You are on page 1of 10

The Essential

Mike Bloomfield
Chords & Rhythm
by Don Mock
The legendary Michael Bloomfield is remembered as one of the premier Blues/Rock soloist of all time. His improvising techniques and mastery of the Blues has influenced generations of aspiring guitarists the world over. But Mike was also a fine rhythm player and accompanist. Artist such as Bob Dylan valued Bloomfield’s chording and supporting fills he brought to songs such as “Like a Rolling Stone.” Mike also proved he was a team player in his own band the Electric Flag. He supplied perfect rhythm phrases to many of the Blues, Pop and R&B style tunes that featured vocals rather than his guitar playing. And even when he was thrust into situations where his guitar was the focus, such as the Super Session, Live Adventures and Nick Gravenites albums, he still delivered inspiring and energetic rhythm behind the vocals and other instrumentalists. This fourth installment of The Essential Mike Bloomfield takes a closer look at Mike’s rhythm playing. We’ll learn some of his favorite chord voicings and double stop moves. Growing up in Chicago, Bloomfield acquired an interesting mixture of rhythm guitar talents. He started out playing ‘50’s Rock & Roll. Eventually he became intrigued by the Blues and became the hot young player in town sitting in with as many Blues artist he could. But he also somehow got involved in the Folk and Bluegrass scene too and mastered finger-style acoustic guitar. He also played piano and admired R&B session players such as Steve Cropper, both which likely contributed to his rhythm guitar know-how. By the time Mike started playing with the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, he was already an experienced young veteran with a sizable knowledge of chords and rhythm fills.

Chord Voicings
First up, lets explore some of the chord voicings Bloomfield relied on. Blues requires a decent knowledge of dominant chords and Mike knew all the classics. Example 1 shows several dominant 7th, 9th and 13th voicings that Mike can be heard using on recordings. Their roots are either on the 5th or 6th string (a few shown do not have the actual root on the 5th string but are in the same basic position.) Remember that 9th, 11th and 13th chords are just extended “fuller” versions of dominant 7ths and are interchangeable.

1

2 . Example 2 C major chords C C minor chords root on 5th C minor chords root on 6th Cm Cm7 Cm9 Cm7(add11) Cm Cm7 Cm7 Cm9 _ œ » »œ _ »œ _ œ » _ œ » _ œ » _ bœ »œ _ » _ » _ » _ _ » _ œ œ œ » œ »œ »œ œ » œ » œ » œ » œ » » » » œ œ »œ œ bœ » » œ » » œ œ œ » »œ » œ » » »»œ »œ œ » œ » » » œ » »»» » » œ » » œ œ bœ œ » » » » » »»œ œ » » œ » œ œ œ » »»»œ _ » » » » œ » » » & _ bœ l======================== ” »»œ _ »»œ _ »»œ _ »»œ » » » _ _ » œ _ » œ _ œ _ œ » » » » » »» »» »» ” »» »» »» »» » » » l 8 8 10 8 12 3 3 3 3 lT 3 ” 5 8 13 4 4 3 4 8 11 8 8 8 8 9 12 5 3 3 3 8 8 10 8 8 8 5 10 14 5 5 1 3 lA 5 ” 15 3 3 3 3 10 10 l B 3 10 ” 8 8 8 8 8 The third example are other chord voicings Bloomfield likely used. diminished and augmented. dominant 7#9. Just like the dominants.Example 1 C dominant chords root on 5th C7 C7 C9 C13 C6 C dominant chords root on 6th C7 C7 C9 C13 C9 C6 C7 _ »œ _ »œ _ œ » _ œ » _ œ » _ »»œ b _ œ » _ » _ » _ œ » _ » _ œ » _ œ » » œ œ » œ œ œ » » » » » »»œ » » œ » œ » œ œ œ œ » » œ » œ » » œ » œ » œ » œ » » » œ bœ»œ » œ œ » œ » œ » œ » »» œ œ » œ » œ » » » œ » » œ » » » » »»œ » » » » œ l======================== & _ œ » œ » » œ » » » » ” » » » » _ œ _ œ _ œ _ » œ _ » œ _ œ » _ » œ »» » » » » » » » » »» »» »» »» » » » » l ” 3 3 5 8 8 8 8 12 lT 1 ” 5 3 3 1 8 8 8 10 5 10 11 2 9 9 7 9 7 9 12 3 3 3 3 2 5 2 2 2 8 8 8 8 8 10 10 ll A ” 3 3 3 3 3 10 7 ” B 8 8 8 Example 2 list his basic major and minor voicings. Gaug for example. are usually interchangeable with basic minor and min7th chords. It’s important to remember that any tone in a diminished 7th or augmented chord can be considered the root. such as minor 9 and minor 11. is also Baug and D#aug. extended minors. suspended. They include a few major 7ths.

Bb. It’s a very useful coincidence that the same voicing works in two places for Bb7. the first bar uses a Bb9 voicing. 3 . Then the top note is sounded as the chord is slid back down. Or you can just bar a full Bb7 (include the 5th-F on the 5th string) and hammer the 3rd with your second finger. or at the 7th fret where it’s Bb6.Example 3 Important additional chords Cmaj7 Cmaj9 Cmaj7 Cmaj7 Csus4 C7sus4 C7 9 Gaug Gaug _ œ » » œ « _ _ »»» »»» œ »»œ œ »»œ œ » œ œ » œ œ œ « »»»œ œ œ » œ » » œ bœ » #œ » » œ #ˆ « »»œ » » œ œ » » »» bœ œ œ » œ œ » œ œ » n « ˆ » » » » » œ œ œ » œ » » « ˆ » »» ” » » » » » œ l======================== & _ » œ » œ » œ » bˆ « » » bœ » » »œ _ œ » _ œ _ » œ _ œ _ œ » _ œ » » » » » » »»» » » » » »» » » »» » » » » l ” 7 8 3 3 3 lT 5 3 8 ” 8 8 6 4 5 2 4 4 4 4 9 9 10 3 3 8 3 3 4 4 2 9 10 10 5 2 8 5 2 5 5 ll A 5 ” 3 3 3 7 4 6 ” B 3 8 8 8 # C7 9 # (G. but Bloomfield would usually add them. Since this is a slow blues. 3rd and 4th strings with your first finger and hammer the D (major 3rd) with your second finger. in which case it’s Bb9. It is. Mike would usually keep a steady 1/8th note-triplet rhythm throughout the progression. It’s a common R&B and Blues technique of hammering from the minor to major third of a dominant chord. It’s a composite of several recordings where Mike is comping behind other soloists. possible to play this move without your thumb by baring with your third finger. I’m pretty sure Mike. like a lot of players. Following the pickup move. bar 4 demonstrates a common chromatic chord move as the I7-Bb9 chord walks up in 1/2 steps for the change to the IV7-Eb9 in bar 5. at the 5th fret. The chord progression also uses diminished 7ths and augmented chords in several places to add a nice bit of motion and tension/resolution to the chords. They’re chord substitutes and are optional. B & D#aug) Slow Blues in Bb The next example is a 12 bar slow Blues in Bb demonstrating chords and movements Bloomfield played. wrapped his left thumb around the neck allowing him to fret notes on the 6th string. Using your thumb on the low Bb makes the move easier as you can bar the 2nd. It features several examples of Mike’s classic 6th and 9th chord approach phrases. root with your second and hammer the 3rd using your fourth finger. He would then add the sliding-approach phrases at key points to help emphasize the chord changes. however. Another move Mike often used is shown in at the beginning or bar 3. The pickup bar uses one of these melodic moves which is essentially a Bb6 voicing that is slid up from a whole step below.Db & Edim7) Gdim7 Gdim7 (G. Also. in a slow Blues like this.

Example 4 “Slow Blues in Bb” Bb9 _ »»œ » b œ _ _ » » œ œ œ » » œ œ » œ » » » » œ » œ œ » œ » œ » œ œ » » œ » œ œ » » » bœ » œ » œ œ œ » » » bœ » » 4 » » » » » » ‰ œ » » » » œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ »»» bœ œ bœ » » » » » Ó Œ » » » » » » bœ » » » » bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ » » » » » 4 » » » » » » » » “ { »» »» »»œ »œ »»»œ »»» »»» »»» l l======================== & »œ »œ »œ »œ »œ » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » £ l “ l £ £ £ £ 8 6 lT “ l 8 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 8 6 8 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 6 8 5 7 8 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 8 { ll A “ ll 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 “ B Eb9 Edim7 _ œ »_ » » œ » œ » œ »œ »œ »œ »œ œ »œ œ b œ œ œ » » œ œ œ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ »œ » » » » œ » » » » »»œ »»œ » œ œ œ œ »»» b _ » » » » » » » » bœ » œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ » » » » » » » » »»» » » œ œ œ œ œ œ »œ » » » » » » » »»» bœ »œ œ œ » » » » » » » » » l & »»» œ œ nœ œ œ œ ======================== œ œ œ »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »» l »» » l l £ £ £ £ 8 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 lT 8 l 6 6 6 6 6 8 8 8 8 8 8 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 8 9 9 9 9 5 5 5 5 9 9 ll A ll 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 B »»œ œ œ œ »œ »œ œ œ »œ œ »»» »œ œ »»»œ »œ œ »œ œ œ »»» »»» »»» » »»œ »»» nœ » œ » » bœ œ œ œ È bœ » » » » » œ œ œ œ œ n œ œ œ œ » œ » » » »»» =l » » » » » » œ œ œ » œ œ œ l======================= »» & »»œ » » » » » » » » » _ » _ » _ » _ » _ » » » » » b_ œ œ œ œ œ »» »» »» » » » » » » l l £ £ £ £ lT l 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 8 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 ll A ll 8 8 8 8 8 8 B 6 6 6 6 6 6 « « bˆ « ¯ j Bb7 Faug b_ œ œ »»» nn_ »œ œ œ »»œ »» œ »œ »œ bœ »»» n nœ »» nœ œ »» »œ »»œ » œ » œ œ œ œ bœ » » bœ »»» È œ ˜ J » œ » » b œ » » » » œ œ nœ » » » œ » »»» l b œ » » œ bœ » » » » œ œ n œ » œ œ »_ » » » bœ » » œ » » » » » ======================== l& » » » » » » bœ nœ » » » » » œ »» »» »» _ _ _ _ _ _ »»»œ »» » bœ œ œ » œ œ »» œ »» »» » » l l £ £ £ £ lT 6 6 l 6 6 8 8 8 6 6 7 8 9 10 7 7 7 8 8 8 7 5 6 7 8 9 6 6 6 8 8 8 6 6 7 8 9 10 ll A ll 5 6 7 8 9 B 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 Eb9 b_ œ »œ _ œ _ » »œ b_ »»œ œ » œ » œ » œ » œ » œ » œ » œ » œ » œ » œ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ » »»»œ » » » » » » » » œ » » œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ » »»» »»» »»»œ »»» »»» »»» »»» »»» »»» »»» œ »»» bœ bœ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ » œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ »» »» »» »»» »»» »»»œ »»» »»» »»» »» »»» »»»» »»»» l======================== & œ l » £ l l £ £ £ 11 l T 11 l 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 13 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 13 ll A ll 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 B 4 Bb7 (Eb) (Bb7) (Bb9) (B9) (C9) (Db9) (D9) .

Edim _ »œ œ » » »œ » » œ » œ œ b œ œ œ _ » _ _ _ _ _ _ » œ » »»œ » » » » » œ » œ » œ œ »»» b »œ » œ œ œ œ œ » » bœ »œ » » » » » » » œ œ œ œ » œ œ nœ œ œ » œ » »» » » » » » » » » œ » bœ œ œ œ œ bœ »»» »œ »œ »œ »œ »œ »œ »»»œ »œ » » »» »» »» »» »»» »»» » » » l======================== & »» l »» » »» »» » £ £ l l £ £ 6 11 11 11 11 11 8 8 8 8 6 8 l T 13 l 12 10 10 10 10 10 6 6 6 6 5 7 13 11 11 11 11 11 8 8 8 8 6 8 ll A ll 10 10 10 10 7 7 7 7 B (Eb) (Bb9) Bb9 Faug Bb7 »»»œ _ b » œ b œ » _ _ œ _ œ _ » » œ » » » œ » œ » » œ »»œ œ œ œ œ œ » » œ » œ œ » » » » œ œ » » œ » œ œ œ œ œ » » » » » » » œ » œ » ‰ nœ » bœ » » » » bœ » œ œ bœ » ˜ J È » » » œ œ œ nœ œ œ » » » » » » œ œ œ œ œ » » » » » » » œ » » » » » » » » » » œ œ » bœ » » » » » b œ » »œ »»» »»» œ »»» »» œ »»œ œ »»œ n œ »» œ »»» œ »»» œ »»» »»» _ »»» œ »»» œ »»» »»»œ œ œ »»» »»»» l » bœ œ »»»œ œ œ & »»»» bœ l======================== l œ œ £ » » » » _ _ _ _ _ » » œ » bœ œ œ œ œ » » » » » » » » » » » l l £ l » £» » » £» » £ £ £ 6 6 10 lT 8 l l 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 8 6 6 6 8 8 8 3 8 10 7 5 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 5 9 10 8 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 ll A ll 6 6 6 8 8 8 6 ll 8 8 8 8 8 5 5 5 5 B 6 6 6 6 6 6 £ « « Eb9 F9 Edim7 « « « »_ œ « « « _ _ _ œ œ _ œ »»»œ »»»œ »»» _ »»œ »»œ _ »»œ œ _ »»œ œ _ »»œ œ _ ˆ « _ ˆ _ »»œ œ b_ »œ œ _ »œ œ »œ œ »» _ œ »» _ œ »» œ »œ « « « »»»œ »»»œ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ « _ _ _ _ _ _ œ œ œ » œ » » »»» bœ « ˆ « ˆ « ˆ » » » œ œ œ » » » » » « ˆ » œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ « ˆ « ˆ « ˆ bœ » » » » » » n » œ » œ »»» »» »»œ œ »» »»œ »»œ »»œ »»œ »»œ « bˆ « »» b »»œ »»œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ»» œ»» œœ » » » » » » bœ œ œ » » » » » » » « ˆ »»» œ »»» œ »»» œ »»» œ »»» œ »»» ˆ »»» »» bœ œ œ œ « »»»œ »»»œ »œ »œ »œ »œ »œ »»» œ »»» œ »»» l ======================== œ n l & »» »»» »»»»œ œ l » » » » » » » » » » » » » » l l £ £ £ £ £ £ £ l 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 l 8 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 l l T 10 8 6 6 6 6 6 8 8 8 5 5 5 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 6 8 6 6 6 10 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 6 8 8 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 5 5 5 5 8 8 8 5 5 5 l ll A l 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 l l B £ « Bb7 (Bb6) Eb Gdim7 « « »» »» »» b_ »œ œ _ »œ œ « « « œ œ œ _ _ _ »»œ » » œ » œ » œ « « « « ˆ ˆ ˆ « » bœ » » œ » œ n » œ » œ »»» œ « « « nˆ ˆ ˆ œ bˆ « ¯ j b œ œ œ »»» »œ « « « » » » » » bœ » œ œ œ œ » b ˆ ˆ ˆ » » » » » « « « » œ œ œ »»» b_ » » » » » »» « « « l======================== & »» »»»œ _ bœ œ œ l » » « « « » » » _ _ ˆ ˆ ˆ » » » « « « » » » » » » £ l l £ £ lT 6 l 8 6 6 8 8 11 11 7 6 7 7 8 8 9 9 8 8 6 6 8 8 11 11 ll A ll 6 6 10 10 B 6 6 6 (Faug) Bb7 F7 » œ _ œ _ _ » œ _ » œ » b_ œ »œ »œ œ »œ œ œ »»» bœ »œ »»»œ _ _ _ œ »œ _ _ »»»œ _ »»»œ _ »»»œ bœ œ œ œ »» _ œ œ »»» _ »œ » » œ » » œ » œ » œ » » » » œ œ œ œ » » » nœ œ » » » » » œ » » bœ œ œ œ » » » » » œ œ » œ œ » » » » » » œ œ bœ » » » » » » » » »œ »»œ » » » » œ œ œ œ » » & b_ » » » » » l======================== » {” »»» _ » » » » » » » » » » » _ »» _ »» œ »»»œ »» »»» »» £ l ” £ £ £ 6 6 6 10 8 8 8 6 lT 6 ” 8 8 8 8 8 10 8 8 8 6 6 8 7 7 7 7 8 10 8 8 8 6 5 7 7 7 7 7 6 8 lA 8 8 8 8 ” {” 8 8 8 8 lB 6 6 6 6 Eb9 7 5 .

” It’s a great guitar performance all the way around including a fine country-ish solo and lots of classic uses of his double-stop phrases. Example 6 is a six-bar excerpt from “The Weight. The series of hammer-on 3rds. Then he plays just the triad bar-chords with the organ while the bass plays a descending line underneath. Example 5 demonstrates several positions of the move over C major. Something that has always stood out to me about Mike’s rhythm playing is how well he “laid back” on the time. I’ve been around hundreds of young guitarists and one thing they all have in common is the tendency to “push” or rush when playing rhythm. The phrases in Example 5 also works great when played over Am. and I’m sure many other young players at the time.Double-Stop Phrases Up next are some examples of Mike’s double-stop-rhythm phrases. Mike then plays one of his classic 6th licks to set up the next chorus. 6 . learning these little double-stop moves off Bloomfield’s records was a huge benefit to my own rhythm playing. Notice throughout “The Weight” how laid-back he plays the quarter-note comp.” It occurs around 1:08 into the track during the Csus2. Example 5 »»œ »œ _ »»»œ _ œ _ « « » _ « _ œ « « « « œ »»» _ œ » œ » œ ˜ J « « » « « » « « « » » ˆ « ˆ » œ » œ œ « « « « » » » » œ ˜ J « ˆ « « « 4 œ « « ¯ j » » » « ˆ ˆ ˆ « « ˆ ˆ œ » » « œ « » » « « « « Œ ” « « » » » » ˆ « » » « œ « « « ˆ « « « ˆ »»» » » » » l œ ˜ J « ˆ ¯ j « ˆ ˆ « « « « « « l======================== & 4_ ˆ l « ˆ « ¯ j » « « ˆ «_ ˆ « ˆ ˆ ˙ « l l l ” 8 8 8 l lT l ” 8 10 8 8 8 5 5 5 8 7 9 7 5 7 5 5 5 5 5 9 lA 3 5 7 5 l ” 5 7 5 l 5 5 7 5 5 lB l l5 7 5 8 ” H H H H H H C (Am) For me. you can liven up the chords of even the most boring and simple tunes. end with a Bluesy version at the 3rd fret. in the first two bars. It’s rare to hear a player in their mid-twenties having such a mature rhythm feel like Bloomfield. He often used them to add interest to his chord playing. They’re essentially 4th intervals that are played followed by a whole-step hammer-on of the lower tone creating a 3rd interval. A great recording that you can hear Mike play several versions is on “The Weight” from “The Live Adventures of Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper. The next three examples are country/steel-guitar inspired hammer-riffs which Mike used in many different situations. Armed with just a few.

” Bloomfield plays a nice Dm7sus voicing followed by an F at the 5th fret before shifting up to the 10th fret for the high arpeggiated Gsus2 adding the hammered 3rds.Example 6 Excerpt from “The Weight” The Live Adventures of Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper »œ _ »œ _ »œ _ »œ _ »œ _ »œ _ »œ » œ _ »»» _ œ »»» œ »»œ œ » ˜ J » » »»» » 4 » » »»» œ œ ˜ J »»» »»œ œ »»» » bœ »»» œœ ˜ J » 4 »» =l & » l======================= l l l l 10 8 8 8 3 3 10 12 8 8 10 8 3 3 3 lT l 3 5 l 3 5 3 ll A ll ll B »» œ G Bm/F# Am/E G/D C »»» _ œ G _ _ _ »œ b » œ »œ _ _ » _ » _ œ » _ _ œ ‰ » »»œ » » » œ » » œ J » » Œ » b œ ı ı ı » œ » ı » » » » » » » » » »» »» »» »» l »»» Œ Ó ” ======================== l & »» l »» l »» »» »» l » l l l l l etc.” At the time I didn’t know who the guitar player was but knew there was something special about the cool rhythm part he was playing.. it’s where Dylan sings “After he took from you everything etc. And one of the parts that stood out was the hammer-triads he played up high on his Telecaster...” 10 12 l 8 5 6 l 7 lT l l ” 10 12 9 5 6 7 ll A ll ll ll ll ” ” B _ »œ ˜ J »» Csus2 Like most people. If you know the lyrics. the first time I heard Mike Bloomfield was probably on the Bob Dylan classic “Like a Rolling Stone.. Check it out. Example 7 is a short excerpt from “Like a Rolling Stone” during one of the Dm to F sections. 7 .

... 8 . The example uses a classic melodic-triplet-sequence moving up or down the scale of the particular chord in the progression. Just keep your 2nd finger on the lower notes and slide down from one 6th group to the next. The 6ths in the example can be played in a few different styles... Bloomfield relied on this sound often when playing Blues or even Rock and Pop tunes.. The notes can be picked separately or played more legato with slides." lT l l 8 8 8 6 6 6 5 5 5 5 5 5 lA l 7 l 7 7 7 7 7 lB l l G _ œ »»» _ œ »»» _ œ »»» _ »»» _ œ »»» _ œ »»» _ œ _ _ _ _ _ œ » œ » œ » » œ œ » _ œ » _ _ » œ _ _ » œ _ » œ _ _ » œ _ » œ _ _ »»» œ » » »»» _ œ » » » œ » œ » »» »»» »» »» »» »» »» » » »» »» »» »»» »» »» »» »» »» » » œ l& l ” ======================= = etc. such as in bar 4.. l l ” 10 10 10 10 10 10 lT l ” 10 10 12 10 12 10 10 10 12 10 12 10 12 12 l A 12 l 12 ” lB l ” H H H H Dm The final example is another 12-bar Blues. this time played entirely with 6th intervals in the key of C....Example 7 Excerpt from “Like a Rolling Stone” by Bob Dylan F œ » œ » » œ œ »»» œ œ »» œ »» œ œ » » » 4 » œ » » œ » » » » œ » »»» » » œ » » œ » » » » œ » » » œ » œ » » » œ » » œ » œ 4 » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » » & » » » » l======================== l » »» » » » » » » » l » » » » l l l "After he took from you. Bar 1 can easily be played this way. Most of the time the 6ths follow the scale but in a few instances. The typical way you would likely hear Bloomfield play this would be with slides on the lower notes. the line uses chromatic passing tones for that classic Blues melody.

“Slidin’ 6th Blues” Example 8 F7 »_ _ œ » œ _ _ » _ » œ »»» œ b_ »»» œ _ _ »»» œ »»»œ »» »»» œ œ »» »»œ _ »»» œ » œ »»» œ » » bœ »»» » » œ 4 » œ » » » » » œ » œ » » » » » » » » » bœ » » œ » » » » » œ » œ » » » 4 » » » » » » œ »» l » » » » » » » »» » »» »» »» »» »»» œ & ll £ l======================== l £ » £ £ £ £ £ l ll l l £ l T l l 12 12 12 10 10 10 9 8 9 7 6 7 l 10 l 8 6 4 10 10 8 8 7 7 5 5 l ll A l l l ll l l B _ »»» œ C7 » œ # œ » _ œ » _ _ _ b » œ » » _ » œ _ _ » _ _ _ »» œ »» œ »»» »» œ »»» »» œ »»» »œ »»» »»» œ œ »»» #œ »»» »»» œ »»» œ »»œ bœ œ » » œ » œ » » » » » » » » œ » » » » » » »»» »»» »»»œ »» »»» »» »» »» »» » »» » l » » » l& œ l ======================== £ £ £ » £ £ £ £ l l l £ 6 8 10 11 12 lT l l 5 8 10 7 7 9 9 10 10 11 11 12 12 5 5 8 8 10 10 ll A ll ll B C7 œ »»» _ b_ »» œ »»» œ _ _ _ »» œ b_ »»» œ _ œ _ _ » œ _ _ _ _ »» œ »»» _ » »» »» œ œ »»» œ » » œ » œ » » » »» œ » bœ œ » » » » œ » œ » » » » » » » »» » »» »» »» »» »»» »» »»» »» »»» »» œ »»» »»» œ »»» bœ » œ » » »»» œ » œ » »»» l » » » » ======================== l& £ l » » » » » » » » » » » » » » £ £ £ £ £ £ l l l £ 13 11 10 8 lT l 6 l 10 8 6 14 14 12 12 10 10 8 8 7 7 10 10 8 8 7 7 l ll A ll l B C7 £ « £ « _ »»» œ b » œ « « _ _ » œ _ « » » œ « « « » » œ « « « »»» »» œ œ »»» »»œ »»» œ » » œ « « « » » » « ˆ « « œ » » œ » » « « « ˆ » bœ » « « » » » œ » » » » œ » œ » « « » » » » » » » » œ » œ « « » » » » »» » l »» »» »» »» »» »» ˆ « ˆ « ˆ » & £ l======================== « « l ˆ » £ £ £ l l £ l £ 5 3 1 lT 9 8 9 7 6 7 5 5 5 3 3 3 l 6 l 7 5 5 3 3 2 2 ll A ll 7 ll B F7 9 .

For more information visit: DonMockGuitar. It finally took the insistence of my fellow band mates to get serious about my comping. you spend at least 3/4 of the time playing rhythm in most music situations.” He also produced and directed nearly 100 instructional videos of some of the world’s top players including Robben Ford.T. When I was young.I. 10 . Joe Pass. Joe Diorio. Pat Martino. As one of the founding instructors of G. CD’s and videos on modern guitar including his acclaimed “The Blues from Rock to Jazz. someone who learned the hard way that you cannot neglect your rhythm playing in favor of flashy soloing. and Musicians Institute in Hollywood. And as we all learn. I was intensely focused on my improvising chops and figured playing a bunch of chords during the vocals or other guys solos was a mindless exercise. Take it from me. Paul Gilbert. -Don Mock Don Mock is one of America’s most respected guitar educators and players. Scott Henderson. Thanks for checking this out. I’m sure Bloomfield knew this early on. Don has authored several books. So you might as well get it down.com. Allan Holdsworth and many others.»»» œ _ œ #_ »»»œ œ _ _ œ »»» »»» œ »»» » œ #œ » œ » » » » » œ » » » œ » #œ » » œ » » » » »» »» œ »» »» œ »» »» »» œ » œ »» »»» œ »» nœ »» »»» œ »» œ »» bœ » » l & œ » l======================== » » » »» »» »» »» »» £» »» » £ »» » l œ » » » » » » » » » £ £ £ £ £ l l £ l 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 lT 4 4 5 l 6 l 5 6 6 7 7 A 7 7 8 8 9 9 10 10 ll B ll ll G b _ » œ ‰ »» œ »œ _ »»» _ »»» œ _ _ b » œ b œ »œ _ _ _ _ œ b _ » œ » _ œ _ » b œ » » œ »»» » » œ œ »»œ »» œ »» œ » » » » » œ » » » » œ » » œ » œ » ‰ ‰ » » » œ » » œ » » bœ nœ œ Œ ” bœ »» »œ »» œ » l======================== & » £» » » £»» » »» »» »» »» »» »» l »» »» » £ £ £ £ l l ” 8 6 11 10 lT 9 l 8 ” 10 9 11 10 9 7 7 11 10 10 10 9 9 l 8 10 9 ll A ” 11 10 l ” B C7 F7 C7 (Ab9) 9 G7 F7 I hope this lesson got you thinking a bit more about you rhythm playing.