If so, why?
- That game encouraged you to find out other peoples points of view, but did you
listen to them when making your decision?
- Why did you think its important to understand other points of views?

Impact on colony
- Did you try another solution? If so, what and why? If not, what else might have
worked?
- How well did your colony do overall? What do you think the success of the
colony depends on? Try to think of some words to describe how youd measure
success.
- What was good about the outcome of your solution?

Then, extend the students thinking about the decisions they made by asking: Have you
ever faced a similar problem in your own life- a problem where theres no clear answer
and you dont know what to do? If there anything that you learned form the game that
would help you make decisions when you face similar problems?

Concrete activity: Have students draw a picture of a time they experienced a quandary.
This can be used for a bulletin board to assist in student understanding.

Day 4-5: Students should work in small groups to work through and discuss the episode
of their choosing. It is important for the teacher to circulate and add to discussion.

Day 6-10: During center time, the students should work in small groups to go through an
episode and discuss.

6u

Assessment: Exit ticket/timed writing in preparation for student written narratives
(next GoodWork activity planned).

Write about a time that you experienced using good work (ethics, excellence, or
engagement).


Instructional/Environmental Modifications/Differentiated Strategies
Students are working in homogeneous partnerships.

EfS Assessment/Scoring Criteria
What do I need to collect or administer to prove that students have grown towards and/or
achieved desired outcomes/standards? What criteria will I use to assess/evaluate student
work?




























EfS/State
Standard
(name)
EfS/State Performance
Indicator
(letter and number)
EfS/State
Assessment
Instrument
EfS/State Scoring
Criteria
** Please see rubric
61

Appendix F

Name: ______________________________________________________________
re and ost-assessment
GoodWork 1oo|k|t kubr|c
C?&%-11 D$"E"8# 0$&92"48F GB-2 E4 34$ 2B"8H -I4$2 JB-2
B-KK&8&E "8 2B& 924%3L 6-8 34$ J%"2& -I4$2 34$% 5&&1"8#9
-I4$2 2B"9 924%3L

4 3 2 1
Relationship
and Role Models
- Does students
response show the
basic principles of
good work?
- Does student
describe their
feelings through
conversation or
short answers?

NJCCCS
9.1.4.A.5
9.1.4.D.2

Student discusses
consequences of
positive or negative
relationship/role
model; discusses
ways in which an
individual can
negotiate conflicting
opinions in relation to
his/her own ethical
standards.

Because the teacher
stood up for
Chrysanthemum, it
made the students
see that flower names
are nice. The student
should comment
about
Chrysanthemums
change in feelings.
Student is aware of
power difference
between junior and
senior persons and
the difficulty of
navigating this power
differential when
opinions conflict.

Student addresses
the concept of good
work by discussing
how they felt about
Chrysanthemums
dilemma- no one told
the students not to
treat her that way,
and explains why
they are feeling a
certain way.

Student is unsure or
unable to express
her/his thoughts
about role models
and social
realtionships.

Student addresses
the concept of good
work by discussing
how they felt about
Chrysanthemums
dilemma.
Does not
address
Individual
background,
expertise,
beliefs, values
- Where does
student pull
examples from-
personal
experience,
literature?

NJCCCS
9.1.4.A.5
Takes a position on to
what extent he/she
agrees with how
individual actor
navigates the
dilemma, making
connections to ideas
about mission and
standard.

I can understand why
Chrysanthemum
Analyze how these
particular factors
influence how the
dilemma is handled

Because
Chrysanthemum is so
proud of her name
before she does go
into school, she feels
sad when people
laugh at her name on
Recognizes that
individual
background,
expertise, beliefs,
values of individual
actor in dilemma as
relevant to how he
handles the dilemma

Chrysanthemum
believes that her name
is the best name ever.
Does not
address
62

doesnt like her name
anymore - she used to
think her name was
the best name, but
she didnt know
students in her class
would make fun of her
about it.
the first day of school.
Responsibility
- Is student able
to differentiated
between
situations where
GoodWork is
relevant or
important?
- Is student able
to comment on an
individuals
responsibility for
good work?


LA: R-L KIDG2.1
9.1.4.A.5
EfS B8


Student is able to
show his/her critical
thinking by
explaining via writing
why good work is
important to the
classroom
community- pride.

Student presents an
argument for how the
bullying toward
Chrysanthemum
affects the class as a
whole.

The student should
not pick on
Chrysanthemum, it is
the role of her
classmates to stop
the bully.
Student is able to
show his/her critical
thinking by
explaining via writing
why good work is
important for
him/her.

Student discusses
how the actions
toward
Chrysanthemum
affect themselves and
their feelings and
gives a reason why.

Though she needs to
stand up for herself,
the students should
not pick on
Chrysanthemum.
Student is able to
explain, via writing,
basic understanding
of good work, but is
unable to describe
the implications of
this knowledge.

Student discusses
how the actions
toward
Chrysanthemum
affect themselves and
their feelings.

Chrysanthemum
should not be picked
on. Everyone should
be kind.
Does not
address

Scoiing uuiue:

12-16 points- The stuuent has an excellent, complex unueistanuing of uoouWoik.
8-12 points- The stuuent has a faii, suiface level unueistanuing of uoouWoik.
4-8 points- The stuuent has a ueveloping unueistanuing of uoouWoik at a base
level.
u-4 points- The stuuent has little to no unueistanuing of uoouWoik.

M892%$;2"489 54% 48NE&7-8E A%&N-99&997&82F
Stuuents shoulu be given the oppoitunity to choose wiiting
papei baseu on theii uevelopmental ieauiness. Some youngei
stuuents may want to uiaw pictuies insteau of wiiting, oi a
combination of both. Stuuents will neeu the oppoitunity to auu
pages to theii booklets if uesiieu. Stuuents shoulu be given 2u-
Su minutes foi this activity. This is meant as an on-uemanu
6S

uiscussion of goou woik anu no piioi infoimation shoulu be
given.

:&-E 24 2B& 92$E&829 2B& 9$##&92&E ;B"1E%&8O9 K";2$%&
I44H9 I&14JP =4 842 #"?& -83 "82%4E$;2"48 54% 2B& A:Q
>99&997&82P

6B%39-82B&7$7 I3 R&?"8 S&8H&9


T&11 92$E&829F
!"#$ &' (') $"*+, #-')$ ."#$ "#//0+0& *+ $"0 1$'2(3 4#+ (')
.2*$0 #-')$ (')2 5006*+71 #-')$ $"*1 1$'2(3 8'. &' (') $"*+,
4"2(1#+$"09)9 50061 #-')$ "02 +#90 +'.3 !"(3




















64

Appendix G






6S








66








67








68

Appendix H






69








7u








71








72








7S

Appendix I






74








7S








76








77

Appendix J






78








79








8u








81








82

Appendix K






8S








84








8S








86

Appendix L






87








88








89








9u








91

Appendix M

Grade: first through eighth grade
Unit: The GoodWork Toolkit
Lesson: Partner Writing- Ethical Narratives

Lesson Overview: This lesson is designed to develop an understanding of the concept of
personal ethics in moving toward the development of authoring partner ethical narratives.

Number of Class Periods (e.g. 3 45-minute periods): one session

Standards
State Standards (2009)
6.1.P.A.3- Civics, Government, and Human Rights Demonstrate
appropriate behavior when collaborating with others.
6.3.4.A.3- Active Citizenship in the 21
st
Century Select a local issue and
develop a group action plan to inform school and/or community members
about the issue.
9.1.4.A.1- Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Recognize a problem
and brainstorm ways to solve the problem individually or collaboratively.
9.1.4.A.2- Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Evaluate available
resources that can assist in solving problems.
9.1.4.B.1- Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Participate in
brainstorming sessions to seek information, ideas, and strategies that foster
creative thinking.

National Standards (2012)
Reading: Literature Key Ideas and Details Grade 2 1. Ask and answer
such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate
understanding of key ideas and details in a text.
Reading: Literature Key Ideas and Details Grade 2 3. Describe how
characters in a story respond to major events and challenges.
Speaking and Listening Comprehension and Collaboration Grade 2 1.
Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about
grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
Speaking and Listening Presentation of Knowledge and Ideas Grade 2 6.
Produce complete sentences with appropriate to task and situation in order
to provide requested detail or clarification.

EfS Standards (add performance indicators and narratives if applicable)
B: Responsible Local and Global Citizenship
o 1. Articulate the rights and responsibilities of democratic
participation and leadership in both local and global contexts.
o 4. Form an opinion about the requirements of responsible local,
national, and global citizenship by synthesizing diverse
perspectives on participation and governance.
92

o 7. Demonstrate individual and collective respect for themselves
and the Commons.
o 10. Use their own choices as exemplars that demonstrate
awareness that all human choices contribute to sustainable or
unsustainable consequences.
G: Inventing and Affecting the Future 1. Develop visioning skills to create
a healthy and sustainable future.
H: Multiple Perspectives 7. How can I understand and work with others to
achieve a common goal?
I: Sense of Place 22. Engage in goal setting/future visioning.

Essential Question: What makes a good community?

Guiding Questions:
Did you discover differences or similarities between how you completed the sort
for yourself versus how you thought your peers might complete it? What are the
differences? What are the similarities? What do you make of them?
Consider the values on these cards. Do any of them resonate for you? What values
do you consider your own?
Which of the values guide your approach to work? Your approach to peer
relationships? Your approach to familial relationships?
Are there any values that are important to you that are not listed? If so, what are
they?
Why is it important to perceive life from anothers perspective?
What is your ethical responsibility?
How is being responsible making you an ethical person?
How can you use descriptive language to enhance the readability of your story?
In what ways can you strengthen your stories?
How do writers give a special atmosphere to common settings?

Resources/materials for this lesson:
GoodWork Toolkit- Value Sort cards
GoodWork Toolkit- Value Sort SMARTboard activity
Chart paper
Hey Little Ant by Philip Hoose
http://ensemble.stanford.edu

Learning Opportunities, Activities, and Procedures:
Step 1: Value Sort on SMARTboard. With a set of thirty GoodWork Toolkit Value Sort
cards (or the cards in the SMARTboard file), do the following three activities:
1. As a class, think of an activity that is important to you (collectively), something
you would find hard to miss. Think about how you go about doing this activity
(e.g. soccer, rest reading, class meeting). Were going to sort the values in terms
of importance to you while involved in this activity. Together, were going to
follow the grid so that only the allotted number of cards is placed in a particular
9S

category. (Teacher- when the activity is finished, save the SMARTboard file and
print.)
2. As a class, now were going to sort the cards in terms of you personally (when not
in an activity). Together, were going to follow the grid so that only the allotted
number of cards is placed in a particular category. (Teacher- when the activity is
finished, save the SMARTboard file and print.)
3. As a class, now were going to sort the cards in terms of how we think other
people see the values. Together, were going to follow the grid so that only the
allotted number of cards is placed in a particular category. (Teacher- when the
activity is finished, save the SMARTboard file and print.)

Step 2: Read Hey Little Ant! By Phillip and Hannah Hoose. Discuss with the students the
choice to squish or save the ant. Chart the students responses- focus on the ethical
responsibility surrounding preservation of nature.

Step 3: Pair students for the process of writing their own GoodWork story- discuss
ethical dilemmas, problem and solution, and cause and effect. Students will use the
website http://ensemble.stanford.edu to partner write. They will need to log in using:
fall2013global++@gmail.com and the password: fall2013global.

Instructional/Environmental Modifications/Differentiated Strategies
Partners serve as a scaffold

EfS Assessment/Scoring Criteria
What do I need to collect or administer to prove that students have grown towards and/or
achieved desired outcomes/standards? What criteria will I use to assess/evaluate student
work?


Assessment Rubric: ethical narrative activity

4 3 2 1
Relationship
and Role
Models
- Does students
response show
the basic
principles of
good work?
- Does student
describe their
feelings through
conversation or
short answers?
Student discusses
consequences of
positive or negative
relationship/role
model; discusses
ways in which an
individual can
negotiate conflicting
opinions in relation to
his/her own ethical
standards.

Student is
aware of power
difference
between junior
and senior
persons and the
difficulty of
navigating this
power
differential
when opinions
conflict.

Student is unsure
or unable to
express her/his
thoughts about
role models and
social
relationships.

Does
not
address
94

NJCCCS
9.1.4.A.5
9.1.4.D.2
Individual
background,
expertise,
beliefs, values
- Where does
student pull
examples from-
personal
experience,
literature?
NJCCCS
9.1.4.A.5
Takes a position on to
what extent he/she
agrees with how
individual actor
navigates the
dilemma, making
connections to ideas
about mission and
standard.

Analyze how
these particular
factors
influence how
the dilemma is
handled

Recognizes that
individual
background,
expertise, beliefs,
values of
individual actor
in dilemma as
relevant to how
he handles the
dilemma

Does
not
address
Responsibility
- Is student able
to differentiated
between
situations where
GoodWork is
relevant or
important?
- Is student able
to comment on
an individuals
responsibility for
good work?
LA: R-L
KIDG2.1
9.1.4.A.5
EfS I 22
Student is able to
show his/her critical
thinking by
explaining via writing
why ethical behavior
is important to the
classroom
community- pride.

Student is able
to show his/her
critical
thinking by
explaining via
writing why
ethical
behavior is
important for
him/her.

Student is able to
explain, via
writing, basic
definition of
ethical behavior,
but is unable to
describe the
implications of
this knowledge.

Does
not
address


Scoring Guide:
12-16 points- The student has an excellent, complex understanding of ethics.
8-12 points- The student has a fair, surface level understanding of ethics.
4-8 points- The student has a developing understanding of ethics at a base level.
0-4 points- The student has little to no understanding of ethics.