River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No.

854 • April 17- 30, 2014 2 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 3 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
Nevada Rancher’s Fight Goes Much Deeper Than Media Willing to Cover
A
s I write this, hundreds of Ameri-
cans are gathered in Clark County,
Nevada, in support of cattle rancher
Cliven Bundy in his fight to save his fam-
ily’s ranch from an aggressive takeover by
the federal Bureau of Land Management
(BLM), an agency within the Department
of the Interior.
The mainstream media’s shocking
lack of coverage of this story provides
all the evidence Americans need to
unambiguously indict it for the propaganda
machine it has become. Massive resources
are provided for weeks of endless
speculation on a missing plane originating
in Malaysia, but practically no coverage of
well over 200 federal agents surrounding
the Bundy ranch – fully armed and
including trained snipers – high-tech
surveillance, and a declared no-fly zone
over this area of Nevada.
Any coverage by the corporate media
has been glaringly slanted in favor of the
government’s position in this takeover,
claiming that Bundy owes $1 million in
grazing fees for his cattle that graze on
federal land. The cattle of Bundy’s family
have been grazing on this same land since
the 1800s.
What the media isn’t mentioning is that
Bundy’s cattle grazing on a small section
of nearly 600,000 acres of barren desert
land was never an issue until the early
1990s. Coincidentally, that is when Senator
Harry Reid (D-Nevada) initiated a study
to designate huge swaths of land in a six-
state area for solar-energy development to
accommodate a Chinese corporation that
wants to build at least one solar plant that
includes Bundy’s property.
Instead, the media mentions a highly
questionable threatened tortoise that
purportedly faces extinction due to
trampling by Bundy’s cattle. Noticeably
absent from reports is the BLM’s own
extermination of large numbers of the
very same tortoise it claims to be trying to
protect.
Obviously there is a lot more to
the situation than grazing fees. For
years, Bundy paid the fees as a part of
his ranching enterprise, but he began
withholding payments when he claimed the
BLM started operating against his property
interests, and those of his neighbors.
(Examples include the BLM bulldozing
long-established water wells and removing
cattle with baby calves that then perished.)
He has been to federal court to no avail on
three occasions seeking remedy against
BLM’s arguably strategic effort to force his
family off its ranch.
There are several important aspects of
this story that bear consideration. First,
there is plenty of case law in support of
the constitutional limits of the federal
government to “own” property outside the
10 square miles that compose the District
of Columbia, or “the Erection of Forts,
Magazines, Arsenals, dock-yards, and
other needful buildings” (U.S. Constitution
Article I, Section 8, Clause 17 – known as
the Enclave Clause). The founders expressly
gave Congress control over territories that
were not designated as states, but once
formed as a state, all sovereign control of
the land reverted to the state.
Second, the Bureau of Land Management
is an administrative federal agency,
one of 456 agencies that compose the
Executive Branch – although several
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
agencies are under the purview of the
Legislative Branch. The Executive Branch of
government is exponentially larger than the
the other two branches, and only gaining
in size and scope of power, even usurping
power from other branches – especially
that of Congress. Within the agencies are
thousands of smaller bureaucracies, most
of which Congress has no clue exist, let
alone knowing what each does. Wikipedia
has a listing that demonstrated the sheer
enormity of the federal government’s
agency-heavy hierarchy that is well worth
reviewing for perspective alone (RCReader.
com/y/agencies).
BLM is deriving its authority from
administrative statutes that often ignore
the Constitution. Specifically, BLM claims
authority under the International Property
Maintenance Code, whose rules are the
result of the United Nations’ Agenda 21.
There is nothing in our Constitution that
obliges property owners to international
regulations. When did compliance with an
international code of anything become an
enforceable event within the continental
Continued On Page 21
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 4 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 5 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
talked to his members before announcing
his proposal. The constitutional amendment
required a three-fifths super-majority, so
Madigan would need every single one of
his Democrats if he couldn’t lock down any
House Republican votes.
Representative Jack Franks,
a Democrat who prides himself
on voting against tax hikes,
offered tentative early support,
but his support was tied to
allowing the 2011 income-tax
hike to expire. Just days later,
Madigan publicly supported
keeping the tax hike permanent.
Franks says he told the
speaker that he couldn’t back
the proposed constitutional amendment a
couple weeks ago. Madigan asked for time
to try to find GOP votes. In the meantime,
other Democrats went off the reservation,
including Representative Scott Drury, who
issued a press release last week announcing
his opposition. The momentum was going
too fast the other way, so the plug was
pulled.
Madigan, through a spokesperson,
blamed the Republicans for the proposal’s
defeat. But Madigan had surprised the
Republicans with his plan’s unveiling
instead of finding some GOP support in
advance.
As it turns out, Madigan simply bit off
more than he could chew. His proposal
failed, but he sure got a lot of publicity
about it – much of it favorable.
And, hey, lemons into lemonade. Pro-
business groups such as Americans for
Prosperity Illinois offered up praise for
Drury, who faces a Republican opponent
in November. Drury and Franks “should be
commended for siding with taxpayers and
small businesses by taking a courageous
stand against this proposal,” said Americans
for Prosperity Illinois State Director David
From via press release. That’ll surely make
Drury more palatable to tax-sensitive
business owners in his district.
And the proposal put Republican
gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner in a
difficult spot. Rauner flatly opposed the tax
while leaving open the possibility that he
could favor taxing retirement income and
services. It didn’t make him look good.
Maybe this is all part of some grand
scheme. But right now it sure looks like
James Bond has gone tabloid.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol
Fax (a daily political newsletter) and
CapitolFax.com.
A
long time ago I asked Illinois
House Speaker Michael Madi-
gan why he never golfed at his
golf-outing fundraisers.
Madigan explained that he was a terrible
golfer. (He’s since improved, I’m told.) If
people saw him embarrassing
himself on the golf course,
they might take a dimmer
view of him as a leader.
He has applied this lesson
to just about everything he
does. He examines every
angle before he acts. He hates
mistakes and almost never
acts impetuously.
For example, Madigan and
his staff gather a few times a week to read
through every bill and every amendment
to those bills to look for flaws and hidden
agendas or to discuss strategies. He always
wants to be as prepared as possible.
As a result, he rarely fails.
But something else has been happening
over the past year or so.
Madigan has become a media hound.
The speaker has never really sought
media attention. He does what he does, and
then he goes home or, more likely, back to
his office. A Republican friend of mine calls
him “James Bond.”
But after getting royally hammered by
the Chicago media over how he asked
Metra to give one of his loyal patronage
workers a raise, he’s seemed to change.
Nowadays, he seeks publicity and credit.
It started after the House passed the
gay-marriage bill. It wasn’t an easy task by
any means, and Madigan publicly took the
credit for its passage. A few months later, he
took the lion’s share of the credit for passing
the long-sought pension-reform bill.
Then, earlier this year, out of the blue, he
proposed a 50-percent cut in the corporate-
income-tax rate. He got a ton of media
coverage, but he hasn’t yet followed up
on it. It looked like a “press-release bill”
– legislation unveiled merely to generate
media interest. It might yet resurface, but as
of now it has disappeared into the ether.
Madigan was also working behind
the scenes this spring with the Senate
Democrats on a constitutional amendment
to impose a 3-percent surcharge on income
over a million dollars. But then Madigan
went ahead with his own announcement
of the proposal. It was referred to in pretty
much all media reports as “Madigan’s
millionaire tax.”
At the time of the unveiling, Madigan
said he’d done his homework and had
Botched Millionaire Tax
Brings Benefits to Democrats
by Rich Miller
CapitolFax.com
ILLINOIS POLITICS
Madigan’s
proposal failed,
but he sure got a
lot of favorable
publicity.
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 6 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
F
or pianist
Jonathan
Turner,
“It’s a really
unique kind of
entertainment
experience in
the area. There
isn’t really any-
thing like it.”
For
performer
Korah Winn,
“It’s kind of like if you take the best play
you’ve ever been in, with the best cast, with
the best audience, and you get to do that
once every month.”
Producer/writer/musician Mike Romkey,
however, has a slightly different take: “It’s
kind of like a local Prairie Home Companion
... but not in a way that would get us sued.”
The “it” in question is the Bucktown
Revue, a stage show of proudly “old-
timey” musical acts, comedy sketches,
and storytelling that Romkey originated
seven years ago, and one that’s presented
monthly, October through May, at
Davenport’s Nighswander Theatre. (Its
next performance takes place on Friday,
April 18.) For Romkey and the hundreds
of patrons who regularly attend its
performances, the Bucktown Revue is also
an excellent showcase for area talents whose
particular gifts might not have a frequent
outlet elsewhere.
“For example,” he says, “the hammered
dulcimer is not an instrument that most
people know ... unless they’re really into
hammered dulcimers. So where can you go
to play your hammered dulcimer? Well, you
can go to the Bucktown Revue.”
A two-hour celebration of (as is stated
on the BucktownRevue.com Web site)
“Mississippi River levee culture” with a
definite emphasis on folk and bluegrass
tunes, Romkey says the inspiration for
his creation came from a simple directive:
“Make your own job.”
He explained: “I have an Irish band
called the Barley House Band,” which now
serves as the in-house ensemble for every
Bucktown Revue performance, “and we are
of a certain age and temperament, and we
didn’t want to be packing up in bars at two
in the morning. And so we started to think,
‘Where can we get some really good playing
jobs?’
“We thought, ‘Well, we want a really nice
venue, we want a really nice audience that
really pays attention and listens instead of
basically ignoring the band, and we’d like to
Companion Companion
The Bucktown Revue, April 18 at the Nighswander Theatre
be home at 10
o’clock.’ And so
I kind of came
up with the idea
to just invent
our own gig. If
there’s a stroke
of genius in
any of it, it was
that.”
From the
start, and
with friend
Scott Tunnicliff recruited to be the show’s
emcee, Romkey says that he hoped to
deliver “a down-home, folksy, folk-music
kind of experience,” much like Garrison
Keillor’s beloved public-radio series
A Prairie Home Companion.
“It’s mainly music with selections from
different local artists,” he says, “and it sort of
runs the gamut from American songbook
to jazz to bluegrass to jug band. And one of
the things about the revue which is pretty
cool is that we typically have people come
on and do two songs. So, say you discover
you really just don’t like barbershop
[quartets]. Or maybe bluegrass isn’t your
thing. Well, just relax – it’s not gonna last
forever. We cover a lot of ground.”
“It’s just quality, overall, that every act
shoots for,” says Turner, who has been
playing for the show for roughly five years.
“And even though it’s a lot of folk and
bluegrass and certain kinds of styles with
the house band, the stuff I usually play is
more the standards, jazzy pop, Broadway-
style stuff, all obviously piano-based. But it’s
a really good mix.”
Adding to that mix, says Romkey,
“we have various elements of humor in
the show,” with the regionally themed
comedy designed for immediate – and,
specifically, local – audience recognition.
“One of the funniest skits we had,” he
says, “was ‘At Home with the Eagles,’ which
was a little skit about a husband and wife
eagle sitting on a tree by Lock & Dam 14,
conversing about the Quad Cities. And
usually, we have some fake commercials.
Like one of our running sponsors has
been the Iowa Wine Council, so we’ll have
a representative from the council on to
talk about how fabulous the new vintage
of Chateau Wapsi Bottom is. Or Buffalo
Muscatel.
“This year, the big-deal skit has been ‘The
Pleasant Valley Hillbillies,’” says Romkey of
the monthly feature that – as with most of
MUSIC
Continued On Page 20
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
For all the details, go to jumerscasinohotel.com
or visit the IMAGE Players Club.
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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 7 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
R
achel Hartman, the April 28 guest in
Augustana College’s River Readings
at Augustana series, is the author of
the 2012 young-adult novel Seraphina. It’s a
fantasy tale of royalty and knights and the
faraway kingdom of Goredd; of a myste-
rious murder and supernatural powers
and fanciful beings named Loud Lad and
Pelican Man.
More specifically, it’s a story of the
16-year-old girl of Hartman’s title, a gifted
music instructor who’s harboring a bit of
a secret: She’s not actually a girl. Or rather,
she’s half-girl, and half-dragon. And she’s
hardly the only dragon in town.
It turns out Goredd, as we learn on the
book’s eighth page, is a kingdom where
dragons are able to assume human form,
even if they don’t have much understanding
of, or use for, human emotions. Yet if you
ask Hartman how she landed on the idea
for Seraphina, and for her transformable
creatures in general, she’ll no doubt
admit that inspiration didn’t come from
mythology or legend or previous works
of fiction. It came from an inability to
illustrate dragons.
“I started out doing mini-comics,” says
the Vancouver, Canada-based Hartman
during our recent phone interview, “and
there’s one issue that has me drawing a
dragon, and it’s just ... . It’s awful. I can’t
even tell you. It’s just so stupid-looking.
It looks like a kangaroo with fangs. So it
came to me that if dragons could turn into
humans, then I could draw humans, and
then I could be super-lazy ... which is my
whole goal in life.”
Laughing, she continues: “But what
ended up happening, which I hadn’t
anticipated, was that all these questions
were raised. Because if dragons could take
human form, then the person sitting right
next to you could be a dragon, and how
would you know? And if you were a dragon,
were you obligated to tell anybody? And
then I thought, ‘Okay, there are gonna have
to be rules for this society so they [dragons
and humans] can get along, and a history,’
and this sort of thing.
“So yeah. It was just inadvertent. An act
of laziness was the biggest idea-generator
that I’ve ever had. Ever.”
As acts of laziness go, Hartman’s has
hardly been an unpopular or unprofitable
one. A New York Times bestseller that
debuted at number eight on the periodical’s
Children’s Chapter Book rankings,
Seraphina was the recipient of 2012’s Cybils
Award for best young-adult fantasy or
science-fiction novel and 2013’s William C.
Morris Award
for best young-
adult work
by a debuting
author. Its
success has
also, as might
be expected,
created
demand for a
sequel, which
Hartman has
titled Shadow
Scale, and
which is set
for publication
next March.
Seraphina
is also, in
this middle-
aged author’s
opinion, a helluva fun read for adults,
evocatively and excitingly and sometimes
quite humorously written, and boasting
characters and narratives that keep you
engaged through the entirety of its 464
pages (including its “Cast of Characters”
and “Glossary” sections, both of which are
helpful and amusing in their own rights).
It’s the sort of unexpectedly gripping novel
in which, as I did, you intend to read 50 or
so pages before bed, and finally turn out
the lights 150 or so pages later.
“Fantasy has always been my very
favorite genre,” says Hartman. “And, really,
books for kids, as well. I feel like one of
the reasons I wrote a young-adult novel
instead of an adult fantasy novel is because
that was the age when reading was the
most magical to me. When a single book
still had the power to change your whole
life.”
Kicking and Screaming
Out of the Children’s Sec-
tion
A native of Lexington, Kentucky, and
the daughter of a college-professor father
and visual-artist mother, Hartman recalls
being engulfed in the magic of literature
from early childhood. “During summer
vacations, my mother used to have to, like,
throw me out of the house. But I figured
out that if I took a book and went outside
before she could throw me out ... . I was
not, shall we say, athletically gifted in any
way, so reading was sort of my alternative
there.”
Yet by her teen years, Hartman’s tastes
in reading material, as
she admits, hadn’t much
changed. “My parents
would have to drag me
kicking and screaming out
of the children’s section
of the library. They said,
‘No, no, you have to read
grown-up books now,’ and
the ones that appealed to
me were fantasy, because
that most resembled what I
had enjoyed as a child. So I
started reading Tolkein and
that sort of thing.
“In college,” adds the
graduate of Washington
University in St. Louis, “I
did have sort of a hiatus
where I decided, ‘Okay, I
really do have to read adult
books.’ And I gave it my best shot. I loved
Latin American magic realism. But fantasy
has always been my favorite.”
As far as Hartman’s career goals were
concerned, “My very first aspiration,
according to my mother, was to be a fire
hydrant. That didn’t work out so well.
“I thought about being an
anthropologist. I thought about being a
historian. But what I finally figured out
at university was that I wasn’t so much
interested in history as I was interested in
history as a story, you know? I mean, my
favorite history teacher in high school –
he was really good at this – would make
American history into a story to the extent
that every day you wanted to go back to
class and find out, like, ‘Who won the Civil
War?!?’”
She laughs. “Like we didn’t know. But
that’s the kind of compelling storyteller he
was. And so I kind of mistook loving the
story for loving history.”
Hartman settled on a degree in
comparative literature, which she calls
“sort of a catch-all thing for all these classes
I’d taken.” But she opted against graduate
school in favor of pursuing new interests –
namely, comic strips and graphic novels.
“I was reading the student paper,” says
Hartman, “and I turned the page, and there
was this ad that said, ‘See your comic strip
here. Call ... .’ And it was like being hit by
lightning. All of a sudden, I was like, ‘A
comic strip! I have to do that! That is the
thing I always wanted to do that I had no
idea I always wanted to do!’”
Her school-paper comic strip, a
“classicist humor” serial titled Ellen
of Troy, ran for two years, and led to
10 years as a mini-comic author and
illustrator that culminated in the 1996
debut of her self-published serial Amy
Unbounded. (The comics’ individual
installments were subsequently collected
in graphic-novel form.) A fantasy that
first introduced readers to Seraphina’s
kingdom of Goredd, Amy Unbounded
also served as the figurative birthplace of
Hartman’s miraculous dragons – and, more
significantly, Hartman’s professional career.
“I received a Xeric Grant for self-
publishers,” she says of Amy Unbounded’s
origins, “and got it distributed by comic
distributors, and so I actually made money.
At least, I didn’t go into this hideous debt,
which was kind of amazing.
“But it was hard. I mean, it was no
way to make a living. I was working at
bookstores, too. And I was married,
which helped,” she says with a laugh. “But
financially, I wasn’t qui-i-ite pulling my
weight in the household. And I was about
30, and I had just had a baby, and so I was
like, ‘You know what? It’s time to start
writing seriously.’”
The Myths of Goredd
For her first attempt at a fantasy novel,
Hartman knew she wanted to keep writing
about Goredd, a kingdom she had actually
been writing about for a long, long time.
“You can really dial it all the way back
to seventh grade,” says the author. “I was
assigned a narrative poem in English
class, and I wrote this poem, which was
very silly, called ‘The First Adventure of
Sir Amy.’ It was about a little-girl knight,
and she lived in the kingdom of Goredd –
because it rhymed with ‘Fred,’ which was
the name of her horse, you see?”
With a laugh, Hartman continues, “It
wasn’t very fleshed out, but there were
dragons, and there was a king named King
Kiggleworth, who later became [Seraphina
character] Prince Lucian Kiggs. And then
in high school, I would write stories on my
own, and I would set them in Goredd. I
had a mythology class where I had to make
up myths, and they were all the myths of
Goredd.
“So this had been building really slowly.
And now, it’s become really handy, because
it’s sort of a visual guide. Any time I’m
writing and I get kind of stuck in trying to
picture things, I can look at Goredd in the
comic and say, ‘Oh, right!’”
She also wanted to continue writing
The Girl with the Dragon or Two
River Readings at Augustana Presents Seraphina Author Rachel Hartman, April 28
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
BOOKS
Continued on Page 20
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 8 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Vol. 21 · No. 854
April 17- 30, 2014
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R
oughly a quarter-century
ago, B.B. King said of Joe
Bonamassa that “he hasn’t
even begun to scratch the surface.”
It was an undeniable compliment
to somebody not yet in his teens,
but it was also a challenge – one
that the blues-rock guitarist, singer,
and songwriter apparently still takes
to heart. Bonamassa continually
scratches and scratches to get deeper.
His performance April 19 at the
Adler Theatre will be one example,
featuring a set with his acoustic
band and another with his electric
– both covering roughly 10 songs.
The acoustic sets demonstrate that
Bonamassa isn’t content to skate by on
instrumental virtuosity – unlike too many
of his ace-guitarist peers. These shows
require solid songs, nuance, and variety.
As he said in a phone interview last
week, the two-set engagements are
“very challenging vocally and on guitar,
because you’re essentially switching
gears tune to tune.”
Even better evidence of his range can
be found in his recent discography. In the
past two years alone, Bonamassa has put
out the Driving Towards the Daylight studio
album, live and studio releases with singer
Beth Hart, the third and final album from
the Black Country Communion super-
group, a studio disc by the jazz-fusion Rock
Candy Funk Party, Beacon Theatre: Live
From New York, the live album An Acoustic
Evening at the Vienna Opera House, and the
four-disc Tour de Force: Live in London –
documenting themed shows at four venues
with different band lineups and more
than 60 different songs. And he has a new
studio album planned for fall release. (The
old saw about the weather can be adapted
for Bonamassa: If you don’t like his latest
record, just wait a few minutes.)
He explained: “There’s no master plan.
‘All right, I’ll go play with Rock Candy Funk
Party.’ Or ‘I’ll go play a solo gig.’ Or ‘I’ll go
play with a rock band.’ Having that freedom
to basically switch gears makes it fun. We
don’t sit around and ask ourselves, ‘Is this the
right move for my career at this point?’ ... I
just go, ‘This seems musically fun to me.’”
Keep on Scratching
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
Bonamassa said his current tour
originated with an acoustic show. “It would
be kind of fun to bring it on the road, but I
don’t know if everybody’s ready for just an
evening of acoustic music,” he said of his
initial doubts. “So we split the show once
last year at the [Royal] Albert Hall, and it
went so well that we decided there was our
answer right there.”
His recent output provides ample proof
that Bonamassa is a versatile guitarist,
singer, and songwriter. He’s best known for
heavy blues rock in the British tradition,
but in an acoustic context his voice and the
songwriting shine nearly as brightly.
The massive Tour de Force is a
great sampling, and it offers listeners
opportunities to compare songs in different
settings. There are two versions, for
instance, of “Jockey Full of Bourbon” – one
jazzy and light, the other a creamy rock
treatment, and both showcasing a voice
that’s nimble and emotive.
But the long-form jams of “The Ballad of
John Henry” (in three of the four featured
concerts) might be the best examples of
Bonamassa’s skills beyond being a six-string
wizard. The structure of the song doesn’t
change, but each version is distinct and
carries a different vibe.
All versions highlight his singing in both
the gentle and forceful veins, and there
are of course plenty of great riffs, building
to the nearly metallic. But the band and
arrangement are just as important.
On the Royal Albert Hall version, the
massive “When the Levee Breaks”-like
drumming is balanced by whooshing
percussive textures, and the pulsing
bass occasionally pops up as melody
instrument. The warm, thick organ
is given an edge in a blistering duet
with Bonamassa’s guitar, which then
rises from relatively quiet in the mix
to again take the reins of the song.
Bonamassa has clearly benefited
from his longstanding relationship
with producer Kevin Shirley, who
regularly pushes him out of his
comfort zone. On Driving Towards
the Daylight, Shirley surrounded
him with ace session players. On
his upcoming album, Shirley asked
him to get away from his typical
balanced mix of covers and originals. “He
challenged me to write a whole record,”
Bonamassa said – which he did save for
the opening track.
Bonamassa has said he doesn’t
particularly enjoy recording albums.
“Some sessions fight me where I hate
the studio; then there are some sessions
where it doesn’t fight you and you just
love it,” he told me. “The sessions that do
fight you, though, you tend to get a better
result than if you’re just too comfy.”
The new album, he said, was “definitely
a combination of both. ... The gear kind
of fought me a little bit. I blew up some
amps, and the guitars were not happy
to be in Las Vegas, but the music was
happening. Sessions are great if the songs
are together.”
He added that music still provides
plenty of opportunities to build on his
craft, and that keeps him going: “I try
to learn something every day. I’m still
excited about the guitar. I still wake
up, and I’m excited. If I’m excited, then
great. If I’m not, then that’s the time
to hang it up.”
Joe Bonamassa will perform on Saturday,
April 19, at the Adler Theatre (136 East
Third Street, Davenport; AdlerTheatre.
com). The show starts at 8 p.m., and tickets
range from $71 to $101.
For more information on Bonamassa, visit
JBonamassa.com.
Joe Bonamassa, April 19 at the Adler Theatre
MUSIC
Photo by Christie Goodwin
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 9 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 10 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
F
rom an Adler Theatre stage filled
with more than 200 musicians, the
Quad City Symphony forcefully
premiered Gustav Mahler’s monumen-
tal Symphony No. 3 on April 5. Moving
from the dissonance of uncertainty to
the transcendental climatic moments of
harmonic resolution, the concert was
abundant in gravitas, contrasts, and
drama that revealed a thorough artistic
vision from Music Director and Conduc-
tor Mark Russell Smith and included a
valuable collaborative process with other
area musical organizations.
There are important reasons why it
took the Quad City Symphony 99 years
to perform this epic Mahler composition
and why it is infrequently played by
other organizations. “It is gigantic in
every detail,” Smith said in a pre-concert
discussion.
Approaching 100 minutes, this
symphony is the longest in the classical-
music repertoire. (The first movement
alone is longer than Beethoven’s iconic
Fifth Symphony.)
It requires a massive orchestra: an
augmented string section, twice the
normal complement of winds, off-stage
soloists, an alto vocal soloist, a children’s
choir, and a large adult women’s chorus.
The symphony is also saturated with
detailed musical instructions. In some
sections, every note requires a particular
nuance, articulation, or dynamic
variation.
But arguably the most intimidating
element of this symphony is clarifying
the meaning of the depth and breadth
of its subject matter, what Mahler called
“The World” – all of nature and what it
communicates to us about life. Discarded
before publication, Mahler’s original
subtitles for the six movements identified
what his music depicted, from “What
the Flowers in the Meadow Tell Me” to
“What Man Tells Me” to “What Love Tells
Me.”
“Such ideas and music deserve all the
technical means at our disposal,” Smith
said. And with ample instrumentalists,
singers, and choir directors on board,
he said that the time was right to bring
Mahler’s symphony to the Quad Cities
area.
The performance was an affirmation of
the conductor’s and orchestra’s capacity
to produce stunning presentations of
large-scale, complex music. For me, the
first movement (written in sonata form)
was unquestionably the highlight of the
concert. The comprehensive control over
contrasting expressive details marked
in the notations made Mahler’s extreme
and subtle differences in the musical
characterizations vivid and persuasive.
The blistering horn declaration set the
tone of the symphony with unmistakable
gravity. Returning repeatedly throughout
the first movement, the eight horns were
precise and musical, picking out awkward
intervals with skill while maintaining an
edge to the musical narrative.
The expansive solo trombone recitative
conveyed a message of anguish and
suffering in striking relief to fancifully
playful tunes in the oboe and solo violin
interspersed in the first movement. The
entire trombone section was impressive,
bringing both the brilliant fanfare
elements and contrasting dark, funeral-
march-like triplets into musical focus.
Even the adjustment of stage position
to accommodate the large orchestra
dramatically supported the clarity of
subtle timbre changes, especially in the
string section. Moved out from behind
the proscenium arch to the edge of
the stage, the strings sounded more
immediate with a broader and more
vibrant tonal spectrum, infusing human
qualities – moaning and groaning, ebbing
and flowing – into huge musical sighs of
expression in Mahler’s music. With their
sound holes pointed toward the audience,
the first violins, cellos, and basses pushed
a thicker, more robust sound directly into
the hall.
Mahler’s grand musical ideas were
so convincingly played with clarity
and intensity that the audience burst
into sustained applause after the first
movement. A compelling visceral
moment, it was Mahler, Smith, the
orchestra, and a spontaneous audience at
their best.
The remainder of the symphony was a
more distinct representation of Mahler’s
programmatic narrative, with specific
elements of nature clearly depicted in
more subtle changes of sound from the
orchestra.
In the third movement, the off-stage
trumpet solo worked well with the
on-stage horn duet, and in the extreme
dynamic changes the orchestra was
balanced.
The differences in the tone color
and the accuracy of pitch and German
diction in the voices made the contents
Managing Mahler Magnificently
The Quad City Symphony, April 5 at the Adler Theatre
by Frederick Morden
f.morden@mchsi.com
MUSIC
Continued On Page 20
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 11 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
Movie Reviews
by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com
storylines are of no particular interest. Yet
it’s an agreeable time-waster that seemed
to tickle the young uns at my screening,
and it doesn’t look at all slapdash; the
animated vistas of Rio de Janeiro and
Amazon forests offer a fizzy grandeur
that makes up for the going-through-the-
motions quality of the narratives. But this
is one of those occasions in which I feel
inordinately lucky to be a movie reviewer,
because I never would have caught
Rio 2 if doing so weren’t a professional
obligation, and consequently would’ve
missed out on easily the most lovingly
hysterical big-screen musical number
since “Man or Muppet”: a little Kristen
Chenoweth ditty titled “Poisonous Love.”
Rio 2 features impressive and amusing
vocals performed by Anne Hathaway,
Bruno Mars, will.i.am, and even the great
Jemaine Clement, but when Chenoweth’s
toxic fuchsia tree frog Gabi performed
her outrageous, operatic, Phantom of the
Opera-style show-stopper here, I didn’t
just want to applaud; I wanted to hug the
bejeezus out of Chenoweth and her whole
freaking movie. Wicked co-star Idina
Menzel performed a statuette-garnering
tune at this year’s Oscars. Next year,
hopefully, it’ll be Glinda’s turn.
For reviews of Captain America: The
Winter Solider, The Grand Budapest
Hotel, Oculus, Veronica Mars, the Putnam
Museum’s Mysteries of the Unseen
World, and other current releases, visit
RiverCitiesReader.com.
Follow Mike on Twitter at
Twitter.com/MikeSchulzNow.
DRAFT DAY
Draft Day casts Kevin Costner as the
Cleveland Browns’ general manager on the
titular day in which his professional and
personal crises reach their boiling points.
And 20 minutes before its climax, director
Ivan Reitman’s pro-football saga lands
on what is simultaneously its most ironic
and most perverse moment, which finds a
roomful of executives and analysts bickering
about a potential trade, and Costner’s Sonny
Weaver Jr. ending the squabble with the
incensed directive “Just give me a moment
of silence so I can think!” The moment
is ironic because, to this point, the movie
has already been flooded with silence. The
moment is also perverse because, after 90
minutes of pause-heavy introspection and
hushed build-up – with the audience all but
slavering for a scene of biting, fast-paced
bickering – now is when Sonny demands
some quiet?
In outline, and especially for sports
(and sports-movie) fans, Draft Day would
seem all but irresistible. Given its subject’s
inherent, behind-the-scenes drama and
ticking-clock appeal, I entered Reitman’s
latest hoping for something akin to a
feature-length take on Brad Pitt’s and
Jonah Hill’s panicked/exhilarated trade-
agreement sequence in Moneyball. (And
Lord how I wish that film’s Aaron Sorkin
and Steven Zaillian were also given a crack
at this script, credited to Rajiv Joseph and
Scott Rothman.) But despite the one that
routinely appears on-screen, counting down
the minutes until Sonny and his fellow
managers begin gambling on their teams’
futures, a ticking clock – at least a figurative
one – is precisely what this logy, sentimental
effort doesn’t possess.
I guess I applaud
the filmmakers for
their attempts at
verisimilitude, and
for not saddling their
outing with too much
manufactured, rat-a-
tat sitcom banter; with
its real-world rhythms
and employment
of actual NFL team names, locales, and
personalities, Draft Day feels “real.” But
“real” isn’t the same as “entertaining,” and as
you slog through the plodding pacing while
Sonny ruminates on whether to recruit a
new quarterback, or give up his first-round
draft pick, or make a commitment to his
newly pregnant girlfriend (Jennifer Garner),
you may find yourself longing for some
good, old-fashioned sitcom phoniness. This
is a movie in which Denis Leary – one of the
fastest-talking actors on the planet – plays an
embittered head coach, and even he sounds
as though he’s speaking at half-speed after a
lengthy nap.
Reitman makes clever use of his film’s
split-screen effects and elicits a solid,
engaging portrayal from Costner, with the
supporting cast offering universally fine
work; Chadwick Boseman, doing a low-key
riff on Cuba Gooding Jr. in Jerry Maguire,
is especially strong, and I also adored Frank
Langella, whose intimidating Browns owner
– like the actor himself – proves too cool to
ever remove his sunglasses. Plus, Reitman
and company get some enjoyable, much-
needed momentum going during their
final scenes of trade negotiations, in which
we’re finally given a reprieve from all the
preceding, tedious soap opera, and you can
feel the audience
collectively
rousing itself
back to full
attention. The
extended climax,
though somewhat
predictable in
its particulars, is
just juicy enough
to fool you,
momentarily, into thinking that the whole
film was this good. Yet its finale and sheen
of professionalism aren’t quite enough to
make up for the movie’s overall lack of drive,
or its cutesy contrivances (Costner’s and
Garner’s secretive tête-à-têtes are continually,
“comically” interrupted by a nerdy intern
played by Griffin Newman), or its tired
scenes of familial and romantic discord that
should make any self-respecting sports fan
want to bolt the auditorium immediately.
“No one can stop a ticking clock,” says Sonny
in the film, “but the great ones find ways to
slow it down.” I suppose, here, that would
make Reitman one of the great ones, because
Draft Day has slowness in spades.
RIO 2
For most of its length, Rio 2 – director
Carlos Saldanha’s colorful, hyperactive
sequel to his colorful, hyperactive Rio from
2011 – is just as innocuous and pleasant,
and just as unnecessary, as you’d expect it to
be. True, with Tracy Morgan’s mischievous
bulldog mostly missing in action and
Jesse Eisenberg’s neurotic macaw Blue
(somewhat) calmer this time around, the
movie is missing some of its forebear’s comic
spirit, and its ecology- and family-minded
Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on ROCK 104-9 FM with Dave & Darren
Taking One for the Team
Denis Leary, Frank Langella, and Kevin Costner in
Draft Day
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 12 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
T
he band
Decker calls
its sound
“psychedelic desert
folk,” and each of
those words car-
ries roughly equal
weight.
The folk
influence is a carry-
over from earlier incarnations of the band.
Before its fourth album – last year’s Slider –
leader Brandon Decker wrote the songs and
brought people in to round them out. “I
didn’t feel they were really musical,” he said
in a phone interview last week. Rather, they
were vehicles to say something.
But when the band performs at Rozz-Tox
on April 20, Decker will be emphasizing the
other two words. In its current form as a
four-piece, the folk leanings are somewhat
obscured by the wide-open space reflecting
its home base of Sedona, Arizona, and
the spaciness of psychedelic rock. (The
band stylizes its name as “decker.”, but for
readability I’m ignoring that.)
On Slider and the epic “Cellars” (from the
upcoming Patsy EP), there’s a comfortable
balance between direct simplicity and airy,
patient exploration. Instead of being dense
in any given moment, the songs wander
purposefully, collecting detail to achieve
their fullness.
Undoubtedly, Decker the songwriter
hasn’t abandoned folk content. He said
the songs on Slider concern “my failings
as a man and the unraveling of pertinent
relationships. Patsy’s more of a less-personal
set of songs. Kind of more about, in a non-
Marxist way, the plight of the proletariat
and how it affects us all to be scrounging
around in life trying to find our morsels of
sustenance.”
But with a strong group of collaborators,
Decker said, the band with Slider began to
write the music as an ensemble, resulting
in a more expansive style. “We just decided
to let the songs pan out how they did,” he
said. “And what that ended up being was I
think a lot more musical and melodic than
anything that I’d ever experienced. But I
think also we didn’t try to stop anything at
any song length.”
The two-part “Weight in Gold” actually
feels like a three-part suite, with “Part 1”
bifurcated. The first half is straightforward,
lovely, and driving acoustic-guitar-based
pop, and after a pause it begins to cast a
downbeat, dreamy spell. “Part 2” builds,
releases, and re-builds, and combined they
craft an emotional arc.
The nine-minute “Cellars” is similarly
a musical triptych
– and it effectively
summarizes the
psychedelic-desert-
folk aesthetic. The
first section is a
spare showcase for
the vocal interplay
of Decker and
drummer/singer/
guitarist Kelly Cole; the androgynous,
artful switching of the lead singing and
coming together of the voices create a
subtle but startling nebulousness that
carries through the rest of the song. The
concise second section gallops and stomps
before the space rock explodes, with
an elegant lead guitar contrasted with
distortion and feedback and thick bass –
marching toward entropic noise.
Decker said that while these tracks
demand a certain amount of patience and
attention from listeners, they also required
the room to reach their destinations. “I love
the moments that they build to,” he said.
“They need that time to get there.”
The band itself nearly didn’t get to this
point. Its van blew a tire and rolled over in
August 2012, seriously injuring Cole and
making Decker wonder whether he should
continue.
Cole was in intensive care, and several
members of the band left shortly after the
accident.“I had a real hard time,” Decker
said.
Because it’s based in a place that is by
no means a musical hotbed, Decker needs
to tour – an unattractive prospect after
such a serious accident. (Living in Sedona
challenges the band, its leader said: “It
caused me to kind of work harder and
push it to the road rather than ascend
some music scene.”)
But “it was Kelly’s visioning that kind
of inspired me,” he said. “Within days [of
the accident], she decided she was going to
quit working on her master’s and teaching
and wanted to fully devote to Decker.”
He added that, with Slider nearly finished
at that point, he had another incentive:
“Music is always kind of booked up three
or four months in advance. So you would
really have to be committed to stopping.”
Decker will perform on Sunday, April 20, at
Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island;
RozzTox.com). The $5 all-ages show starts at
8 p.m. and also features Speaking of Secrets
and Loren.
For more information on Decker, visit
DeckerMusic.org.
Building to Moments
Decker, April 20 at Rozz-Tox
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
MUSIC
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 13 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
PHOTOGRAPHY
(Editor’s note: The River Cities’ Reader
each month will feature an image or
images from the Quad Cities Photography
Club.)
M
any members of the Quad
Cities Photography Club enjoy
spending time in the cold
photographing the eagles at Lock & Dam
14. Dave Engler was at the lock and dam
in late February and was surprised to
see that the pelicans had arrived in spite
of the cold winter that was still hanging
on. He remarked that the eagles were not
very active, but the pelicans made up for
it by putting on a show for those watch-
ing – and shooting. He was able to get
this shot of a pelican that scored highly in
the club’s monthly competition.
Dave used a Nikon D7100 with a
300-millimeter f/2.8 lens at ISO 200, 6.3
f-stop, and 1/2000 of a second with -0.7
exposure bias. Then he used Lightroom
for post-processing from a raw file,
cropped it to remove some unwanted
space at the right, and added some
Featured Image from the Quad Cities Photography Club
contrast and saturation to bring out the
blue water and yellow beak. Finally he
sharpened the image to enhance the
details of the pelican.
The Quad Cities Photography Club
welcomes visitors and new members.
The club sponsors numerous activities
encompassing many types and aspects of
photography. It holds digital and print
competitions most months. At its meetings,
members discuss the images, help each
other to improve, and socialize. The club
also holds special learning workshops
and small groups that meet on specific
photography topics, and occasionally offers
interesting shooting opportunities. The
club meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Thursday
of the month September through June at
the Butterworth Center, 1105 Eighth Street
in Moline.
For more information on the club, visit
QCPhotoClub.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 14 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
What’s Happenin’
Music
Lisa Loeb
The Redstone Room
Wednesday, April 23, 7:30 p.m.
I
f you’re familiar with
the talents and accomplishments of Grammy-
nominated singer/songwriter Lisa Loeb – the
pop/rock/folk performer who plays Davenport’s
Redstone Room on April 23 – you could easily be
fooled into thinking the artist is ... well ... pretty
unassailably cool.
A Brown University graduate who spent the
early 1990s playing New York City’s rock-club and
coffee-house circuit, Loeb achieved phenomenal
success with the release of 1994’s “Stay (I Missed
You)” from the Reality Bites soundtrack, a pop-rock
single by Loeb and her Nine Stories ensemble
that shot to number one on Billboard’s Hot 100
chart, earned the group a Grammy nomination,
and made VH1’s list of the “100 Greatest Songs
of the ’90s.” (The tune’s release also made Loeb
the first musician to top the Billboard charts
before being signed to any record label.)
Following that early career high, Loeb
had a critical smash with her gold-selling debut
album Tails in 1995, additional hits with such
releases as 1997’s Grammy-nominated Firecracker,
2002’s Cake & Pie, and 2013’s No Fairy Tale,
and an Entertainment Weekly rave citing her
“undeniable gift for creating an air of intimacy and
vulnerability.”
Beginning in the early 2000s, Loeb became a
considerable force in children’s entertainment and
welfare, releasing albums (2003’s Catch the Moon,
2008’s Camp Lisa) and books (2011’s Lisa Loeb’s
Silly Sing-Along, 2013’s Movin & Shakin), launching
Music
Kip Winger
Rascals Live
Friday, April 18, 9 p.m.
“H
ey, Jeff!”
“Hello, Mi – . I’m not even going to ask.”
“You mean the outfit? I’m wearing it in honor
of the upcoming Moline concert with Kip Winger,
who’s going to be playing Rascals Live on April 18!
Seems kind of perfect, don’t you think?”
“Mike, you do know that Kip Winger is the
bassist and lead vocalist for the rock band Winger,
don’t you? The group that had platinum-selling
albums with their self-titled 1988 debut and 1990’s
In the Heart of the Young? The group nominated
for a 1990 American Music Award for Best New
Heavy Metal Band?”
“Of course I know that, Jeff ... .”
“And you do know that after the original Winger
lineup disbanded in 1994, the group re-formed in
2006, released the albums IV and Karma, and has
a new studio album – Better Day’s Comin’ – being
released on April 22?”
“Well, I’m not an idiot ... .”
“In addition to fronting Winger, you know that
Kip has five solo albums to his name, toured and
played on two albums with Alice Cooper’s band,
served as lead singer for the Alan Parsons Live
Project, and has participated and performed as
a counselor for the Rock & Roll Fantasy Camp
alongside such rock legends as Roger Daltrey and
Steven Tyler?”
“I’m aware of all that ... .”
“And! Even if you didn’t know a thing about Kip
ACTING
SMART
Helpful Tips on
Appearing More Intelligent
Than You Actually Are
A
t 9 p.m. on April 18, Rock
Island’s Rozz-Tox will present a
special evening with the Minneapolis-
based musician Dosh, the wildly
gifted multi-instrumentalist known
primarily for his experimental,
electronics-based percussion stylings
and the dynamic skill with which he
attacks the drums, keyboards, and
marimba. As Dosh himself stated in
Walker Art magazine, “Going to see a
band you’ve never seen before is one
of my favorite things in the world,” so
if you’re unfamiliar with the artist but
curious to catch his local gig anyway,
here are five ways to feel more in-the-
loop before entering Rozz-Tox’s door.
1) Know some of Dosh’s
biography. Born Martin Chavez Dosh
on September 6, 1972, Dosh grew up
in the Twin Cities, began drumming
at age 15, received a degree in creative
writing from Bard College at Simon’s
Rock in Massachusetts, and started his
first Minneapolis-based band in 1997.
2) Know some of Dosh’s
collaborators. Best known for his
extensive tours alongside Andrew
Bird, Dosh has also played
with such Minnesota-based
groups as Happy Apple, Tapes
’n’ Tapes, and Nasty Goat;
performed alongside Andrew
Broder in the bands Fog and
Lateduster; and is currently a
member of the four-piece Cloak Ox
alongside Broder, Mark Erickson, and
Jeremy Ylvisaker.
3) Know Dosh’s discography. With
2013’s acclaimed Milk Money his most
recent release, Dosh has delivered 13
additional albums – plus the 2004
EP Naoise – since his self-titled 2002
debut, and can also be heard playing
on albums by Bon Iver, Dark Dark
Dark, and Sole & the Skyrider Band.
4) Know what reviewers say about
Dosh. AllMusic.com says that Dosh’s
compositions “have a driving sense of
wonder, like the most optimistic Philip
Glass pieces.” The A.V. Club writes
that his songs “evolve like dreams,
always in motion and revealing new
surprises at each turn.” And Pitchfork.
com states that Dosh achieves “just the
right balance between restraint and
restlessness.”
5) Know how to use Dosh’s name
in a sentence. If your Mom calls on
April 18 and asks for help moving
something heavy out of the basement
that night, just say, “Sorry, Mom –
gotta Dosh!” Then hang up quickly,
before she can call you “jock-oss.”
For more information on Dosh’s
area concert, call (309)200-0978 or
visit RozzTox.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 15 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
MUSIC
Thursday, April 17 – Daytrotter:
Communion. Concert with
independent musicians Johnny
Stimson, Sturgill Stimson, Lee Bains
II & the Glory Fires, Gloom Balloon,
and Christopher the Conquered,
with an opening DJ set by Ragged
Records. Rock Island Brewing
Company (1815 Second Avenue,
Rock Island). 7 p.m. $9.50-15. For
information, call (309)793-4060 or
visit RIBCO.com.
Friday, April 18 – Mason
Jennings. Folk singer/songwriter in
concert, with Living Lands & Waters
giving away free oak-tree saplings
to ticket-holders as part of the
Million Trees Project. The Redstone
Room (129 Main Street, Davenport).
7:30 p.m. $25-30. For tickets and
information, call (563)326-1333 or
visit RiverMusicExperience.org.
Friday, April 18 – Ricky Nelson
Remembered. Concert tribute to
the pop idol featuring Matthew
and Gunnar Nelson. Quad-Cities
Waterfront Convention Center
(2021 State Street, Bettendorf ).
7:30 p.m. $10-15. For information,
call (800)724-5825 or visit
Bettendorf.IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
Saturday, April 19 – An Evening
What Else
Is Happenin’
What’s Happenin’
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 16
the Camp Lisa Foundation to help underprivileged
kids attend summer camp, and earning honors
from the Parents Choice Awards and National
Parenting Publications Awards.
Loeb has appeared in TV series such as Gossip
Girl and The Sarah Silverman Program. She voiced
Mary Jane Watson in MTV’s animated Spider-
Man: The New Animated Series. She started her
own signature eyewear collection. She has her own
brand of coffee, for heaven’s sake.
So yeah. Pretty unassailable. But still: Check
out the accompanying photo. I mean, no graham
crackers? No melted bars of chocolate? Not
cool, Lisa. That’s just a waste of perfectly toasted
marshmallows.
Lisa Loeb performs with an opening set by
Dan Tedesco, and more information on the night
is available by calling (563)326-1333 or visiting
RiverMusicExperience.org.
Theatre
Pinocchio
Davenport Junior Theatre
Saturday, April 26, through Sunday, May 4
D
avenport Junior Theatre wraps
up its 2013-14 season of locally
written plays based on classic literary
works with Pinocchio, the timeless tale
of a puppet who longs to be a real live
boy, running April 26 through May
4. And tasked with writing the stage
version of Carlo Collodi’s Italian serial
The Adventures of Pinocchio, adapter
Daniel D.P. Sheridan says he took an
unusual approach in crafting his hour-
long family entertainment: “I wrote a
really, really, really, really long play. Like
a two-and-a-half-hour play.”
Call it madness, but there was a
method to it. “I first spent a lot of time
with [Collodi’s] text,” says Sheridan,
“and before I decided to remove too
much of it, I wanted to see how it fell
out theatrically. Because sometimes
you read something in a book where
you think, ‘Oh, that’d be awful in a play,’
but then you write it out, and it reveals
itself to be a really great moment.
So I [adapted] it all, and I then went
backward and tried to figure out what
was essential to the dramatic telling
of this story, and what was going to
service its momentum.”
Sheridan did this, he says, without
watching 1940’s beloved Disney
cartoon. “I stayed away from any videos
of any other
Pinocchios. But I
was conscious of
wanting to keep
elements that kids
knew from the
movie. Pinocchio
becoming a donkey, and spending more
time with that story, was a big thing for
me, and things like his nose growing
longer, and the Blue Fairy ... . I think
I could have gotten away with cutting
the cricket out of the story, but I really
thought people would’ve left going,
‘Where’s the cricket?!’”
Pinocchio is being directed by
Sheridan’s wife Jessica, whose recent
credits for Junior Theatre include
Mia the Melodramatic and The Jungle
Book, and its cast includes such Junior
Theatre favorites as Andy Pavey as
Pinocchio, Amanda Grissom as the
Fox, and Shaun Garrity as Geppetto.
Sheridan also promises “a really fun
and imaginative” experience involving
special effects, shadow puppetry, and
a visual aesthetic more steampunk
than Disney ... plus, of course, the
aforementioned cricket.
Just don’t expect it to meet the same
fate it does in Collodi’s serial. “Rather
than scraping the cricket off the end of
a mallet,” says Sheridan with a laugh,
“we leave his fate a little more open-
ended than that.”
Pinocchio will be performed
Saturdays at 1 and 4 p.m. and Sundays
at 2 p.m., and more information is
available by calling (563)326-7862 or
visiting DavenportJuniorTheatre.com.
Winger’s rock history, you probably landed on the
information that he’s also an acclaimed composer
of classical music, and has even been nominated
for the prestigious Isadora Duncan Award for
Excellence in Music?”
“I know all that! But did you know that Kip
Winger wrote a 30-minute symphonic ballet piece
that debuted in 2010 at the San Francisco Ballet?”
“I did. But that piece was titled Ghosts.”
“So?”
“Why are you dressed as the lead in Swan Lake?”
“Oh, come on, Jeff. Swans? Swans have wings?
He’s Kip Winger? Man, you can be clueless
sometimes ... .”
“Yes. I’m the clueless one.”
For more information on Kip Winger’s area concert,
call (309)757-9457 or visit RascalsLive.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 16 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
by more than 75 professional
artists from the Iowa City/Coralville
community. University of Iowa’s Iowa
Memorial Union Main Lounge (125
North Madison Street, Iowa City).
Saturday 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday
10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. For
information, call (319)335-3393 or
visit Now.UIowa.edu.
Tuesday, April 29, through
Sunday, May 25 – New Departures:
Senior Art Show. Exhibit of
works by studio-art and graphic-
design majors Grace Bunderson,
Adrielle Louise Canda, Monica Hill,
Lindsay Hohertz, Reji Kaur, Chris
Madison, Samantha Paddock, Liv
Reinacher, Amelia Ruzek, Sara
Sievert, Samantha Stanton, and
Erin Williams. Augustana College
Teaching Museum of Art (3703
Seventh Avenue, Rock Island).
Tuesdays through Saturdays
noon-4 p.m. Free admission. For
information, call (309)794-7231 or
visit Augustana.edu.
EVENTS
Friday, April 18 – Bucktown
Revue. A celebration of Mississippi
River Valley folk music and culture
through a combination of music,
storytelling, poetry, and humor.
Nighswander Theatre (2822 Eastern
Avenue, Davenport). 7 p.m. $12
at the door. For information,
call (563)940-0508 or visit
BucktownRevue.com.
Saturday, April 19 – Astronomy
Day. Event sponsored by the
Popular Astronomy Club, and
featuring displays including items
on loan from NASA, demonstrations,
speakers, children’s crafts, door
prizes, refreshments, and more.
Moline Public Library (3210 41st
Street, Moline). 2-5 p.m. Free. For
information, call (309)797-3120 or
visit MolineLibrary.com.
Friday, April 25 – River Action’s
12th-Annual Fish & Fire Fundraiser
& Friendraiser. Event featuring
a 5:30 p.m. social hour and silent
auction, a 7 p.m. dinner, and the
presentation of the 15th-Annual
Eddy Awards recognizing individuals
or organizations achieving
excellence on the riverfront. Black
Hawk State Historical Site’s Watch
Tower Lodge (1510 46th Avenue,
Rock Island).$12-32. For tickets and
information, call (563)322-3969 or
visit RiverAction.org.
with Joe Bonamassa. Blues-rock
musician in concert. Adler Theatre (136
East Third Street, Davenport). 8 p.m.
$71-101. For tickets, call (800)745-3000
or visit AdlerTheatre.com.
Saturday, April 19 – 25 or 6 to
4. Concert with the touring Chicago
tribute band. Ohnward Fine Arts Center
(1215 East Platt Street, Maquoketa).
7 p.m. $13-25. For tickets and
information, call (563)652-9815 or visit
OhnwardFineArtsCenter.com.
Sunday, April 20 – The Steve
Grismore Trio. Musicians Grismore,
Scott Barnum, and Cassius Goens
educate and perform in Polyrhythms’
Third Sunday Jazz Workshop & Matinée
Series. The Redstone Room (129
Main Street, Davenport). 3 p.m. jazz
workshop ($5/adults, free for kids),
6 p.m. concert ($10-15). For tickets
and information, call (309)373-0790
or visit Polyrhythms.Ning.com or
RiverMusicExperience.org.
Thursday, April 24 – Working Class
Heroes. Robert Shaw pays tribute to
the musical icons Tom Petty, Bruce
Springsteen, and John Mellencamp.
Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third
Avenue, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $25-30. For
tickets and information, call (309)786-
7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com.
Friday, April 25 – Whey Jennings
& the Unwanted. Country rockers
in concert, with an opening set by
Fifth of Country. Rock Island Brewing
Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock
Island). 9 p.m. $10 advance tickets. For
information, call (309)793-4060 or visit
RIBCO.com.
Friday, April 25 – Joseph Hall: Elvis
Rock ’n’ Remember. Concert tribute
featuring the touring impersonator
and a Branson-based rock ’n’ roll band.
Coralville Center for the Performing
Arts (1301 Fifth Street, Coralville).
8 p.m. $18-28. For tickets and
information, call (319)248-9370 or visit
CoralvilleArts.org.
Saturday, April 26 – Family
Groove Company. Jazz, funk, and
rock musicians in concert, with an
opening set by the Uniphonics. The
Redstone Room (129 Main Street,
Davenport). 9 p.m. $10-12. For tickets
and information, call (563)326-1333 or
visit RiverMusicExperience.org.
Saturday, April 26 – ZBTB. Concert
tribute to the Zac Brown Band. Quad-
Cities Waterfront Convention Center
(2021 State Street, Bettendorf ). 7:30
p.m. $10-15. For information, call
(800)724-5825 or visit Bettendorf.
IsleOfCapriCasinos.com.
Saturday, April 26 – Nashville to
Walcott. Concert featuring musicians
Colene Walters, Jimmy Parker, and the
Dale Thomas Band. Walcott Coliseum
(116 East Bryant Street, Walcott). 7 p.m.
$20-25. For tickets and information,
call (563)260-2651.
THEATRE
Thursday, April 24, through
Sunday, May 4 – The Last Romance.
Romantic comedy by Joe DiPietro,
directed by Tom Morrow. Richmond
Hill Barn Theatre (600 Robinson
Drive, Geneseo). Thursdays through
Saturdays 7:30 p.m.; Sundays 3 p.m.
$10. For tickets and information, call
(309)944-2244 or visit RHPlayers.com.
Thursday, April 24, through
Sunday, May 25 – Ring of Fire. Stage
revue of the music of Johnny Cash. Old
Creamery Theatre (39 38th Avenue,
Amana). Wednesdays, Thursdays, and
Sundays 2 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays
7:30 p.m. $18.50-28. For tickets and
information, call (319)622-6262 or visit
OldCreamery.com.
Friday, April 25, and Saturday,
April 26 – Peter Pan Jr. The musical-
comedy fairytale, in a Student
Performance Series presentation
directed by Dino and Tina Hayz. Center
for Living Arts (2008 Fourth Avenue,
Rock Island). Friday 7 p.m.; Saturday
2 and 7 p.m. $10. For tickets and
information, call (563)340-7816 or visit
CenterForLivingArts.org.
Friday, April 25, through Sunday,
May 4 – Man of La Mancha. The
Tony Award-winning Don Quixote
musical. Iowa City Community Theatre
(4265 Oak Crest Hill Road, Iowa City).
Fridays and Saturdays 7:30 p.m.;
Sundays 2 p.m. $10-18. For tickets and
information, call (319)338-0443 or visit
IowaCityCommunityTheatre.com.
DANCE
Thursday, April 25, and Friday,
April 25 – Gallim Dance. Touring
company performs in a presentation in
the Hancher Auditorium Visiting Artists
series. University of Iowa’s Space/Place
Theatre (20 Davenport Street, Iowa
City). 7:30 p.m. $10-35. For tickets and
information, call (319)335-1160 or visit
http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu.
COMEDY
Friday, April 18 – Paula
Poundstone. An evening with the
comedienne and regular panelist on
NPR’s Wait, Wait ... Don’t Tell Me. Englert
Theatre (221 East Washington Street,
Iowa City). 8 p.m. $35-55. For tickets
and information, call (319)688-2653 or
visit Englert.org.
Monday, April 21 – Suzanne
Westenhoefer. Comedienne performs
a concert presented by Iowa City Pride.
Coralville Center for the Performing
Arts (1301 Fifth Street, Coralville).
7:30 p.m. $30. For tickets and
information, call (319)248-9370 or visit
CoralvilleArts.org.
LITERARY ARTS
Tuesday, April 22 – Remembering
Langston Hughes. Presentation on
the famed man of letters with poet
and storyteller Shellie Moore Guy,
musician and composer Coleman
Harris, and dancer Dorian Byrd.
Moline Public Library (3210 41st
Street, Moline). 6:30 p.m. Free. For
information, call (309)524-2470 or visit
MolineLibrary.com.
Monday, April 28 – River Readings
at Augustana: Rachel Hartman.
Readings and discussion with the
bestselling author of the young-adult
novel Seraphina. Augustana College’s
Center for Student Life (639 38th
Street, Rock Island). 7 p.m. Free. For
information, call (309)794-7316 or visit
Augustana.edu.
SPORTS
Friday, April 18 – Quad City
Rollers. Women’s flat-track roller-
derby matches featuring the spring
intra-league. Davenport RiverCenter
(136 East Third Street, Davenport).
7 p.m. $6-12. For tickets and
information, call (563)326-8500 or visit
QuadCityRollers.com.
VISUAL ARTS
Saturday, April 19, through
Tuesday, April 29 – Young Artists
at the Figge: Davenport. Exhibit
featuring the works of student artists.
Figge Art Museum (225 West Second
Street, Davenport). Tuesdays through
Saturdays 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursdays
10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sundays noon-5 p.m.
Free with $4-7 museum admission. For
information, call (563)326-7804 or visit
FiggeArt.org.
Saturday, April 26, and Sunday,
April 27 – 2014 Riverbank Art
Fair. Weekend event featuring
ceramics, drawing and painting, glass,
woodworking, jewelry, metal works,
fiber, mixed media, and photography
Continued From Page 15
What Else Is Happenin’
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 17 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
T
here were
several
moments
during the evening
performance of
Spring Is in the Air
– presented April
12 at the Adler
Theatre – in which
I sat slack-jawed in
awe of the choreog-
raphy executed by Ballet Quad Cities.
The lifts, in particular, impressed me to
full attention, and I was especially eager
to see what would come next within Elie
Lazar’s choreography for the presenta-
tion’s first half: the ballet Tehilah, set to
Aaron Copland’s “Appalachian Spring.”
My astonishment started with a sweeping
lift in which Margaret Huling held her
arched legs aloft as Patrick Green held her
up, while also spinning so that her feet
skimmed the stage. While this struck me
as exquisite, their movements were topped
again and again as the piece progressed, as
when Emily Kate Long later used the calf
of Alec Roth’s bent leg to step up into a lift,
and Roth was seen spinning Long back-
wards while she held a tucked position.
Such beautifully unexpected motions
marked much of the first half of Spring
Is in the Air, with Lazar’s choreographed
constant movement peppered with
abstract, sometimes odd steps or actions,
and performed with breathtaking musi-
cality by the entire company. With their
indisputable connection to the music, the
dancers made Lazar’s nonstop steps seem
lilting despite their rapidity, as if the effort
exerted were no effort at all; the piece felt
like a quick-paced physical poem.
While I struggled to follow the cho-
reography’s exact storyline, which was
based on a short story by Shai Agnon, it
hardly mattered, as I was so taken by the
ballet unfolding before me. And what was
clear for me was even more stunning for
its meaning, as part of the tale involved
Margaret Huling’s Tehilah returning to
her now-married ex-fiancé – Alec Roth’s
Shraga – with each exquisite pas des deux
interrupted by Jacob Lyon as Tehilah’s
father. At one point, after pulling her away
from Roth, Lyon held Huling in front of
him with his hands on each side of her
head, turning it 180 degrees again and
again, with Huling’s body following just
before the next spin. This struck me as Te-
hilah’s father’s effort to turn her attention
away from her former fiancé and direct
it elsewhere – advice that Tehilah would
attempt to follow only to find herself, once
again, unable to let
go of her past.
The second half
of Saturday’s per-
formance was set
to Igor Stravinsky’s
Rite of Spring and
choreographed by
Ballet Quad Cities’
artistic director
Courtney Lyon.
While Tehilah was fluid and eloquent, Rite
of Spring was more staccato and severe.
With the company dressed in light-blue,
sleeveless bodysuits for the women and
matching tights (without a shirt) for the
men, there was a clear rawness to the
proceedings, with Lyon’s disjointed move-
ments representative of ancient tribes of
humans, or even groups of animals par-
taking in a ritual. There was a clear sense
of awakening, as though the return of
spring stirred new life into the long, cold
limbs of these people. The tribal aspect
was particularly apparent in the way the
dancers would form a group with one or
two separating from among them, as if
assuming roles of leadership.
Much of Lyon’s choreography involved
holds on beats, with a movement ex-
ecuted then a position held, if only for a
single beat before another movement was
made and another position held. Lyon
also incorporated a recurring movement
throughout that involved a dancer start-
ing in a crouched position, jumping up
into the air with one arm held straight up
while performing a bent-legged scissor
kick, and then returning to the crouched
position. This eventually familiar motion
lent rhythm and intent to an otherwise ob-
scurely modern dance that was both weird
and wonderful all at once.
As if the physical performance weren’t
enough, the experience was elevated by
Orchestra Iowa’s performance. There’s
something stirring about live music that
recorded accompaniment cannot mimic,
and it didn’t hurt that Orchestra Iowa’s
flawless performance was worthy of a con-
cert itself, even without the visual display
of the dancers adorning the ensemble’s
music. Paired together, though, Orches-
tra Iowa and Ballet Quad Cities created
a work that stirred my soul both visually
and aurally, with Spring Is in the Air now
the most stunning Ballet Quad Cities
production I’ve yet seen.
For more information on Ballet Quad
Cities’ season, call (309)786-3779 or visit
BalletQuadCities.com.
Spring in Their Steps
Ballet Quad Cities’ Spring Is in the Air at the Adler Theatre
By Thom White
DANCE
Emily Long and Alec Roth
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 18
interactive, it is an open invitation for
stepping through openings, ducking
under poles, even climbing on some of
the gently sloped forms.
Educational signs are sprinkled
throughout the site. For example, two
photographs and a brief description are
placed near a grouping of parabolic arcs
made of metal poles. One is a photo of a
wickiup, a seasonal home built in the late
1700s in the Sauk village at the mouth of
the Rock River. The other is a photo of a
Georgian-style house built a century later.
The caption notes that the semicircular
windows under the house’s eaves echo the
arches of the wickiup poles. It is a forced
comparison, but it does draw attention to
relationships between structures that are
otherwise so very different.
The concept for an interactive and
educational park grew from a series of
design meetings facilitated by Quad
City Arts. Nearly 50 area historic
preservationists, businesspeople,
recreation enthusiasts, and river activists
came together over a two-year period
to develop the community-built project.
Lori Roderick and John Gere were its
primary designers, with Roderick serving
as the project’s lead artist. The breadth
of Gere’s experience as an architect
is evident in the scope of the historic
architectural references. The park was
dedicated and presented to the City of
Davenport on May 22, 1999.
Bruce Walters is a professor of art at
Western Illinois University.
This is part of an occasional series on the
history of public art in the Quad Cities. If
there’s a piece of public art that you’d like
to learn more about, e-mail the location
and a brief description to BD-Walters@
wiu.edu.
Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
arches are meant to
characterize the rounded
window openings
found in Romanesque
Revival architecture.
These architectural
forms have been
streamlined, abstracted.
In removing non-essential
details, their underlying
geometric forms have
been revealed; there
is a beauty in their
simplicity of form. Still,
the park’s artful layout,
the circular groupings,
the variety of geometric
forms, and variations in
scale create a wealth of diverse patterns
and compelling compositions.
Though it has an aesthetic sensibility,
the park also feels playful. Predominantly
made of triangles, circles, and cylinders,
it looks somewhat like a village made
of very large toy blocks. Intended to be
T
he Lindsay Archi-
tectural Sculpture
Park is a grouping
of structural forms de-
rived from historic styles
of buildings and homes
in the Quad Cities. The
park is – in turn – visu-
ally engaging, playful, and
educational. It is located
along the Riverfront Park-
way south of the Village of
East Davenport.
The park’s layout feels
organic. Its overall circular
shape is crisscrossed
with walkways that lead
one past – or through
– 10 primary groupings of structural
forms. The largest of these structures is a
30-foot-tall limestone tower. Its slate roof
is constructed in the style of the Victorian
towers and turrets built in the late 1800s.
Another prominent structure is based
on a Fort Armstrong blockhouse built
in 1816. Made of wood, concrete, and
copper, its partially completed roof shows
the construction methods usually hidden
under a building’s exterior.
Other forms, such as the twin
freestanding arches, are based on a
singular architectural element rather
than an entire structure. These concrete
Art in Plain Sight: Lindsay Architectural Sculpture Park
Article and Photos by Bruce Walters
BD-Walters@wiu.edu
ART
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 19 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
I
t’s unfortunate
that William
Marbury’s angry,
domineering King
Creon and Analisa
Percuoco’s defi-
ant, strong-willed
Antigone don’t share
more stage time in
Scott Community
College’s production
of Crossing Acheron:
The Tragedy of Antigone. The actors share a
similar energy in their performances, creat-
ing a palpable tension as the king condemns
Antigone to be buried alive for, against his
decree, twice attempting to bury her slain
brother. Marbury and Percuoco are equally
gifted at gleaning emotional meaning out of
director/author Laura Winton’s Greek-trag-
edy adaptation and delivering their words
with conviction, and their performances and
chemistry are so captivating that they left
me hoping the two will appear in a future
production that involves more interaction
between them.
It’s also unfortunate that we can’t see at
least half of Percuoco’s performance (and
about a third of the play) because of the
decision not to light the scenes in which
Antigone is locked in a tomb. While the
idea is a valid one, allowing the audience to
experience the same darkness as Antigone
does, it was, to me, maddening in practice.
For much of Thursday’s Crossing Acheron
presentation, I also wished for more
movement from the actors, as Winton has
her cast members act with their voices, but
rarely their bodies. Too often, they’re seen
standing around, sometimes shifting their
weight from foot to foot, without really doing
anything other than speaking. It isn’t until
Antigone’s scenes in her tomb that we finally
get to witness an actor moving about and
emoting physically – except that we really
don’t. The only way I could tell Percuoco was
moving was due to the red glow emanating
from the performance space’s exit sign and
the fading sunlight slipping through the
imperfectly placed pieces of paper covering
the windows. Thanks to these (likely)
unintended light sources, we could at least
see costume designer Arta Fazliu’s white
veil and a small section of what remains of
Antigone’s white tulle wedding gown moving
about the stage area, but that’s not enough
to prevent the audience from missing out
on what, based on her earnest deliveries, I’m
guessing are Percuoco’s finest scenes.
Winton’s adaptation, in my estimation,
is also problematic. While the sections
employing Sophocles’ original work are
poetic and stirring,
Winton’s inclusion
of analytical texts
written by George
Bataille and Judith
Butler diminished
my experience.
Admittedly, I did
learn a few things
about Antigone’s
motivation and
situation as they
relate to gender roles, and the significance
of her tomb as a bridal chamber. But I
fall on the side of preferring that art not
be explained to me, as a strength of art is
one’s individual interpretation of it. These
passages, read by Winton as Crossing
Acheron’s narrator, would be better left
for the Q&A sessions following each
performance.
At least the problems here are with
the play, not the players. John R. Turner’s
Tiresias, the blind seer who warns King
Creon of the consequences of his actions,
orates commendably, while the gentle-
spirited deliveries of Colin Hepner’s “Leader
of the Chorus” (though in reality he’s the
entire chorus) seem to amicably invite to
the audience to experience the tale with
him. Though Austin Stone seems limited
by what registers as self-uncertainty, there’s
obvious talent beneath his stiff movements;
Stone suggests that he’s up to the task
of characterizing King Creon’s son and
Antigone’s fiancé Haemon, but requires
more direction to deliver the performance
he’s clearly capable of. And there continues
to be something about Sara Bolet that I
find unusually charming. Though I prefer
Bolet’s humor (which was showcased in Scott
Community College’s The Actor’s Nightmare
in 2012), when her Ismene pleads with sister
Antigone to stop her attempts at burying
their brother, the character elicits sympathy
thanks to the performer’s commitment to
the role.
With its running time of a little over
an hour, Crossing Acheron: The Tragedy of
Antigone isn’t all that long. However, its
overwhelmingly long scenes set in the dark,
and its narration that made the production
feel more like a college lecture than a
theatrical performance, made its length seem
like twice that amount. At least.
Crossing Acheron: The Tragedy of Antigone
runs at Scott Community College’s Student
Life Center (500 Belmont Road, room #2400
through exterior door #5, Bettendorf) through
April 19, and more information is available by
e-mailing Steve Flanigin at sflanigin@eicc.edu.
My Crossing to Bear
Crossing Acheron: The Tragedy of Antigone, at Scott Community College through April 19
By Thom White THEATRE
William Marbury
EXHIBITION CLOSING
Olivia Gamache, Flower Turtle, 2008,
blown and hot-sculpted glass with
applied bits, made by Bee Kingdom;
Macay Fischer, Banana Bam, 2007,
blown and hot-sculpted glass with
applied bits.
Davenport, Iowa • 563.326.7804
www.figgeartmuseum.org
Through May 4, 2014
Kids
Design
Glass
Kids Design Glass is a traveling exhibition from the Museum
of Glass in Tacoma, Washington of 52 glass sculptures
inspired by children’s drawings.
Sponsored by
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 20 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
of the text clearer. From the dark
recesses of the low, slow, brooding
cellos and basses in the beginning of
the fourth movement, guest mezzo-
soprano Adriana Zabala’s haunting
“O Mensch” announced a shift inward
from depictions of nature to the
wisdom of mankind in the roundelay
from Friedrich Nietzsche’s Thus Spoke
Zarathustra. Even in her softness of tone,
Zabala’s sound cut straight to the back of
the Adler.
In contrast, the clear, light vocal timbre
produced by the Quad City Symphony
Youth Choir and the Quad City Women’s
Choir (made up of women from the
Augustana Choir, Quad City Choral Arts,
the Handel Oratorio Society, the Jenny
Lind Vocal Ensemble, and the Pleasant
Valley High School Chamber Choir) was
appropriately angelic. The tonal balance
between the singers worked well when
they all sang together, and the sound
quality of the melodic arches provided
a light, airy sonic color that floated over
the orchestra.
The last movement, beginning with
the string section, was a reverently and
intensely played instrumental hymn
to platonic love. As more instruments
were folded into the slowly, majestically
building sequences of overlapping
themes, the eloquent and comforting
musical climax brought Mahler’s grand
expression of “The World” to a powerful
conclusion.
Frederick Morden is a retired orchestra-
music director, conductor, composer,
arranger, educator, and writer who has
served on the executive board of the
Conductors Guild.
Managing Mahler Magnificently
by Frederick Morden
f.morden@mchsi.com
MUSIC Continued from Page 10
the comedy sketches – he himself writes.
“I live in Bettendorf, and when I moved
there, I thought Bettendorf was sort of the
upscale community. But over the past 20
years, Pleasant Valley has really become the
place to live. So we have this sort of take-off
on The Beverly Hillbillies where this poor
dentist who lives in Bettendorf wins the
lottery and finally has enough money that
he can buy a house in Pleasant Valley.
“Obviously,” he adds, “the emphasis is
on fun,” and singer/comedienne Winn –
who began performing with the Bucktown
Revue in 2010 and plays the mayor in
the ‘Pleasant Valley Hillbillies’ sketches –
couldn’t agree more.
“The Bucktown Revue is one of the few
things that I’ve found in life where every
time I go, I leave feeling more fulfilled
than when I walked in,” she says. “It’s just
ridiculous fun, and when we all sing ‘Good
Night, Irene’ at the end, and do that last
a cappella verse, it’s just overwhelming; I
feel like I’m part of something bigger than
myself.
“The show is just a beautiful thing,” she
continues, “and it hooks you, and you keep
coming back for it.”
It’s also designed to be a low-pressure
environment for its performers. “There
really isn’t any rehearsal,” says Romkey
with a laugh, though he does add that the
show’s musicians, as would be expected,
do rehearse their numbers prior to
performance night. “We perform with
scripts, just like you would with a radio
program, so it’s not like people have to
memorize their lines. But one of the key
talents to be in the show is being good
at ad-libbing, because somebody might
miss their lines, or say the wrong thing, or
something else won’t work at the right time
... .
“I don’t want to create the impression
that it’s incredibly slapdash,” he adds,
laughing further. “But there’s really nothing
quite as gratifying as to have something go
really wrong, and then to have somebody
make a joke out of it, and have the audience
think that’s the funniest thing they’ve ever
seen.”
With this month’s show featuring, in
addition to its recurring performers, Iowa
City bluegrass musicians Marc and Brandi
Janssen, guitarists Steve Flatt and Tom
Rood, local artist/singer Heidi Sallows,
and former Rock Island mayor Mark
Schwiebert (“who’s going to come and read
some poetry”), Romkey calls the April 18
presentation “off the charts” in terms of
talent.
Turner, meanwhile, calls the Bucktown
Revue “my favorite time of the month. This
next show is on Good Friday, but for me,
every Bucktown is a good Friday.”
The Bucktown Revue will be presented at
the Nighswander Theatre (2822 Eastern
Avenue, Davenport) at 7 p.m. on Friday,
April 18, and Friday, May 16, and tickets are
$12 at the door. For more information on the
monthly event, visit BucktownRevue.com.
MUSIC
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued from Page 6
Companion Companion
about her shape-shifting creatures, as
she became more and more intrigued by
the question “What would it be like for a
dragon in human form?”
Hartman says, “Like, dragons in dragon
form – surely they must have really good
eyesight. They’re hunters. But I bet they
don’t have much sense of touch. And their
sense of hearing, probably, would not
connect to emotional centers like ours
would. So how disorienting would it be for
dragons to find themselves in human form,
and suddenly be bombarded with all this
sensory information they weren’t used to
handling?
“And from the senses,” she continues,
“it was just a sort of hop, skip, and jump
to emotions. Because, surely, that’s also a
messy, mammalian thing that reptiles aren’t
going to need for their social structure,
such as it is. I know from having raised a
child that we’re not born knowing what to
do with our emotions. And so how does
a dragon handle emotion coming into
our world as an adult, and never having
experienced emotion before?”
(Regarding her Seraphina dragons’
natural talent for mathematics, Hartman
says, “Well, in my life, I’ve found that people
who are a little less emotional are also really
good at math. My husband’s a physicist, so I
have this mathematical dragon in my house
all the time. But don’t tell him that. He
thinks the prince was modeled on him, and
I just let him think that.”)
Yet even armed with a ready-made
setting and fascinating fantastical
characters, Hartman says that it still took
“about nine years to write” Seraphina.
“The first plot I had was actually a very
quiet one. It was just about Seraphina and
her father, like, not getting along,” she says,
laughing. “And I sent the book out to agents,
and they’d send me notes back saying, ‘Oh,
you write really well ... and if you ever figure
out what a plot is, look me up.’
“So I spent months and re-wrote it with a
better plot, and was able to get an agent that
way. But he sent it out, and the first person
he sent it to, at Simon & Schuster, said, ‘You
know, this plot sort of has two arcs. What
if we divide the book into two and make
each arc its own book? Then you’ve got a
two-book deal!’ So I expanded the first half
into its own book, and I sent it to her, and
I waited and waited and waited. And then
the first thing I hear back, after about nine
months, is that this person had left Simon
& Schuster.”
Eventually, after many months of
continued revisions, Seraphina landed
at Random House. “And my Random
House editor said, ‘You know what? I love
your writing, I love the world, I love the
characters ... but the plot has got to go.’” (It’s
at this point in our interview that Hartman
lets out a comically agitated “Aa-a-a-a-a!!!”)
“So I finally say, ‘Okay, you know what?
I’ve written this book three times now, and
I can’t write it again. So here’s what I can
do. I’ll write the next book.’ The second arc.
And that’s what I did. That’s what Seraphina
is – the next book. And I don’t think that
first one is ever gonna see the light of day. I
think I just had to let it go.
“It’s one of those really funny things,”
says Hartman about Seraphina’s consequent
success, “where everyone treats you like
you came out of nowhere, and you’re the
overnight sensation ... and you know it
took nine years to write the thing, you
know? There’s this dissonance there. To go
from endlessly toiling at this task – being
Sisyphus pushing this thing up the hill
again and again – to having this thing that
people love really kind of did a number on
my head. Suddenly, there were thousands of
people for me to disappoint with this next
book.”
Regarding her follow-up Shadow Scale,
Hartman is understandably hesitant about
revealing details, except to say, “I started
the sequel before Seraphina actually came
out, and have been writing it for three
years now. And it’s been really hard. I went
through some depression, because I had
to get back to a place where I was writing
because I loved it, and not because people
were expecting me to write this thing. I
can’t write unless I can get back to a place
where it’s at least engaging enough to keep
me in my chair.”
And, as must be asked in our era of
Twilight, The Hunger Games, and Divergent,
is there any chance of a Seraphina movie on
the horizon?
“Oh, golly,” says Hartman. “In my
dreams. So far not, but I would love to see
somebody’s interpretation of it. That would
tickle me.”
Just don’t expect Hartman to take on the
screenwriting duties herself. “I think that
would jut drive a stake right through my
heart,” she says with a laugh. “No. I think
I know my limitations as far as external
pressure goes.”
Rachel Hartman will read from and discuss
Seraphina at Augustana College’s Center for
Student Life (639 38th Street, Rock Island) on
Monday, April 28, at 7 p.m. Admission is free,
and more information is available by calling
(309)794-7316 or visiting Augustana.edu.
For more information on the author, visit
RachelHartmanBooks.com.
Continued from Page 7
BOOKS
The Girl with the Dragon or Two
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 21 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
I
’m not person-
ally familiar with
author Judy Blume’s
children’s book Tales
of a Fourth Grade
Nothing, but judging
by the almost-packed
house for Saturday’s
opening-day perfor-
mance, I’m pretty sure
many elementary-
school students are.
And based on the kids’
relative silence and lack
of fidgeting while observing the produc-
tion, I’m guessing the Circa ’21 Dinner
Playhouse’s stage production is, for them,
just as much of a hit as the book.
Unfortunately, as an adult, I didn’t find
the play quite as appealing as I do most
of Circa ’21’s family shows. Though the
tale of Blume’s fourth-grade nothing is
interesting enough, it didn’t appeal to me
as much as past Circa ’21’s productions
such as 2013’s How I Became a Pirate and
2012’s Diary of a Worm, a Spider, & a Fly;
instead of finding its central situation
funny, I felt as unhappily annoyed with our
title character’s younger brother as the title
character did. Then again, the story is told
through the older brother’s perspective, so
it could easily be argued that my reaction
was, in truth, the appropriate one.
Directed here by Marc Ciemiewicz,
playwright Bruce Mason’s adaptation is
a series of vignettes tied together with
narration by Peter, portrayed as fittingly
bland, and fittingly male, by female actor
Morgan Griffin. (That’s not to say that
Griffin is bad in the role, but that her
energy is true to that of a fourth-grade
boy who feels like he’s invisible.) Peter’s
main problem is his attention-stealing
brat of a three-year-old brother, Fudge
(Stacy Phipps), and the scenes shared from
their lives include, among others, Fudge’s
birthday party, a visit to the dentist, a
shoe-shopping trip, and the search for
Peter’s missing turtle.
Fudge is such a nuisance that Phipps,
dressed in costume designer Gregory
Hiatt’s toddler-appropriate choice
of yellow bib overalls, had me really
rooting for Peter. Phipps manages to
maintain a sincere joy and smile while
misbehaving over and over again, from
Fudge repeatedly getting out of bed to
play with – i.e., harass – the wife of his
father’s potential client (Tamarin Lawler’s
mustached Mr. Yarby) to refusing to do
anything he’s told until Peter does it first.
Andrea Moore’s take on the boys’ mom
When a Hot Dog Is a Brat
includes a sense of
defeat under the
surface, which fits
given how difficult
this child is, and
while I don’t believe
in spanking, Phipps’
Fudge had me
reconsidering the
option.
So, too, did Cara
Chumbley’s scaredy-
cat crybaby Sarah, a
friend and guest at
Fudge’s birthday party whose piercing
shrieks are appropriately excruciating. It
was her shoe salesperson Vicki, though,
whom I liked best of the five characters
Chumbley portrays. This gum-chomping,
New York-accented woman wears a
friendly, patient façade while dealing
directly with the boys and their mother,
but offers wickedly funny eye-rolls and
visibly impatient sighs – delivered through
her nose – as she watches Moore’s mom
deal with Fudge’s refusal to try on red
shoes.
If anyone in the cast, however, truly
connects with the adult audience members
in terms of comedy, it’s Brad Hauskins,
who also takes on numerous roles. Playing
Peter’s dad, Hauskins delivers facial
expressions that are likely to register
with adults, such as his annoyance with
the banality of the television shows he’s
choosing to watch. His Ralph, Fudge’s
pudgy friend, had me in stitches with his
repeated cries for “More cake!”, even after
puking at Fudge’s birthday party. Hauskins’
dentist Dr. Brown unleashes a laugh that
has a tinge of the maniacal to it, but never
crosses over from funny to evil. And even
though his character Jimmy – a classmate
of Peter working with him on a school
project – reads a little too “stoner” for a
fourth grade, Hauskins is no less enjoyable
to watch for it.
To be clear, I didn’t dislike Circa ’21’s
production of Tales of a Fourth Grade
Nothing; I just found the material less
adult-friendly than previous plays of its
type. Its storyline is still amusing and will
likely please the children who see it –
especially those with younger siblings they
find unbearably annoying.
Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing runs at
the Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third
Avenue, Rock Island) through May 10, and
more information and tickets are available
by calling (309)786-7733 extension 2 or
visiting Circa21.com.
By Thom White
Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, at the Circa ‘21 Dinner Playhouse through May 10
THEATRE
Tamarin Lawler, Stacy Phipps, Brad
Hauskins, and Morgan Griffin
WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
we know about: murder of embassy and
ATF personnel; drone attacks that killed
innocents; lying to Congress under oath;
IRS targeting of certain groups; NSA spying
on Americans; myriad agencies’ misuse
of taxpayer funds; ignoring congressional
subpoenas; ethics violations; waste, fraud,
and abuse in defense-contract expenditures;
ignored auto-industry mandatory
disclosures resulting in loss of life and
limb; billions in bank fraud and money-
laundering; refusal to submit mandatory
audits of books by both the Department of
Defense and the Department of Health &
Human Services.
Meanwhile, through the federal courts,
federal control over state-owned land is
gaining. However, Utah is fighting back,
passing legislation to “demand the return
of most of the federal lands in Utah back to
state control by 2015” (RCReader.com/y/
utah).
This controversy begs the question: What
circumstances permit administrative law to
trump constitutional protections? For what
purpose does the federal government now
claim authority over 80 percent of Nevada,
45 percent of California, 55 percent of Utah,
and 70 percent Alaska? Visit RCReader.
com/y/land to learn more about federal
claims in all 50 states, including Iowa and
Illinois. Keep in mind the collateral value
of U.S. property, both public and private,
for the federal government in managing its
dangerous national debt.
Which brings me back to Cliven Bundy.
The issue is far more about whom and what
interests the federal agencies really serve.
If it were those of Cliven Bundy and other
similar American ranchers, the problems
would be worked out amicably. (Bundy is
the only remaining rancher of 53 ranchers
in Clark County and surrounding territory
that have been forced out by BLM.) Perhaps
the grazing fees could be forgiven to the
extent that BLM harmed property.
In the meantime, the compromised
media turns a blind eye to this showdown
with the BLM, which could very easily
turn into another travesty not unlike Ruby
Ridge. Call your senator and representative
today to demand to know where they stand
on protecting American life, liberty, and
– as U.S. legislators – property rights in
Clark County, Nevada, and the rest of our
50 states.
Continued From Page 3
United States, specifically in one of the
several states – namely Nevada – that
justifies heavily armed agents against a
rancher and his family?
How is this scenario even possible in
a constitutional republic of laws? This is
perhaps the most important question of
our time. Americans must become far
better informed about administrative
government. Think about it like an overlay
of government that exists in corporate form
– United States of America, Inc. – because
that is precisely what it is. USA, Inc. has
branches of itself in every state and county
in America, all “agents” for the parent
corporation in DC.
Administrative statutes are akin to
corporate bylaws. Initially, Congress passes
legislation that establishes an agency
and its authority, along with its funding,
deliberately using overly broad language
to comply with our Constitution on its
face. Once established, the agency is free
to create its own rules and regulations in
carrying out its duties – more often than
not, completely afield and outside of what
the Constitution actually allows. It is free to
grow and multiply, adding departments and
sub-departments as it sees fit. The growth
of agencies is the primary force behind the
explosive growth of government – federal,
state and local – resulting in a massive,
out-of-control regulatory behemoth that is
inherently abusive. But until this multitude
of abuses of authority is challenged by
Americans, the overreach goes merrily
on, with agencies policing themselves
and remaining unaccountable in any
meaningful way.
The congressional oversight committees
tasked with overseeing the 456 agencies are
ludicrously outnumbered and outmatched
by agency personnel. Recent congressional
hearings have exposed those agencies
under investigation to be adept at thwarting
serious oversight and shielding their
agencies’ leadership from accountability.
Third, administrative rules and
regulations are antithetical to a bottom-up
constitutional republic. The body of statutes
is exhaustive in its agenda to control
resources as comprehensively as possible,
therefore necessarily adopting a top-down
structure that is disgracefully arbitrary in its
enforcement authority. This is evidenced in
recent exposure of corruption and crimes
that have gone criminally unprosecuted
at the federal level, especially when it
involves agency personnel. To name
egregious acts in just the past five years that
Nevada Rancher’s Fight Goes Much
Deeper Than Media Willing to Cover
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 22 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
(Save for saying, “I’m ugly.”) Admit that you
don’t know much about art, and ask her to
tell you about her work: the thinking behind
it, her painting process (color, form, why
she includes certain elements), and what
she’s trying to say or evoke. You might find
that you respect where she’s coming from
and believe in her on that level, which could
mean that the two of you can make a go of it.
If so, keep in mind all the ways she’s just like
any other girlfriend, and be prepared to fake
a seizure when she asks the artist’s version
of that classic lose-lose question: “Do I look
untalented while painting in this dress that
makes me look fat?”
Don Emoticon
Last month, I hit it off with a girl on
an online dating site. The problem is
that my written banter is much better
than what I can achieve on a first date.
I do poorly when just staring across a
table at somebody. I’m worried she’ll be
disappointed when she sees how bad I am
at being witty on the spot, so I’ve been
reluctant to ask her out.
– Stalling
Maybe as a preliminary step, you could
make plans to go to the same Starbucks
but hide behind your laptops and e-mail
each other. We need to start calling online
dating sites “online meeting sites” so people
will stop thinking they can get to know
somebody while spending a month sitting
miles away and staring deep into their
computer screen. They typically end up
filling in the blanks with who they want
the person to be and believe they’re getting
attached to them, when maybe what they’re
most attached to is how witty they feel while
leaning on a thesaurus the size of Rhode
Island. Sure, it’s tough sitting across a table
from a near stranger with “Say something
already!” ringing in your head. So don’t sit on
the first date. Do something. Go somewhere
you can pluck subjects of conversation out
of the atmosphere: a street fair, a flea market.
Play pool; go bowling. And lighten up on
feeling that you need to be funny. You’ll
ultimately be funnier and more likely to get
a second date if you approach the first date
as if your goal is getting to know a woman
instead of getting her to book you for your
own Comedy Central special.
Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.
171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405
or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
Ask
the
Advice
Goddess
BY AMY ALKON
Watching Paint Die
I’ve been dating a girl I really like for
six weeks. She pays her rent with a 9-to-5
job but studied painting at art school and
wants to make it her career. Unfortunately,
I don’t like her paintings at all. They are
abstract and don’t look like they take much
craft, and they just don’t aesthetically
appeal to me. (Maybe I’m missing
something. Who knows?) I haven’t told her
my real feelings. But as we get more serious
and as she talks about her aspirations, I’m
finding it more and more uncomfortable to
keep playing along. I worry that we won’t
have a future because of this.
– Philistine
There are questions you long to ask her
about her work, such as, “What did you do in
art school? Spend four years playing Angry
Birds on your phone?”
Abstract art is an easy target for ridicule.
The thing is: somebody who went to art
school most likely had to learn formal
principles and show they could draw
figuratively before they could venture into
abstraction. But to the untrained eye, an
abstract work can look like somebody made
a big mess with some paint and then stuck
a mythical title on it – Androcles & the Lion,
No. 4. You can’t help but wonder, “Sorry,
but is that the lion’s paw on the left, or did
somebody at the gallery opening trip and let
their appetizer go flying?”
Because your girlfriend’s artwork is more
than a weekend hobby, your disliking it
probably is a big deal. Paintings are basically
stripteases of the artists’ selves on a piece of
canvas, reflecting who they are, what they
see and feel, and what they want to say. Also,
it’s hard enough to try to earn a living as
an artist without sharing a bed with one of
your detractors. (Imagine Edvard Munch’s
girlfriend seeing The Scream and nagging
him, “Come on, Eddie, The Smile would be
so much nicer.”) And even if you can hide
your true feelings for a while, there’s a good
chance they’ll poke their little heads out
during an argument, à la “Wanna vastly
improve your work? Incorporate gasoline
and a lit match.”
For a relationship to work, it isn’t enough
to have the hots-ies for somebody. You need
to have a crush on them as a human being.
Fortunately, you may be able to get to this,
even if her paintings don’t speak to you.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 23 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Even if this possibility seems whimsical to you,
Leo, I invite you to give it a try. According to my
reading of the current astrological omens, your
moving body is likely to generate bright ideas
and unexpected solutions and visions of future
adventures.

VIRGO (August 23-September 22):
Throughout North America and
Europe, there are hundreds of unused
roads. Many are former exit and entrance ramps
to major highways, abandoned for one reason
or another. Some are stretches of pavement that
used to be parts of main thoroughfares before
they were rerouted. I suggest we make “unused
roads” your metaphor of the week, Virgo. It may
be time for you to bring some of them back into
operation, and maybe even relink them to the
pathways they were originally joined to. Are there
any missing connections in your life that you
would love to restore? Any partial bridges you feel
motivated to finish building?

LIBRA (September 23-October 22):
Karma works both ways. If you do
ignorant things, ignorant things may eventually
be done to you. Engage in generous actions, and
at some future date you may be the unexpected
beneficiary of generosity. I’m expecting more of
the latter than the former for you in the coming
days, Libra. I think fate will bring you sweet
compensations for your enlightened behavior in
the past. I’m reminded of the fairy tale in which
a peasant girl goes out of her way to be kind to a
seemingly feeble, disabled old woman. The crone
turns out to be a good witch who rewards the girl
with a bag of gold. But as I hinted, there could
also be a bit of that other kind of karma lurking
in your vicinity. Would you like to ward it off? All
you have to do is unleash a flurry of good deeds.
Anytime you have a chance to help people in
need, do it.

SCORPIO (October 23-November
21): As they lie in the sand, African
crocodiles are in the habit of opening
their jaws wide for hours at a time. It keeps them
cool, and allows for birds called plovers to stop by
and pluck morsels of food that are stuck between
the crocs’ molars. The relationship is symbiotic.
The teeth-cleaners eat for free as they provide a
service for the large reptiles. As I analyze your
astrological aspects, Scorpio, I’m inclined to see an
opportunity coming your way that has a certain
resemblance to the plovers’. Can you summon
the necessary trust and courage to take full
advantage?

SAGITTARIUS (November
22-December 21): Are you sure you
have enough obstacles? I’m afraid
you’re running low. And that wouldn’t be healthy,
would it? Obstacles keep you honest, after all.
They motivate you to get smarter. They compel
you to grow your willpower and develop more
courage. Please understand that I’m not taking
about trivial and boring obstacles that make you
Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's
EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES
& DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES
The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at
1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700
FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Brezsny
ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s
Compensation Week. If you have in
the past suffered from injustice, it’s
an excellent time to go in quest of restitution.
If you have been deprived of the beauty you
need to thrive, now is the time to get filled up.
Wherever your life has been out of balance, you
have the power to create more harmony. Don’t
be shy about seeking redress. Ask people to make
amends. Pursue restorations. But don’t, under any
circumstances, lust for revenge.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Our
brains are no longer conditioned for
reverence and awe,” said novelist John
Updike. That’s a sad possibility. Could you please
do something to dispute or override it, Taurus?
Would it be too much to ask if I encouraged you
to go out in quest of lyrical miracles that fill you
with wonder? Can I persuade you to be alert for
sweet mysteries that provoke dizzying joy and
uncanny breakthroughs that heal a wound you’ve
feared might forever plague you? Here’s what the
astrological omens suggest: Phenomena that stir
reverence and awe are far more likely than usual.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I wonder
if it’s time for you to modify an old
standby. I’m getting the sense that
you should consider tinkering with a familiar
resource that has served you pretty well. Why?
This resource may have some hidden weakness
that you need to attend to in order to prevent a
future disruption. Now might be one of those rare
occasions when you should ignore the old rule “If
it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” So be proactive, Gemini.
Investigate what’s going on beneath the surface.
Make this your motto: “I will solve the problem
before it’s a problem – and then it will never be a
problem.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Do you
really have what it takes or do you not
have what it takes?” That’s the wrong
question to ask, in my opinion. You can’t possibly
know the answer ahead of time, for one thing.
To dwell on that quandary would put you on the
defensive and activate your fear, diminishing your
power to accomplish the task at hand. Here’s a
more useful inquiry: “Do you want it strongly
enough or do you not want it strongly enough?”
With this as your meditation, you might be
inspired to do whatever’s necessary to pump up
your desire. And that is the single best thing you
can do to ensure your ultimate success.

LEO (July 23-August 22): I swear my
meditations are more dynamic when I
hike along the trail through the marsh
than if I’m pretzeled up in the lotus position back
in my bedroom. Maybe I’ve been influenced by
Aristotle’s Peripatetic School. He felt his students
learned best when they accompanied him on
long strolls. Then there was philosopher Friedrich
Nietzsche, who testified that his most brilliant
thoughts came to him as he rambled far and wide.
numb. I’m referring to scintillating obstacles that
fire up your imagination; rousing obstacles that
excite your determination to be who you want
and get what you want. So your assignment is to
acquire at least one new interesting obstacle. It’s
time to tap into a deeper strain of your ingenuity.

CAPRICORN (December 22-January
19): In 1937, physicist George Paget
Thomson won a Nobel Prize for
the work he did to prove that the electron is a
wave. That’s funny, because his father, physicist
J. J. Thomson, was awarded the Nobel Prize in
1906 for showing that the electron is a particle.
Together, they helped tell the whole story about
the electron, which as we now know is both a
wave and a particle. I think it’s an excellent time
for you to try something similar to what George
did: follow up on some theme from the life of one
of your parents or mentors; be inspired by what he
or she did, but also go beyond it; build on a gift he
or she gave the world, extending or expanding it.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February
18): You have been a pretty decent
student lately, Aquarius. The learning
curve was steep, but you mastered it as well as
could be expected. You had to pay more attention
to the intricate details than you liked, which was
sometimes excruciating, but you summoned the
patience to tough it out. Congrats! Your against-
the-grain effort was worth it. You are definitely
smarter now than you were four weeks ago. But
you are more wired, too. More stressed. In the
next chapter of your life story, you will need some
downtime to integrate all you’ve absorbed. I
suggest you schedule some sessions in a sanctuary
where you can relax more deeply than you’ve
allowed yourself to relax in a while.

PISCES (February 19-March 20):
You have the power to shut what has
been open or open what has been shut.
That’s a lot of responsibility. Just because you
have the power to unleash these momentous
actions doesn’t mean you should rashly do so.
Make sure your motivations are pure and your
integrity is high. Try to keep fear and egotism
from influencing you. Be aware that whatever you
do will send out ripples for months to come. And
when you are confident that you have taken the
proper precautions, by all means proceed with
vigor and rigor. Shut what has been open or open
what has been shut – or both.


Homework: Comment on the following hypothesis:
“You know what to do and you know when to do it.”
Visit FreeWillAstrology.com.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 24 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
April 3 Answers: Pg 26
NET RESULT · April 17, 2014
ACROSS
1. Plateau
5. Simple vessel
10. Kind of box
15. Dwindles
19. Feat in figure skating
20. Embellish
21. Instrumental passage
22. Ball of thread
23. Monkey
24. Specified
25. Like a martinet
26. Trig function
27. Start of a quip by Paula Poundstone: 4 wds.
30. Treat for tabby
32. Nuzzle
33. __ McCoy
34. One of Arthur’s men
35. Depict
37. Crow’s-nest support
39. Pseudonym
40. Hardy girl
41. Part 2 of quip: 5 wds.
48. “__ la vista, baby!”
50. Flag
51. Crater
52. Gas: Prefix
53. “Name of the Rose”author
54. Shipboard crane
56. Movie category
58. War personified
59. Mal de __
60. Still snoozing
61. Easy to handle
62. Houdini specialty
64. Part 3 of quip: 4 wds.
69. About
71. Chatters
72. Potter’s creation
73. __ douloureux
76. Legal claim
77. Steep slopes
80. Tooth: Prefix
81. Tokyo, years ago
82. Sawbuck
83. Exchange fee
84. Execute
85. prosequi
87. Part 4 of quip: 5 wds.
93. Drained of liquid
94. Worth
95. Scraps
96. Like a runner in a race
98. Wise king
101. Magnum __
103. Pompano relative
104. Tweets
105. End of the quip: 3 wds.
110. Mr. Shankar
111. Writer Bret __
113. Earn
114. The Emerald Isle
116. Buffalo’s waters
117. Lawn tool
118. Stun
119. Higher-ed sports org.
120. Joins
121. Dutch and double
122. Famed
123. Dry run
DOWN
1. Coaster
2. Illuminated sign
3. OT name
4. Old expert in mental competence
5. Card game
6. Saw
7. Alaskan cape
8. Raw materials
9. Backs
10. __ brevis
11. As far as
12. Kind of British gun
13. Flawed garment: Abbr.
14. Ego
15. Bliss
16. Russian pancakes
17. Country bordering Togo
18. Used a broom
28. Gained
29. Goat cheese
31. Graceful horse
34. Attached, in a way
35. Heartsease
36. Panoply
37. Capital of Yucatan
38. Underground passage
39. Competent
40. A pronoun
42. Fastening device
43. Noted doubter
44. Hit in baseball
45. Frenzied dance
46. Uriah __
47. Irish Gaelic
49. Second president (or sixth)
55. Furthers
56. Containers
57. Leavening agent
58. Crackerjack
61. __ Dome scandal
63. Yarn coil
65. Free electron
66. Marsh plant
67. Happenings
68. Do a certain dance
69. __ -relievo
70. Place
74. Ran in neutral
75. Like some campuses
78. Zydeco enthusiast
79. Fever
80. Pub missile
84. Roughrider
86. Dutiful
88. Piano keys
89. Press down
90. Waded
91. Mixed drink
92. Like a cut gem
97. “2001: A Space Odyssey”computer
98. Propeller
99. Where they land near the Loop
100. Angry
101. Lutrine creature
102. Wharves
103. Confiscate
105. Ship of myth
106. Test-drive vehicle
107. __ house
108. Polite
109. Foie __
112. Big bother
115. Chow down
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 25 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show -Big
Shots, 419 15th St. Moline, IL
Eleven Fifty Two CD Release Party - Life
in Cycle - Crop Circle - Shadow Stone
-Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL
Fai rhaven - Fi re Sal e - Stonebel l y
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Franti Project - Patio -Bent River Brewing
Company - Rock Island, 512 24th St.
Rock Island, IL
Hardball -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust
Davenport, IA
Item 9 & the Mad Hatters - Zeta June -
Gone South - Soul Phlegm -Gabe’s,
330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Jeremy Kittel Band -CSPS/Legion Arts,
1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Barrel
House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Krotchripper - Aborted Diety - Gore-
monger - Obsidian Hammer - Archi-
medes Death Ray -Salute on 7th, 1814
7th St Moline, IL
Little Vito -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Local Bands for Local Music Education
Fundraiser: The Winter Blues All-
Stars - KAB - The Effie Afton - The
Mercury Brothers - Cody Road - The
Mississippi Misfits - Jason Carl & the
Whole Damn Band (5pm) -The Red-
stone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
North of 40 -Poopy’s Pub & Grub, 1030
Viaduct Rd Savanna, IL
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ featur-
ing Leigh Timbrook -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Resurrgent -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State
St Bettendorf, IA
Rob Dahms (6pm) -Rustic Ridge Golf
Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa
St. Eldridge, IA
2014/04/17 (Thu)
Chuck Murphy -Harrington’s Pub, 2321
Cumberland Dr Bettendorf, IA
Curtis Hawkins & Nic Clark -RME Com-
munity Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Dav-
enport, IA
Daytrotter Communion: Johnny Stim-
son - Sturgill Simpson - Lee Bains
II & the Glory Fires - Gloom Bal-
loon - Christopher the Conquered
- Ragged Records DJ Set -RIBCO, 1815
2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Double Dz Karaoke -Purgatory’s Pub,
2104 State St Bettendorf, IA
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show
-Hook’s Pub, 318 N. 4th St. Clinton, IA
Jam Sessi ons w/ John O’ Meara &
Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Jon Wayne & the Pain - Gone South
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Jordan Dani el sen w/ Jef Spradl ey
-The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Dav-
enport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Quarry, 2202 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms -Rustic
Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151
East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club, 213
17th St. Rock Island, IL
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
2014/04/18 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport,
2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
SRVLST - Joie de Vivre - Wounded
Knee - Prize the Doubt - Ice Hockey
-Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
The Knockoffs -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
The Recliners -Uptown Bi l l ’s Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
2014/04/20 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
decker. - Speaking of Secrets - Loren
-Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Jaron Rosien & Company (4pm) -Riv-
erside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184
Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Open Mic for Originals Only (noon)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Sunday Jazz Brunch ( 10: 30am &
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Sunday Live Jazz (10:30am) -Brady
Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza
Hotel, 111 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Third Sunday Jazz Presents The Steve
Grismore Trio (6pm) -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Vegas Karaoke Contest -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
2014/04/21 (Mon)
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
Night People (6pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606
W Locust Davenport, IA
North of 40 -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ featur-
ing Leigh Timbrook -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Ricky Nelson Remembered -Quad-Cities
Waterfront Convention Center, 2021
State St. Bettendorf, IA
River City Radio Hour (5:30pm) -Mo-
line Commercial Club, 513b 16th St
Moline, IL
Rudie Clash - Funkma$ter - Rich Rok
-Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa
City, IA
Simon Townshend -CSPS/Legion Arts,
1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Sinjo Thraw Mash - ARY Resuscitation
Unit - Blue Movies - The Concrete
Muse (6pm) -Public Space One, Jef-
ferson Building Iowa City, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Horde - Omens - Disintegrator
-RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Bucktown Revue -Nighswander Junior
Theatre, 2822 Eastern Avenue Dav-
enport, IA
Caught in the Act -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Chuck Murphy -Bleyart’s Tap, 2210 E. 11th
St. Davenport, IA
Country Dance with the Paul Avers
Band -Col Ballroom, 1012 W. 4th St.
Davenport, IA
Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510
N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Curtis Hawkins & Nic Clark -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Dan Dimonte & the Bad Assettes CD
Release Party - Weathered Heads
-Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St
Iowa City, IA
Dosh - Ghost Band -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show -The
Smoking Dog Pub, 1800 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Good Friday Blues w/ Ellis Kell & Friends
-Trinity Episcopal Cathedral, 121 W.
12th St. Davenport, IA
Jazz After Five w/ OddBar (5pm) -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Kip Winger -Rascals Live, 1418 15th
St. Moline, IL
Little Vito -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Live Lunch w/ Curtis Hawkins & Nic
Clark (noon) -RME Community Stage,
131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Mason Jennings -The Redstone Room,
129 Main St Davenport, IA
Minor Decline - Fairhaven - Cody Tracy
-Bier Stube Moline Blackhawk Room,
417 15th St. Moline, IL
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke -Bier Stube LeClaire,
1001 Canal Shore Dr. LeClaire, IA
2014/04/19 (Sat)
25 or 6 to 4: The Chicago Experience
-Ohnward Fine Arts Center, 1215 E
Platt St. Maquoketa, IA
7 Sins Sideshow - Matt Woods - Jail-
house Poets -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
An Evening with Joe Bonamassa -Adler
Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Blackstones -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Bo Ramsey & Hi ghway 12 - Kel l y
Pardekooper -The Mill, 120 E Burl-
ington Iowa City, IA
Caught in the Act -Generations Bar &
Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL
Chuck Murphy -Timber Lanes, 1005 E.
Platt St. Maquoketa, IA
DJ Entertainment -Barrel House 211, 211
E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Sima Cunningham @ Rozz- Tox – April 23
30
19 SATURDAY
00
18 FRIDAY
20 SUNDAY
Continued On Page 26
00
17 THURSDAY
21 MONDAY
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 26 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Loop -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washi ngton St.
Iowa City, IA
Lost Country Dancers’ Dance -Walcott
Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
Mark Avey Band -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
North of 40 -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State
St Bettendorf, IA
Oink Henderson & Squealers (8:30pm)
- Hold On Band (10pm) -Riverside
Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway
22 Riverside, IA
Peer Pressure - Outsiders - Iron Born
- Ruthless -Bier Stube Moline Black-
hawk Room, 417 15th St. Moline, IL
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Second-Annual Earth Day Concert -Uni-
tarian Universalist Church of the Quad
Cities, 3707 Eastern Ave. Davenport, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Jordan Danielsen Band -Rhythm
City Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Dav-
enport, IA
Two Peace -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2
W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke -Bier Stube LeClaire,
1001 Canal Shore Dr. LeClaire, IA
Whey Jennings & the Unwanted - Fifth
of Country -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Wild Oatz -On the Rock Grille & Bar, 4619
34th St Rock Island, IL
2014/04/26 (Sat)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Cemetery Gatez - Heavyweight -RIB-
CO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2014/04/22 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Mandolin Junction -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub, 217
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz
Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Van’s
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
Sleepwalkers - Crystal City -Gabe’s, 330
E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA
2014/04/23 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve McFate
-McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Mo-
line, IL
Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Cross Creek Karaoke -Hero’s Pub, 3811
N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Fifth of Country (6pm) - Vegas Karaoke
Contest (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Chuck Murphy -Cochran’s Pub, 13464
Galt Rd. Sterling, IL
Community Drum Circle (10:30am)
-RME (River Music Experience), 131
W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Cosmic -Mulligan’s Valley Pub, 310 W 1st
Ave Coal Valley, IL
Dirt Road Rockers -On the Rock Grille &
Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Divebomb -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State
St Bettendorf, IA
DJ Entertainment -Barrel House 211, 211
E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show -Bad
Boyz Pizza & Pub, 5266 Utica Ridge Rd.
Davenport, IL
E11eventh Hour -Hook’s Pub, 318 N. 4th
St. Clinton, IA
Exile (8pm) - Hold On Band (10pm)
-Riverside Casino and Golf Resort,
3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Family Groove Company - The Uniphon-
ics -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
Funktastic Five -Rascals Live, 1418
15th St. Moline, IL
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Barrel
House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Nashville to Walcott: Colene Walters
- Jimmy Parker - The Dale Thomas
Band -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant
St Walcott, IA
North of 40 -Hawkeye Tap Sports Bar
N Grill, 4646 Cheyenne Ave. Dav-
enport, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Riverside Jam Post-Show Party: Broc-
coli Samurai - Genome -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms -Rustic
Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151
East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club, 213
17th St. Rock Island, IL
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Ultraviolet Hippopotamus -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Working Class Heroes -Circa ‘21 Din-
ner Playhouse, 1828 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
2014/04/25 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport,
2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA
Buddy Olson (noon) -Bettendorf Public
Library, 2950 Learning Campus Bet-
tendorf, IA
Candymakers - Uniphonics -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Lisa Loeb - Dan Tedesco -The Redstone
Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Brad Vickers & His Ve-
stapolitans (noon) - Acoustic Open
Mic Night (6:30pm) -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
Sima Cunningham -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd
Ave. Rock Island, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street
Landi ng, 1029 Mound St. Daven-
port, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
2014/04/24 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
C.J. the D.J. -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Chuck Murphy -The Cooler, 311 W. 2nd
St. Rock Falls, IL
Double Dz Karaoke -Purgatory’s Pub,
2104 State St Bettendorf, IA
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show -It’s
on the River, 201 N. Main St. Port
Byron, IL
Jam Sessi ons w/ John O’ Meara &
Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
John Gorka -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd
St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Live Lunch w/ Terry Hanson & Larry
Boyd (noon) -RME Community Stage,
131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Quarry, 2202 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Corporate Rock -11th Street Precinct,
2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA
Cross Creek Karaoke -It’s on the River,
201 N. Main St. Port Byron, IL
Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510
N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show
-Timber Lanes, 1005 E. Platt St. Ma-
quoketa, IA
Echoes & Afterthoughts - Michael Stin-
son - The Effie Afton - Gain the Wolf
-Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL
Hal Reed Blues Band -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Holly’s Buddies (5:30pm) - Chuck Mur-
phy (8:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Jazz After Five w/ OddBar (5pm) -The
Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA
Joseph Hall: Elvis Rock ‘n’ Remember
-Coralville Center for the Performing
Arts, 1301 5th St. Coralville, IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Larry Bo Boyd (6pm) -Cool Beanz Cof-
feehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
The Horde @ RIBCO – April 18
24 THURSDAY
Continued From Page 25
30
26 SATURDAY
00
25 FRIDAY
23 WEDNESDAY
22 TUESDAY
April 3 Crossword Answers
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17-30, 2014 27 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
2014/05/03 (Sat)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
Brad Pouleson -Uptown Bill ’s Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
Cinco de Mayo Celebration featuring
Orquesta Son del Tumbao -The Red-
stone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Cosmic -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th
St Davenport, IA
DJ Entertainment -Barrel House 211, 211
E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Flat Top (4pm) -Wi de Ri ver Wi nery -
Clinton, 1776 East Deer Creek Rd.
Clinton, IA
Gordy & Debbie -Ohnward Fine Arts
Center, 1215 E Platt St. Maquoketa, IA
Groove Inc. -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Joe Tingle’s DJ Entertainment -Barrel
House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114
1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Lynn Allen -Rascals Live, 1418 15th
St. Moline, IL
Mobb Deep - Daggers & Gadema - DJ
GMJ - DJ OMS -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
That Freak Quincy -Iowa City Yacht Club,
13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
The Hitman (6pm) -Rustic Ridge Golf
Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa
St. Eldridge, IA
The Knockoffs -Building 311 @ Fro’s Pub &
Grub, 309 Cedar St. Wilton, IA
Two Peace - Fire Sale - The Fiyah -RME
(River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Sunday Live Jazz (10:30am) -Brady
Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza
Hotel, 111 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Vegas Karaoke Contest -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
2014/04/28 (Mon)
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E
Burlington Iowa City, IA
2014/04/29 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Danielle Ate the Sandwich -Rozz-Tox,
2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub, 217
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz
Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Van’s
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St
Davenport, IA
2014/04/30 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Acoustic Jam Night w/ Steve McFate
-McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Mo-
line, IL
2014/05/02 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport,
2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA
Cheese Pizza -Rascals Live, 1418
15th St. Moline, IL
Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510
N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Dani ka Hol mes (5pm) -Wi de Ri ver
Winery - LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd.
LeClaire, IA
Fire Sale - Surrounded by Giants - The
Casual Ties -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13
S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Indigosun -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Groove Inc. -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside,
IA
Karaoke Night -Rooster’s Sports Bar &
Grill, 2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ
featuring Leigh Timbrook -The Old
Stardust Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street
Moline, IL
Smooth Groove -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Gi vi ng Tree Band - The Dawn
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
The Saturday Giant (6pm) -RME Com-
munity Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Dav-
enport, IA
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Kooby’s Karaoke -Bier Stube LeClaire,
1001 Canal Shore Dr. LeClaire, IA
2014/05/01 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Danika Holmes -Barrel House 211, 211 E.
2nd St. Davenport, IA
Indigosun -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn
St Iowa City, IA
Jam Sessi ons w/ John O’ Meara &
Friends -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Jazz Jam w/ the North Scott Jazz Combo
-RME (River Music Experience), 131 W.
2nd St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -The Quarry, 2202 W. 3rd
St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms -Rustic
Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151
East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Open Stage Night -Theo’s Java Club, 213
17th St. Rock Island, IL
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Acoustic Open Mic Night (6:30pm)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd
St. Davenport, IA
Band du Jour (6pm) - Vegas Karaoke
Contest (9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail,
2606 W Locust Davenport, IA
Cloud Nothings - Protomartyr - John
June Year -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Cross Creek Karaoke -Hero’s Pub, 3811
N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
Paul Thorn (6pm) -Fat Fish Pub, 158 N.
Broad St. Galesburg, IL
The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street
Landi ng, 1029 Mound St. Daven-
port, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
Shadow Stone - Natural Oil - Blood
Banked -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollar’s
Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Terrapin Isle -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House,
730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
The Matchsellers -RME Communi ty
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
The Maw - Flannel Season - Muckrock-
ers - Thankful Dirt -Gabe’s, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
The Tailfins -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W
Locust Davenport, IA
Wild Oatz -Poopy’s Pub & Grub, 1030
Viaduct Rd Savanna, IL
ZBTB -Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention
Center, 2021 State St. Bettendorf, IA
2014/04/27 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 2108
E 11th St Davenport, IA
Anthony Catalfano Quartet (10:30am)
-Radisson Quad City Plaza Hotel, 421
W. River Dr. Davenport, IA
Chuck Murphy (4pm) -Shannon’s Bar
and Grill, 252 S State Ave Hampton, IL
God Is Still Speaking Concert -Edwards
Congregational Church, 3420 Jersey
Ridge Rd. Davenport, IA
Har-di-Har - Subatlantic -Rozz-Tox, 2108
3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Juvenile Diabetes Research Founda-
tion Benefit: Battle Red - Barncore
Betty - Stillchyld - Indocile - Moral
Belief - Lethal Injektion - Sinistir
Mind (3pm) -Rascals Live, 1418 15th
St. Moline, IL
Open Mic for Originals Only (noon)
-Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave
Rock Island, IL
Sunday Jazz Brunch ( 10: 30am &
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
30 WEDNESDAY
28 MONDAY
30
3 SATURDAY
29 TUESDAY
1 THURSDAY
2 FRIDAY
27 SUNDAY
Family Groove Company @ The Redstone Room – April 26
1777 Isle Parkway • Bettendorf, IA 52722 • 1-800-THE-ISLE • www.theislebettendorf.com
© 2014 Isle of Capri Casinos, Inc. Must be 21 to enter the casino. Isle, Get Winning! and IsleOne are registered trademarks of Isle of Capri Casinos, Inc.
Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center is a service mark of the City of Bettendorf. Gambling a problem? There is help. And hope.
Call 1-800-BETS-OFF. www.theislebettendorf.com
CONNECT WITH US
ENJOY TWO AMAZING SHOWS
ZBTB: ZAC BROWN
BAND TRIBUTE
Enjoy a big night of
country music
SATURDAY, APRIL 26
7:30PM
Don’t miss this special tribute
to the country/folk sounds of
the Zac Brown Band.
RICKY NELSON
REMEMBERED
Starring Matthew and
Gunnar Nelson
FRIDAY, APRIL 18
7:30PM
Join us as we remember
a music legend and rock out
to great music.
Catch both shows at the Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center
SM
.
Purchase tickets at the IsleOne
®
guest service center or online at
www.theislebettendorf.com today.
River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 21 No. 854 • April 17- 30, 2014 28 Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com