LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan

THEME: Culture, Dignity, and Identity CONCEPT: Africa, Us, and the World - Chicago: African American Influence From DuSable to Obama - The vibrant African American culture in Chicago changes the face of society, art, and culture CONTENT TOPIC: Examining the impact African Americans’ contributions to the culture of Chicago and other global cities through fiction and nonfiction texts UNIT TITLE: How Chicago Was Created
Unit Topic: How Chicago Was Created Unit Description: This unit examines the impact of African Americans’ contributions to the culture of Chicago and other global cities through a series of diverse resources by collecting important details and understanding key words and phrases to determine and support the main idea related to the influences by the African American culture during the time period of 1840-1915. Students will use the gathered key details to craft an informative/explanatory piece that identifies the main idea and is supported by their findings across multiple texts and content related resources. Key Themes: Individual Development and Identity Length: 5-6 weeks

Enduring Understandings

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Systems differ with respect to level of stability, efficiency, freedom, security, and equality. People use maps to navigate the physical world and to understand local, national, and global events, conditions, and issues. The interactions of identities and cultures produce varied perspectives, challenges, and opportunities within and among societies. Readers use textual evidence when asking and answering questions. Readers integrate knowledge and ideas by describing logical connections within a text. Writers support the main idea of a topic by providing text evidence. How do culture and identity influence who we are? How do time, culture and history influence works of art and/or the advancement of science and technology? What can I do to positively impact my community?

Essential Questions

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE
Common Core State Standards Primary Secondary

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Primary: Standards Assessed RI.3.2 Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea. RI.3.4 Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in a text relevant to a grade 3 topic or subject area. W.3.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. a.) Introduce a topic and group related information together; include illustrations when useful to aiding comprehension. b.) Develop the topic with facts, definitions, and details. c.) Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information. d.) Provide a concluding statement or section. SL.3.2 Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. SL.3.5 Create engaging audio recordings of stories or poems that demonstrate fluid reading at an understandable pace; add visual displays when appropriate to emphasize or enhance certain facts or details. Secondary: Standards Addressed RI.3.1, RI.3.3, RI.3.5, RI.3.7, RI.3.8, RI.3.10, W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.7, W.3.10, SL.3.1, SL.3.4 Reading, Writing, and Citing Textual Evidence Literal and inferential comprehension Synthesizing inferential information Summarizing and sequencing Comparing and contrasting Close reading and analysis Applying qualities of explanatory/informative writing Building Knowledge through Texts African-American Influence in Early Chicago (1840-1915)  Early Black Communities in the 1840s  Anti-Slavery Movement  Old Settler’s’ Club- Ida McIntosh Dempsey st  Conservator (1 Black Newspaper)  Ferdinand L. Barnett  Ida B. Wells  Jack Johnson Diagnostic (Pre-Assessment) *Same as summative assessment with the use of variation informational texts on the related topic. Formative Assessments Student summaries Student annotations and notes Student small and whole group discussion Summative Performance Assessment Task 1: As they read, students should gather key details from general academic and domain-specific words and phrases that explicitly relate to the key people and events of early Chicago’s African

Cognitive Skills

Content

Assessments (D) Diagnostic (F) Formative (S) Summative

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Americans from information within and across texts, using text evidence to explain how they support their identification of the main idea of the text. Task 2: After task one is completed, the teacher will tell students that they are going to use the details they have gathered in task one to craft an informational/explanatory piece on one of the important people or events related to African Americans in early Chicago, supporting the main idea of the text. Their piece should include; an introduction, which states the topic, supporting facts, definitions, details, grouped together by linking words and phrases to connect ideas within categories, and a conclusion. Students need to also include an illustration. Suggested Resources Short & Extended Texts Chicago History for Kids: Triumphs and Tragedies of the Windy City by Owen Hurd Ida B. Wells-Barnett by Heidi Moore Chicago of the Fire by Harriette Gillem Robinet A Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes History Lesson by Hope Anita Smith Christ In Alabama by Langston Hughes Sonny Liston Poem by Muhammad Ali Internet Resources http://www.biography.com/people/ida-b-wells-9527635 (Biography.Com) http://www.biography.com/people/jack-johnson-9355980 (Biography.Com) http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/305329/Jack-Johnson (Britannica Online) http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=76,3 (WTTW) http://www.chicagohistoryfair.org/images/stories/pdfs/early%20chicago%20history%20through %20art.pdf (Chicago Metro History Education Center) Chicago History Museum: Great Chicago Stories: www.GreatChicagoStories.org Center for Chicago Education: Chicago--A History of Choices and Changes http://teacher.depaul.edu/Chicago_3rdGrade_Oct2009_Edition/Part%201_ChicagoA%20History%20of%20Choices%20and%20Changes.pdf Determining the Facts Excerpt from the National Register Nomination for Chicago's Black Metropolis http://www.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/53black/53factsr.htm Early Chicago: Illinois Slavery http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=76,4,3,4 The Anti-Slavery Poems by John Pinpont http://antislavery.eserver.org/poetry/antislaverypoems/antislaverypoems.pdf People and Events Ida B. Wells http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/world/peopleevents/pande04.html Barnett, Ferdinand Lee (1864?-1932) http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/barnett-ferdinand-lee-1864-1932 Ferdinand L. Barnett Race Unity http://www.blackpast.org/?q=1879-ferdinand-l-barnett-race-unity

Texts/Resources

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
DuSable Museum http://www.dusablemuseum.org/

Learning Activities

Videos Early Chicago: Old Settlers photo slideshow http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=76,4,3,5#oldsettlers_ss From DuSable to Obama: Chicago Metropolis http://video.wttw.com/video/1522918184/ Unit Kick-Off (Introduction of Map & Timeline Conversations) Week 1 Teacher sets the context for Timeline and Map Conversations by introducing students to the Timeline that will collect and sequence the key events in which they occur and where they were located, to identify the main idea of how African Americans influenced Chicago between 1840 and 1915 in this unit. Teacher introduces students to the content they will be immersed in throughout this unit in a chronological order to identify the main idea of how African Americans influenced early Chicago by fostering such learning activities:  Students watch DuSable to Obama: Chicago's Black Metropolis (http://video.wttw.com/video/1522918184/) to frontload the course of events that occurred during the time period of early Chicago and the influences made by key African Americans.  Students will gather key details related to the different key people and events and where and when they occurred by capturing them on their personal timelines.  Students will work with partners to discuss their findings and cross check events and people they may have missed.  Student groups share out during a whole class discussion as teacher captures their responses on Post-it notes. Teacher introduces students to the method of plotting key events on a timeline for the purpose of understanding the significance of the sequential order events, in which, occur by fostering such learning activities:  Students will mark the timeline with a date and key details of the events that occurred in chronological (date) order using butcher paper prepared and posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations and state that when researching African American influences on Chicago between 1840 and 1915.  Students will work as a group to plot the temporary Post-its, from the above activity, on the timeline. These will be crosschecked, modified, added-to and permanently written on the timeline throughout the unit.  Students will turn and discuss with a partner the importance of the timeline to their learning of the related content.  Students will capture, in writing, what they believe the importance of a timeline is to their learning in their response notebook, using ideas they discussed with their partner.  Students will cross-check their personal timelines with the class time line to include anything they may have missed. Teacher introduces students to the method of identifying where key events occurred for the purpose of understanding the significance of where different events took place and their

U4

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
relationship to each other by fostering such learning activities:  Using a posted map, state that during the research they are conducting of African American influences on Chicago between 1840 and 1915 the class will place markers on the many places that key events take place during this time period to build an understanding of the locations significance and the relationship between the different locations.  Students will work as a group to plot the temporary Post-its, from the above activity, on the timeline. These will be crosschecked, modified, added-to and permanently written on the timeline throughout the unit.  Students will turn and discuss with a partner the importance of the map to their learning of the related topic.  Students will capture, in writing, what they believe the importance of a timeline is to their learning in their response notebook, using ideas they discussed with their partner. Early Black Communities in the 1840s Week 2 Suggested Text The Anti-Slavery Poems by John Pinpont http://antislavery.eserver.org/poetry/antislaverypoems/antislaverypoems.pdf Teacher engages students in exploring the early Black communities in the 1840s. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view (may be beneficial for students to have an individual paper copy of the poem). Briefly introduce the poem by giving a basic explanation of what the poem is about. st  1 Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy. nd rd  2 & 3 Read – engage students in a shared reading of the poem with the teacher and with expression two times.  Using 3 previously determined and posted questions, engage students in a discussion about the poem.  What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem?  How do I know?  What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students discuss with a partner their answers to the 3 questions related to the poem.  Ask a few students to share their answers with the whole group and allow for other students to respond to or add to the other students’ responses. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and define concept of selected key words by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Introduce and provide student friendly definitions for the concept of using a primary source.

U5

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
*Primary Source: A document (like a newspaper) or a physical object or any kind of artifact (like pictures) that was created during the time period being studied.  Explain that the class will be exploring different primary sources throughout the unit.  Project Primary Sources – Photos  Explain that these photos were taken during the 1840’s in early Black Chicago communities, so these are Primary Sources.  Project images, one- at a time, using 4 questions to prompt discussions among the partnerships. o What do you notice? o What does this photo tell us about ________? o What does that make you think? o Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model his/her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of selected terms. Suggested Primary Sources

Chicago’s Black Belt, April 1941

Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and sharing new vocabulary through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, thoughtfully planned introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire book aloud. Suggested Text Determining the Facts Excerpt from the National Register Nomination for Chicago's Black Metropolis #2 http://www.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/53black/53factsr.htm Early Chicago: Mary Richardson Jones http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=76,4,2,1&content=mary-richardson-jones Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the Anchor Text through Map & Timeline Conversations and Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Use the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations, state that the class is going to read the text aloud again, but will first mark on the enlarged timeline when the events in the text took place and the key details related to the event. Engage students in marking the timeline.

U6

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
 Use the posted map; ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the text took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. nd  Restate the purpose for listening to the teacher and do a 2 Read-Aloud.  Read-Aloud stopping at key points in the text (and after reading) to ask questions, which are directly tied to the purpose set for reading. Embed teacher think-alouds to model responses to the questions for the students.  Students closely read the text with a partner while annotating key details and identifying the main idea of the text.  Ask students to write a 1-2 sentence response to one of the questions by using a Post-it to capture their response o What is the author trying to tell you about _______? o What is the author trying to tell you about ________? o What part of the text made you think so? o What happened because of _______? o What is the author trying to tell you about the effects of _______?  Prompt students to turn and share their response with their partner and then post their response on the wall next to the map. Suggested Text Determining the Facts Excerpt from the National Register Nomination for Chicago's Black Metropolis #2 http://www.nps.gov/nr/twhp/wwwlps/lessons/53black/53factsr.htm Mary Richardson Jones http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=76,4,2,1&content=mary-richardson-jones Teacher engages students in developing a response to the activities related to the early Black communities in Chicago of 1840 through a closing reflection by fostering such activities:  Prompt students to use a fresh piece of paper in their journal (lined notebook).  Ask students to respond to the following question: What have we learned about reading and writing today?  Teacher writes responses on a large piece of chart paper and writes the students’ name or initials next to the comment they provided.  Ask students to share what was their most impactful take-away from the text and the other related activities. Anti-Slavery Movement Week 3 Suggested Text The Anti-Slavery Poems by John Pinpont http://antislavery.eserver.org/poetry/antislaverypoems/antislaverypoems.pdf Teacher engages students in exploring the Anti-Slavery Movement. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view (may be beneficial for students to have an individual paper copy of the poem). Briefly introduce the poem by giving a basic explanation of what the poem is about.

U7

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
 1 Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy. nd rd  2 & 3 Read – engage students in reading the poem 2 more times with a partner.  Using 3 pre-determined and posted questions, engage students in a discussion to the build on the main idea of the poem.  What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem?  How do I know?  What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students discuss with a partner their answers to the 3 questions related to the poem.  Students write 1-2 sentences about the poet's main idea on a Post-it note.  Students share their sentences with a nearby small group.  Direct students to put their Post-it responses on their poem or in their Response Notebook.
st

Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and define concept of important words related to the primary source by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Project Primary Source – Photo  Explain that these photos were taken during the Anti-Slavery Movement.  Project the images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships. o What do you notice? o What does this photo tell us about ________? o What does that make you think? o Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model his/her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of terms. Suggested Primary Sources

Poster for slave auction Source: Chicago History Museum

Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:

U8

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
 Give a brief, thoughtfully planned introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire book aloud. Suggested Text Early Chicago: Slavery in Illinois http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=76,4,3,4 Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the Anchor Text through Map & Timeline Conversations and Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Use the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations, state that the class is going to read the text aloud again, but will first mark on the enlarged timeline when the text took place and the key details related to the event. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Use the posted map; ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the text took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. nd  Restate the purpose for listening to the teacher do a 2 Read-Aloud.  Read-Aloud stopping at key points in the text (and after reading) to ask questions, which are directly tied to the purpose set for reading. Embed teacher think-alouds to model responses to the questions for the students.  Students closely read the text with a partner while annotating key details and identifying the main idea of the text.  Ask students to write 2-3 sentence responses to one of the questions by using a Post-it to capture their response. o What is the author trying to tell you about ________? o What part of the text made you think so? o What happen because of _______? o What is the author trying to tell you about the effects of _______?  Prompt students to turn and share their response with their partner and then post their response on the wall next to the map. Suggested Text Early Chicago: Slavery in Illinois http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=76,4,3,4 Teacher engages students in developing a response to the activities related to the Anti-Slavery Movement through a closing reflection by fostering such activities:  Prompt students to use a fresh piece of paper in their journal (lined notebook).  Ask students to respond to the following question: What have we learned about reading and writing today?  Teacher writes responses on a large piece of chart paper and writes the students’ name or initials next to the comment they provided.  Ask students to share what was their most impactful take-away from the text and the other related activities.

U9

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Week 3-4 Suggested Text A Dream Deferred by Langston Hughes Old Settler’s’ Club- Ida McIntosh Dempsey Teacher engages students in exploring the Old Settler’s’ Club - Ida McIntosh Dempsey. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view (may be beneficial for students to have an individual paper copy of the poem). Briefly introduce the poem by giving a generic explanation of what the poem is about. st  1 Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy. nd rd  2 & 3 Read – engage students in reading the poem 2 more times with a partner.  Using 3 pre-determined and posted questions, engage students in a discussion to the build on the main idea of the poem.  What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem?  How do I know?  What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students discuss with a partner their answers to the 3 questions related to the poem.  Students write 1-2 sentences about the poet's main idea on a Post-it note.  Students share their sentences with a nearby small group.  Direct students to put their Post-it responses on their poem or in their Response Notebook. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and define concept of important words related to the primary source by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Project Primary Source – Photo  Explain that these photos were taken during the Anti-Slavery Movement.  Project the images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships. o What do you notice? o What does this photo tell us about ________? o What does that make you think? o Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of terms. Suggested Primary Sources Early Chicago: Old Settlers photo slideshow http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=76,4,3,5#oldsettlers_ss

U10

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, thoughtfully planned introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire text aloud. Suggested Text Chicago History for Kids: Triumphs and Tragedies of the Windy City by Owen Hurd Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the Anchor Text through Map & Timeline Conversations and Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Using the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations, state that the class is going to read the text aloud again, but will first mark on the enlarged timeline when the text took place and the key details related to the event. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Using the posted map, ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the text took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. nd  Restate the purpose for listening to the teacher do a 2 Read-Aloud.  Read-Aloud stopping at key points in the text (and after reading) to ask questions, which are directly tied to the purpose set for reading. Embed teacher think-alouds to model responses to the questions for the students.  Students closely read the text with a partner while annotating key details and identifying the main idea of the text.  Ask students to write 3-4 sentence responses to one of the questions by using a Post-it to capture their response. o What is the author trying to tell you about ________? o What part of the text made you think so? o What happen because of _______? o What is the author trying to tell you about the effects of _______?  Prompt students to turn and share their response with their partner and then post their response on the wall next to the map. Suggested Text Chicago History for Kids: Triumphs and Tragedies of the Windy City by Owen Hurd Teacher engages students in developing a response to the activities related to the Old Settler’s’ Club through a closing reflection by fostering such activities:  Prompt students to use a fresh piece of paper in their journal (lined notebook).  Ask students to respond to the following question: What have we learned about reading and writing today?  Teacher writes responses on a large piece of chart paper and writes the students’ name or initials next to the comment they provided.  Ask students to share what was their most impactful take-away from the text and the other related activities.

U11

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Week 4-5 Ida B. Wells and the Conservator (1 Black Newspaper) st Teacher engages students in exploring Ida B. Wells and the Conservator (1 Black Newspaper). Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view (may be beneficial for students to have an individual paper copy of the poem). Briefly introduce the poem by giving a generic explanation of what the poem is about. st  1 Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy. nd rd  2 & 3 Read – engage students in reading the poem 2 more times with a partner.  Using 3 pre-determined and posted questions, engage students in a discussion to the build on the main idea of the poem. o What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem? o How do I know? o What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students discuss with a partner their answers to the 3 questions related to the poem.  Students write 1-2 sentences about the poet's main idea on a Post-it note.  Students share their sentences with a nearby small group.  Direct students to put their Post-it responses on their poem or in their Response Notebook. Suggested Text History Lesson by Hope Anita Smith Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and define concept of important words related to the primary source by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Project Primary Source – Photo  Explain that these photos were taken during the Anti-Slavery Movement.  Project the images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships.  What do you notice?  What does this photo tell us about ________?  What does that make you think?  Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of terms. Suggested Primary Sources
st

U12

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan

Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, preplanned introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. ”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire book aloud. Suggested Text People and Events Ida B. Wells http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/world/peopleevents/pande04.html Ida B. Wells-Barnett, by Heidi Moore Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the Anchor Text through Map & Timeline Conversations and Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Use the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations, state that the class is going to read the text aloud again, but will first mark on the enlarged timeline when the text took place and the key details related to the event. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Use the posted map; ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the text took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. nd  Restate the purpose for listening to the teacher do a 2 Read-Aloud.  Read-Aloud stopping at key points in the text (and after reading) to ask questions, which are directly tied to the purpose set for reading. Embed teacher think-alouds to model responses to the questions for the students.  Students closely read the text with a partner while annotating key details and identifying the main idea of the text.  Ask students to write 4-5 sentence responses to one of the questions by using a sticky to capture their response. o What is the author trying to tell you about ________? o What part of the text made you think so? o What happen because of _______? o What is the author trying to tell you about the effects of _______?  Prompt students to turn and share their response with their partner and then post their response on the wall next to the map. Suggested Text People and Events Ida B. Wells http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/world/peopleevents/pande04.html Ida B. Wells-Barnett, by Heidi Moore

U13

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Teacher engages students in developing a response to the activities related to Ida B. Wells and the Conservator through a closing reflection by fostering such activities:  Prompt students to use a fresh piece of paper in their journal (lined notebook).  Ask students to respond to the following question: What have we learned about reading and writing today?  Teacher writes responses on a large piece of chart paper and writes the students’ name or initials next to the comment they provided.  Ask students to share what was their most impactful take-away from the text and the other related activities. Week 5 Suggested Text Christ In Alabama by Langston Hughes Ferdinand L. Barnett Teacher engages students in learning about Ferdinand L. Barnett. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view (may be beneficial for students to have an individual paper copy of the poem). Briefly introduce the poem by giving a generic explanation of what the poem is about. st  1 Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy. nd rd  2 & 3 Read – engage students in reading the poem 2 more times with a partner.  Using 3 pre-determined and posted questions, engage students in a discussion to the build on the main idea of the poem. o What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem? o How do I know? o What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students discuss with a partner their answers to the 3 questions related to the poem.  Students write 1-2 sentences about the poet's main idea on a Post-it note.  Students share their sentences with a nearby small group.  Direct students to put their Post-it responses on their poem or in their Response Notebook. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and define concept of important words related to the primary source by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Project Primary Source – Photo  Explain that these photos were taken during the Anti-Slavery Movement.  Project the images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships. o What do you notice?

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
o What does this photo tell us about ________? o What does that make you think? o Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of terms. Suggested Primary Sources

Ferdinand Barnett, Ida B. Wells and Their Family, 1917

Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, thoughtful introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire book aloud. Suggested Text Barnett, Ferdinand Lee (1864?-1932) http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/barnett-ferdinand-lee-1864-1932 Ferdinand L. Barnett Race Unity http://www.blackpast.org/?q=1879-ferdinand-l-barnett-race-unity Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the Anchor Text through Map & Timeline Conversations and Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Using the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations, state that the class is going to read the text aloud again, but will first mark on the enlarged timeline when the text took place and the key details related to the event. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Using the posted map, ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the text took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. nd  Restate the purpose for listening to the teacher do a 2 Read-Aloud.  Read-Aloud stopping at key points in the text (and after reading) to ask questions, which are directly tied to the purpose set for reading. Embed teacher think-alouds to model responses to the questions for the students.  Students closely read the text with a partner while annotating key details and identifying the main idea of the text.  Ask students to write 4-5 sentence responses to one of the questions by using a Post-it to

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
capture their response. o What is the author trying to tell you about ________? o What part of the text made you think so? o What happen because of _______? o What is the author trying to tell you about the effects of _______?  Prompt students to turn and share their response with their partner and then post their response on the wall next to the map. Suggested Text Barnett, Ferdinand Lee (1864?-1932) http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/barnett-ferdinand-lee-1864-1932 Ferdinand L. Barnett Race Unity http://www.blackpast.org/?q=1879-ferdinand-l-barnett-race-unity Teacher engages students in developing a response to the activities related to Ferdinand L. Barnett through a closing reflection by fostering such activities:  Prompt students to use a fresh piece of paper in their journal (lined notebook).  Ask students to respond to the following question: What have we learned about reading and writing today?  Teacher writes responses on a large piece of chart paper and writes the students’ name or initials next to the comment they provided.  Ask students to share what was their most impactful take-away from the text and the other related activities. Week 6 Suggested Text Sonny Liston, Poem by Muhammad Ali Jack Johnson Teacher engages students in exploring the Jack Johnson. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view (may be beneficial for students to have an individual paper copy of the poem). Briefly introduce the poem by giving a basic explanation of what the poem is about. st  1 Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy. nd rd  2 & 3 Read – engage students in reading the poem 2 more times with a partner.  Using 3 pre-determined and posted questions, engage students in a discussion to the build on the main idea of the poem.  What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem?  How do I know?  What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students discuss with a partner their answers to the 3 questions related to the poem.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
 Students write 1-2 sentences about the poet's main idea on a Post-it note.  Students share their sentences with a nearby small group.  Direct students to put their Post-it responses on their poem or in their Response Notebook. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and define concept of important words related to the primary source by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Project Primary Source – Photo  Explain that these photos were taken during the Anti-Slavery Movement.  Project the images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships. o What do you notice? o What does this photo tell us about ________? o What does that make you think? o Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of terms. Suggested Primary Sources

Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, thoughtful introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire book aloud. Suggested Text Jack Johnson.biography http://www.biography.com/print/profile/jack-johnson-9355980 Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the Anchor Text through Map & Timeline Conversations and Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Use the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations, state that the class is going to read the text aloud again, but will first mark on the enlarged timeline when the text took

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
place and the key details related to the event. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Use the posted map; ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the text took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. nd  Restate the purpose for listening to the teacher do a 2 Read-Aloud.  Read-Aloud stopping at key points in the text (and after reading) to ask questions, which are directly tied to the purpose set for reading. Embed teacher think-alouds to model responses to the questions for the students.  Students closely read the text with a partner while annotating key details and identifying the main idea of the text.  Ask students to write 4-5 sentence responses to one of the questions by using a sticky to capture their response. o What is the author trying to tell you about ________? o What part of the text made you think so? o What happen because of _______? o What is the author trying to tell you about the effects of _______?  Prompt students to turn and share their response with their partner and then post their response on the wall next to the map. Suggested Text Jack Johnson biography http://www.biography.com/print/profile/jack-johnson-9355980 Teacher engages students in developing a response to the activities related to Jack Johnson through a closing reflection by fostering such activities:  Prompt students to use a fresh piece of paper in their journal (lined notebook).  Ask students to respond to the following question: What have we learned about reading and writing today?  Teacher writes responses on a large piece of chart paper and writes the students’ name or initials next to the comment they provided.  Ask students to share what was their most impactful take-away from the text and the other related activities.

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