by S.

Aaron Shamshoyan
A local business is being called a neighborhood nuisance by
some living in the area, leaving the business’s future in the hands of
selectmen.
Multiple complaints against Rocco’s Used Auto Parts, one of
several names of the business operating at 55 Park Avenue, has
captured the Salem Board of Selectmen’s attention, prompting
members to question if operations should continue on the site.
Assistant Town Manager Leon Goodwin informed the board
Monday of complaints filed by neighbors, but said the license for
a salvage yard on the property could only be revoked if it was a
common law nuisance.
The salvage yard license is renewed annually by the town, and
Rocco’s has operated for more than 45 years.
A variance was granted in the sixties allowing for the salvage
yard to operate in the residential neighborhood, Goodwin said.
But neighbors continue to file complaints against current owner
Supported Through Advertisers An Independent Weekly Newspaper
Volume 7 Number 20
April 18, 2014 16 Pages
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Salem Community
Salem Community Salem Community
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Centerpoint Community Church, 101 School St.
Good Friday, April 18
Service - 7 p.m.
Easter Sunday, April 20
Continental Breakfast - 9 a.m.
Easter Worship - 10 a.m.
First Congregational Church of Salem,
15 Lawrence Rd., Salem
Easter Sunday, April 20
Easter Sunrise Service - 6 a.m., Salem Center Park Gazebo,
Breakfast to follow at the Church
Easter Worship Service - 10 a.m.
Pleasant Street United Methodist Church, 8 Pleasant St.
Good Friday Service, April 18
Held jointly with St. Luke’s United Methodist Church
- 7 p.m.
Easter Service, April 20
Sunrise Service - 6 a.m., Scottish Highlands Golf Course,
79 Brady Ave., jointly with United Methodist Church;
Continental Breakfast to follow
Traditional Easter Service - 9 a.m.
Rockingham Christian Church, 5 Industrial Way
Easter Sunday, April 20
Worship - 8 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:15 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.
Saints Mary & Joseph Parish
St. Joseph Church, 40 Main St.
Good Friday, April 18
Stations of the Cross - 3 p.m.
Lord’s Passion - 7:30 p.m.
Easter Sunday, April 20
Masses: 7:30 a.m. and 8:45 a.m. in the Church
and 11 a.m. in the Auditorium
Mary Queen of Peace Church, 200 Lawrence Rd.
Holy Saturday, April 19
Easter Vigil - 7:30 p.m.
Easter Sunday, April 20
Masses: 9 a.m. and 10:45 a.m.
EASTER SERVICES
Dedication
POW/
MIA
Rolling Tunder NH 1 and 2, along with veterans and selectmen,
dedicated a POW/MIA memorial at town hall Monday.
Bob McGuian, center, POW/MIA chair of cer for Rolling Tunder
New Hampshire 1; Janice Maramaldi, president of New Hampshire
Rolling Tunder 1; and Selectman Patrick Hargreaves dedicate the
POW/MIA memorial at Salem Town Hall.
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Maintenance of
Canobie Lake Water Pumps
One of three raw water
pumps in the Canobie Lake
Pump House was removed
for service Tuesday.
Te pump is used to lift
water to the treatment plant.
Below: Inside the Canobie Lake Pump House where
one of three pumps was removed for service. Te town
is currently using Arlington Pond for the water supply
as is traditionally done during the winter.
Staff photos by S. Aaron Shamshoyan
Te pump was covered in tuberculation.
Utilities Manager Frank Giordano said the
pumps haven’t been serviced in over 20 years.
Selectmen Could Scrap Salvage Yard Business
by S. Aaron Shamshoyan
A chance to step back in time and model
history’s heroes is an exciting project second
graders at Fisk School look forward to each year.
Fisk teacher Clelsea Ford said students
conducted biography research projects during the
month of March and used what they learned to
create a “Biography Wax Museum.”
For almost an hour Friday, second grade students
were dressed as the subject of their projects and
stood still as parents, teachers and other students
toured the displays.
The wax museum isn’t the only way students
shared their research; they also created a more
permanent display.
“One way that we had students present their
reports was by creating a life-size portrait of
their chosen person,” Ford said. The portraits
were displayed around the rooms during the wax
museum.
‘Biography Wax Museum’ Turns Heads
Mateo Caro, center, poses during the biography wax museum Friday.
Students appear as the subjects of their research projects at Fisk Elementary School during the Biography Wax Museum.
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Neighbors have fled multiple complaints against Rocco’s Used Auto Parts on
Park Avenue saying the business is a neighborhood nuisance.
continued to page 7- Salvage Yard
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2 - April 18, 2014 | Salem Community Patriot
Accolades Accolades
• Good Friday Service April 18, 7:00 PM
• Continental Breakfast April 20, 9AM
• Easter Worship April 20, 10:00 AM
• Egg Hunt for Children after worship
101 School St., Salem, NH
603-893-9191 www.centerpointsalem.org
You Are Invited to Lenten Service at
Curry College is proud to announce that Meghan Breen has been
inducted into the Sigma Theta Tau Nursing Honor Society. The Sigma
Theta Tau Honor Society was formed in 1953 when a group of nurses
attending Boston University set out to establish an organization that
would represent the best of what nursing offered in this part of the
world. The Curry College chapter was formed soon after, chartered
at the time as only the seventh chapter of Sigma Theta Tau. Members
of the Honor Society are routinely sent to leadership conferences,
academic events, and member forums.
Keene State College’s 14th Annual Academic Excellence
Conference took place on April 5. This student professional
conference is designed to showcase the academic work of Keene State
students and the collaborative work between students and faculty. It
allows students to share excellent work with a broad audience, and
prepares them for submitting proposals to professional conferences.
One-hundred eighty-three students presented oral and poster projects,
exhibits, panel discussions, and workshops this year.
Among the participants were the following Salem residents:
Stephen Day (Environmental Studies) presented “Functional Value
Assessment of Wetlands at the Harris Center for Conservation
Education” and Annan Walker (Education) presented “Fostering
Collaboration Among Professionals.”
Send your Accolades to news@areanewsgroup.com with a photo
JROTC Program to
Remain at Salem High
by S. Aaron Shamshoyan
The Air Force JROTC program will continue to operate in Salem
High School despite orders from the Air Force to deactivate due to
sub standard enrollments.
Superintendent Michael Delahanty explained to school board
members he was contacted by the Air Force and told to begin
deactivating the program, requiring an inventory of uniforms,
supplies and equipment, and returning them to the Air Force.
Delahanty appealed the decision, and later learned the appeal
was denied and the program would have to end.
“The Air Force requires us to have 100 cadets,” Delahanty said,
noting since 2000 when the program began in Salem, enrollment
reached 100 only once.
The decision prompted outrage from current and former cadets,
establishing a Facebook group and seeking support for the program.
More than 560 members in the group, many past and present
cadets, shared positive stories about the program and the impact it
had on their lives.
Delahanty contacted U.S. Senators Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH) and
Kelley Ayotte (R-NH) seeking support to continue the program.
Shaheen responded to the request with a letter she received from
the Air Force stating the reason for deactivation.
“We failed to reach the requirement of 100 cadets,” Delahanty
said from the letter.
A meeting with students and staff at the high school broke the
news to the school. “The kids were crushed,” Delahanty said.
But administrators weren’t ready to give up and found a way to
maintain the program.
JROTC leaders discovered an option called the National Defense
Cadet Core, which would allow the program to continue but leave
the district to fund the entire $191,000 cost of the program. The Air
Force currently contributes almost $60,000 to the program cost and
covers uniform replacement and repairs.
While the NDCC doesn’t typically cover the Air Force, Delahanty
said they agreed to make an exception for Salem, but the school
was encouraged to grow the program above the 100-student
requirement, and reapply.
And if the program doesn’t reach 100 members on the next two
years, it could have to deactivate.
“If we don’t maintain the 100 in 2016, 2017, we would have to
look at deactivating the program,” he said.
“I think this is how we have to move forward,” Delahanty said.
“We still need to move forward as though we need to meet the
threshold.”
Board members praised the program and administrators for
fighting to keep the opportunity available to students.
“They find their place through the JROTC program,” School
Board Member Michael Carney said about students. “We have to
get this to 110, 115 students as quickly as possible.”
Board member Pamela Berry commented on the community
involvement by students and leaders.
“We see this group representing our school in just about every
aspect in this community,” she said.
Board member Peter Morgan said it was important to reach the
100-member enrollment soon, adding the district was previously
granted extensions. “We need to have support,” he said.
Students and faculty are working to share information with
prospects for the program about the benefits of JROTC.
The board voted unanimously to cover the remaining cost for the
program, which the Air Force currently funds.
There are currently about 85 students enrolled in the program.
Plans for Kelly Plaza Furniture Store Get Green Light
by Bob Gibbs
The Salem Planning Board recently reviewed
and unanimously approved plans for a proposed
furniture store at 14 Kelly Road. The site of
the furniture store will be adjacent to Ashley
Furniture and share the parking lot. The
proposed store would be a separate manufacturer
of American-style furniture.
The new 24,218-square-foot building will be
located to the west of Ashley furniture with its
back wall facing the building currently housing
Sports Authority and other businesses.
During the planning board meeting, much
discussion focused on required parking spaces.
For a building this size, there is a requirement to
have 125 parking spaces. Current plans call for
111 spaces. Ross Moldoff, the planning director
for Salem, recommended granting the conditional
permit for the parking lot. Under this permit, the
building must be operated as a furniture store
only. Chairman Campbell added that the permit
ceases to be valid for any other use. The board
approved the conditional permit.
Also, signage for the building was considered.
The owner requested placing a sign on the
Ashley furniture building. There is currently a
270-square-foot sign on this building that has
been approved by the town. A second sign
would be 100 square feet.
After much discussion by the board, Mr.
Moldoff, and the owners of the buildings, the
board voted 6-1 to allow a 100-square-foot sign
facing Kelly Road on the new building and a
100-square-foot sign on the northeast corner of
the new building appearing toward the Best Buy
parking lot. The requested additional signs, to be
added to the existing Ashley Furniture building,
were not permitted.
The board asked the applicant about lighting
for the new building. Since there is a residential
abutter to the property, the Planning Board
inquired whether the lights closest to this abutter
be turned off after hours. The applicants stated
that due to security concerns they would not
want to do that. There were no abutters present
at the meeting to voice concerns.
Before the planning board voted, Mr. Moldoff
read the following conditions that had to be met
by the applicant:
1. Prior to the building permit, submit the
approval from the Engineering Department;
2. Pay for the outside inspections per the
direction of the Engineering Department;
3. Prior to occupancy, all improvements must
be constructed in accordance with the
approved plan;
4. Provide an as-built site plan;
5. Note the conditional-use permits for the
parking and the signs on the plan; and
6. Operate the business so that the parking lot
capacity is not exceeded.
The board unanimously voted in favor of this
motion.
Staff photos by Bob Gibbs
Kelly Plaza furniture store Kelly plaza site plan
Kelly Plaza
furniture store
elevation drawing
Like Salem Community Patroit on
Salem Community Patriot | April 18, 2014 - 3
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Field of Dreams Gets Spring Cleaning
by Bob Gibbs
Supporters of the Field of Dreams in Salem held their annual
Spring Cleanup on April 12. Members of the Field of Dreams Board
and volunteers grabbed their rakes, tarps, shovels, and leaf blowers
to bring a fresh look of spring to the park located in the center of
Salem.
More than 60 volunteers from Salem AF/JROTC, Walgreens, Salem
Cub Scouts Troop 160, T-Bones Restaurant, the Salem Rotary, and
the Greater Salem Chamber of Commerce joined other volunteers in
cleaning up the park in preparation for the summer fun.
Pat Good, Field of Dreams vice president, stated that the park’s
schedule this year includes its summer concert series and new for
this year there will be a Pizza Fest. The Pizza Fest on May 17 will
bring many of the best Salem pizza restaurants together at the park
to compete.
The concert series will take place on Thursday nights throughout
the summer beginning July 10.
As a part of the scheduled park improvements, VP Good spoke
of the addition of a new fitness trail. The new fitness stations will
be located where a previous fitness trail had been located. The new
exercise equipment will be installed with labor donated by local
contractors.
During the cleanup, Rebecca Lemay, managing operator and
owner of T-Bones, presented Field of Dreams President Ross Trecartin
and VP Pat Good with a check for $10,940. The money was raised
at the Salem T-Bones through employee and customer donations.
President Trecartin thanked T-Bones for the donation, stating the
money will go to fund a fountain in the park.
Historical Society Hosts Clara Barton
Addressing the Salem Historical Society, Jessa Piaia portrays the amazing
Clara Barton, founder of the American Red Cross,
who dedicated her life to serving others.
by Bob Gibbs
The Salem Historical Society hosted “Clara Barton,” the founder
and first president of the American Red Cross. As a part of the
society’s monthly meeting, Ms. Barton – portrayed by Jessa Piaia--
gave a talk of her life on the battlefields that led up to her forming
the American Red Cross.
Clara Barton began teaching school at a time when most teachers
in the United States were men. After teaching for 13 years, she
took a job in the U.S. patent office in Washington, DC. In 1861,
the first units of federal troops began to organize in Washington in
preparation for the Civil War. Barton saw that many of the troops,
having been recently recruited, were under equipped and underfed.
She began by taking supplies to the young soldiers of the Sixth
Massachusetts Infantry, as many of these soldiers were from her
hometown area of North Oxford, Mass. Several of these soldiers
were her former students. She saw that many of these men had no
bedding and only the clothes on their backs.
She started an appeal through her Unitarian Church group to
gather supplies from civilians, church and civic organizations and
businesses. She eventually required three rented warehouses to
store all of the supplies that she was able to obtain.
During her work on the battlefields of the American Civil War, she
saw great suffering on all sides. She described coming across the
many wounded and dead soldiers on the battlefields, and the terrible
suffering she observed in the makeshift hospitals of the war. Many of
the hospitals were undersupplied with even the most basic needs to
help the wounded.
Toward the end of the war, she came to realize that the
government had no records of the soldiers who had died in battle.
She began a campaign to organize the names and other information
of the soldiers that had gone to battle and had not returned. She
and her group began to compile a list of the soldier’s names, their
regiments, and the area that they had fought and died.
At Andersonville, Ga., one of the most notorious prisoner of war
camps, she and the group discovered that there had been 13,000
soldiers buried there, not the 8,000 that the government had records
for. Her group gave these soldiers a proper burial at what is now
one of the earliest U.S. national cemeteries.
Following the war, Barton saw a continued need for services. As
she stated, “The work of the Civil War is not complete until we have
cared for the widows and orphans.”
Being raised in the Unitarian Church and by her Mason father, she
had this deep need to serve. This need to serve led her to organize
the American Red Cross.
In 1882, following much pressure from Barton, President Chester
A. Arthur, signed the Geneva Convention Treaty, which formally
recognized the International Red Cross as a neutral organization. In
1900 the U.S. Congress gave the American Red Cross is first official
charter.
In letters and journals, Ms. Barton stated, that in times of need,
“the Red Cross is there time and time again to offer a hand up” and
“we will serve until there is no need.”
Jessa Piaia’s character portrayals celebrate women of the past
whose diverse lives span three centuries. In her poignant and
inspiring dramatic vignettes, Jessa reveals the accomplishments,
struggles, and contributions of these women to American history.
Jessa depicts each woman’s life set against the historic events and
issues of the day.
Some of those portrayed - Amelia Earhart, Clara Barton, and Susan
B. Anthony - achieved a place of prominence in history. Others,
like Rachel Revere, Susanna Rowson, and Mary Dyer, may be
less familiar to present-day audiences, but their lives deserve the
attention Jessa gives them. Famous or not, all of these women can
serve as role models for Americans today.
The next program at the Salem Historical Society will be
“Hollywood - Wild West to Movie Mecca” on May 8.
The Salem Historical Society is based at the Old Town Hall
Museum, 310 Main Street. For more information you can visit the
society’s website: www.historicalsocietiesnh.org/salem.
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Major James Blazak and Taylor Specht of the
Salem AF/JROTC drag leaves out of the park.
Nanci Carney
plants bulbs at
the front wall
of Fields of
Dreams.
Rebecca Lemay, managing operator and owner of T-Bones, center, Field of
Dreams President Ross Trecartin, left, and VP Pat Good with a donation check
from T-Bones. Staf of the restaurant is behind.
Aja Metcalf
and Mike
Columbake do
their part to
get the Field of
Dreams ready.
Odin Bradley, 3, and brother Gabe, 5, of Salem would probably
rather play in the leaves but decide to help instead.
Salem
Recreation
Director Chris
Dillon gets in
to rake out the
streams running
through
the Field of
Dreams.
The Word Around Town...
Letters to our Editor
4 - April 18, 2014 | Salem Community Patriot
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SB-366 - Expanded Gaming
On behalf of the Board of Directors of the Greater
Salem Chamber of Commerce, I am writing to urge
you [New Hampshire Representative] to vote in support
of Senate Bill 366. Now is the time to act in favor of
expanded gaming in our state!
Te directors of our organization are comprised of
industry leaders and business professionals in the areas
we serve. We have discussed the economic impact
of potential legislation regarding expanded gaming
in the state of New Hampshire, and specifcally at
Rockingham Park. Te Greater Salem Chamber of
Commerce views the potential increase in economic
development, the creation of permanent and contract
jobs, and the defnitive increase in revenue stream to our
state as a result of expanded gaming highly benefcial.
SB-366 is a balanced bill that addresses funding
for many issues critical to New Hampshire, and past
concerns that have inhibited our great state from going
forward.
Te associated revenues are necessary to accomplish
state goals. Businesses and residents of Salem, NH
have spoken in support of expanded gaming (as
demonstrated by 81 percent local support in a recent
non-binding referendum). As an organization,
representing over 450 businesses, we feel it is
incomprehensible to think that entertainment dollars
and subsequent tax revenues may be deported from
New Hampshire and delivered to almost any other New
England state.
We believe that Rockingham Park, as a business,
should have the opportunity to be competitive in its
own industry. Language in SB-366 outlines a bid
process that will allow Rockingham Park the chance to
compete for a state license, and potential access to the
tools of its industry to succeed.
Te chamber encourages your support of the
economic opportunities SB-366 ofers to our state, and
recognition of the importance of a healthy business
environment to our state economy. Please feel free to
contact me through the chamber ofce at (603) 893-
3177 if you have any further questions.
Donna Morris, President, Salem
Boys & Girls Club
Appreciates Support
Te support of the Board of Selectman, the Budget
Committee and the voters of Salem for the Boys &
Girls Club of Greater Salem is greatly appreciated. Te
funding provided for by Article 27 will help to ensure
that all youth have access to our quality programs
and services during the crucial before and after school
hours enhancing their lives and positively shaping their
futures. Te club provides a safe place for our members
during the school year and throughout the summer
months. We ofer a wide range of targeted programs
which are intentionally designed, evidenced-based, and
chosen to help members reach their full potential as
productive, caring, and responsible citizens.
Since 1967 the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Salem
has been at the forefront of youth development and
has actively sought to enrich the lives of the boys and
girls in our community. Te club has more than 2,000
active members with nearly 40 percent meeting the
guidelines for free or reduced lunch, and has an average
daily attendance approaching 325 inclusive of our
preschool serving 75 children ages 3-5. With constantly
evolving and expanding programming, this number
continues to grow and represents a 25 percent year over
year increase. Our vision is to provide a world-class
club experience that assures success is within reach
of every young person who enters our door, with all
members on track to graduate having a plan for the
future. Te club prepares youth for success after high
school by providing ongoing relationships with caring
adults and connections to new friends in a positive
environment, reinforcing a sense of belonging, personal
accountability, civility and civic responsibility.
We ofer daily access to a broad range of programs
facilitated by trained instructors with well-defned
curricula in fve core program areas: Character and
Leadership Development; Education and Career
Development; Health and Life Skills; the Arts; and
Sports, Fitness and Recreation. Additionally, under our
new mentoring initiative, Relationships, those youth
who require additional support will have an opportunity
to work one-on-one with a positive, caring adult
opening the door for career exploration, job shadowing,
college preparation, various sports activities and basic
fnance.
Tis year the club has expanded hours of operation
remaining open to 9:00 PM, Monday through Friday
with free evening transportation provided by the
generous support of the Salem Cooperative Bank. In
partnership with Rockingham Community Action, we
added a meals component to our daily programming
that provides breakfast, an afterschool snack and dinner
for more than 300 members.
On behalf of the growing number of youth in the
Greater Salem area that are in need of positive role
models and guidance during the crucial out of school
hours, we thank you for your support in helping us
reach our goal of accommodating every child-especially
those who need us most.
Maria Camerlengo, Boys & Girls Club of Greater
Salem
Open Letter to Staf, Students
of North Salem Elementary
On behalf of struggling families in Salem, we thank
you for your recent generous donation of food to
Saints Mary and Joseph Food Pantry. It will enable
us to keep our pantry adequately stocked as we try
to meet the needs of many Salem families afected by
unemployment caused by the economic conditions in
our country.
May God bless you for all the service that you provide
to families in our Salem community. We look forward
to benefting from your eforts again in the future.
David T. Costello, Deacon, Saints Mary & Joseph
Food Pantry, Salem
Register for Swim Lessons, Swim
Team at Boys & Girls Club
submitted by the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Salem
The Boys & Girls Club of Greater Salem is now taking registrations for Spring Swim Lessons.
Lessons are for children 3 years old and older. The session begins May 5 and will run for six weeks
with one lesson each week, each for 45 minutes. The session is $57 per child. A Parent & Tot class on
Thursdays at 9 a.m. has been added and the Different Strokes program will be offered Fridays at 5:15 p.m.
Don’t forget Adult Lap Swim is available Monday through Friday, 9-10:30 a.m. and 11:45 a.m.-12:45
p.m. Cost is $5 per visit.
Keep an eye out for Swim Team registrations, which will be held May 1. Season to start May 12. You
can find more information about the team/sign-ups/practices/schedules on our website: http://www.
salembgc.org/portal/swim-team.
Boys & Girls Club of Greater Salem offers a quality swim lesson program that with a variety of classes
to meet the needs of children of all ages and abilities. A certified lifeguard is always on duty during all
aquatic programs. Programs include swim lessons, swim team, fun swim/open swim and more.
For more information about their aquatics program, go to their website at http://www.salembgc.org/
portal/aquatic-programs or call/ e-mail Scarlette LeBlanc at 898-7709, ext. 8/sleblanc@salembgc.org.
Relay For Life
Enters Tenth Year in Salem
by Sonny Tylus
Relay For Life, the American Cancer Society’s
premier community event, will take place this
year on June 21 at Grant Field at Salem High
School from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. This is the tenth
year in a row the community has come together
to celebrate those who are fighting cancer and
remember those we have lost. Over the years,
volunteers have raised well over $1.5 million
to support the research and programs of the
American Cancer Society.
In addition to the teams of volunteers, a key
element in the success of Relay For Life in any
community is the support of area businesses. In
the case of Relay For Life in Salem, one local
business has been a supporter for 10 years in a
row, Chief Wok.
Chief Wok owner, Sherry Wang has supported
the Salem Relay, and in particular one team, the
“Synthroid Sluggers” since 2004. The Synthroid
Sluggers is a team organized by Ashley and Nick
Haseltine and Diane and Bill Sherry. Members
include family and friends who have been
touched by cancer. Chief Wok has supported the
team by donating food for the Relay event itself as
well as hosting buffet fundraisers during the year.
This year’s buffet nights will be held At the Chief
Wok Restaurant on May 21 and June 11 from 6 to
8 p.m. with a portion of the proceeds going to the
Relay for Life.
North Salem Elementary Receives
Donation for iPads
submitted by Robyn Glickel, President, North Salem PTA
The Arlington Pond Protective Association of Salem was very proud to present a check for $2,200
to North Salem Elementary School for the purchase of iPad Mini’s. These iPads will be used to support
alternative learning strategies for students at North Salem Elementary School. The team at North Salem is
appreciative and grateful for the continued support they receive from the generous community leaders at
APPA.
Back row: Liz Geraneo, speech language pathologist, North Salem; Howie Glynn, president APPA; Robyn Glickel, president
North Salem PTA; Tom Connell, director APPA; and Michelle Bedigian, guidance counselor, North Salem. Front row:
Students: Tanner Morgano, Hunter Glickel and Juliana Cirella.
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Presentation of a Certifcate of Appreciation: Jim Zheng, Bill Sherry, Sherry Wang owner Chief Wok,
Cameron Haseltine (youngest person to sign up for Relay), and Diane Brooks-Sherry.
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Salem Community Patriot | April 18, 2014 - 5
Good for the Community
Your Hometown Community Calendar
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Friday, April 18
Walking Way Of The Cross. Walk the
road to Calvary with Jesus. Beginning
at St Joseph Church, Salem, at 9 a.m.;
ending around 12 p.m. at Pine Grove
Cemetery. Join with over 100 Salem area
residents who carry a cross down Main Street to
the cemetery stopping along the way for prayer
and scripture. Return transportation to St Joseph
Church parking lot will be provided by the Salem
Boy’s and Girl’s Club.
Saturday, April 19
Rockingham Christian Church will
hold two Egg Hunts this year!
• Lancaster Elementary School,
54 Millville St., from 10 a.m. 12 p.m.
(Hunt begins at 11 a.m.)
• Michele Park, 190 Lawrence Rd., Salem, from
1-3 p.m. (Hunt begins at 2 p.m.)
Free admission. Jump House, face painting, live
music, giant slide, balloon animals, games, live
music by the RCC Worship/Arts Teams. Egg Hunts
for ages 11 and younger! Follow the signs to age
appropriate designated areas for the Egg Hunt.
Bags provided at registration to collect your eggs.
A very special thank you to both Lancaster School
and the Salem Recreation Department for hosting
the 2014 Egg Hunts!
Tuesday, April 22
Tuscan Kitchen is coming to the
Woodbury Middle School! You are
invited to join us for an Italian Feast on at
6:30 p.m. for fresh homemade pasta, meat
sauce, delicious salad and fresh breads. Tickets
available for $10 per adult and $5 for children
under 10 years old. Space is limited, so please get
your tickets now!
We will also be having music, a bake sale and
raffle table – so come and try your luck, have a
great time and a fantastico meal with the Tuscan
Kitchen and Woodbury Middle School PTSA!
If you wish to attend indicate the number of
adults and children attending along with your
payment and bring/mail to Woodbury Middle
School, 206 Main St., Attn: Christine Cochran,
Salem, NH. If you have any questions e-mail
christinecochran@comcast.net or call 475-1218.
Wednesday, April 23
Free Sunday Supper at the Pleasant
Street United Methodist Church, 8
Pleasant St., Salem (in Call Hall), from 5-6
p.m. The menu: Manny’s baked beans,
ham, candied carrots, bread, yummy dessert,
beverage. Anyone in the Salem Community is
welcome. Meet a friend, make new friends. This
is a Mission of the Pleasant Street and Hannah
Tenney United Methodists Churches. Call either
church at 898-2501 or 898-2785 and make
your reservations, by Wednesday, April 19. This
is extremely important so enough food will be
prepared.
Saturday, April 26
Salem Recreation Department’s Annual
Fishing Derby will be held at Hedgehog
Park, 53 Lowell Rd. The Fishing Derby is free and
open to children 15 years old and younger. The
Greater Salem Rotary Club sponsors this annual
event. Participants sign up on the day of the
Derby: children 8 years old and younger register
between 8:30 and 9 a.m. and fish from 9-10:15
a.m. Children ages 9 to 15 register at 9:30 a.m.
and fish from 10:20-11:20 a.m. Awards will
follow at the end of the derby for each age group.
Prizes will be awarded to the smallest and largest
fish caught per age category. Only one prize per
person will be awarded … lots of other prizes
will be raffled off. This event runs rain or shine.
Questions? Call Salem Recreation Department,
890-2140.
The Salem Democratic Town Committee invites
all area residents, including friends and family, to
join us for the annual Fran Brennan Scholarship
Breakfast at the Triumphant Cross Church at 171
Zion Hill Rd. in Salem. The menu will include
family-style pancakes, fruit and juices, coffee
and other delicious goodies and will start at 9
a.m. The Salem Democrat’s yearly $500 essay
scholarship will be awarded to the winning Salem
High School senior, and the honored invitees
include Senator Jeanne Shaheen, Congresswoman
Annie Kuster, Governor Maggie Hassan, and other
NH luminaries.
Donations for the Breakfast are $15 for
attendees, proceeds which will fund the
scholarship as well as the Committee. To pre-
register online, send your name and ticket
requirements to salemnhdems@gmail.com.
Monday, April 28
Salem Senior Softball. Get out! Get
moving! And have some fun with friends
in the process! The Salem Senior Center
will be offering a softball program again this
year for those 60 and over. Interested? It doesn’t
matter if you are a lifetime softball player or just
a beginner, there are positions for everyone! Join
other interested parties of all skill levels for an
organizational meeting at the Salem Senior Center
from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.
The first practice and “on the field” meeting will
be held on from 8:30-10:30 a.m. at the Michele
Memorial Park, 188 Lawrence Rd., Salem. Balls
and bats are provided by the Salem Senior Center,
but if you have a glove, bring it along and plan to
play. Fresh air and fun await! We hope you can
join us.
If you have questions, need additional
information, or just need convincing that you will
have a good time, contact the Salem Senior Center
or Mark Roth at 898-6340.
Thursdays, May 1 thru July 27
Hershey’s Track and Field youth
program provides a quality recreation
and school program where children have
fun and are introduced to physical fitness
through basic track and field events such as
running, jumping and throwing. It is for children
ages 9 to 14 and held at Salem High School (track
meets held elsewhere). Most Track & Field days
will be held on Thursday’s from 5:30-
6:30 p.m., but due to track availability, a
different day may be scheduled. Program
fee. Questions? Call Salem Recreation
Department, 890-2140.
Friday, May 3
Salem Animal Rescue League
Trivia Night, Windham Country
Club. Enter a team for a chance to
win $600. Teams are 4-6 people, and
registration is $180 per team. Fee includes
food and beverages.
Sunday, May 4
Kids Music Fest featuring bands from
Music Workshop - Lets Play Music kids
from age 5 to 17 at 1 p.m., Salem-Derry
Elks. Kids free; $3 admission for adults.
Tuesday, May 6
Salemfest Planning Meeting. Salemfest
2014 will be held for the 11th year the
third weekend of September, and all the
charitable, non-profit organizations that
want to participate need to reserve a spot and
attend the one planning meeting from 11 a.m. to
1 p.m. Call Betty Gay, chairwoman, at 818-1614
to make your reservation for this one mandatory
meeting. The only other meeting will be to date
signs two weeks prior to Salemfest.
A few organizations last year skipped the
meeting; this year a representative must come
to sign letters of intent to help before the
organization can participate; no exceptions. What
makes this a great event are all the volunteers’
countless contributions.
Friday, May 9
Child Find Screening. The Salem
School District will be conducting a
free screening for Salem children, age’s
birth to six years old, who are suspected
of having vision problems, hearing problems or
developmental concerns. The purpose of the
screening is to identify children who may require
special education. This Child Find screening will
be held at the Barron School, 55 Butler St., Salem.
Appointments are required; spaces are limited.
For more information or to schedule an
appointment contact Linda Collier, Special
Education Department, Salem School District,
893-7040, lcollier@sau57.org.
Monday, May 12
Do It Yourself Part D Workshop - to
be held on from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at
Southern NH University, 25 Pelham
Rd., Room 311, 3rd floor in Salem for
residents of Rockingham County. This workshop
is hosted by Rockingham County ServiceLink in
Salem. Learn how to enter your own medications,
compare Medicare drug plans and enroll in a drug
plan using the Medicare Plan Finder. Participants
are requested to bring a list of their medications
with dosage and frequency information and
their Medicare card. Enrollment is limited; call
ServiceLink at 893-9769 to register. Note: Basic
computer skills are required to participate in the
Workshop.
Friday, May 16 & Saturday, May 17
Experience “Here I Am, Lord” with
Dan Schutte sponsored by Saints Mary
and Joseph Parish.
Through concert and workshop
events, “Here I Am, Lord” will offer participants
opportunities to reinvigorate and recommit to the
vital nature of music in worship.
• “An Evening With Dan Schutte” concert,
Friday, 7-8:30 p.m., Mary, Queen of Peace
Church, 200 Lawrence Rd., Salem.
• “Music As Ministry” Workshop, Saturday,
9 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Bishop Peterson Council
Hall, 37 Main St., Salem.
Dan has been composing music for worship
for more than 30years, including extensive
collaboration with the St. Louis Jesuits. His more
recent pieces exhibit an enduring ability to reach
into people’s hearts and draw them into prayer.
He is one of the best-known, most prolific and
influential composers of music for the liturgy
today.
Registration fees for both programs. For
registration and more information visit www.
saintsmaryandjoseph.org, call the Parish Office
at 893-8661, ext. 301, or e-mail st.josephs@
comcast.net.
Saturday, May 17
Build Your Own Waffle fundraiser
Salemhaven Chapel from 8 to 10
a.m. Homemade waffles with tons of
toppings to choose from served with bacon
sausages, fruit, coffee, and juice. All proceeds
will go to the American Cancer Society Salem
Relay For Life
Saturday, June 22
Family Day Celebrating National Pet
Appreciation Week, Derry-Salem Elks
Club. Join the Salem Animal Rescue
League for some outdoor family fun with
a BBQ, raffles, kids’ games, prizes, and pictures
with SARL mascot, Rocky, as we celebrate
National Pet Appreciation Week.
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submitted by Citizens Bank
To help students manage the cost of college and reward them for
their volunteer efforts, Citizens Bank today announced that it once
again is offering the TruFit Good Citizen Scholarship ®. Now in its
fourth year, Citizens Bank will award a total of $50,000 in college
scholarships to students who demonstrate good citizenship through
community volunteerism and leadership.
The application period for the TruFit Good Citizen Scholarship for
college will begin on Tuesday, April 15 and run through May 6, or
until 2,000 applications have been received, whichever occurs first.
Winners will be announced this summer.
A total of 10 college scholarships of $5,000 each will be awarded
to U.S. residents who are 16 years of age or older and are attending
or accepted to a federally accredited four-year college, university or
graduate program for the fall 2014 semester, located in one of the
following regions:
• Connecticut, New Hampshire and Vermont (one winner)
• Massachusetts (one winner)
• Pennsylvania (one winner)
• New York (one winner)
• Rhode Island (one winner)
• California (one winner)
• Florida (one winner)
• Ohio and Michigan (one winner)
• All other US states not listed above (two winners)
“The TruFit Good Citizen Scholarship program recognizes and
rewards students who are devoting their time and effort to making
their communities better places to live,” said Brendan Coughlin,
president of Auto and Education Finance, RBS Citizens Financial
Group. “We believe in making college education accessible to
students, as well as contributing to the health and prosperity of our
communities, and look forward to seeing this year’s applicants and
the contributions they are making in their local neighborhoods.”
Applicants to the TruFit Good Citizen Scholarship program
are asked to submit an essay of no more than 500 words that
describes their community volunteerism and leadership. They must
also provide two references that are directly connected to their
community involvement. For full details, rules and to apply, go to
citizensbank.com/scholarship. Information about the TruFit Good
Citizen Scholarship program can also be found on the Citizens Bank
Facebook page beginning April 15.
This year, Citizens Bank has increased the average award amount
to $5,000 per student to increase the impact for the 10 recipients.
Additionally, Stop & Shop will provide the Massachusetts and Rhode
Island winner each with a $250 gift card. The four runners up in
each state will each receive a $50 gift card from Stop & Shop. In
2013, one winner received $5,000; four winners each received
$2,500; and 35 winners each received $1,000.
As part of its commitment to students and to making education
more affordable, Citizens Bank offers the TruFit Student Loan®
product to students who live or attend school in the continental U.S.
The TruFit Student Loan is a private student loan available with a
fixed or variable rate and flexible repayment terms, giving students
the choice to select the option that best fits their needs. Plus,
borrowers who lock in a TruFit Student Loan between April 15 and
June 30 will receive a 0.25 percentage point interest rate discount for
the life of their loan.
The bank also recently introduced the Education Refinance Loan,
to enable borrowers to refinance or consolidate their private student
loans at a competitive rate with flexible repayment terms.
Looking for more information on financial aid and the student
loan application process? Citizens Bank offers online tips and tools
to help students prepare for, save for and finance college, including
information on free aid like grants and scholarships and federal
loans.
Citizens Bank is a division of RBS Citizens, N.A., operating
its seven-state branch network in Connecticut, Delaware,
Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island and
Vermont.
Citizens Bank Offers Scholarships for
Students Active in Community Service
submitted by the Rotary Club of Greater Salem
The Rotary Club of Greater Salem is soliciting applicants for its Community Service
Scholarships (two $1,000 awards will be given) from this year’s graduating high school
seniors who reside in the towns of Salem, Atkinson, Hampstead, Windham, Pelham,
Derry, or Methuen, MA. Students with service activities performed in the community
while in high school are urged to apply. Applications are available at the Salem High
School Guidance Department or online: www.salemnhrotary.org or by calling 893-8167.
Deadline for receipt of completed applications is May 21.
Salem Rotary Club Community
Service Applications
Submitted by the Office of U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte
U.S. Senator Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) on April 10 continued
her efforts to protect open spaces in New Hampshire and
across the nation, signing on to a bipartisan letter to Senate
appropriators that expresses strong support for the Land and
Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) and the Forest Legacy
Program – which have helped advance public-private efforts
to protect thousands of acres of forest in New Hampshire.
The letter Ayotte signed was sent to Senator Jack Reed (D-RI)
and Senator Lisa Murkowski, who serve as chairman and
ranking member, respectively, of the Senate Appropriations
Subcommittee on Interior, Environment, and Related
Agencies.
The LWCF is an account in the U.S. Treasury that collects
a small percentage of offshore oil and gas leasing receipts,
specifically intended to be used for conservation projects.
At the local, state, and federal levels, the LWCF provides
grants to help conserve natural resources and protect outdoor
recreation opportunities, working forests, and wildlife
areas. The Forest Legacy Program is a voluntary, grant-based
program funded through LWCF that helps states support
efforts to protect environmentally sensitive forest lands.
Ayotte Supports Conservation Programs
6 - April 18, 2014 | Salem Community Patriot
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SALEM, NH • 236 N. Broadway, Rte 28
See ALL our specials at:
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Arneis Quartet
Sunday, April 27th | 2:30 p.m.
Please join the Windham Terrace residents, friends and
family for a live performance as part of our on-going
concert series.
Playfully named after the Arneis grape – a varietal that
is difficult to grow, yet yields an exquisite white wine –
the Boston-based quartet was hand-picked by the
St. Lawrence String Quartet for its inaugural John Lad
Prize, which included debuts on the Stanford University
Lively Arts series and Music on Main in Vancouver.
A concert you will certainly not want to miss.
Seating is limited. Call us today to RSVP. (603) 437-4600
Their program will include:
Hugo Wolf - Italian Serenade
Ludwig van Beethoven - String Quartet Op 74 “Harp”
Franz Joseph Haydn - String Quartet Opus 77 No 1
in G Major
Finale
3 Church Road, Windham, NH 03087
TerraceCommunities.com
WINTJ6106 Friends&Family Ad 11.625x4.indd 1 4/9/14 4:37 PM
Annual Spring Fling Art Show and Sale
GSAA President Margaret Moon Hames stands in front of her artwork.
by Bob Gibbs
The Greater Salem Artists Association held its 28th annual Spring Fling Art
Show and Sale at the Woodbury School in Salem. The art show displayed
the fine art of more than 25 local artists.
Edith Kaufman founded the Greater Salem Artists Association in 1985.
The purpose of the association is to bring together those who share a
common interest in all mediums of art. As a non-profit organization,
the GSAA supports local young artists with yearly scholarships, provide
education and information to their members, and encourage all artists to
share and grow.
The association recently awarded their GSAA scholarship to photographer
Jessica Evans. Jessica is an 18-year-old Salem High School senior who, after
high school graduation, has plans to attend the New Hampshire Institute of
Art in Manchester. After she gets her Bachelors of Arts degree, Jessica plans
to open her own photography studio. As a fifth grader, Jessica received her
first camera from her grandfather, Brian Jollie of Reading, England. She is
currently taking photography classes at the Salem High School Center for
Technical Education.
Margaret Moon Hamies, president of the GSAA, said the artists at the
show enjoy showing their artwork to the public.
A jazz trio from the Manchester Community Music School provided a
musical backdrop for the many that walked through the various art displays.
The trio is made up drummer Ben Pinard, bass player Jason Emmonds, and
playing horns was Adam Claussen.
Painter Don Whittemore shows his work to Emily and Bob Reese.
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Jazz quartet members, from left, are Adam Claussen, Jason Emmonds, Ben Pinard. GSAA scholarship winner and photographer Jessica Evans plans
to attend the NH Institute of Art in Manchester.
Trivia Challenge Offers $600 Grand Prize
submitted by the Boys & Girls Club
of Greater Salem
The Boys & Girls Club of Greater Salem has set
the date for the next Trivia Challenge. This fun-
filled night of trivia and prizes will be Wednesday,
April 23 at the club’s Teen Center from 6:30 to
9 p.m. (check-in begins at 6 p.m.). Teams will
consist of four to six members and can be made
up of co-workers, friends or family. Are you the
smartest folks in Salem? Your team could win the
grand prize of $600.
Registration forms and additional information
is available at www.salembgc.org. There will be
plenty of free food and refreshments. Chunky’s
Cinema is supplying the popcorn, Balducci’s
Wood Fired Pizza is supplying the pizza and the
Boys & Girls Club staff will be supplying the hot
dogs and drinks. There will be chances to win
great raffle prizes too. “It will be great fun for a
great cause; the future of our kids” says Denise
Dolloff, director of development for the club. The
event is sponsored by Pentucket Bank.
There will be teams from banks, real estate
companies, stores, municipal offices, schools and
corporations. Entry fee is $180 per team. Prizes
will be given out throughout the night during
“bonus” rounds. Bring additional friends and
family to fill the cheering section. ($10 - per
person includes refreshments)
STUMP Trivia has been hired to coordinate the
event. They are the same trivia company used by
Margaritas Restaurant in Salem for their weekly
trivia. Please register by April 18 . If you have
any questions, contact Denise Dolloff at 898-
7709 ex 16 or at ddolloff@salembgc.org.
Te Easter Bunny visits the preschool at the Greater Salem Boys & Girls Club.
Like Salem Community Patroit on
by Bob Gibbs
New Hampshire Senator Jean
Shaheen and Salem Police Chief
Paul Donovan hosted a roundtable
discussion Friday, April 4, on the
current epidemic of heroin and
prescription drugs in the Granite
State. In attendance for this
information gathering roundtable
were many members of state and
local police agencies as well
as physicians, counselors, and
representatives from the legal
community.
According to the New
Hampshire Department of Health
and Human Services (NHDHHS),
the number of people admitted to
state treatment programs increased
90 percent for heroin use and 500
percent for prescription drug use
over the last 10 years, with the
largest increases occurring in just
the last two years
All attending the senator’s roundtable agreed
that the current use of opiate drugs, particularly
heroin, has risen recently and this has resulted in
many overdose cases and a rise in the crime rate.
Salem Police Department Lieutenant
Kevin Fitzgerald said, “Lawrence is
doing a great job of cleaning up their
city. And now dealers and users are
coming over the state line to sell and
do their drugs.” New Hampshire
State Police Major David Parenteau
concurred, saying his officers are
“coming up on drivers that have
pulled over in the break-down lane
of Route 93 to shoot up.”
Salem Police Prosecuting Attorney
Jason B. Grosky spoke of his
experience with a 15 year old girl
from Salem High School that was
caught stealing from teachers in
the school. As a minor, there were
programs to get her into and get
her out of the school environment.
Through the juvenile probation
department, they managed to get her
into in-patient treatment. Now that
she is 17, some of the programs are
not available to her, and she is still in
the same situation with little support.
For the health professionals in the
group they
see the
shattered
lives of
not just the
drug users,
but also the families of
the addicted. Susan
McKeown from Child
Health Services said,
“Disruption in families is
so real;” everyone in the
circle of the user’s life
is affected. Not only is
there the great concern
for the user, often family
and friends are victims of
the crimes that the user
commits.
Law enforcement
officials have also
seen a spike in crimes
associated with drug
use – like burglaries, assaults and property crimes
– and according to NHDHHS, 64 individuals died
of heroin-related deaths last year
Law enforcement officials stated that with
the reduction in the supply and now the higher
cost of prescription drugs, such as oxycontin
and oxycodone, heroin has become the drug of
choice for many abusers. Speaking with a Salem
detective that requested anonymity, he stated that
currently the cost of a gram of heroin is around
$50 a gram. Compared to $70 a gram just a
few years ago and to one dose of a drug such as
oxycodone which could run for as much as $25
a pill.
Much of the discussion centered around the
medical community not having the funds it needs
to continue programs that get started. Often drug
treatment programs are started with federal grant
money. But, once the funding is gone programs
can’t continue and people are left on their own.
The group suggested, to the senator, that more
long-term funding is needed and the funds need to
be stabilized for these programs.
Senator Shaheen said that after listening to
everyone at the roundtable she agreed: “This
problem is something a lot of people believed
existed in urban areas, big cities, and what we’ve
seen is that it’s a real issue in New Hampshire,
northern New
England, small
towns, and cities.”
She said
that she had
met with U.S.
Attorney General
Eric Holder.
What she was told is that in the past it was
believed that this needed to be treated with a
zero tolerance approach. Now they believe that
the problem needs to be treated with a multi-
pronged approach. Shaheen said, “ It’s got to be
treatment, it’s got to be law enforcement, it’s got to
be education.”
“While there is no single reason why so many
in our communities are turning to drugs, there
are many ways we can assist law enforcement
and public health officials dealing with the
problems that result,” Shaheen said. “We must act
aggressively and comprehensively to take on this
challenge and put an end to this epidemic that is
hurting so many in our state.”
Shaheen added, “Law enforcement and drug
prevention, treatment and recovery, education
and outreach all have a role to play as we work
together to save lives and fight this fight.”
The roundtable today follows Shaheen’s
recent call for federal investments to assist New
Hampshire law enforcement and health care
providers to fight what has become a top public
health concern in the Granite State. Yesterday, at
a Senate Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related
Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee hearing,
Shaheen urged U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder
to partner and collaborate with state and local
law enforcement to comprehensively prevent and
address heroin and prescription drug addiction
within New Hampshire communities.
Salem Community Patriot | April 18, 2014 - 7
603-553-9040
877-728-9593
www.insphereis.com/Karen.Archer
KA ARCHER

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Independent Licensed Agent
Londonerry, NH
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Michael McClellan, citing off-hours operations,
excessive noise, ground contamination, and non-
permitted uses.
Deborah Smith of Granite Avenue, a direct
abutter, said work at the facility continues until
8 p.m. and later, past the 5 p.m. required closing
time.
She said operation hours were even
recently extended, causing more noise in the
neighborhood.
“I went complaining about the hours of
operation, and they have gained three and a half
work hours,” she said.
Smith added cars were being dropped off
overnight causing excessive noise when the
business was supposed to be closed.
“It’s located in a residential neighborhood, not
an industrial park,” she said.
Walter Williams of Granite Avenue said the
business had grown from when it was originally
approved.
“It’s completely gotten out of hand,” Williams
said. “This Saturday they were working until three
or four o’clock.”
Williams raised concerns over McClellan’s
expanded operation in the yard saying cars are
being sold and repairs are being conducted
outside of the salvage yard variance. He also
feared his property and the nearby wetlands were
being contaminated with toxic fluids.
Williams added an unauthorized paint booth
was established on the site, and fumes made their
way through the neighborhood.
McClellan said he purchased the property nine
years ago, and has been struggling to operate it.
“The business revenue now is lower than it was
when he owned it,” McClellan said referring to
the previous owner. “If there’s problems we’re
willing to fix it.”
McClellan said expanses to the business had
been necessary to survive, and said he even
obtained a dealership license for the property and
at one point had over 450 cars on the lot.
He said the complaints from neighbors are not
new. “Why would you buy a house in the area?”
he asked, adding there was a mobile home park
and repair shop nearby.
But McClellan said he was not contaminating
the ground, spending more than$15,000 to install
a mat 26 inches below the ground to contain any
fluid spills.
The New Hampshire Department of
Environmental Service issued a press release
in 2009 praising Park Avenue Auto Parts and
awarding them a New Hampshire Green Yard
Certification, noting the mat installed on the
property.
“Mr. McClellan has taken action to run a clean
facility and prevent pollution that can result
from such operations, including having a site
investigation conducted to test for contaminants,
hiring a consultant to develop a stormwater
pollution plan and having an environmental mat
installed in the yard,” DES officials said.
Health Inspector Brian Lockhart said tests
conducted by the state on the property haven’t
showed signs of contamination.
“They do meet the environmental concerns,”
Lockhart said, noting that work was supposed to
be done on concrete pads to guard the ground
from fluid.
But repeated complaints and reports of zoning
violations are causing selectmen to debate
whether the business should continue to operate.
“I am moved by the plight of the
neighborhood,” Selectman Michael Lyons said to
a large audience of locals.
Goodwin said multiple notices had been sent to
McClellan regarding violations and complaints by
neighbors.
McClellan said he wasn’t currently operating
the yard but had allowed Anthony Licclardi
of Londonderry to manage the property. He
admitted Licclardi was operating a paint booth
without permission and told him to cease
operation.
Board members were concerned whether
denying the renewal of the salvage yard permit
would result in a lawsuit. The board voted to
continue the public forum during the May 5
meeting.
McClellan’s salvage yard license has currently
expired with the town according to Goodwin, but
is allowed to continue operations while the matter
is discussed. Goodwin explained car sales were
permitted on the lot as part of an ancillary use of
a salvage yard, but less than the 25 to 30 vehicles
McClellan said were currently there.
The nearly two-acre property is assessed at
$284,600 according to the town’s database and
is owned by Rockingham Auto Metal Recyclers of
Salem.
Other business names for Rocco’s Used Auto
Parts include Rockingham Auto Metal Recyclers of
Salem, Park Ave. Used Auto Parts, and McClellan’s
Used Auto Sales.
Salvage Yard- continued from front page
Senator Shaheen in Salem for Drug Epidemic Roundtable
Portsmouth Police Department Deputy Police Chief Corey MacDonald,
Nashua Chief John Sousy, Senator Shaheen
Nashua Chief John Seussing, Senator Shaheen, Salem Police Department Lieutenant Kevin Fitzgerald,
Salem Police Prosecutor attorney Jason Grosky at rear
S
t
a
f
f

p
h
o
t
o
s

b
y

B
o
b

G
i
b
b
s
A wide view of the roundtable
Shaheen opens the drug round table
at the Salem Police Station
Scan this with
your smart device
to view a video
8 - April 18, 2014 | Salem Community Patriot
Chuck Rage
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603-880-1516
School
News
School
News
School News
School News
School News
School News
Woodbury Students Get a
Dose of Financial Reality
Just the Facts
Pennies for Patients Campaign
Ready Set Go Workshop on
April 22: Building Gross Motor Skills
North Salem
submitted by Ellyn Burke,
Woodbury School
In March, 320 Woodbury School eighth
grade students attended the CU 4 Reality
Financial Education Fair at the Salem Boys
& Girls Club. The event was sponsored
by Service Credit Union and was done in
conjunction with the Family and Consumer
Sciences classes at the school. The fair is
designed to help the eighth grade students
meet financial literacy goals. The CU 4 Reality
Education Program gives the eighth grade
students from the Woodbury School a chance
to learn about managing finances and how to
calculate earnings and expenses.
Besides Service Credit Union, there were
parent volunteers as well as representatives
from local businesses who assisted the
students with their choices on housing,
transportation, utility, cable TV, internet,
phone, utility, food, and clothing. This was
all done while the students tried to live
on a calculated monthly budget for their
chosen career salary. The students were
also introduced to the fact that there would
be loans to pay back, and with the “Wheel
of Reality,” they suffered income loss due to
illness or speeding tickets. All of this was
geared to help the students understand the
many expenses they will face in adulthood.
This is the seventh year that the
Woodbury eighth grade students have
participated in this successful program.
Courtesy photos
submitted by North Salem School
Our V.I.P.S. (Volunteers Interested in Providing
Services) Food Drive committee conducted a
food drive earlier this month to benefit Salem
food pantries. North Salem families were very
generous in their support of this activity making it
our most successful food drive ever!
On Friday, April 11 our gym was awash with
glitter, sparkles and sequins as our annual Father/
Daughter Dance took place. Everyone had a
wonderful time! We thank Sandra Galvez and
Stephanie Callahan for all of their hard work to
make this an evening to remember. Next month
the boys have their turn with their mothers for our
annual Mother/Son Baseball Game with the Fisher
Cats.
Mark your calendars for our Spring Open
House and Medal Award Ceremonies for our
Math-a-thon. The open house will run from
6:30-7:45 p.m. with medal ceremonies for grades
K-2 from 6:45-7 p.m. and grades 3-5 from 7:05-
7:20. Medal ceremonies will take place in the
classrooms.
As part of our open house we will have our
annual Used Book Sale where books are sold for
only 25 cents each. We are currently accepting
used book donations for the sale so this is a
wonderful opportunity to clean off your book
shelves. We ask for books that are appropriate
for elementary school children so please no
preschool or adult books – thank you!
As we continue with our Character Counts
Program, students caught showing the trait of
“Fairness” in its final week include: Billy Richart,
Jacob Marconi, Alexis DeLaurier, Damian
Thornton, Haylee Bernard, Jack Callahan, Anthony
Simard, Aidan Federico-Dyer, Joey Colecchia,
Patrick Harris, Jason Ciarcia, Zach Burke, Mac
McCarthy, Daslyn Resendez, and Amy Murphy.
We are now focusing on the trait of
“Trustworthy.” Students caught showing this trait
in its first week include: Mrs. Richard’s Class, Jack
Callahan, Joelle Petkiewich, Isabella Evangelidis,
Mason Emerson, Ralph Tashjian, Jared Marconi,
Kyleigh Oliveri, Tyler DeVito, Alexia Abdel-Malek,
Julia Petersen, Jimmy Donovan, Liliana Burke,
Petra Illes, Gwen Vincent, Maddie McDonough,
Jordan Fithian-West, Jenny Olson, Jefferson Burke,
Roma Mistry, Jeremy Cantor, Madi Hannon, Laila
Galvez, Jackson Case, Logan Smith, Matthew
Lizak, Jimmie Glynn, Julian Quintal, and Jennifer
Bouraphael.
submitted by Erin Richard, North Salem School
Students at North Salem Elementary School had fun showing their parents fun ways to practice math
facts.
First grade math visit Tird grade classroom math visit
submitted
by Patricia
Maestranzi
National Junior
Honor Society
members at
Woodbury School
coordinated
the Pennies
for Patients
Fundraising
Campaign
throughout
the month of
March. The
school was able
to raise $2,555
in donations.
Pictured, from
left, are NJHS
members: John
Bucciero, Kaitlyn
Wilson, June
Milos and Cole
Corbett.
submitted by Salem Family Resources-
Success By 6
Salem Family Resources-Success By 6 and the
Salem School District will host a “Ready ... Set ...
Go!” workshop on Tuesday, April 22, 5:30-7 p.m.,
at the Barron Elementary School, 55 Butler St.,
Salem, for families with young children, birth to 5
years old. The topic is building gross motor (large
muscles) skills. There is no cost to attend.
Educators from the Salem School District and
early childhood educators from Salem Family
Resources will present information about what
families can do while their children are young;
birth to five years old, so their children will be
ready for success when they enter kindergarten.
The “Ready ... Set ... Go!” workshops are a
series of information sessions offering fun and
easy tips on early learning at home that will
help children to be prepared for success when
they enter school. Parents are their children’s
first teachers, and experiences during the early
years from birth to 5 years old, build a strong
foundation for life-long learning.
Children of all ages are welcome. Childcare
with fun activities will be provided at no cost. A
light dinner of pizza and salad will begin this
session.
To reserve your spot, help us plan for pizza, and
to arrange for childcare, register on the website
events page at: www.salemfamilyresources.org,
or for more information, contact Salem Family
Resources, info@salemfamilyresources.org or 898-
5493.
Information about all of the programs of Salem
Family Resources-Success By 6 is available at
www.salemfamilyresources.org or contact at
info@salemfamilyresources.org or 898-5493.
Courtesy photo
Salem Community Patriot | April 18, 2014 - 9
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Composite or Wood?
Myth-busting Facts to Know Before You Decide on a Deck
As temperatures warm across the country, many homeowners will
begin thinking about home improvement. Adding a deck or replac-
ing an old one is a popular project in spring and summer - one that
provides outdoor entertaining space and enhances home value. If
you’re considering a deck project this season, will you choose to
build with wood or composite?
Decks built from either material have a high return on investment
at the time of resale. Both can provide your family with a great space
in which to enjoy warm weather. Before you decide which material
is right for your deck, however, consider these facts, and learn the
truth behind some common myths about composite decking:
Myth: Wood is “greener” than composite decking.
Truth: In many ways, composite decking is far more eco-friendly
than wood. When you consider the life cycle of both products,
composite products like Fiberon emerge as materials with minimal
environmental impact. Composite production processes require less
energy and water, create fewer emissions and make use of recycled
materials. Because Fiberon purchases most materials from sources
within 500 miles of the production plant, less energy is consumed
transporting materials. Your final, finished deck requires no harsh
chemical treatments to make it resist rot and stain, and it will last for
decades. That durability means less energy consumption, fewer re-
sources needed to replace it and less discarded material in landfills.
Myth: Composite fades, looks fake and doesn’t have wood’s beauty.
Truth: Like any new technology, composite decking has evolved
from its basic beginnings. Today’s composite deck material comes
in an array of colors and textures that are fade resistant. Wood is
undeniably beautiful, and many composite decking options now
mimic the natural grain and beauty of wood. Whether your taste
runs to classic or contemporary, you’ll find composite selections
from Fiberon that deliver the look of traditional wood grains and
even exotic hardwoods. Advances in composite technology have
yielded products that so closely resemble wood, you may not be
able to tell the difference until you step on one barefoot - you’ll find
the composite smooth and splinter-free!
Myth: Composite decking is too expensive.
Truth: While the initial outlay for materials may be the same as
exotic woods or more than pressure treated wood, the durability,
longevity and low-maintenance requirements of composite mean
it will actually cost less over its lifetime than wood. Composite
eliminates the cost of re-staining
a deck every year, and its rot-
resistant qualities greatly curtail
repair costs.
Myth: Wood is a better material
for do-it-yourself decks.
Truth: If your DIY skills are
up to working with wood, you
can definitely build your own deck using composite materials. In
fact, composite products are easier to work with than wood in many
ways. Unlike wood, composite planks won’t splinter or fracture.
Finally, when your deck is done, you can start enjoying it right away,
without the need to stain or seal the deck before you can use it.
Myth: You can’t make custom designs with composite decking.
Truth: Composite decking offers vast design flexibility, just like
wood. Whether your dream deck involves multiple tiers and multi-
function spaces, customized railings, built-in seating or an outdoor
kitchen, you can achieve it with composite decking. Not sure how to
begin? The Fiberon Deck Designer is a great place to start. The online
tool allows you to specify the shape and size of your deck, its num-
ber of levels features such as stairs and railings. It also allows you to
customize with colors, textures, shapes, accessories and more.
Finally, if you’re still unsure about composite decking, consider this:
a composite deck will return about 74 percent of its construction
cost when you sell your home, according to Remodeling Magazine’s
Cost vs. Value Report. Until then, your low-maintenance composite
deck will can provide decades of worry-free enjoyment to
your family.
Deck Staining Secrets for Success
After one of the toughest winters on record,
your backyard deck may be looking worse for
wear. And spring showers will just bring more
potential damage to unprotected wood. Water
is your deck’s worst enemy. It causes ugly and
expensive cracking and splitting.
Luckily, restoring your deck’s beauty and pro-
tecting it from further damage can be relatively
easy and affordable. HGTV/DIY Network star and
seasoned deck builder Jeff Wilson shares his six
essential tips for success for this popular project.
* Coming clean: “Cleaning the deck first is
critical - even new wood,” says
Wilson. “You wouldn’t wax a
dirty car, so don’t stain a dirty
deck. Good prep means a bet-
ter finished look and can help
the stain last longer.” The new
line of Thompson’s WaterSeal
Waterproofing Stain, available
exclusively at The Home Depot,
can be applied to damp wood, so
application of the stain can start
just hours after cleaning.
* Take the temperature: Apply
stain when the thermometer reads
50 to 90 degrees. Make sure there
is no rain in the forecast for 24
to 48 hours and do not apply the
stain in direct sunlight if it can be
avoided.
* Choose the right color and
look: Homeowners have a few
options when it comes to choos-
ing the right color for their
deck. A clear coating is best
to show off wood’s natural
beauty. Transparent stain
shows the most wood grain
with minimum color. Semi-
transparent stain shows me-
dium wood grain with more
color. Solid stain shows the
least wood grain with the
most color. (Every can of
Thompson’s WaterSeal Wa-
terproofing Stain has a sliding scale to show you
exactly which look you’re getting.) “When apply-
ing waterproofing stain, always test the stain first
in an inconspicuous corner to be sure you like the
color,” advises Wilson.
* More is not always better: When it’s time to
stain, use a paint pad on a long pole for applica-
tion. This will ensure an even distribution of the
stain and a smooth finish - and it’s easier on your
back. One coat is enough to get the job done and
the stain dries to the touch in a few hours.
Set boundaries: Many homeowners find them-
selves staining more than just their deck. Be sure
to add painter’s tape where the top of the deck
and the exterior wall meet. This ensures the deck
stain stays on the deck. Work from top to bottom
or side to side in areas small enough to allow the
leading edge to remain wet at all times during
application. Use natural breaks, such as windows
and doors, as boundaries to divide large areas into
more manageable work areas.
* Protect from water damage: Many people ask
if they need to put a clear waterproofer on top of
a deck stain for added protection. “Definitely not,”
says Wilson “An exterior stain will provide color
and waterproofing protection, all in one coat.”
“Tackle your deck makeover project at the be-
ginning of the season, and you can enjoy the deck
worry-free for the rest of the year,” says Wilson.
Watch step-by-step videos demonstrating deck
cleaning and staining that can be seen at www.
thompsonswaterseal.com or www.youtube.com/
thompsonswaterseal.
10 - April 18, 2014 | Salem Community Patriot
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How to Guarantee Your Garden Starts Off on the Right Foot
As winter slowly winds down, many
gardeners cannot wait to soak up the
springtime sun and get their hands dirty
in the garden. Such excitement is not just
good for gardeners, but can benefit the
garden in the months to come as well.
Late winter or early spring is a great
time to get a head start on the gardening
season. Even if gardening season is still
around the corner, completing the follow-
ing projects can ensure your garden gets off on the right foot.
Clear debris
One of the best things you can do for your garden as winter winds down
is to clear it of debris. Winter can be especially harsh on a landscape, and
gardens left to the elements are often filled with debris once spring arrives.
Dead leaves, fallen branches, rocks that surfaced during the winter frost, and
even garbage that might have blown about in winter winds can all pile up in
a garden over a typical winter. Clearing such debris likely won’t take long, but
it’s a great first step toward restoring the garden before the time comes to plant
and grow the garden once again.
Examine the soil
Soil plays a significant role in whether a garden thrives or struggles. Exam-
ining the soil before the season starts can help gardeners address any issues
before they plant. Ignoring the soil until a problem arises can turn the upcom-
ing gardening season into a lost opportunity, so test the soil to determine if
it has any nutrient or mineral deficiencies. This may require the help of a
professional, but if a problem arises, you might be able to adjust the acidity or
alkalinity of the soil and still enjoy a successful gardening season.
Another way to examine the soil is less complex but can shed light on
when would be a good time to get back to work. Reach into the soil and dig
out a handful. If the soil quickly crumbles, you can start preparing for garden-
ing seasoning. But if the soil is still clumped together, it needs more time to
dry out before you can begin your prep work.
Initiate edging
Edging is another task gardeners can begin as they get ready for the season.
Edge plant and flower beds, but be sure to use a spade with a flat blade or an
edger designed to edge flower beds. Such tools will cut deep enough so grass
roots that may eventually grow into the flower bed are severed. Depending on
how large a garden is, edging can be a time-consuming task, so getting a head
start allows homeowners to spend more time planting and tending to their
gardens once the season hits full swing.
Fight weeds
Though weeds likely have not survived the winter, that does not mean they
won’t return once the weather starts to heat up. But as inevitable as weeds
may seem, homeowners can take steps to prevent them from turning beauti-
ful gardens into battlegrounds where plants, flowers and vegetables are pitted
against unsightly and potentially harmful weeds. Spring is a good time to ap-
ply a pre-emergent weed preventer, which can stop weeds before they grow.
Though such solutions are not always foolproof, they can drastically reduce
the likelihood of weed growth.
Though gardeners might not be able to start planting their gardens in late
winter or early spring, they can still get outside and take steps to ensure their
gardens thrive once planting season begins.
How to Repair Dead Grass
A patch of dead grass on an otherwise lush lawn can be a
frustrating eyesore for homeowners. Whether lawn care is your
passion or just something you do to maintain the value of your
home, dead grass can be exasperating.
But as unsightly as dead grass can be, addressing it and re-
storing the dead patches can be somewhat simple. Before you
can restore grass, however, you must first identify the source of
the problem. Grass often dies because of urine damage, which
is typically characterized by a dead spot surrounded by other-
wise green grass. Grub infestation might be at fault when dead
grass appears, and such an infestation often produces patches
of light brown grass that are scattered throughout the lawn. It’s
also possible that dead grass is a result of human error. If your
lawn was overfertilized, then patches of gray-green grass may
appear. Fungal disease is another common culprit behind dead
grass, and such disease can manifest itself in different ways.
Once you have identified why the grass is dead, which may
require the help of a professional, then you can begin to treat
your lawn.
Urine damage
Urine damage is often limited to a particular area of the
grass where your family pet routinely relieves itself. Once a
particular patch of grass has worn down, the pet may move on
to another spot. But if you quickly notice a dead spot due to
urine damage, you can train the animal to urinate elsewhere, limit-
ing the damage it causes. When repairing the grass, dig a hole that’s
roughly four inches deep and fill it with fresh soil until it’s level with
the soil surrounding the dead patch. Then you can sprinkle seed on
top of the freshly laid soil and water the spot. Grass should grow in
and stay green so long as you prevent further urine damage.
Insect damage
Addressing dead spots caused by insect damage can be a little
more complicated, and some homeowners may prefer
to hire a professional. If you want to handle the problem
on your own, apply pesticide to the affected areas so the
insects behind the problem are killed. Once the insects are
no more, cut the grass, raking the affected area to remove
the dead grass and any additional debris. Scatter grass seed
over the affected areas and then apply an appropriate fertil-
izer and water immediately. Professionals may know just
the right fertilizer for your lawn, so even if you want to go it
alone, visit a local lawn care center to ask for advice about
addressing your particular problem.
Fertilizer damage
Fertilizer damage can also prove difficult to address, as
applying fresh seeds too soon can kill any freshly growing
seedlings. So grass that has been damaged by overfertil-
ization must first be allowed to fully die. Once that has
happened, the grass can be cut and any remaining debris
or dead grass can be removed. Seed can then be scattered,
and you can even add some additional soil before laying
down an appropriate amount of fertilizer and watering the
lawn immediately. If you don’t trust yourself to use fertilizer
correctly, then hire a professional to do the job for you. This
will cost a little more, but you likely won’t wake up to more
dead patches of grass down the road.
Dead grass can be unsightly and turn an otherwise lush lawn into
a patchy eyesore. But addressing dead grass can be easy and can
quickly restore a lawn to its green grandeur.
Identifying the source of the problem is the frst step to addressing dead grass.
The Basics of
Cleaning Windows
After a long winter of snow and ice, many people are ready for the
warmth and sunshine synonymous with spring. But dirty windows can
block that sunshine from finding its way into a home. Washing windows
can be quite an undertaking, particularly in those homes with many
windows on multiple levels. However, there are several time-saving tips
available that can cut the work considerably.
* Save window washing for a cloudy day. Otherwise, the warmth and
sunlight may dry the cleaning solution too quickly and you will be left
with streaks on your windows.
* Vacuum windowsills and tracks first to remove a good deal of dust
and debris. This will reduce the amount of dirt you smear onto the
windows while cleaning them.
* Use a combination of a sponge soaked in cleaning solution and a
squeegee to get really clean windows. The squeegee helps to prevent
streaks and cut down on the time it takes the windows to dry, all the
while helping the windows to sparkle.
* Window screens may be the culprit behind dingy windows. Hose
down the screens with water to clean them, using a mild cleaning
solution if water is ineffective.
* Working with a partner
can make the task go much
more quickly. One person
can clean the exteriors of the
windows while the other does
the interiors.
* A mild dishwashing
liquid diluted in water can cut
through dirt and grime. For
stubborn dirt, wash windows
with diluted ammonia or
vinegar.
* Use a glass-cleaning tool
to clean hard-to-reach win-
dows. A telescoping cleaning
tool and pad can make it safer
to reach windows that are high
up.
Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down? Thumbs Up? Thumbs Down?
“Thumbs down. There is no such thing as a
victimless crime. No victim, no crime. Yet the
town employees (in uniform) want you to believe
the State of New Hampshire was somehow
injured because your tail-light was out, or you
were a few miles over the posted commercial
vehicle speed limit. So require the injured party
to appear! Otherwise, it’s a false claim. And the
top employee, Hickley, is jumping ship. There
is no limitation on when you have to file a claim
against a man that did you wrong.”
“Thumbs down to the speaker who failed to
honor the memory of lifelong resident of Salem,
Rita Palmer. Rita Palmer was born in Salem, not
Lawrence, MA and she just recently passed away
earlier this year, not more than a decade ago.
But the day can be confusing
as it falls on Evacuation Day.
Evacuation Day is the day the
Yankees forced Redcoats out
of Boston. It is the only-in-
Suffolk County, MA holiday
and suspiciously coincides with
the same holiday named after
a British Christian Missionary
and Patron Saint of Ireland, St.
Patrick.”
“Thumbs up/Thumbs down.
Just read an article about a man
with medals on his cap that
helps in all organizations and
causes. My personal
feeling it that is Dave
Thompson ... his
dedication to helping
others if unreal. He
gives of himself to
Salem residents every
day of his life. He is
a wonderful caring
man. He donates
his time cooking on
holidays for folks that
have no family. He
also assists at Masses
almost on a daily
basis. I feel honored
to know him and his
lovely wife whose
license plate I tried to
figure out for years.
God bless you Dave
Thompson and your
dedication to the
town of Salem. See
you at the Main St.
Deli. Once a Marine
always a Marine
serving his country
one person at a time.
Cherish the day that
my mother introduced
me to you. God Bless
you.”
“Thumbs down to
the Salem area paper
for not urging more of
the Salem seniors to utilize the volunteer Salem
wonderful free Caregiver organization to their
advantage. Dick O. and Doris now located at
44 Millville St. facility are here with volunteers
willing to take folks to the market, doctor
appointments or just to check in and stay with
them for well being checks and just to offer some
support to them. Shame on you Salem, care for
your Seniors, they support your town and schools
no questions asked.”
“Thumbs down. Now let
me get this right. On Attorney
Leems of Rockingham County,
no criminal charges will
be brought against him for
$250,000 misappropriation of
money, six harassment charges,
and more. He is still being
paid on his $85,000 salary. I
guess it pays to work for a city
or a State. Try that in private
business.”
“Thumbs down to BOS
Chairman Hargreaves. For you
to bang the gavel and point to
the microphone and tell Mr.
Russel to go there is probably
one of the rudest things I’ve
seen lately. FYI, you may think
you are King but you are not,
you are nothing but a Ringmaster for the Circus
we know as the Board of Selectman meetings.”
“Thumbs up/Thumbs down. How come
the Andover Town Manager and the Budget
Committee can come up with a potential of
$1.1M in savings in their budget while Salem’s
Town Manager and Budget Committee only find
ways to increase Salem’s taxes.
They are a small step above
the Salem School Committee
who has consistently been
responsible for the annual
increases to Salem’s property
taxes.”
“Thumbs up. A guffawed
‘Thumbs Up’ for last issue’s
absurd anti-Jeanne Shaheen
diatribe, which in sheer
inaccuracy and juvenile
animosity might be the
funniest political rant ever
published in the Thumbs
section. Lying hyperbolic
figures abound: $17 trillion
national debt accrued by
Shaheen? $240 trillion
unfunded liability (as if the
‘writer’ even knows what
‘unfunded liability’ is?) A
quadrillion-dollar credit swap derivative debt? In
reality, most Granite Staters possessing a brain
know that these ‘numbers’ emanate from a third-
grade intellect. This excellent senator is neither
a ‘socialist’ nor a ‘global elitist’, and has been a
bulwark against Republican Party ravages foisted
on New Hampshire and America over her term
in office.”
“Thumbs down. Horrified! My son is telling
me there is no lunch for him at Woodbury.
What? I have plenty of money in his account. I
went to Woodbury to see why my son can’t get
lunch; I see a bunch of woman at the cafeteria
standing, sitting around. I ask why my son can’t
get a lunch. They said oh, we run out by third
lunch, not enough food. One woman said it
wasn’t her job. What? There’s a woman standing
at a register and she say’s you don’t want your
son eating here, trust me, the dishwasher’s
broken, the kitchen is nasty, you’re better off
sending him with his own lunch. I go over to
look. I saw three women working in there but
dishes were piled high, water all over the floor.
Disgusting! Parent’s watch out for your children
who go to Woodbury. They shouldn’t be eating
what they are dishing out.”
“Thumbs down to Scott Brown for the negative
TV Adds already, It makes you look really
desperate. Scott couldn’t make it Massachusetts,
So he comes to New Hampshire to run for
senate seat. I guess his main reason for running
is Obama Care is the best
you got. Scott Brown I would
like to know when you ran in
Massachusetts and won, what
did you get accomplished and
why were you only a one term
senator?”
“Thumbs down to the town
and whoever owns the old
Rockingham lumber building.
Its absolute disgrace how can
the town of Salem NH allow
this neglected property to be in
this deplorable condition. The
town should get the owner to
knock it down. You just want to close your eyes
driving by the building. The new graffiti in the
windows is the nice touch to the building too.”
“Thumbs Up/Thumbs down. Haigh School
cook makes chili. And what a big hit. A lot of
the students wanted seconds, and hope that it
becomes a menued item. Great job to the cook,
from one of your students.”
“Thumbs down to the new Woodbury baseball
coach for cutting kids he said
were too short. Guess he’s
never heard of Justin Pedroia.”
“Thumbs up. It is getting
better each week. Can’t wait
for elections. People are
throwing shoes at Clinton;
congress is finally telling Eric
Holder that he is a liar and
a criminal. It is now fact
that Lerner and Issa were in
it together on targeting only
conservative groups. The sheep
are waking up ...”
“Thumbs down! Let me get this straight.
Obama is attending the memorial service at Fort
Hood today for the 3 slain military personnel.
Then 2 hours after that he’s attending a
democratic fundraiser? Wow. What class.”
“Thumbs down. A big thumbs down to all
the Democrats who voted to take money away
from Medicare (that’s us seniors, you know,
who paid into it?) to help support this disaster of
Obamacare.
Thanks a lot
Gene, Annie,
Carol. You’re
really thinking
of your seniors, aren’t ya?”
“Thumbs up and a big thank you to the people
who came to our yard sale as advertised in the
SCP. Especially to those who stopped for a cup
of lemonade from our little guy. You absolutely
made his day; it’s all he’s talked about since. It
was so kind of you, and we thank you.”
“Thumbs up. I’m so happy to have my new
neighbors. Don’t know which I like more: the
smell of your pigs, the ash from your fire, or the
noise from your four wheelers. So happy you’ve
joined our neighborhood.”
“Thumbs down. Because Republicans
mention Bengazi. But I remember the losses
and going to war with the wrong country. I also
remember the Clinton surplus, and the Bush
deficit, leaving Obama in a big hole, smothered
in hardships. After Republicans shut down
government, I’ve had enough. I won’t risk our
middle class, or lose our voice to anymore
Republican spin. My memory will do my voting
in 2016, and not the words of any Republican.”
“Thumbs up to my amazing husband
Wes. I have no idea how or why you
put up with my crazy ideas, but you
do and I cannot tell you how thankful I
am that you put up with it all and how
extremely lucky I am to have you in
my life. You are the reason why I think
I can pull off these big events. Thank
you for your support and for helping
me get through these past few weeks.
They have been crazy, but our sons had
a blast and these memories will be with
them forever. I love you more everyday
and try to remember how much you
love me when I ask you to do it all over
again with me next year!”
Tank you for your submissions. All
comments, thumbs up or down, are anonymous
and not written by the Salem Community
Patriot staf. Tumbs comments can be
sent via telephone, 880-1516 or emailed to
us at thumbs@areanewsgroup.com. When
submitting a Tumbs comment, please specify
that you would like it printed in the Salem
Community Patriot. During the election
campaign, no comments will be allowed that
are direct endorsements or censure of candidates
on the thumbs page. No names are necessary.
Please keep negative comments to the issue.
Comments should be kept to 100 words or less.
Comments expressed in this column are the sole views of those callers and do not reflect the views of the Salem Community Patriot or its advertisers. Town and school officials encourage
readers to seek out assistance directly to resolve any problems or issues. The Salem Community Patriot editorial staff holds the right to refuse any comment deemed inappropriate.
Salem Community Patriot | April 18, 2014 - 11
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Every lifetime has a story
Obituaries
NEW Obituary Headers
6 column
3 column
4 column
5 column
2 column
Obituaries
Obituaries
Every lifetime has a story
Every lifetime has a story
Obituaries
Every lifetime has a story
Obituaries
Every lifetime has a story
Sophie E. (Pasamon)
Radziwill, 93, of Salem,
died April 12, 2014, at
Baker-Katz Nursing Home
in Haverhill, MA.
Sophie was born and
educated in Lawrence,
MA. She retired from
Sanders in Manchester.
She previously worked
at Bellock Industries in
Lawrence, MA. Sophie
was a member of St. Joseph
Church and a member of the Polish National Club
in Lawrence. She enjoyed crafts, knitting and
dancing, especially the Polka. Sophie loved the
beach, traveling, cruises and wintering in Florida.
She was predeceased by her sister, Mary Babish.
Sophie is survived by her beloved husband of 72
years, Walter J. Radziwill; her four children, Walter
and his wife Debra of Salem, Richard of Blairsville,
GA, Joanne and her husband Henri Boucher of
Katy, TX and Janice Gravell of Windham; nine
grandchildren, 13 great-grandchildren and two
nieces.
A funeral Mass was celebrated April 16 at St.
Joseph Church, Salem.
Memorial contributions in Sophie’s name may
be made to the Alzheimer’s Association, 5 Bedford
Farms Dr., Suite 201, Bedford, NH 03110.
The Douglas & Johnson Funeral Home, 214
Main St., Salem, had care of the arrangements.
To send a message of condolence to the family,
please view the obituary at
www.douglasandjohnson.com.
Deirdre “Dee” Louise (Mogé)
Marquis, 47, of Dover, NH passed
away on April 1, 2014.
Dee was born in Methuen, MA
and was raised in Salem, NH. She
worked in accounting for many
years before working as a residential
advisor for adults with developmental
disabilities. She loved her work with
this population as it brought out her
love for helping others, and bringing joy
to others’ lives.
Dee was predeceased by her father,
Maurice R. Mogé.
She is survived by her mother and
step-father, Jane and Bill Maczko of
Fort Lauderdale, FL; her three children,
Matthew Landry of New Hampshire,
Jennifer Landry of San Francisco, CA,
Mark Marquis of Dover, and step-
daughter, Caitie Marquis of
Dover; her sister, Dori Pease of
Glastonbury, CT; her brother,
Paul Mogé of Port Orange, FL; as
well as her dog, Snowball. She
is also survived by step-siblings,
nieces, nephews and friends.
A memorial service was held
April 12 at Douglas & Johnson
Funeral Home, 214 Main St.,
Salem. To send a message of
condolence to the family, please
view the obituary at
www.douglasandjohnson.com.
Deirdre ‘Dee’ Louise (Mogé) Marquis
Sophie E. (Pasamon) Radziwill
Boys & Girls Club Annual Charity Auction
Jim Desjardins of Daisy Cleaners places a bid during the silent auction.
Kevin Morales of Highline Auto Sales, left,
and U.S. Senate Candidate Scott Brown
Regina
Andler wins
an iPad
as part of
the heads-
or-tails
competition.
Joe Faro, owner of Tuscan Brands, provided dinner for the guests.
Sue Desjardins, left, and Kelly Bryant in the Eclipse Teen Center
during the Boys & Girls Club charity auction
Kim and Travis Terry attend the Boys & Girls Club charity auction.
From left, Joanne Finnegan, Janice Tylus, and Holly Braddy enjoy the live auction.
Diane Stilian and Sonny Tylus help manage auction boards during the event.
Club HR/Payroll Administrator Kelly
Stigliano tells of the support she received
from the club when her son passed away
last year.
S
t
a
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p
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o
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o
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b
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A
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o
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S
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a
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Steve Ormond, left, Regina Andler, and Robbie Tomaskow enjoy the silent
auction during the Boys & Girls Club annual Charity Auction April 5.
Joe Faro of Tuscan Brands and his daughter read the name of the Dream
Vacation raf e winner.
Auctioneer Mike Morin and Auction Committee Chairwoman Joanne Flynn
during the live auction. Director of Development Denise Dollof said nearly
$200,000 was raised to support club operations.
Bev and Tim
Donovan
during the Boys
& Girls Club
annual Charity
Auction
U.S. Senate
Candidate Scott
Brown and Jim
Desjardins of
Daisy Cleaners
Friday, April 18, 2014
7:00 a.m. Town Manager Update (April)
7:30 a.m. Board of Selectmen (Apr. 14)
9:30 a.m. Budget Committee (Apr. 9)
11:30 a.m. Planning Board (Apr. 8)
2:00 p.m. Board of Selectmen (Apr. 7)
3:20 p.m. North Policy Water Pipe and 2014 Road
Program
3:30 p.m. NH Governor Maggie Hassan at Salem High
School’s Round Table Discussion
5:00 p.m. Salem Police Beat - SafetyNet
6:00 p.m. Town Manager Update (April)
7:00 p.m. Board of Selectmen (Apr. 14)
8:30 p.m. Budget Committee (Apr. 9)
10:30 p.m. Planning Board (Apr. 8)
Saturday, April 19, 2014
7:00 a.m. Town Manager Update (April)
7:30 a.m. Board of Selectmen (Apr. 14)
9:30 a.m. Budget Committee (Apr. 9)
11:30 a.m. Planning Board (Apr. 8)
2:00 p.m. Board of Selectmen (Apr. 7)
3:20 p.m. North Policy Water Pipe and 2014 Road
Program
3:30 p.m. NH Governor Maggie Hassan at Salem High
School’s Round Table Discussion
5:00 p.m. Salem Police Beat - SafetyNet
6:00 p.m. Town Manager Update (April)
7:00 p.m. Board of Selectmen (Apr. 14)
8:30 p.m. Budget Committee (Apr. 9)
10:30 p.m. Planning Board (Apr. 8)
Sunday, April 20, 2014
7:00 a.m. Town Manager Update (April)
7:30 a.m. Board of Selectmen (Apr. 14)
9:30 a.m. Budget Committee (Apr. 9)
11:30 a.m. Planning Board (Apr. 8)
2:00 p.m. Board of Selectmen (Apr. 7)
3:20 p.m. North Policy Water Pipe and 2014 Road
Program
3:30 p.m. NH Governor Maggie Hassan at Salem High
School’s Round Table Discussion
5:00 p.m. Salem Police Beat - SafetyNet
6:00 p.m. Town Manager Update (April)
7:00 p.m. Board of Selectmen (Apr. 14)
8:30 p.m. Budget Committee (Apr. 9)
10:30 p.m. Planning Board (Apr. 8)
Monday, April 21, 2014
8:00 a.m. Recreation News Update (Spring)
9:30 a.m. Zoning Board of Adjustment (Apr. 1)
11:30 a.m. Conservation Commission (Apr. 2)
1:02 p.m. Board of Selectmen (Apr. 7)
2:20 p.m.
North Policy
Water Pipe
and 2014 Road
Program
2:30 p.m. NH
Governor
Maggie Hassan
at Salem
High School’s
Round Table
Discussion
3:30 p.m.
Governor
& Executive
Council (Mar.
26)
5:30 p.m.
Town Manager
Update (April)
7:00 p.m.
Board of
Selectmen (Apr.
14)
8:30 p.m.
Salem Police
Beat - SafetyNet
9:00 p.m.
Budget
Committee
(Apr. 9)
Tuesday, April
22, 2014
8:00 a.m.
Recreation
News Update
(Spring)
Salem Community Patriot | April 18, 2014 - 13
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Dr. Paul F. Masterson, DDS
Dr. Jhon O. Giraldo, DMD
Accepting patients of all ages!
S T I L E S F A MI L Y D E N T I S T R Y
by Bob Gibbs
Five students from Salem High School won medals at
the recent SkillsUSA competitions held recently in New
Hampshire. These competitions, held at several sites and over
many dates, are considered the skills Olympics for students in
Career and Technical Education Training.
Salem High School’s CTE Culinary Arts instructor Chef
Jeffrey Stuart called participation in SkillsUSA “a time to
show CTE at its very best.” Chef Stuart had competed in a
SkillsUSA challenge when he was in high school. He said
the competition showed him what he was very good at and
changed his career path from military to culinary arts.
SkillsUSA is a U.S. student organization serving more than
320,000 high school and college students enrolled in training
programs in technical, skilled, and service occupations,
including health occupations. SkillsUSA is a partnership of
students, teachers and industry working together to ensure
America has a skilled workforce. SkillsUSA helps each
student excel.
SkillsUSA’s mission is to empower its members to become
world-class workers, leaders and responsible American
citizens.
Two Salem High competitors came from the CTE’s Culinary
Arts department. Sara Mersereau won a silver medal in the
Commercial Baking high school division; Cody Stiner won a
bronze medal in the Restaurant Service division.
Senior Cody Stiner began his restaurant training in his
sophomore year. Cody spent many after school hours
practicing his service techniques. During the competition,
held March 14 at the Seacoast Technical School in Exeter,
Cody was judged on his skill in setting the tables, as well as
greeting and
serving his
guests. Cody
believes he set
himself apart
from the other
contestants with
his ability to
memorize his
guests’ dinner
orders without
writing them
down. This
was his second
time in the
competition.
After taking
courses in
business and
hospitality
management
at Nashua
Community
College,
Cody plans to
open his own
restaurant, possibly in Arizona.
Also a senior, Sara Mersereau competed for the second
time in the Culinary Arts program of the Salem CTE. Sara’s
competition was in the commercial baking division. Sara
spent many late nights in the school’s culinary arts kitchen
practicing her baking skills under the tutelage of Chef Stuart
and Chef Sullivan. Her event required her to bake several
items including cookies and a decorated birthday cake. Sara
stated that she has been tested many times in achieving a 3rd
degree black belt in karate, but the SkillsUSA competition
was the hardest.
Both Sara and Cody said that getting
into the culinary arts program at Salem
High School CTE was the best decision
of their lives.
The SkillsUSA competition is more
than just a contest, the competitors and
especially those that medal are highly
sought after by colleges and industry.
Colleges such as Johnson and Wales,
NH Community College, and Ohio
Technical College give scholarships of
as much as $20,000 to those who win
these competitions. Businesses see these
students as the cream of the crop.
The goal of SkillsUSA is to provide
American industry with a skilled
workforce by having students live up
to this SkillsUSA pledge: “To prepare
myself by diligent study and ardent
practice to become a worker whose
services will be recognized as honorable
by my employer and fellow workers”.
For further information on the Salem
CTE Culinary Arts program and SkillsUSA, visit the culinary
arts program website: http://ssd.sau57.org/culinaryarts.
A complete list of SkillsUSA winners from Salem High
School:
• Commercial Baking High School: silver medal - Sara
Mersereau
• Restaurant Service High School: bronze medal - Cody
Stiner
• Television (Video) Production High School: bronze
medal team A - B. Tremblay, D. Florian
• Architectural Drafting High School: silver medal - Allison
Lewis and bronze medal - Robert Dortona
NH Department of Revenue
Offers Property Tax Relief
submitted by the NH Department of Revenue Administration
New Hampshire Low and Moderate Income Homeowners may receive State Education
Property Tax relief by applying for such relief during the filing period this year- May 2
through June 30.
Low and Moderate Income Homeowners Property Tax Relief The Low and Moderate
Income Homeowners Property Tax Relief provisions were designed to lessen the economic
burden of the State Education Property Tax on certain taxpayers. New Hampshire
residents who own a homestead subject to the State Education Property Tax, resided in the
homestead as of April 1, 2013, and have a total household income of $20,000 or less if a
single person (or $40,000 or less if married or head of household) may apply for property
tax relief during the filing period - after May 1, 2014, but no later than June 30, 2014.
In 2013, over 10,600 claims were submitted and over $2.1 million of property tax relief
was distributed to valid claim applicants; resulting in an average of approximately $200
of State Education Property Tax Relief per household. Starting on April 25, application
forms (Form DP-8) will be available on the NH Department of Revenue Administration’s
web site at: www.revenue.nh.gov. Older versions of the Form DP-8 will not be accepted
by the Department. The form and Frequently Asked Questions brochures will also be
available at most local municipal offices. In addition, many New Hampshire libraries
allow residents to utilize their computer Internet services to complete and print a Form
DP-8 for submission by mail. Residents who do not have access to the Internet or who
cannot pick up a form at their local municipal office may request a Form DP-8 by calling
the Department’s Forms Line at 230-5001.
Granite State residents can find more information about the Low & Moderate Income
Homeowners Property Tax Relief program and check the status of their application on
the department’s website. Note: one of the most common reasons an applicant may
see a delay in the response is due to lack of proper attachments. Completed claim forms
must be accompanied by a copy of the 2013 final tax bill from the municipality where
the applicant resides along with a copy of the applicant’s 2013 federal income tax return
(1040-EZ, 1040A, etc). Applicants are reminded that the NH Department of Revenue
Administration is a state taxing agency and cannot determine an individual’s federal tax
liability. If you are unsure whether you are required to file federally, you may contact
the IRS at 1-800-829-1040. If you are not required to file with the IRS, you may check a
box on the Form DP-8 indicating this. Homesteads held in trust must also be verified by
submission of the trust document, but may still qualify for relief.
SHS Students Win SkillsUSA State Medals
SHS Culinary Arts students and instructors. Back row, from left: Chef Stuart, Paige Bradish, Austin Hamil, Alex Zsoika,
Gianny Ramey and Chef Sullivan. Front row, from left: Jean-Luc Croteau, Cody Stiner,
Sara Mersereau, Kara Beninata and Kassidy Condo.
Cody Stiner receives a bronze medal at the
SkillsUSA competition.
Sara Mersereau puts her baking skills to the test
at the SkillsUSA event.
Goodies baked by Sara Mersereau for her SkillsUSA competition.
Cody Stiner and Sara Mersereau both achieve SkillsUSA medals in culinary arts.
SGC 23 Listings
Staff photos by Bob Gibbs
Classifeds!
Classified Ad Rates: 1 week: $10.00 for 20 words or less. 4 weeks: $37.00 for 20 words or less. Additional words: .10 per word per week. (Maximum of 60 words). “Lost and Found” and
“Free Bee” ads run for one week at no charge. Deadline for placement is Tuesday at noon of the week you would like the ad to run. You may pay by cash, check (made out to Area News Group),
or credit card (Master Card or Visa, name, address, phone & card info. required) – no refunds. Ads paid by credit card can be faxed to 603-879-9707 or e-mailed to classifeds@areanewsgroup.com.
All other ads can be mailed or delivered to: Salem Community Patriot, 17 Executive Drive, Suite One, Hudson, NH 03051. Call 603-880-1516 for more information.
Buyer Be Aware: Te Area News Group supplies advertising space in good faith for our customers. However, occasionally an advertiser will require up front investment from the consumer.
We do not endorse or guarantee these or any advertisers’ claim. We encourage you to be a good consumer and do your homework before you invest/purchase any products or goods.
Scoop’s got your Scoop’s got your
Salem Community Patriot | April 18, 2014 - 14
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www.townofsalem.org/boards-committees-commissions.asp
CALL FOR CANDIDATES
TOWN OF SALEM
The Salem Board of Selectman has issued a call for candidates to serve as
members of the Economic Development Action Committee (EDAC)
EDAC is dedicated to economic development to facilitate opportunities
by focusing on developing and implementing strategies for business
expansion and retention. Serving as an internal Town committee EDAC
will report to the Board of Selectman.
This is a standard committee that will meet once per month, with
possible subcommittee assignments which may require additional
meetings. Interested citizens wishing to serve on this committee may
submit an application to the Town Manager’s Office before 5:00 p.m.,
Thursday April 24, 2014. Applications can be picked up at the Salem
Town Hall, 33 Geremonty Drive or on our website at http://www.
townofsalem.org/boards-committees-commissions.asp. Please call
Leon Goodwin at 603-890-2120 with any questions or e-mail him at
LGoodwin@ci.salem.nh.us.
Interviews with the Board of Selectmen are tentatively scheduled for
shortly after the deadline.
PUBLIC NOTICES
AUTO/
MOTORCYCLE
WE BUY junk cars and
trucks. Call Pat at Jean-Guy’s
in Pelham, a N.H. Certifed
Green Yard, at 603-635-7171.
4/18, 5/2/14
CLEANING
MILENA’S Quality
Home Cleaning Service:
Personalized Home Cleaning,
Professional Ofce Cleaning,
Free Estimates & Excellent
References, Reliable &
Afordable Prices.
Don’t wait, make your
appointment today.
Call Andrea at 603-461-1137,
603-438-9533. 4/18, 5/2, 5/16, 5/30/14
HELP WANTED
DRIVERS: HOME
NIGHTLY! Boston Flatbed!
Great Pay, Benefts!
CDL-A, 1yr. Exp. Req.
Estenson Logistics.
Apply: www.goelc.com.
1-866-336-9642.
4/18, 5/2, 5/16/14
HOME
IMPROVEMENT
1 A11 IN ONE PAINTING.
25+ years experience, interior/
exterior painting, power
washing, all work guaranteed,
free estimates. Fully insured.
www.allinonepainting.net,
603-305-4974. 4/18, 5/2/14
1 COLLINS BROS.
PAINTING. Interior &
Exterior; Top quality work;
Afordable; Fully insured;
Free estimates; Excellent refs.
603-886-0668. 4/4, 4/18/14
ALL PHASES OF HOME
REPAIRS. Carpentry/
painting/fooring.
Bathrooms - from faucet
replacements to full
renovations.
All work performed by owner,
Tomas Jablonski.
27+ years experience.
Call today, 603-440-9530.
Free estimates, fully insured.
4/4, 4/18/14
ELECTRICAL WIRING.
Insured Master Electrician.
Fair prices, Fast response and
Free estimates.
Call Dana at 603-880-3768
or 603-759-9876. 4/18, 5/2/14
FULL SERVICE
REMODELING. Licensed,
insured, registered. Repairs/
Additions. Roofng/Siding.
30 years experience. Formerly
with Tis Old House.
Competitive pricing.
Walter, 603-661-6527.
4/18, 5/2/14
INS & OUTS PAINTING:
Interior and Exterior -
exceptional quality, pride and
integrity at a reasonable price.
Why call anyone else?
Call Dan at 603-966-7870.
3/21, 4/4, 4/18, 5/2/14
*JACOBS
CONSTRUCTION*
Additions, decks, screened
porches, basements, interior
trim work, etc. Licensed
and insured. Over 25 years
experience. We accept MC,
Visa, Discover.
Call Joe 603-635-9953.
www.jacobsconstructionllc.com.
4/18, 5/2/14
JOE’S Handyman Service/
CONSTRUCTION –
I do what he won’t. No job
too small. Fully insured.
All around home repair and
maintenance. Bathroom
remodeling, decks, doors,
windows, light plumbing,
electrical, indoor and outdoor
painting.
Call (cell) 603-670-8151,
603-893-8337. 4/4, 4/18, 5/2, 5/16/14
KME PAINTING LLC.
Why remodel? Painting is
quicker, cleaner and better
bang for the buck. Interior,
exterior, home improvement.
Quality work at a fair price.
Fully insured, call for a free
estimate. 603-759-5680.
4/18, 5/2/14
P.E.D. CARPENTRY AND
HOME REPAIRS.
Decks, doors, windows,
bathrooms, kitchens,
interior/exterior home repairs,
water damage repairs.
Call for a free estimate.
Insured and guaranteed work.
603-594-8377. 4/4, 4/18/14
PJP & SONS Painting and
Decorating – Serving southern
NH and northern MA.
Interior & Exterior. Insured,
Free Estimates. Follow us on
Facebook. 603-300-8623,
603-845-3801. 4/18, 5/2, 5/16, 5/30/14
INSTRUCTION
MUSIC LESSONS,
EXPERIENCED TEACHER.
Piano - Voice - Strings - Winds.
All ages - best price.
whenthemusicmatters@hotmail.com.
3/21, 4/4, 4/18, 5/2/14
LANDSCAPING
AAA LANDSCAPING:
Lawn Mowing Most Lawns
$30 - $45, Spring Cleanups
Starting at $175, Mulch
Installation, Patios, Walkways,
Walls, Fences, Fully Insured,
Reasonable Rates, Free
Estimates, Call 603-759-4591
or Schedule An Estimate On
Our Website at
www.JasonsAAALandscaping.com.
4/18, 5/2/14
ACCENT LAWN
Services - Spring Clean-ups,
Dethatching, Mow and
trim as low as $30.00. Free
Estimates. 603-890-1223.
4/18, 5/2, 5/16, 5/30/14
603-635-1378


A Handy Company
Spring Clean-ups
Complete Landscape Maintanence
We will meet or beat any
competitors’ pricing by
10%!
Free fertilizing service with
mowing contract.
4/18, 5/2, 5/16, 5/30/14
ALL ABOUT MOWINGS:
Now scheduling weekly and
bi-weekly mowings. Spring
cleanups: brush removal and
mulching. Free estimates, fully
insured.
Call John, Lex Landscaping.
603-889-7173, 978-758-8371.
4/4, 4/18/14
JOE’S LANDSCAPING &
LAWN SERVICE:
Mowings starting at $35.00.
Trees/bush/shrubs - trimming,
pruning, removal.
Spring/Fall cleanups.
Call for a free estimate.
603-401-3255. 4/4-10/24/14
Yard Spice
Lawn & Garden
Yard Spice
Lawn & Garden


595-8813
Lawn Mowing
Spring Clean-up
Aeration
www.yardspice.com
4/18, 5/2/14
PETS
PROFESSIONAL PET
SITTING Etc.,
603-888-8088,
www.profpetsit.com,
daily dog walking/vacation
pet care. 4/4, 4/18/14
POOL SERVICES
LINER REPLACEMENT,
liner repairs, and pool
removals. 15+ years
experience.
Call Dan, 603-765-1818.
4/4, 4/18/14
SERVICES
REFLECTIONS HAIR
CARE: Complete perm,
$45.00; Colors, $40.00; Cut
and style, $15.00. Over 30
years experience. Call for
appointment, 603-893-0377.
4/4, 4/18/14
TREE SERVICES
BOUTIN TREE REMOVAL.
Specializing in hazardous tree
removal. Fully insured. Free
estimates and frewood for
sale.
Call Daryl at 603-321-8768.
www.boutintreeremoval.com.
4/18, 5/2/14
HIGH VIEW TREE
SERVICE: Fully insured, free
estimates, 24-hour service.
Specializing in all aspects of
tree service.
Call Brownie, 603-546-3079.
4/18, 5/2/14
WANTED
A’S UNWANTED scrap
metal, cars and trucks, lawn
tractors, washers and dryers,
hot-water tanks, etc.
Will pick up.
Call Steve at 261-5452.
4/18/14
WASHING MACHINE
AND DRYER, refrigerators,
AC, lawn mower-tractors,
scrap metal, computers, hot
water tanks, dish washers,
VCR’s and most electronics.
Will pick up.
Call Sammy, 603-235-2648.
3/7-5/23/14
YARD/MOVING
SALES
MOVING SALE. Saturday,
April 19, 9:00 A.M. - 3:00
P.M. Sunday, April 20, 9:00
A.M. - 12:00 P.M. 7 Collins
Brook Road, Windham NH.
Furniture, houseware, toys,
etc. 4/18/14
YARD SALE. 4/19, 10:00
A.M. - 2:00 P.M. No
early birds. Furniture and
household goods. 8 Sorenson
Road, Salem NH. 4/18/14
Like Salem Community Patroit on
Area News Group
accepts MasterCard,
Visa & Discover
for payment on all
types of advertising.
No minimum.
Paula Faist MS, LSW, Silverthorne Adult Day Center
My wife is feeling overwhelmed with caring for our children and
my parents. Do you have some hints on what I can do to help her?
Caregiving, like so much in life, impacts not just the primary
caregiver but the whole family. You need to address the stress of
caregiving in order to keep your wife healthy as well as your entire
family. If you are sensing some stress from your wife, I can imagine
your children are too.
Here are a few tips that may help or at least give you an idea of
what to do next.
I think one of the first things that may help is to be a listener. We
may think we listen to one another, but sometimes, we are just
hearing words. You need to shut off the television and put away the
phone. Listen to what she is saying & what she is worrying about.
Resist the urge to solve problems, and instead empathize with her,
listen to her, and make her feel like you care about her day and
what she has been through. It may sound simple, but it is important
to invest the time to sit and listen.
Another helpful tip may be to give her time to do things without
you, the kids or your parents. I think everyone needs time to relax
and be away from responsibilities. When she comes back you may
notice she is a bit refreshed and calmer. She may be ready to face
her day and all that comes with it with more ease and less stress.
You did not say how well your folks are or the ages of the
children, but if you can leave them and get out on a date that is a
great plan. You both need to take care of each other! A date night
no matter your home responsibilities, is a positive, healthy event to
plan at least once a month. It is never too early to ask for some help
from your siblings or friends. If your parents need to be cared for
and this makes it difficult for you both to be out on a date, maybe a
sibling or friend can watch them for you.
And of course doing some of the household chores can be
a great help to an overwhelmed wife. Taking on some of the
responsibilities whether it is bringing them shopping, to the
doctor or picking up medication will also be a help your wife will
appreciate.
And finally, thank her and tell her that you love her. You can
never tell your wife too many times that you love her, but it can be
something that is said too little.
Paula Faist MS, LSW, is President of the NH Adult Day Services
Association, and Program Director, Silverthorne Adult Day Center.
Caregiving Impacts the Whole Family
submitted by the New Hampshire Department of Transportation
The New Hampshire Department of Transportation announces the
beginning of blasting work adjacent to the interim southbound lanes
on Interstate 93 at Exit 3 in Windham. This blasting is necessary to
accommodate the new alignment of the northbound off-ramp.
Blasting will take place, as needed, from Monday through Friday
between 10: a.m. and 2 p.m. from now until the end of July. State
Police rolling road blocks will be used to slow southbound and
northbound traffic during blasting operations, resulting in minor
delays.
Southbound on-ramp and NH Route 111 traffic will be
temporarily stopped during blasting. Extended ramp and NH 111
closures may be required to allow crews to safely remove blasted
ledge from the roadway, due to its close proximity to the work.
This work is part of the construction of the final northbound I-93
roadway alignment and northbound ramps in the vicinity of Exit 3.
Weaver Bros. Construction of Bow, NH, is the general contractor for
the $32.2 million project, which is scheduled for completion in the
fall of 2016.
Blasting Underway on I-93 at Exit 3 in Windham
Southbound On-Ramp Temporary Closures
submitted by the Greater Salem Chamber of Commerce
The Greater Salem Chamber of Commerce welcomed
Triskelia Wellness, one the their newest members, with
a Ribbon Cutting at Triskelia’s Grand Opening held on
Thursday, April 3, at Brookstone Park, 16 Route 111,
Derry. The Open House featured tours of Triskelia’s
warmly-decorated and relaxing facility, a musical
accompanist, and a wine and cheese tasting. Dr. Dawn
Buik gave a comprehensive overview of Triskelia’s services
which include chiropractic, acupuncture, massage therapy
and many other services that promote a healthy lifestyle.
Triskelia Wellness
Open House and
Ribbon Cutting
Courtesy photo
Employees, family and Chamber representatives with Dr. Dawn Buik (center).
Friday, April 18
6:28 p.m. Positive Place: Salem Boys & Girls Club Show (Apr. 11)
6:59 p.m. Salem Chamber Today (Apr. 11)
7:30 p.m. Salem Today: Hot Air Balloon Launch
8:00 p.m. Around Town Clip: CLP Memories - The Holland Family &
Baseball
8:08 p.m. Filler: Around Town Clip: Guest Keith Kuceris talks about
his time with the Red Sox
8:18 p.m. Public Service Announcement on the Upcoming Salem
Lion’s Club 1K Walk for Hunger
8:31 p.m. Open Mic at Coffee Coffee No. 6 Hosted by Aaron
Tornberg (March)
9:30 p.m. Salem in the Revolutionary War - “The Battle of Bunker
Hill”
9:55 p.m. Salem Exchange Club’s Freedom Shrine Exhibit at Canobie
Lake Park
10:00 p.m. “The Story: An Easter Cantata”
11:30 p.m. The Seasons of Music presented by The Interfaith Choir
Saturday, April 19
12:45 a.m. Merrimack Valley Philharmonic Orchestra (Mar. 17, 2013)
7:58 a.m. Positive Place: Salem Boys & Girls Club Show (Apr. 11)
8:29 a.m. Salem Chamber Today (Apr. 11)
9:00 a.m. “The Story: An Easter Cantata”
10:10 a.m. Beginning Genealogy presented by Michael Brophy
(KLASeries)
11:30 a.m. Salem Today: Salem Boys & Girls Club Youth of the Year
SCTV17 Weekly
Schedule
Salem Community Patriot | April 18, 2014 - 15
David Bloom, DMD
New England Dental Arts
One Manor Parkway
Salem NH, 03079
Call Kristen today to get started on your path
to optimal dental health.
603-893-6120
www.newengland-dental arts.com
“where beauty
and function
come together”
Big News!
David Bloom DMD
-Master Restorative and Cosmetic Dentist
Awarded New Hampshire Top Dentist –four years (2010-2013)
and Pankey faculty member is making his world-class dental
practice more affordable for you and your family. Effective April 1
Dr. Bloom will be a participating provider with Delta Dental.
www.idealweightlosspelham.com
Ideal Weight Loss Clinic of Pelham, LLC
LOSE AN AVERAGE OF 2-5 LBS. PER WEEK
PROMOTES FAT LOSS • MAINTAIN MUSCLE MASS
NATURAL APPETITE SUPPRESSANT • 1 ON 1 COUNCILING
Would like to introduce the “Ideal Protein Protocol” Would like to introduce the “Ideal Protein Protocol”
Just In Time For Summer!
Call Now for Your Free Consultion!
(603) 402-0553 * Idealweighlossofpelham@gmail.com
49 Atwood Rd. Suite 3, Pelham, NH 03076
Animal Rescue Network of N.E.
Sat., April. 26

First Congregational Church
Photos courtesy of Sea Jay Photography • Special Thanks to Beaver Valley Farm for their support
www.arnne.org
603-233-4801
3 Main St., Pelham, 11am – 2pm
Petey
Katchy
Princess Lucy
Smokey
Pet Adoption Day Pet Adoption Day
Save the Date!
Rabies & Microchip Clinic , Saturday April 5,
Pelham Police Department, 9 - 11
Luna
A
d
o
p
t u
s!
A
d
o
p
t u
s!
Tommy
submitted by Maria Kench
Thanks to donations, a Beard-A-Thon, selling T-shits,
bracelets and three fundraisers, Tom Kench from the
Salem Police Department and his wife, Maria, have raised
$14,444 for the Charity Cops For Kids With Cancer. They
will be running the Boston Marathon on Monday, April
21, through this charity. Tom and Maria Kench were not
runners but were inspired to run in honor of the bombing
victims from last year’s Boston Marathon. They began to
train for a 5K, 10K, and ran the Bay State half marathon
in October. They also were selected to run on the Cops
For Kids For Cancer Charity team. On top of training for
the marathon, they were each required to raise $6,200
to run on the team. The Kenchs also have three children,
ages 6, 4, and 2.
They have received a tremendous amount of support
from the community in donations, raffles donations
for their fundraisers and the community also attending
local fundraisers they had at the Black Water Grill and
Margaritas.
They also worked with a local family who has a 5 year
old with brain cancer and they submitted the paperwork
to the charity for the family to receive some financial
assistance from the charity. In March the Cops For Kids
For Cancer charity presented a check for $5,000 to the
local family.
You can view their Boston Marathon
fundraising page at: http://www.crowdrise.com/
cfkwc2014bostonmarathon/fundraiser/thomaskench.
submitted by the Barron School.
Everyone in grade one is so happy that spring has finally sprung. If
you walk through the hallways you’ll see lots of art and writing about
the many signs of spring. There’s information and imaginings about
kites, flowers, rainbows and chicks.
First graders have been learning about opinions and how to
convince others to agree with them. They have become judges for
each other’s collections, choosing the best item and explaining why it
should be a “Blue Ribbon” winner. They have also discovered how to
include important details when writing reviews and recommendations
for movies, ice cream shops, games, restaurants and amusement parks.
So watch out – they can be very
persuasive when they feel strongly
about something.
Grade one students are getting
very adept at counting money
and experimenting with ways to
measure. All that skip counting
they worked on earlier this year
sure came in handy when learning
to count money! They’ve been
solving how to pay for items
with different combinations of
coins. Now it’s easy to count
from nickels to dimes and even
quarters. When measuring, they
have used cubes, paperclips, their
feet, hands and arms. Students
found that it’s easier to measure a
table with a length of string than
it is to line up a row of paperclips.
Choosing the right measuring tool
when you don’t have a ruler is a
good skill to have.
In May, the first graders will
become young entomologists
when they study the life cycles
of insects. They’ll learn about
the habits and habitats of insects such as ants, ladybugs, bees and
butterflies. They will observe and record the gradual growth of
caterpillars that will eventually emerge from their chrysalises and
become beautiful Painted Lady butterflies. Shortly after, students will
set the butterflies free and watch them fly away.
Right now they’re looking forward to participating in the annual
Barrathon and hoping it’s a perfect day for running, jogging or walking.
All that practice in P.E. will really pay off. As the end of the year gets
closer, grade one teachers and students would like to express a big
thank you to our many volunteers for their generous help throughout
the year. We couldn’t do what we do without you.
submitted by Boys & Girls Club of Greater Salem
The NEW programs and activities at the summer camps of the Boys
& Girls Club of Greater Salem are the best cure for summer boredom.
Club camps include field trips, swim lessons, tech programs, arts and
crafts, outdoor and gym games. A blend of recreational and educational
activities is offered to keep youth engaged both physically and mentally.
Summer Camp runs June 23 thru August 22 from 8:45 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. (drop-off and pick-up times from 6:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. at no
additional cost). Full Day Camp K-9 is only $210 a week. There are
four great camps available this summer: Full time Lil’ Explorer’s Camp
(entering preschool and kindergarten), Full day Camp Funtastic (entering
first through fifth grade) Tween Camp (entering sixth through seventh
grade) and Teen Camp (entering eighth through ninth grade).
This year’s Camp Funtastic will consist of nine themed weeks, with
fun and exciting activities specific to each theme. The themed weeks
include: (Week 1) 104 Days of Summer Vacation, (Week 2) Stars &
Stripes and Gold Rush, (Week 3) Olympics and Around the World,
(Week 4) Space N’ Science, (Week 5) Challenge Week/Talent Show,
(Week 6) Ocean Commotion, (Week 7) Need for Speed, (Week 8)
Mystery Week, and (Week 9) Splish Splash (Water Games).
All field trips are included in the weekly camp tuition. Lil’ Explorer’s
Camp field trips may include: Boston’s Museum of Science, Seacoast
Science Center, Hidden Hollow Farm, Stone Zoo, Palace Theatre, USS
Constitution, Christa McCauliffe Planetarium and the Science Museum.
Camp Funtastic field trips may include: Canobie Lake Park, Water
Country, Liquid Planet, State Parks, Boston’s Museum of Science, New
England Aquarium and York’s Wild Kingdom. The Tween & Teen Camp
field trips may include: Water Country, Canobie Lake Park, Funtown
USA, Checkered Flag Indoor Karting, the beach, Six Flags, Lawrence
Boat House, Skyzone, NH Fisher Cats Game and State Parks. *Field
trips will be listed on the website and are subject to change.
In addition to these great camps, the club offers specialty camps
open to all members which include: Junior Golf, Junior Chef, Microsoft
“Make your own App,” Sailing Club, Counselor in Training (for ages 14
and 15) and more.
A $25 registration fee and $50/week deposit reserves your spot
in camp and locks in your registration rate of $210/week (discounts
for additional siblings). Enrollments are limited. Financial aid and
scholarships are available to those who qualify (contact Beth at
bkeane@salembgc.org). Informational Camp Orientation will be held
in June, date is TBA.
The club is located at 3 Geremonty Drive, Salem. For additional
information, visit their website at www.salembgc.org or call 898-7709.
Great futures start at the Boys & Girls Club.
Cops For Kids With
Cancer Fundraisers
to Run in Boston
Marathon
Courtesy photo
Tom and Maria Kench
Avoid Summer Boredom: Sign up Now
for Boys & Girls Club Camps
L’il Explorers having a hands-on learning feld trip at
the Seacoast Science Center in 2013
Barron First Graders Get Counting
4
0
4
0
Years!
Growing
on
Growing
on
37 Lake St., Salem, NH • Lakestreet.com
603-893-5858
Hours: 9-5 • 7 Days a week

arriving daily
Trees & Shrubs arriving daily • Acres of selection • Expert Advise
Easter Plants & Baskets
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Easter Lilies
Fragrant
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Hyacinths • Daffodils • Tulips
Blooming
Staff photos by Len Lathrop
Crepes, a New Treat
at K of C Relay Breakfast
by Len Lathrop
If you missed breakfast with the Knights this Sunday at the Bishop Peterson Council 4442, let’s
review what you missed: French toast, pancakes, scrambled eggs, sausages, baked beans, coffee,
tea and juice. If that wasn’t enough for your $5, Chanel Simard, past Grand Knight, was staffing the
grill and making crepes that were to die for with several toppings. The crepes were served for the
first time as part of this annual fundraiser for the American Cancer Society Relay For Life, which will
be held on Grant field at Salem High School on June 21.
If you are wishing you visited the
Knights at 37 Main Street for breakfast you
have two more opportunities, May 11 and
June 1, both from 8 to 10:30 a.m.
Have your $5 ready and we will see
you there.
Photo Left: Dave Tompson and Mike
Banks, under the watchful eye of Addison,
search the kitchen for more cofee.
Photo Right: Te infamous Chanel Simard,
master of the crepe, demonstrates his skills.
Photo Bottom: Preparing and serving were
Rico Casaletto, Jon Tripp, Mike Petrilli,
Dave Tompson and Ed Lynch and at the
crepe station is Chanel Simard.
Sports
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Salem Patriot
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Salem Patriot
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16 - April 18, 2014
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Boys Volleyball Spikes Londonderry to Open 2014 Season
by Jacob Gagnon
While other teams may feel the familiar tingle of opening
day butterflies, the Salem High School boys Volleyball
squad took to their home court on Monday, April 14 calm,
confident and ready to begin their state title defense.
The Blue Devils cruised past the Londonderry High
School Lancers, three sets to none, to begin their 2014
campaign. With seven returning seniors and eight juniors,
this veteran team will be tough to overcome as the season
progresses.
“We didn’t really deal with any nerves. We have a lot
of guys returning from the starting lineup last year,” said
Head Coach John Roemer. “The seniors are taking over
the leadership role. We have a lot of juniors in the starting
lineup, and our seniors are teaching them the ropes and
being really supportive.”
Salem started off the evening somewhat slow, with the
Lancers remaining close on the scoreboard. Like a train
gaining steam, however, the Blue Devils quickly collected
the momentum of the match. Salem took the first set, 25-12,
following a strong offensive attack.
While there is no one star performer on this year’s
team, the 2014 Blue Devils are made up of a number of
outstanding players who have the potential to lead the team
in any given match. This squad’s chemistry with one another
was evident from the opening serve. “Everybody is helping
together as a team this year. It’s interesting,” said Roemer.
“They are very team oriented.”
Salem continued their dominance against Londonderry,
securing the second set, 25-20, to take the 2-0 set advantage.
In the third set, the Blue Devils, as they had done the
previous two sets, struck first and often. After jumping out
to an 18-9 lead, the most impressive moment of the night
took place.
After Salem junior Jake Ditore chased down a ball
and knocked it back into play, senior co-captain Darren
Righini turned what many believed was a lost point into
a Salem score with one, swift kick. Righini, a star on the
soccer field, used those skills on the court by booting the
ball back over the net to shock the Lancers and score his
team a point. The Davis Gymnasium erupted. “It was
phenomenal. He’s a soccer player but nobody expected
that,” said Roemer. “That was pretty cool.”
Moments later, Salem finished off Londonderry and took
the third and final set, 25-12, to earn their first win of the
season. Junior Colton Burnham led with 11 kills, while
classmate Patrick Frydryck collected eight kills. Senior co-
captain Charles Peters had 2.5 blocks. Classmate and co-
captain Jacob Slepian recorded 34 assists and eight aces in
the match.
After claiming back-to-back New Hampshire state
championships, the goal has not changed for Roemer and
his squad. But the Blue Devils are not making space for
another trophy in their case just yet. “We are not really
looking at the big picture until the end. Every game is just
one by one,” said Roemer. “We’ve got to stay focused on
what we have to do and how we have to execute. If we
execute well, we have a good chance of making it to the
end.”
Refned Pitching Leads
Baseball Squad into 2014
by Jacob Gagnon
The Blue Devils had been so close. After winning three of their final five games of
the season, the Salem High School Baseball team had secured the 14th seed for the
NHIAA Division I Championship Tournament. In the preliminary round, the Blue
Devils faced the 3rd-seeded Nashua North High School on May 30 in Nashua.
Salem nearly upset the Titans. The Blue Devils’ Dan Morin hurled six strong
innings and allowed only five hits, three walks and a single unearned run. That one
run ended up being all the difference, as Nashua defeated Salem, 1-0, to advance in
the tournament.
That defeat put an end to the 2013 season hopes of the Blue Devils, who finished
7-14 overall. But it was also a new beginning for the Salem Baseball program as they
prepared for the 2014 season with a new assessment of their strengths.
Previously, Salem had believed that their pitching would be their biggest weakness
heading into the 2013 season. Instead, the tremendous efforts on the mound ended
up propelling them into the postseason, despite a shaky start to last season.
That same mistake will not be made this year. While Morin has graduated, the
Blue Devils are returning a number of experienced pitchers including senior captains
Mitch Dufton, C.J. Beaulieu and Jake White. Also returning to the mound for Salem
are junior Cody Soucy and sophomore Nick Shumski.
“Going into last year we thought pitching would be a weak spot, it turned out to
be our strength,” said Head Coach Daniel Keleher. “C.J. Beaulieu is coming off a
good junior year on the mound especially in the summer where he tossed a no-hitter
against Exeter.”
Dufton, Beaulieu and White will lead the Blue Devils this season and hope to
surpass last season’s early exit in the postseason.
“Jake White is one of the top catchers in the state
and he will lead the offense along with Mitch
Dufton,” said Keleher.
Other promising players that may make a big
impact this season for Salem are senior outfielder
Trevor Couture, classmate and infielder/pitcher
Jeremy Bagley, junior utility player Kyle Nagri
and classmates Zach Martineau, Jake Shepley
and Kenny Calabrese. Sophomore Jake Dufton
will also showcase his potential both in the
infield and at catcher. Coach Bob Larson will
lead from the helm of the Junior Varsity squad
this season.
The 2014 journey for the Blue Devils began
on Wednesday, April 16 when they hosted
Manchester Memorial High School.
Boys Tennis Focused on Improvement
Junior Daniel Nugent high-fves teammate senior Darren Righini
in the third set of Salem’s victory.
S
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by Jacob Gagnon
For a growing team, the best learning occurs from its
stumbles. While the Salem High School Boys Tennis team
will strive for success this season, their inexperienced
lineup may suffer some losses in 2014. Head Coach
Gary Duranko is alright with that. After all, he knows that
champions often arise from the ashes of defeat.
“We are an inexperienced team,” said Duranko. “Our
main goal is self improvement.”
Last season, Salem finished 3-11. “I expect that we will
do a little better this year,” said Duranko. While the Blue
Devils lost their top two players from last season, they
were able to replace their number-one performer with a
first-year high school player.
Freshman Melhem Antar may be the Blue Devils’
brightest spot this season. Antar has the potential to lead
the Salem program in the future. “Melhem will have a
tough year, as one is a tough spot,” said Duranko. Still,
Antar will learn from both his struggles and triumphs this
season.
Junior Matt Descoteaux has continued to improve and
will be Salem’s number two this season. Senior captains
Austin Wilson and Ryan Fredette are both developing as
tennis players under Duranko’s guidance. Classmate Jake
Poore and junior Brandon Rastello will round out the Blue
Devils squad for this season.
Salem High lost in their opening match in Manchester
against Memorial High School, 6-3, on Wednesday, April
9. The Blue Devils bounced back on Monday, April 14
to defeat Pinkerton Academy, 5-4, for their first win of the
season. They returned to action Wednesday, April 16 in
Salem as they hosted Winnacunnet High School.
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