CNKYSCENE.

COM
APRIL 2014
April 2014
cnkyscene.com

CNKY Scene
P.O.Box 12285
Covington, KY 41012

Contact us
info@CNKYscene.com
or 513.655.7565

Marketing & Advertising
Opportunities
Chuck Beatty
chuck@cnkyscene.com
Jen Short
jen@cnkyscene.com

Cover Photo
Dallas Padoven
padovenphotography@gmail.com
Taken at Grace Episcopal in College Hill
Lef to Right:
Sue Sivertson, Co-President,
Harmony Unitarian Universalist Church
Pastor Keith Haithcock,
St. John United Church of Christ
Rev Joy Simpson,
New Spirit MCC and Eternal Joy MCC
Te Rev Susan Quinn Bryan
Mt. Auburn Presbyterian
Rev Mitra Jafarzadeh,
St. John’s Unitarian Universalist Church
Brother Michael Childs,
Jubilee Cincinnati

Contributors
Steve Bolia
Rob Bucher
Adam Reilly
Rob Dorgan
Chris Kelley
Jen Short
Brooklyn Steele-Tate

Be Scene Photographer
Christa Curfss

Graphic & Web Design
Quincy Macklin
quincy.macklin@gmail.com

Entire content is copyright 2014.
All rights reserved. Publication of the
name or photograph of any person,
business, or organization in this
publicationdoes not refect upon
one's sexual orientation. CNKY Scene
reserves the right to refuse any
advertising. Tis edition
and additional content can be found
online : cnkyscene.com
LGBT Resources:
Cincinnati Police Dept
LGBT Liaison, Ofcer
Angela Vance
513.389.8467
angela.vance@cincinnati-
oh.gov

Cincinnati Trans* Com-
munity Group
513.549.4447
transqueerwellness.org
Crossport
513.344.0116
crossport.org
Equality Cincinnati
equalitycincinnati.org

Equality Ohio
614.224.0400
equalityohio.org

Hamilton County Sherif’s
Dept
LGBT Liaison, Heather
Dobbins
513.946.6610
Human Rights Campaign
hrc.org/steering-commit-
tees/cincinnati
Te Gay and Lesbian
Center
cincyglbt.com
Te Trevor Project
866.488.7386 (24hr Trevor
Lifeline)
thetrevorproject.org
Youth Services:
Faces without Places
513.389.0805
faceswithoutplaces.org

GLSEN Greater Cincinnati
866.934.9119
glsencincinnati.org

Lighthouse Youth Services
800.474.4138
513.961.4080 (24hr crisis
hotline)
lys.org
PFLAG
513.721.7900
pfagcinci.org

HIV/Aids Services:
Caracole House
513.761.1480
caracole.org

FACE Cincinnati
513.584.4522
facecincinnati.org

Northern KY Health Dept
859.341.4264, ext 2085
(Rapid HIV test)
nkyhealth.org

Planned Parenthood of
SW Ohio
513.679.4453
plannedparenthood.org/swoh

Marriage Equality:
Freedom to Marry
freedomtomarry.org

Why Marriage Matters
Ohio
whymarriagemattersohio.org
CNKY Scene is committed to supporting organizations that sup-
port the LGBT Community. If you know of an organization that
should be listed on this resource page, please let us know at info@
cnkyscene.com.
SERVING OUR COMMUNITY
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Welcoming Places of Worship in CNKY –by Jen Short
Imagine…the NEW Gay editon of the
Easter Cantata! No more warbling
“Christ Arose” from the well-meaning
ancient Calvary Choir, or “Mary Did
You Know” accompanied by karaoke
cassete, and gone is the Sunday school
student portraying Pontus Pilot with
teenage angst and gleaming braces. No,
no. This super-gay-amazing-Technicol-
or-reimagined Easter Cantata is Tony
Award-worthy! There is serious stage
directon, precisely positoned lightng,
historically-accurate yet swagged-out
costumes, even a set with genuine
imported stone from the Holy Land.
Wait…gay people can’t be running the
Easter service! Afer all, Adam and
Steve shouldn’t be entering a church
together, let alone staging the drama of
the crucifxion, right?!
While many families will be atend-
ing an Easter or Passover religious service this spring, it’s no surprise that most LGBT
people and same-sex families are less likely to atend or feel welcome at any place
of worship. The message heard the loudest is that gay people are not welcome or
worthy of partcipatng in religious services. As churches address marriage equality,
more are taking frm stances against the gay community, giving new life to the old
saying that “God made Adam and Eve, not Adam and Steve.” Hate-fueled extremists
perpetuate the condemnaton with disgustng posters held by innocent kids. Families
turn to their church to save their wayward children with “pray away the gay” therapy.
Bible quotes are hurled like daggers with threats of eternal damnaton as the result of
“choosing” to be gay. Some religious leaders take a slightly sofer, separate-but-equal
atempt at tolerance, preaching to “love the sinner but hate the sin.”
Quotng the Bible to atack the LGBT community is common. Because many Christans
believe that the Bible was divinely inspired and its integrity protected by God, they ar-
gue that even the translatons most commonly used today, are truly the Word of God.
This belief usually results in the absolute condemnaton of homosexuality. However,
there are a growing number of churches and synagogues that are standing with the
LGBT community, by sharing new understandings and more historically and contextu-
ally accurate translatons of religious texts, and providing a safe place to worship.
Brother Michael Childs of Jubilee Cincinnat says, “With the current natonal situa-
ton regarding the promoton of discriminaton based on religious views, and with
Ohio coming into view as one of the next states to deal with this, I feel that informing
churches and parishioners on how to ofset this is vitally important.”
In the Christan Bible, there are only a handful of “clobber verses” that even menton
homosexuality, and that is based on, very probably, a mistranslaton. Brother Michael
explains, “Traditonally the verses that opponents use, Lev. 18:22; 20:13, Romans
1:20-25, and I Corinthians 6:9 can only ft their prejudices and bigotry when used out
of context and improperly translated. For example, the term “homosexuals” was not
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found in any translaton untl the publicaton of the New American Standard Version
in 1947. Generally speaking, most opponents will fnd a biblical verse to match their
opinion and support their prejudice rather than matching their opinion to the Bible. As
I recently told a congregaton, God is not as concerned about who you slept with last
night as He is about your relatonship with Him and with others.”
“When properly understood and correctly translated, no passage in the Bible opposes
the life-long expression of love and afecton between two adults of the same gender,”
says Pastor Mike Underhill of Nexus UCC. He also says, “This is an excitng tme to be
a gay, lesbian, queer, or trans Christan. Around the world God is building a grow-
ing force of progressive Christans. In the face of those who argue for an arrogant,
judgmental, and legalistc religion, Jesus ofers a healthy alternatve of humility, love,
mercy, compassion, and justce. Promotng that kind of religion is what a progressive
church like Nexus is all about.”
Rev Jim Strader is the priest at St. James Episcopal in Westwood, and an openly gay
man in a commited relatonship. He says, “I suppose that’s one of the ironies and
divine acts of Grace that I experience in my life - being able to be gainfully employed
by an afrming Episcopal Church community in what has been, and stll may be in
some ways a rather prejudicial and devoutly Roman Catholic set of neighborhoods on
Cincinnat’s west side. I’m glad to say that St. James is striving to “niche” ourselves as
a part of Westwood’s revitalizaton eforts, to include being a place of refuge, spiritual
renewal, and progressive Christan values in our neighborhood.”
When asked about how his church reconciles the supposed Biblical denouncement of
homosexuality, Rev Strader believes, “the vast majority and “trajectory” of texts in the
Bible promote virtues and values of love, justce, equity, compassion, and tolerance.
I note that Jesus gathered around him disciples that were very much representatve
of the marginalized groups of people in Roman society. He taught them, and teaches
us to live lives that are worthy of God’s Grace and that such Grace is undeserved, yet
freely ofered. He also taught them to “do unto others as they would have others do
unto them.”
“In MCC being secure in our identty as same-gender-loving persons is part of the
journey into discipleship,” says Pastor Joy Simpson of New Spirit MCC and Eternal Joy
MCC. “We can’t truly extend the love of Christ to others untl we love ourselves and
claim we are beautful creatons of God.” She believes, “One of the most beautful
parts of our service is when same-sex couples receive communion, in front of God and
everyone, holding hands.”
Unitarian Churches are not only welcoming to LGBT individuals, but also those that
take a more spiritual, verses denominatonal, walk of faith. “Harmony is a Unitarian
Universalist community dedicated to the spiritual growth of all of its members, be they
Humanists, Theists, Mystcs, Earth-Centered, Agnostcs, and/or Atheists. We come
together to unite in a vision of peace, love, and understanding. Our strong beliefs in
social justce means that we work to promote acceptance, inclusion, understanding
and equity for persons of all ages, abilites, colors, genders and sexual orientatons, “
says Harmony’s Co-President, Kathy Dunsmore.
Some gay-afrming churches also open their doors for non-religious LGBT groups.
Hosts of GLSEN Greater Cincinnat’s weekly Youth Group meetngs, Mount Auburn
Presbyterian Church’s The Rev Susan Quinn Bryan says, “We are a welcoming and
afrming church, where all are truly welcome and afrmed in their belovedness.” They
provide the safe space for this important work as part of their love for all human beings.
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Christans that describe themselves as “conservatve” are ofen the ones speaking
against LGBT people, however, when that descriptor is applied to the Jewish faith,
Rabbi George Barnard explains that, “Conservatve Judaism rejects Biblical fun-
damentalism. While we regard the Bible as a basic source of our faith, we equally
believe in the necessity of ongoing interpretaton of the Bible.” He also explains,
“In 2006, the Commitee on Jewish Law and Standards of the Rabbinical Assembly,
the authoritatve body of Conservatve Judaism, approved a positon paper which
opened the way for gay people to live fulflling lives in long-term relatonships, and,
in 2012, the Commitee approved several diferent forms of same-sex commitment
ceremonies. Openly gay people serve as rabbis of Conservatve Jewish congrega-
tons. Even before taking those signifcant positons, the insttutons of Conserva-
tve Judaism have advocated for full civil equality of people regardless of sexual
orientaton, and they have opposed discriminaton or harassment on the basis of
sexual orientaton.”
Of his Congregaton B’nai Avraham, Rabbi Barnard says he wants “everyone to feel
comfortable in our congregaton, including gay, lesbian, bi-sexual, and transgender
individuals. Northern Hills Synagogue is a place where everyone is welcome to wor-
ship, lead services, and become involved. Acceptance is a moral claim of Judaism.
We believe this and strive to put it into practce.”
For LGBT people that have experienced rejecton from family, friends or the church
of their upbringing, the concept that “you can’t go home again” is very true. Having
been alienated from that home because of living truthfully in their identty, they
have lost the foundaton of support that they should be able to rely on in tmes of
need. However, faith in something - whatever it is that flls that god-shaped space
for each of us - can bring great comfort, even when humans fail us. In the darkest
hours, in tmes of tragedy or loss, the peace that can be found in a fulflling spiritual
existence can be they very thing which brings you through it. Likewise, in life’s most
blessed and joyful moments, expressing thanksgiving to that personal god may be
completely instnctve and involuntary…a food of grattude that spills out in an
expression of praise that is beyond control.
At some point, we all ponder those basic questons of life: How did I get here and
what is the meaning of it all? For a person that identfes on the queer spectrum,
exploring those wonderings can be difcult due to the rejecton so boisterously
shouted by those quick to condemn them. It is no surprise that many are hesitant
to seek out a physical place of spiritual refuge, considering how ofen LGBT people
are cast out by them. However, the resounding message delivered by the wonder-
fully welcoming churches, synagogues and ministries that contributed to this story
and the cover photo is this: Religion is not a one-size-fts-all, and no mater where a
person is on their spiritual journey, there are progressive, welcoming places of wor-
ship to call home. Pastor Joy Simpson was eager to contribute to this story because
“showing clergy/rabbi of diferent stripes is a powerful message that each of us is a
child of God.”
Learn more about some of these welcoming places of worship, and others, at the
annual interfaith service as a part of Cincinnat Pride Week. Its organizer, Heidi
Atwood, says it “provides a moment to refect on the sanctty and dignity of each
individual, and to demonstrate there are loving, welcoming, inclusive faith com-
munites in the Greater Cincinnat area. On May 28th, please join us at 7:00 PM at
Temple Sholom, 3100 Longmeadow Lane, to sing, worship, and praise in a variety
of traditons with the theme “Many Faiths, One Family.”
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Sunday Worship @10:30 am
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Ari the Big Gay Rabbinical Student: On
Navigating Two Challenging Identities – By Ari Naveh
In 2006, afer years of debate, arguments, and failed atempts, the Conserva-
tve Movement (fnally) voted to allow the admission of openly gay students
into their fagship insttuton, the Jewish Theological Seminary (JTS) in New
York City.
Among the ‘liberal’ seminaries—including Hebrew Union College, the Recon-
structonist Rabbinical College, and Hebrew College—JTS was the last to make
such a decision, and the vote was met in most circles with joy, celebraton,
and the feeling of great relief. Now openly gay prospectve rabbinical students
who were raised in the Conservatve Movement, or who found meaning in its
tenets, could learn to become its leaders in the hallowed halls of the world-
renowned and historically impressive insttuton.
Having known that my life’s ambiton was to atend rabbinical school in some
capacity, the JTS decision was monumental for me. While I was raised in the
Reform Movement, I felt drawn to many of the tenets of Conservatve Judaism.
It was incredibly heartening to know that I now had the full breadth of non-
Orthodox optons available to me.
But, when it came tme to take that next step and apply to rabbinical school in
2008, I couldn’t shake that low-level feeling of unwelcomedness at JTS. With
the decision only two years old, being an openly gay rabbinical student at JTS
stll seemed fraught with a sizeable number of complicatons.
Did I want to be a halutz (pioneer) for the Conservatve Movement, gaining
the notoriety and the fame—or perhaps infamy—as one of the frst openly gay
students in their seminary?
Was I comfortable with carrying that weight on my shoulders, along with all of
the academic—and halakhic—requirements?
On the one hand, being a student at JTS was an opportunity to be a role model
to many, showing bravery in the face of a slowly changing insttuton in spe-
cifc, and a society in general. On the other hand, it seemed lonely.
What kind of community would I be able to foster if I was among the only gay
students there? To whom could I turn for support? I weighed those optons
heavily and realized that loneliness could not beat out bravery. I chose to
atend Hebrew Union College, which had a strong history of LGBT inclusion,
having welcomed their frst gay seminarians way back in 1990. I did not—and
do not—regret my decision, as I felt it right to honor my Movement, and join
what I thought could be a great and vibrant cohort of openly LGBT students.
Now, almost six years later, I refect on my decision ofen. JTS’s momentous de-
cision in 2006 opened the door for many, and demonstrated a change in the
tde. While my path ultmately took me to Hebrew Union College and the
Reform Movement, seeing the Jewish community opening and redefning the
noton of inclusion made rabbinical school that much safer for me.
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Am I a Gay Rabbi, or Am I a Rabbi Who Is
Gay? - By Ari Naveh
In 2008, I made the decision to enter rabbinical school as an openly
gay man. The decision was in some ways very easy and in some ways
very difcult. My concerns centered on one main queston: what
would my gay and Jewish community be like? Afer my inital year at
Hebrew Union College (HUC) in Israel, I received some less than ideal
news: my new home would be at the HUC campus in…Cincinnat.
This had not been my inital choice and I was none too pleased, having
been born and raised in New York. But, I thought, “I am sure that I will
not only be welcomed with open arms, but I will fnd a loving com-
munity who can help model for me being a gay rabbinical student, and
subsequently a gay rabbi…right?”
I soon discovered, at least for my frst year, I was the only openly gay
student on campus; my therapist always tells me that it’s important
to note openly gay, because you never know, and I do appreciate her
optmism. Somehow by default, I became a halutz (a pioneer), the
very identty I had hoped to avoid when I chose to be a gay rabbinical
student in the Reform world, as opposed to the Conservatve one.
In Cincinnat, I had to actvely think about how to navigate all of my
identtes with a limited support network. In a conservatve Midwest-
ern city, I found myself working with even smaller–and sometmes
even more conservatve–congregatons as their student rabbi. How
would I come out to my student pulpits? Should I use them as bully
pulpits to advocate for the causes that I fnd important and meaning-
ful? How do I seek out a solid LGBT Jewish community outside of the
school, when school takes up most of my life? And of course the big-
gest queston: am I a gay rabbi, or am I a rabbi who is gay?
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These two sentences may sound alike, but they could not be more
diferent, as I discovered a few months ago in trying to craf a personal
statement to send out to congregatons to apply for possible rabbinic
positons. In my personal statement, I told a story of building a rela-
tonship with a congregant in a community in Northwest Florida who
was initally hesitant about having an openly gay rabbinical student;
the fact that I had not yet mentoned my sexuality to that community,
but rather had been outed by my predecessor is a whole other story.
I wrote that over the two years I served there, we grew to form an
incredible relatonship, and that I hoped to have shifed his perspectve
if only a small amount.
The story I told for my personal statement was met with a resound-
ing and near universal oppositon. I was told that it foregrounded my
sexuality too much: It showed me as “the gay rabbi” more than “Ari
who is gay”…and also holds many other identtes and traits, of equal
value and import. While this is certainly true, it felt strange to hear
from – mostly straight – friends, colleagues, and teachers that it would
behoove me to “tamp down the gay.” In a recent artcle in Slate.com,
gay writer J. Bryan Lowder lamented how some public fgures have
taken to coming out by statng that being gay is only but one small part
of who they are, not their whole essence. Lowder believes, as do I,
that this emphasis diminishes the value of coming out and actng as a
role model to fellow LGBT people.
As I round the bases towards my eventual fnishing of this program,
I have no more answers to that quandary than I did when I started. I
think sometmes you just have to be a halutz, taking the lonely road for
the sake of those who will one day follow. It can be challenging, but at
least it creates some prety great stories.
*CNKY Scene sincerely thanks Ari Naveh for sharing this 2-part blog
series, originally posted on myjewishlearning.com/blog/keshet, for
publishing.
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Behind the Curtain - Rob Bucher

Green Day fans can catch the natonal tour of AMERICAN IDIOT for a limited run on April 11 & 12
at the Aronof Center, presented by Broadway in Cincinnat. IDIOT tells the story of three lifelong
friends, forced to choose between their dreams and the safety of suburbia. Based on Green Day’s
Grammy Award-winning mult-platnum album of the same name, AMERICAN IDIOT boldly takes
the American musical where it’s never gone before. www.broadwayincincinnat.com
The Carnegie brings a theater classic to the stage with HARVEY, running April 11-27 in Covington.
Elwood P. Dowd is well-liked, and inexhaustbly happy, and from a respected family… and his best
friend is an invisible man-sized rabbit named Harvey. Commitng Elwood to a sanitarium, his
social-climbing sister Veta is herself mistaken as loony while Elwood and Harvey gleefully carry out
their bon vivant cocktail calendar with the hospital staf in hilarious pursuit. www.thecarnegie.com
Wall Street takeover artst Lawrence Garfnkle’s computer is going tlt over the undervalued stock
of New England Wire & Cable. If the stockholders back his take over, they will make a bundle but
what will happen to the 1200 employees and the community when he liquidates the assets? This
compelling drama explores whether corporate raiders are creatures from the Black Lagoon of
capitalism or realists. OTHER PEOPLE’S MONEY runs April 16-26 at the Aronof Center. Presented
by New Edgeclif Theatre. www.newedgeclif.com
The zany comedy of Monty Python runs amuck in the musical SPAMALOT presented by Northern
Kentucky University on April 17-27. Lovingly ripped-of from the classic flm comedy “Monty
Python and the Holy Grail,” SPAMALOT retells the legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the
Round Table, and features a bevy of beautful showgirls, not to menton cows, killer rabbits, and
French people. htp://artscience.nku.edu/departments/theatre.html
David Ives’ acclaimed VENUS IN FUR receives its local premiere April 19-May 17 at Cincinnat
Playhouse in the Park. At the end of a long day of auditons, a playwright is convinced he’ll never
fnd the right actress to play the heroine in his adaptaton of a scandalous 19th century erotc
novel. Enter Vanda, determined to prove she possesses the perfect blend of beauty, intelligence
and sex appeal for the role. As the two act out the play, reality and fcton begin to blur in an
electrifying cat-and-mouse game of love, seducton and power. www.cincyplay.com
Cameron Mackintosh’s spectacular new producton of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s THE PHANTOM OF
THE OPERA comes to the Aronof Center, courtesy of Broadway in Cincinnat, April 30-May 11. This
producton boasts many excitng special efects including the show’s legendary chandelier, new
scenic and lightng designs, new staging and choreography. www.broadwayincincinnat.com
The Cincinnat Shakespeare Company mounts TWO NOBLE KINSMEN on May 2-25. Captured
and imprisoned during war, two friends become impassioned rivals as they fall in love with the
beautful princess Emilia. Deceit and fghtng arise in this romance, as Palamon and Arcite both vie
for the princess’ love. KINSMEN also completes Shakespeare’s 38-play canon at the CSC, making
this local theater one of only fve in the United States to accomplish this. www.cincyshakes.com
Cincinnat Playhouse in the Park closes out their Shelterhouse seaon with THE NORTH POOL.
Khadim, a Middle Eastern-born transfer student, has no idea why he’s been called into the
ofce of his high school’s vice principal in the fnal hours before the start of spring break. But an
investgaton of a minor school infracton soon leads to questons of a decidedly more dangerous
nature. As secret afer secret is exposed, the suspenseful revelatons in this rivetng psychological
drama threaten to change both men forever. Onstage May 3-June 1. www.cincyplay.com
May 7-25, fan-favorite Raymond McAnally returns to Ensemble Theatre Cincinnat with the
world-premiere of his one-man show, SIZE MATTERS. Living life as a “Big Guy” is one obstacle, but
imagine carrying one hundred extra pounds and getng work based seventy percent of of your
appearance. Welcome to the life of Raymond McAnally, an actor who’s weighed over 280 pounds
since he was 18 years old. Working in a profession that forces his body issues to take center stage,
he’s learned how size maters, and how it doesn’t. Based on true events, this heartelt comedy
will resonate with anyone who’s ever wrestled with body issues and self-confdence. www.
ensemblecincinnat.org
Informaton on ALL local theater productons, including news, reviews and more can be found online at htp://
behindthecurtaincincy.com. You can also follow me on Facebook at www.facebook.com/BTCincyRob and @BTCincyRob on
Twiter.
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Community Service Spotlight : Brooklyn Steele Tate

Brooklyn has been doing drag
for about 13 years, and while
she is professionally employed at
Below Zero Lounge/The Cabaret
in downtown Cincinnat as a paid
house diva, she usually does two
to fve shows weekly for charity.
She has served in numerous roles
on the ISQCCBE Board of Direc-
tors and currently holds the Vice
President positon.
Brooklyn also holds several posi-
tons within the community. She
serves as President of PFLAG,
President of the Greater Cincin-
nat Gay Chamber of Commerce,
Co-President of Pride, Inc., Vice
President of the ISQCCBE, and Entertainment Chair for the Pride Com-
mitee.
Additonally, she has gained support for several charites beyond
the seven chosen for Reign XXII for the ISQCCBE (AIDS Volunteers of
Northern Kentucky, Caracole House, PFLAG, GLSEN, Cincinnat Men’s
Chorus, Cincinnat Children’s Hospital’s Transgendered Unit, and YWCA
Breast Cancer Research Fund), including the American Foundaton for
Suicide Preventon, Tri-State Leather, the CNKY Film Festval, Northern
Kentucky Pride, Clifon United Methodist Church, and Miami (Oxford)
University’s Colors.

Afer launching a “BioDiva” show with the help of current Cincinnat
Empress Freeda Bangkok, Brooklyn created a year-long program involv-
ing this drag medium and has, to date, helped raise over $13,000 for
breast cancer research. Describing herself as driven, demanding, giv-
ing, hardworking, and optmistc, Brooklyn considers her greatest
achievement to date to be putng herself through college. While she
enjoys the work she does in the community in and around Ohio, she
hopes we are one day able to end the spread of HIV and cancer and
eliminate the need for the various commitees on which she serves.
Easter Inspiraton
I’ve noted some busy bunnies this
season sharing fantastc ideas for
Easter inspiraton!
First, these cute cupcakes hopped
onto my Easter dinner table, cour-
tesy of my friend Jill. She’s one of
those “I can do everything” girls,
which would typically make you
want to strangle her, but she’s so
sweet and genuine that you forget
she’s gorgeous, crafy and brilliant
(she’s an engineer). Her Bunny Rump
Cupcakes, pictured below, were a
hit, especially with the kids.
The last thing Elmer Fudd sees.
You can use any cupcake recipe you like.
To create the coton tail, Jill dipped a
miniature marshmallow in water and
rolled it in white sprinkles. She fash-
ioned the feet out of white chocolate,
but if you’re not that crafy, your local
craf & baking supply store might have
supplies to help you out.
Next, I spoted these 2 gals taking their own
spin on my “Rabbits Under Glass” idea. Jamie
dressed up her glass jar and chocolate bunny
with ribbon while Becca replaced the Easter
candy with colorful eggs nested on pink grass.
Both came out great!
I suspect Jamie had
to slap her husband
Brian’s hand a few tmes
to keep him out of this
adorable, edible display.
Becca’s daughter Sophia calls this “Eggies Under Glass.”
Be sure to save these ideas for next year’s Easter season.
Or, they’re so easy, you might even be able to stll pull
them of today!Happy Easter, friends. May this be a season
of peace and a promise of spring to you and yours.
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JUNE 21-22, 2014
Corbett Theater, School for
Creative & Performing Arts
Dr. Casey J. Hayes – Artistic Director
SEASON23
2013-2014
CINCINNATIMENSCHORUS.ORG
PRESENTS
We celebrate pride this year by acknowledging the
diversity of our LGBT community here in Cincinnati.
TICKETS: $23 in advance / $28 at the door
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Updates From the
Cincinnat Men’s Chorus


Hello Dolly
Wow! What an amazing concert weekend. The Hello Dolly concert
was performed in front of sell out crowds for both shows over the
weekend of April 5
th
& 6
th
. Featuring the songs of legendary Broad-
way composer, Jerry Herman mashed up with the greatest hits of
country icon and diva Dolly Parton, the audience were dancing in
the aisles! Look out on Facebook for photos from the event, in-
cluding the audience photobooth, which always draws a fun crowd.
As always we are extremely grateful to our sponsors. Without
their generous support we would not be able to do what we do. A
huge thank you to our Season 23 presentng sponsors The Fosset
McDufe Group, Comey & Shepherd Realtors and concert sponsor
Below Zero Lounge.
Boys, Boas & Bears, oh my!
Our pride concert this year celebrates the diversity of the gay com-
munity here in Cincinnat, with a litle tp of the hat to Judy and
the Wizard of Oz, just for fun! Boys, Boas and Bears, oh my! Will
feature a host of LGBT anthems with a few twists as only the CMC
can do. We are currently working to secure an extra special guest
artst and hope to be able to announce that in the next issue.
The Hello Dolly spring concert, sold out a week before the perfor-
mance, and we expect Boys, Boas and Bears to do the same. Don’t
miss out, get your tckets today by visitng www.cincinatmenscho-
rus.org/tckets. Performances are June 21
st
at 8pm and June 22
nd
at
3pm at the Corbet Theater, School for Creatve & Performing Arts.
Tickets are $23 in advance and $28 at the door (subject to avail-
ability).
Auditons
The next round of auditons for CMC will be April 9
th
and 16
th
at
6pm. You don’t need to prepare anything for the auditons; the
Artstc Director will take you through a series of exercises to check
you pitch, tone etc and if you’re successful you will be assigned
to one of the sectons of the Chorus. Rehearsals are from 7pm-
9:30pm every Wednesday. If you are interested in auditoning,
please email Membership Chair Dennis McGill at membership@
cincinnatmenschorus to reserve a slot.
If you are interested in joining the CMC but don’t want to sing, you
can join our volunteer organizaton “BRAVO”. Our BRAVO volun-
teers run the front of house and retail sales operatons for the
chorus, providing much needed revenue for the CMC. For more
informaton on BRAVO, please email marketng@cincinnatmen-
schorus.org
cincinnatipride.org
Join the Discussion
cincinnati pride
May 31, 2014 • Sawyer Point
cincinnati pride
May 31, 2014 • Sawyer Point
cincinnati pride
May 31, 2014 • Sawyer Point
cincinnati pride
May 31, 2014 • Sawyer Point
Sponsored By:
Family
However you Celebrate Family,
remember this:
"We live now in a global village
and we are in one single family.
It’s our responsibility to bring
friendship and love from all
different places around the world
and to live together in peace."

- Jackie Chan

















































































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The mind; it is our greatest source of inspiraton, knowledge, insight and
bullsh*t! Yes, that’s right, BULLSH*T.
But wait, you say, our minds are an amazing thing – from it come all of our
thoughts of art, architecture, science, humanity and love. You’ve heard it said
that “necessity is the mother of all inventon”. To fulfll these necessites, we
use our minds to create and formulate new ideas and birth them into reality to
make the world a beter place and ourselves a litle more comfortable. But it is
also the Mind that creates our own personal hell.
The Mind and Ego are one in the same – our Ego gets us through our day by
telling us what is good for us and what is bad for us. It strives for control of the
physical body by making us believe that we cannot live without it. We have
been trained at a very early age to fear and to judge. We fear the hot stove so
as not to get burned; we fear our parent’s loud voice so we modify our behavior
to minimize their judgments. We learn from example – from our parents, or
teachers and even our friends. We strive to be just like “them” or totally the
opposite of “them”. Fear and personal judgment guide us through our days and
follow us to bed each night.
There are two voices that reside inside us – the Mind Voice of the Ego and that
sof, Knowing Voice of your True Self. The Mind Voice hides or blocks your in-
ternal Fire, while the Voice of your True Self fans and feeds this Fire. The True
Voice comes to us in the shower, or in our dreams and it speaks to us in a whis-
per – so we must be atentve and listen very closely. But the events of our days
and our judgments keep the Ego voice loud - making it the voice that is most
ofen heard.
So, how to we get more in touch with the voice of our True Self? How can we
make our Internal Fire burn brighter? By taking our tme and not making quick
judgments. When we slow down and really take the tme to see, we begin to
see past our judgments and see things as they truly are. We learn to control
the Ego Mind by not paying so much atenton to it and by asking it to be quiet.
In this quiet or stllness, true knowing lives.
We can make ourselves healthier by listening to the inner voice that celebrates
diversity and recognizes that we are all created equal. When we learn to quite
the Ego Voice we begin to see that all the things “IT” said we are, are just not
true – we are perfect just the way we are – with no need to change – other
than how we see ourselves. We are each a unique expression of the Universe,
deserving of LOVE and Happiness.
Go inside to fnd yours!
Peace, Steve & Rob
www.robandstevemassage.com
Healthy Living - by Rob & Steve
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GLSEN - Brooklyn Steele-Tate
Founded as the Gay and Lesbian Independent School Teachers Network (GL-
STN) in 1990, the organizaton began as a local volunteer group of 70 gay and
lesbian educators. In 1995 GLSTN became Natonal Organizaton and hired
its frst full tme staf person. In 1997 GLSTEN changed its name to The Gay,
Lesbian Straight Educaton Network (GLSEN) to atract broader support.
Cincinnat has its own GLSEN Chapter and they work trelessly to make sure
our kids are safe in schools. I recently talked to John Bruggen, the fundraising
chair for our local chapter to see what is going on with GLSEN Cincinnat.
GLSEN Greater Cincinnat is a local chapter of the natonal network. We work
for safe, respectul k-12 schools for all, regardless of sexual orientaton, gen-
der identty or gender expression. Local programing includes a weekly Youth
Group every Sunday for LGBTQPIA and allied high school age youth, with
professional co-facilitators; Youth Summit, a free annual day-long conference
of workshops, networking sessions and community building for LGBTQ and
allied youth, and adults who work with youth; and our annual inclusive Prom
coming up on Saturday, April 12 at the Mayerson JCC. GLSEN also provides
free school and community group trainings including Safe Space, which em-
powers educators to be identfable resources to LGBTQ and allied students.
All programs are open to the public and we can arrange presentatons for
community groups. Youth group is open to ages 13 to high school and the
Youth Summit (held in the fall) encourages atendance by college students,
parents and adults who work with LGBTQ Youth. We are supported by gifs
from local foundatons, corporatons, and individuals and we provide regular
orientaton for volunteers. Want a more advanced role in GLSEN – then
training is ofered to help interact with the public at events, with teacher in a
training session or with youth during a GLSEN program. Want to get involved
with GLSEN? Click through the GET INVOLVED link on our chapter website,
www.glsencincinnat.org or email volunteer@glsencincinnat.org. GLSEN is
stafng three drink booths at Pride, so we can use lots of help!
April 12 is the Annual ALL inclusive Prom! Its free for youth ages 13 through
high school and for those out of high school but under 21 its only $10.00
There is an accompanying event for adults , the Safe Space Soiree (held in a
separate space at the same venue) for $60.00. There is stll tme to get tckets
– just visit the website.
GLSEN is improving the lives of our children to make them a richer, more
successful part of our world. The best advocates for safe schools come from
inside the schools. If you are passionate about making schools safer for LG-
BTQ youth, we can help you talk with teachers and administrators and they
will appreciate and respond more readily when hearing from voices within
their own community. Be passionate, Be an advocate, Be the change in this
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John Boggess
Licensed in Ohio and Kentucky
(513) 533-5573
jboggess@comey.com
JohnBoggess.com
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