LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

T#E$E% Culture, Dignity, and Identity
CONCE&T% Africa, Us, and the World - African Explorers in the Americas Africans as constant travelers, to Africans in the Americas, to Africans and African Americans in the development of the Atlantic world CONTENT TO&IC% Examining African peoples’ roles in the exploration and development of early orth and !outh Americas through fiction and nonfiction texts 'NIT TITLE% "he Americas #efore $eople % Early &igration Quarter% 'nit% O+,ecti-e.s/% !tudents 'ill (e a(le
to critically analy)e different perspectives related to a similar topic (y synthesi)ing *ey details in order to identify the central idea+

$aterials0Res"urces%
 Timeline: Early Days & Slavery (1400s 1!"#$ http,--'''+p(s+org-'net-aa'orld-timeline-early./0+html  Slavery Timeline 1400 1#00 A %hronolo&y of Slavery, A'olition, and Emancipation http,--'''+(rycchancarey+com-slavery-chrono1+htm  !tudent copies of each timeline  2esponse note(oo*s  "hin*ing 3uestions chart  Chart paper  $ro4ector

(ee) "f 5 *ay CCSS Standards% 2I+5+1, 2I+5+6, !7+5+1

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

1I *O IT2 (np)t & *odelin& Teac!er says and d"es 8"oday 'e 'ill start a ne' unit 'here 'e 'ill engage 'ith the controversial 9uestion, +as
African presence in the early Americas accidental, forced or vol)ntary, "his unit examines African peoples’ roles in the exploration and development of early orth and !outh Americas through gathering and citing *ey details to synthesi)e main ideas and summari)e information found in fiction and nonfiction texts+ "his unit 'ill culminate 'ith you synthesi)ing the information you have learned, and produce a 'riting piece that offers your esta(lished opinion 'ith textual support that ans'ers the 9uestion, (n yo)r opinion has traditional ed)cation served 'ias in the teachin& of African presence in the early America, 1T"day I am 3"in3 t" teac! y"u4+ecause42 8"o critically analy)e t'o perspectives+ :ne important step in doing this is synthesi)ing the gathered *ey details to determine the central ideas in t'o different texts and then comparing them+ "his 'ill help you to see ho' different perspectives can vary so much, even in factual information through omission+; 1(atc! me as I42 "r 1Let me s!"5 y"u !"5 I42 8<o' to closely read a nonfiction resource to gather and synthesi)e the *ey details to identify the central ideas+ I 'ill (e paying attention to *ey 'ords and phrases such as dates, people, places, and events+; "eacher pro4ects the first timeline and provides students 'ith their o'n personal copy, to annotate+ Timeline: Early Days & Slavery (1400s 1!"#$ http,--'''+p(s+org-'net-aa'orld-timeline-early./0+html 8I am first going to read through the entire timeline once, completely through to the end, to get a (asic understanding of 'hat information is provided on the timeline+; "eacher reads the timeline aloud, 'hile students follo' along on either their copy or the pro4ected copy+ 8 o', I am going to go (ac* and reread 'ith pencil in hand, so I can mar* *ey 'ords or phrases or ma*e small notes to myself of 'hat *ey 'ords and phrases I find to (e important to the topic+; "eacher rereads the timeline a second time, circling *ey 'ords and phrases and ma*ing little notes, for the first couple of dates and accompanying details+ 8When I am finished annotating my timeline and collecting all the *ey details, I am going to go (ac* and reread the timeline for a third time, (ut this time I am going to reread and reflect on the mar*ings I made around text and thin* a(out 'hy those things are important to Africans’ presence in the early Americas+; "eacher rereads the timeline a third time =only up to 'here he-she stopped modeling their annotations on the timeline>, stopping to reread her annotations and to thin*-aloud 'hy those specific details are important to the topic, Africans’ presence in the early Americas+ 8As I finish reflecting on my annotations, I am going to synthesi)e all the *ey details (y ma*ing connections (et'een them and coming up 'ith some general statements that the *ey details 'ould fall under+ "o do this, I 'ould as* myself, ?Why did the author ta*e the time to 'rite this timeline@’ and ?What is the author of this timeline trying to teach me a(out Africans’ presence

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

in the early Americas@’ or ?What did the author 'ant me to learn from this timeline@’ "his synthesi)ing of my gathered *ey details is going to allo' me to determine the central ideas of this timeline+; Teac!er says 1*id y"u n"tice !"5 I42 8<o' I reread the timeline three different times, made notes of any *ey 'ords or phrases related to my purpose for reading, and synthesi)ed all the gathered *ey details together to determine the author of the timeline’s central idea@ "his is going to help me gain insight into the author’s perspective or intentionality of the information he or she chose to include related to the topic+;

1(E *O IT2

-)ided (nstr)ction

Teac!er says and d"es 1N"5 5e are 3"in3 t" try4 (e are 3"in3 t"42 8Closely read this timeline again together and gather the *ey details (y identifying the *ey 'ords and phrases through annotations, related to African presence in the early Americas+ Aou are going to annotate on your copy of the timeline 'hile I annotate the one pro4ected+ Beel free to add your o'n annotations along the 'ay as 'e are closely reading+; "eacher reads aloud through the timeline, stopping to ta*e student suggestions to 'hat *ey 'ords and phrases should (e annotated and prompts students to explain 'hy they feel those *ey details should (e identified as important to Africans’ presence in the early Americas+ Student d"es !tudents follo' along as the teacher reads, offering suggested annotations of *ey 'ords and phrases and an explanation of 'hy they feel it is important to (e identified as important details to Africans’ presence in the early Americas+ Teac!er says and d"es "eacher promotes listening and spea*ing norms taught, developed and practice in the classroom off of the Common Core 7istening and !pea*ing !tandards+ Teac!er says and d"es 8 o' that you have gathered your *ey details, go (ac* and reread the timeline to yourself, stopping to reflect on your annotations and 'hy they are important to Africans’ presence in the early Americas+ As you are doing so thin* a(out if you are seeing any connections or similar =trends> throughout your *ey details+; Student d"es !tudents reread through their timelines and their annotations, reflecting on them to find connections and similar trends+ Teac!er says and d"es 8 o' that you have reflected on all the *ey details you gathered, discuss 'ith your partner, 'hat the author’s central ideas are and support your thin*ing 'ith the evidence you collected from the timeline+ Aou and your partner may 'ant to use the 9uestions I mentioned (efore to help guide your discussionC ?Why did the author ta*e the time to 'rite this timeline@’ and ?What is the author of this timeline trying to teach me a(out African presence in the early Americas@’ or ?What did the author 'ant me to learn from this timeline@; Student d"es !tudents 'or* 'ith their partners, their annotated timelines, and the sample thin*ing 9uestions

7D

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

to synthesi)e their gathered details+ Teac!er says and d"es "eacher circulates and facilitates partner discussions (y pro(ing through 9uestioning and supporting the listening and spea*ing s*ills of good discussion+ .Teacher &ives st)dents eno)&h time to really di& deeply into their &athered details and en&a&e in a disc)ssion that allows st)dents to respond off of each other/s tho)&hts thro)&h m)ltiple e0chan&es1 Teac!er says and d"es "eacher calls the 'hole group (ac* together+ 8I heard so many evidence (ased discussions of 'hat 'e thin* the central ideas are+ 7ets ta*e some time to share them 'ith the 'hole group and capture them in 'riting, so 'e can compare the central ideas of this timeline to another timeline related to the same topic, (ut (y a different author+; Student d"es !tudents volunteer their central ideas and the evidence they found to support them+ Teac!er says and d"es "eacher captures student responses through a shared 'riting on a large piece of chart paper+ .+hen st)dents are thro)&h sharin& their responses2 "eacher prompts students to reread through the central ideas that their classmates and themselves synthesi)ed+

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n
%olla'orative 3earnin&

1YO' *O IT TOGET#ER2

Teac!er says and d"es 1N"5 y"u are 3"in3 t" try 5it! y"ur partner4 Y"u are 3"in3 t"42 8Aou are going to 'or* 'ith your partner to closely read a different timeline on the same topic to gather the *ey details (y annotating the *ey 'ords and phrases+ Aou 'ill then 'or* 'ith you partner to synthesi)e all of your gathered details to determine 'hat you thin* the author’s central ideas of this timeline are+ &a*e sure you capture your ideas in your response note(oo*, (ecause 'e 'ill come (ac* together as a 'hole group to share and capture our findings supported, 'ith evidence from the text, in 'riting+; "eacher pro4ects and passes out 1nd timeline related to African presence in the early Americas+ Slavery Timeline 1400 1#00 A %hronolo&y of Slavery, A'olition, and Emancipation http,--'''+(rycchancarey+com-slavery-chrono1+htm Student d"es !tudents 'or* 'ith their partners to closely read the ne' timeline to annotate and synthesi)e the *ey details to support their development of 'hat 'hey (elieve the author’s central ideas are+ !tudents 'ill then capture their thoughts in 'riting, to share 'ith the class after'ards+ Teac!er says and d"es 87et’s discuss 'hat 'e found through our discussions 'ith our partners, 'hile closely reading our timelines+; "eacher conducts a shared 'riting of student responses, 'hile promoting students to discuss off of other student responses+

1YO' *O IT ALONE2

(ndependent 4ractice

Teac!er says and d"es 1N"5 y"u are 3"in3 t" 3" "ff and try t!is "n y"ur "5n4 Y"u are 3"in3 t"42 8Aou are no' going to compare the central ideas 'e determined from the t'o timelines to decide if they portray a different perspective a(out Africans presence in the early Americas+ Aou are going to first critically analy)e the t'o timeline’s central ideas independently and then 'e 'ill come (ac* together to discuss our thoughts and vie's as a class+ 2emem(er, 'hen discussing 'e need to em(ed our claims in evidence, so (e prepared to explain your thin*ing using evidence from your findings during our 'or* 'ith the t'o timelines today+; 8While you are analy)ing you may 'ant to use the follo'ing thin*ing 9uestions to help focus your thoughts,; o Were the central ideas of (oth timelines the same@ o What details from the timelines ma*es you thin* that@ o What is a ma4or difference (et'een the t'o timelines@ o Do you thin* the information on (oth timelines is important@ Why or 'hy not@ o If the information is important 'ho gets to decide 'hat is included and 'hat is not@ Why should they get to decide@ .These sho)ld 'e posted for st)dents to refer to when critically analy5in& the two timelines1 8If you feel as though it 'ould help you to 4ot some notes 'hile analy)ing, feel free to do so in your response note(oo* or directly on your timelines+; Student d"es !tudents critically analy)e their findings of the central ideas of the t'o different timelines and

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

develop their vie's around each of the a(ove thin*ing 9uestions+ !ome students may 4ot notes in their response note(oo*s or directly on their timelines+ .Teacher ens)res to &ive st)dents eno)&h time to really analy5e the two timelines and thin6 a'o)t the provided thin6in& 7)estions1 Teac!er says and d"es 87et’s discuss 'hat vie's you concluded from critically analy)ing the t'o timelines, related to Africans’ presence in the early Americas, using the thin*ing 9uestions+; "eacher acts as a facilitator for student discussion+ <e-she is merely a facilitator here and not a teacher of ne' learning+ "eacher allo's students to freely and openly discuss their thoughts and vie's around the 9uestions related to the t'o timelines+ Student d"es !tudents use the thin*ing 9uestions to focus their discussion 'ith their classmates relating to the t'o different timelines+ Teac!er says and d"es 8Aou are no' going to 'rite a response in your response note(oo*s, reflecting on the discussion 'e 4ust had a(out the t'o timelines related to African presence in the early Americas as a class+ Even 'hen you are reflecting for yourself, it is important to em(ed evidence to support your vie's+; Student d"es !tudents independently 'rite in their response note(oo*s to reflect on the class discussion of the t'o timelines related to Africans presence in the early Americas+

1CLOS'RE "f LESSON2

whole &ro)p reflection

Teac!er says and d"es 1T"day and e-eryday 5!en 5e are42 8Critically analy)ing t'o perspectives from t'o different resources 'e can synthesi)e the gathered *ey details to determine the central ideas and compare them (ecause this 'ill help you to see ho' different perspectives can vary so much, even in factual information through omission+; 8We 'ill continue to critically analy)e different perspectives through different resources through out the unit to (ecome a more critical learner+;

ASSESS$ENT What 'ill you as*@ When 'ill you as* during the lesson@ What 'ill *ids say or do to demonstrate understanding of the o(4ective@ 6"rmati-e, Summati-e,
 !tudent 'ritten responses  !tudent oral responses  !tudent annotations on their timeline  Anecdotal records ta*en off of student discussions • !ummative assessment 'ill happen at the end of the unit, not at the end of the lesson+

7E