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Name: Mrs.

Warner Grade: 5th Grade Lesson Objectives: The students will discuss how it would feel if they were a slave, and
what they would be willing to do to keep their families together if at all possible. The students will learn about how they would want family traditions, or memories sent through the generations. Students will learn empathy towards both the slave families, and the abolitionists who put everything on the line to help them.

IN State Standards: SS.5.1.19 2007 Chronological Thinking, Historical Comprehension,
Analysis and Interpretation, Research: Using primary and secondary sources to examine an historical account about an issue of the time, reconstruct the literal meaning of the passages by identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led to these developments and what consequences or outcomes followed. Example: Issues regarding quartering of troops, separation from Britain, slavery and the controversy over the presidential election of 1800

IN Indicator: SS.5.1 2007 - History Students will describe the historical movements that
influenced the development of the United States from pre-Columbian times up to 1800, with an emphasis on the American Revolution and the founding of the United States.

Content: Materials/Media:          1.
The American Girl book Meet Addy by Connie Porter Shoelaces Strings Shells Rocks Beads Paper Maps Colored Pencils Motivation: The teacher will read the book Meet Addy by Connie Porter and discuss with the students what it was like to be a slave. The teacher will ask the students what would they want to pass along to future generations, and how they would plan to do it. The teacher would ask the students about how do they think a slave could plan a route to run away in a time when it was illegal to know how to read and write. The teacher would

ask the students what they thought would happen to those people who helped the runaway slaves.

 Goal for Learner: Today we will be talking about slavery. What do you think
the life of a slave was like? How do you think that slaves were able to stay connected when their owners sold of family members splitting up families? How would you be able to pass down family history and traditions through generations?

2. Procedure:  New Information: The students have a general understanding about slavery,
this lesson is to develop an empathy with the class toward the feelings of those held in slavery, and those who helped to free them. We will read the book Meet Addy by Connie Porter and begin a discussion on the topic.

 Checking for Understanding: What items would from your family would
you want passed down to future generations? What is the importance of passing down family history and traditions through future generations?

 Modeling: On page 40 of the book Meet Addy by Connie Porter Addy’s
mother gives her a special gift. It is a cowrie shell that her great grandmother was able to bring with her from Africa where she was kidnaped. She kept the shell and passed it down through her family so they would know they came from. Addy’s mother used one of Sam’s (Addy’s brother who was recently sold along with their father to another owner splitting up the family) shoelaces to turn the shell into a necklace. The teacher will talk to the students about something that has been passed through generations in her family, and then open the discussion to the students.

 Guided Practice: The students will use the shoelaces, strings, rocks, shells,
and beads to make an heirloom to symbolize the tradition of passing things through a family. As the students work on the activity talk with them about the limited supplies that the slaves had, and how they were able to preserve their heritage with those limited supplies. Encourage the students to stretch their imagination to symbolize their own families, and how they could preserve their own heritage.

 Checking for Understanding: Continue talking to the students about family
traditions, and heritage. Encourage the students to share family stories that they would want preserved, and how they could do so.

 Practice: As the students finish their heritage activity, have them write what the
item made represents. Have them think about and write how the item would be used to pass on family traditions.

 Assessment: The teacher will ask students what traditions and heritage are. The
teacher would ask the students how they would be able to pass family stories along through generations, while having limited resources and no reading or writing skills. The teacher would again ask the students how they would feel if they were in that situation.

 Extension: If time allows have the students act as abolitionists and make a map
of a route that the slaves could follow with little or no reading skills. This map would have to appear to the slave owners as being just a picture, and not a map. The students will learn how the abolitionists had to be very careful not to let the owners or confederate army learn of the paths or safe houses that the slaves utilized.

 Closure: The students should be familiar with family traditions, and how the
slaves had to pass along their heritage to future generations with limited supplies. The students will learn that simple things such as the shell Addy received held special meaning and hope to those held in captivity. The students should realize how slavery affected families, and how such a horrible thing should never happen again. 3. Evaluation: The students will be graded on their willingness to participate in the discussion about slavery. The students will be graded on their willingness to work on the craft representing a family tradition or heritage to pass down through generations. The students should demonstrate an empathy towards the lives lived by slaves, and the hardships they had to deal with. The students should be able to demonstrate how they would be able to pass on family history with limited supplies, and communication skills just as those in slavery. This lesson was made to allow the students to empathy towards those in slavery.

Historical Role Play : Slavery and Family Traditions
Teacher Name: Mrs. Warner

Student Name:

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CATEGORY Participation

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3

2

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The student actively The student gives engages in the ideas and input in discussion, giving the discussion. ideas and input.

The student answers The student does not questions when participate in the asked directly. discussion.

Required Elements

Student included more information than was required.

Student included all Student included Student included information that was most information that less information than required. was required. was required.

Role

Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were consistently in tune with the discussion. Student willingly created an heirloom to represent his/her family, and included more than required.

Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were often in tune with the discussion.

Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were sometimes in tune with the discussion. Student willingly created an heirloom to represent his/her family leaving some items undone.

Point-of-view, arguments, and solutions proposed were rarely in tune with the discussion.

Willingness

Student willing created an heirloom to represent his/her family as required.

Student failed to complete project as required.

Writing

Student gave a full description of project giving more descriptions than possible.

Student gave a description of the project giving what was required of him/her.

Student gave a description of the project that met most of the requirements.

Student failed to meet most of the requirements in the description of the project.