ENRIQUE CAVELIER P.

PORTFOLIO

Four years ago I decided to pursue my curiosity on space, theory and design by studying architecture at the University of Virginia. Being born in Bogota’s chaotic and vibrant urban fabric and educated on the French rational thought system, I fostered an interest on studying the relationship between a physical space and the conditions that generate it. Today designers encounter countless factors and demands that problems have become extremely complex, encouraging interdisciplinary collaborations in order to arrive to comprehensive answers. Having been brought up in a multicultural environment I understand that there is not a unique or correct solution to a design problematic, but rather a multiplicity of possibilities. The works selected in this portfolio represent my unique vision towards investigation and experimentation in architecture.

Parametric analysis of the behavior of a facade

TABLE OF CONTENTS

[1]. RETRIEVING MEMORY: CRAFT SCHOOL + URBAN HISTORY DEPARTMENT [2]. LV80FOUR-XX4THREE CENTER [3]. CHILDREN BOTANICAL DISCOVERY CENTER [4]. PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS AND THE [RE]CONSTRUCTION OF THE URBAN REALM [5]. LANDFILL TO LANDFORM [6]. EMERGENCY CENTER [7]. 626 FLATBUSH AVENUE [8]. SKETCHES + PHOTOGRAPHS

Parametric Study of the influence of plexiglass on a ray of light, 2012. (Project done with Grasshopper, MasterCAM and analogue tools)

RETRIEVING MEMORY: CRAFT SCHOOL + URBAN HISTORY DEPARTMENT
New Delhi, India ARCH 5011: International Summer Studio Summer 2013 |Fourth year Studio Instructors: Peter Waldman and Phoebe Crisman

Delhi is the second most populous city in India with a population of 11 million people. Not being a very dense city, it expands over a large territory creating a polycentric urban fabric. In 1962 city airport was moved to another location outside the city, the following years the old airport was transformed into an air club that was closed down in 2002. Today the site of Delhi’s first airport is a huge empty lot that not only obstruct the continuity of a busy street but also becomes an enclosed open space. As part of my summer program I was asked to come up with a design proposal for the site. My first move was to reconnect the site with the city by extending the busy street trough the site connecting it to a residential neighborhood on the west. I proposed the design of a technical craft school and an urban history department to be housed on the north east side of the site. The program of the scheme was derived from my personal observation of how Indian rich culture is being lost due to globalization and economic growth. The technical craft school would be located under the existing airplanes hangars and the urban history department would be in front of the school. The two created two parallel axes that were connected by a third axis that would house a public library, a museum and an auditorium. The final proposal then became a new public and educational center that would be connected to the already existing polycentric structure of Delhi’s urban fabric.

Perspective view of the library and flooded plaza

DIAGRAMS OF THE SITE STRATEGY

Creation of a grid and a new street on the site

Creation of a new axis that give a structure to the intervention

Creation of a reservoir and a minor grid for agricultural fields

Master Plan

Faculty and students dormitories elevation

Administrative axis

Technical schools axis

Library

Urban studies center axis

Auditorium

Exhibition axis

Diagram of the program organization

Perspective view of the library and the tower of light

Architectural project master plan

LV80FOUR-XX4THREE CENTER A PLACE TO ARCHIVE AND STORE THE HUMAN GENOME PROJECT
New York, NY ARCH 3010:Unnatural Selection: The Human Genome Project + The City Instructor: Nana Last Fall 2012 | Third year Studio

The human genome project is the world’s largest collaborative biological project that has ever existed. Its goal is to determine the sequence of the human DNA and identify and map all of the genes of the human genome. I was asked to design a center located in downtown Manhattan were the results from the genome project would be housed. I proposed to create a new kind of public space that would be indoors and outdoors where everyone could go and access the results from the genome project. The building then become a space to archive and display information that was in constant change since the project has been and will stay going for many years. In order to render such ephemeral condition the structure transforms itself as information change. By doing so the building becomes a source of emitting and receiving information.

Elevation

MATERIAL TECTONICS

Combined

Concrete

Glass

Steel

Copper

Model representing the three part structure

3D print model

Section perspective

CHILDREN BOTANICAL DISCOVERY CENTER
Charlottesville, VA ARCH 2010: Introduction to Architectural Design I Fall 2011 | Second year Studio Instructor: Anselmo Canfora
Study concept models

Downtown Charlottesville is a dense and dynamic urban environment. Families will go on weekends to spend the day walking on the mall and eating at the many restaurants located in the area. I was proposed to design a new children botanical discovery center on the west side of the mall. I saw it as an opportunity to create a new public space mixed with an educational program where children and adults could explore nature in an urban setting. The center is then divided into two mayor blocks containing separated by a garden. The two blocks were then connected by a continuous ramp than went from the first floor up to the 5th floor creating an uninterrupted walk through green houses, planting beds and exhibition spaces.

First level plan

Second level plan

Cross section Perspective view from the public space

Third level plan Cross longitudinal section perspective

LYNCHBURG: A PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS AND THE [RE]CONSTRUCTION OF THE URBAN REAL.
Lynchburg, Va ARCH 2020: Introduction to Architectural Design II Spring 2012 | Second year Studio Instructor: Robin Dripps

Lynchburg is an old industrial town located at the edge of the James River west of Richmond, Va. Since the years 2000s the city has underwent a series of works on the downtown area to transform an old abandoned area into a dynamic an attractive destination. As a second year students I was asked to study the urban conditions of the city and come up with a design proposal that will revitalized another part of the town. I began by exploring how parametric tools allowed me to map and understand the city in a completely different way. By creating a series of different definitions I was able to map different conditions of the city from density to the location of food facilities and bike paths. By doing so I realized that on the west part of the city there was an area that was completely disconnected from any network of the city. I proposed to rethink the area and transform it as a new residential urban fabric where people would bike around and where rain water would be collected to provided water to new community gardens. I also suggested to create two new exiting public spaces (a market and a sport complex) that would not only bring together the residential community but would become spaces of congregation for the whole city population.

Perspective view of the new market structure

Section featuring the collection pond

Section featuring water management Mapping the city Mapping the connections of the site to the city Understanding the city as circular structure Proposed interventions to connect the site

Understanding the curent city’s density

New density after the proposed intervention

New network of paths and connections after the intervention

Final proposal of three new public spaces

Perspective view of the new sports arena next to the river

LANDFILL TO LANDFORM
Charlottesville, VA Competition Entry to 29th After the Sprawl Vortex Competition | Collaborative Project Spring 2014

We are about to drown in our plastic bottles and baby diapers. The existing Charlottesville landfills are closing and we no longer can hide trash offsite via this infrastructure – it must be dealt with locally. Trash is now the generator of a new urban system driven by a new type of waste infrastructure, and Charlottesville’s strip mall and suburban landscape become cultural artifacts that are adapted into new type of urban form generated by waste processing and landfill strategies. On Route 29, the waste output of the commercial strip is stored in place in a linear landfilling strategy that creates inhabitable public spaces along the highway. The build up of these landfill forms create spectacle along the drive, and reflect the outputs of the commercial system, all while creating a new source of energy for new developments through methane production in the landfill. In the city fabric around 29, new pockets of density are centered around collection, distribution, storage and processing of waste. The emergence of neighborhood collection facilities, sorting and processing facilities, and storage and manufacturing facilities become hubs of mixed use commercial activity and public space. As Route 29 becomes an exciting corridor of mixed use and new urban forms, it also exists as a catalyst for a more polycentric commercial activity, generating new industries and providing new jobs that support this localized trash infrastructure.
Perspective view of the new recycling center Master plan

Section perspective

NEW EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT AT THE UVA HOSPITAL: LIGHT + VOIDS
Charlottesville, Va ARCH 4010: Scaffolding: Structure + Health Fall 2013 | Fourth year Studio Instructors: Peter Waldman and Schaeffer Somers

The University of Virginia Hospital is among the biggest hospitals in central Virginia. It receives thousands of patients every months from all over the state. Since its inauguration in 1901 the current hospital was undergone multiple renovations in order to meet the necessities of the advances in medicine. However the Emergency Department (one of the busiest departments in the hospital) has been barely renovated throughout the years. The ER today is a space where patients experience a lot of trauma due to the slight access of light, the crowd space and the little opportunity of privacy. As part of proposal to rethink the relationship between health and architecture I underwent a careful study of the different processes patients need to pursue on an emergency room. Soon I realized of the need to divide the space into different pavilions where patients will go depending on their medical condition in order to avoid traumatic experiences and to facilitate staff control over patients. The final proposal became a new Emergency Department divided into five different pavilions that were connected through a series of open courtyards that allowed the access of light and views to natural environments.

Cross section perspective

DIAGRAMS EXPLORING THE SITE STRATEGY

Ambulance access + main axis

Courtyards

Rooms around the courtyards

Staff + Visitor rooms

Ground floor plan

Basement 1 Plan

Programmatic organization of the Emergency Center

Basement 2 Plan

Cross section perspective

Aerial view

626 FLATBUSH AVENUE: RETHINK THE URBAN BLOCK
New York, NY ARCH 3020: Monster Studio Spring 2013 | Third year Studio Instructors: Ghazal Abbasy-Asbagh and Robin Dripps

In last ten years Brooklyn has become a hub for young families, students and recently graduates. Over the past few years, new projects like the Barclay’s center and the Botanical Garden haven transformed the area. I was asked to propose a design for a new residential project next to Prospect Park. After a careful study of the neighborhood I realized that the site was in the center of a vibrant middle income area, however it lacks any access to truly public spaces. I saw this as an opportunity to explore the relationship between public and private. To do so I decided to place five courtyards in the site to house different public programs like a theater, a sports complex among other. Soon those courtyards became generators where the residential units began to aggregate. The final design became a hybrid building where public and private spaces connect in innovative manner.

Perspective view of the meadow

SITE STRATEGY

Site main entrances

Five programmatic courtyards

Courtyards adapt to the program

Courtyards become generators of aggregation

Three circulation systems

Ground floor plan

Longitudinal section

AGGREGATION OF MODULES AROUND A VERTICAL CORE

Cross section perspective

CIRCULATION OF A RESIDENT THROUGH THE BUILDING

From the unit to the main plaza

From the unit to the secondary entrance

From the unit to the library

Aerial view

Perspective view of a unit’s balcony

Programmatic organization

Perspective view of the main plaza

SKETCHES + PHOTOGRAPHS

The encounter of new cultures and their unique spatial compositions have become an essential part of my architectural education. The following pages are photographs and sketches of my explorations during my journeys.

Color Study of the High Court Building; Chandigarh, India; 2013 (Sketch and Photoshop)

right: National Museum; Brasilia, Brazil; 2012 Photograph

left: Demolition; Udaipur, India; 2013 Photograph

right: Shadows and Memories; Berlin, Germany; 2012 Photograph

left: Hiding from the sun; Cartagena, Colombia; 2010 Photograph
TBLA PhotoExpo 1st Prize Award

Window; Hauz Khas Delhi, India; 2013 (Sketch)

Garden pavilion; Red Fort, Delhi, India; 2013 (Sketch)

Princess palace; Fatehpur Sikri, India; 2013 (Sketch)

Column detail; Ahmedabad, India; 2013 (Sketch)

Assembly building; Chandigarh, India; 2013 (Sketch)

Jain Temple; Udaipur, India; 2013 (Sketch)

Institute of Indology; Ahmedabad, India; 2013 (Sketch)