LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan

THEME: Culture, Dignity, and Identity CONCEPT: Africa, Us, and the World - Illinois: The impact of African Americans on the emergence of our state From Jean Baptiste Pointe DuSable to A. Phillip Randolph and Pullman Porters to Barack Obama’s trail to the presidency CONTENT TOPIC: Examining the African American influence on Illinois and in the Midwest through fiction and nonfiction texts. UNIT TITLE: Illinois Today
Unit Topic: Illinois Today Unit Description: This unit focuses on African American contributions in relation to the development of Illinois. In particular, students will examine three influential Illinoisans who have had a significant impact on the advancement of our state and society, specific to the fields of politics, entertainment, and science/technology. In this second quarter unit, students will learn how to read text closely and gather information through research, as they consider how various African Americans have contributed toward the development of Illinois politics, entertainment/arts and science/technology. Through a study of Barack Obama, Katherine Dunham and Mae Jemison, using complex text and biographies of each individual, students will participate in Close Reading exercises, listen to informational texts through Interactive Reading Aloud, generate and answer questions, build vocabulary, and locate information to cite textual evidence as they learn about influential African American Illinoisans. Key Themes: Culture, Dignity & Identity Length: 5 weeks

Enduring Understandings

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Civics is a process to determine who participates in bettering society and for what purposes. Different political systems structure and distribute power in distinct ways. Individual economic choices drive and are driven by a wide variety of factors, and all economic choices have costs. Humans interact with their environments to reflect their needs, interests and values. How do past people, places, ideas, and events affect change? How can readers and writers examine topics to deepen understandings to inform writing? How do culture and identity influence who we are? -How has African American culture influenced who we are as Illinoisans? How do time, culture and history influence works of art, politics, and/or the advancement of science and technology? -How has African American culture, over time and throughout history, influenced art, politics and science/technology? What can I do to positively impact my community? -What African Americans have had significant impact in Illinois?

Essential Questions

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE
Common Core State Standards Primary Secondary

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Primary: Standards Assessed RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. RI.4.3 Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text. W.4.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because). d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. SL.4.1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher- led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly. SL.4.1b Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. SL.4.2 Paraphrase portions of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. Secondary Standards Addressed RI.4.2, RI.4.4, RI.4.7, RI.4.10, W.4.1, W.4.4, W.4.7, W.4.10, SL.4.4

Cognitive Skills

Reading, Writing, and Citing Textual Evidence
Literal and inferential comprehension Synthesizing inferential information Summarizing and sequencing Comparing and contrasting Close reading and analysis Applying qualities of informative/explanatory writing

Content

Building Knowledge through Texts
African American contributions to the development of Illinois Politics:  Barack Obama  Bobby Rush  Carol Moseley Braun Entertainment:  African Dance – Katherine Dunham, Choreographer  African-American Theater  Black Ensemble Theater  Chicago Sinfonietta  People’s Music School

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
 Joel Hall Dancers & Center

Science:  Dr. Mae Jemison  Percy Julian

Assessments (D) Diagnostic (F) Formative (S) Summative

Diagnostic (Pre-Assessment)
*Same as summative assessment essay, with the use of various informational texts on the related topic. Formative Assessments Student Written Response to Reading -Daily Routine Writing -Written Analyses Student annotations and notes Student small and whole group discussion Summative Performance Assessment Task 1: Students will read various texts, researching information on a self-selected African American Illinoisan who has had significant and/or influential impact on politics, the arts or science/technology. As they read, students should gather details and examples from the text to explain what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences, using a 2-column notes page that will aid in their completion of Task 2. Task 2: After Task 1 is complete, students will write an explanatory piece that examines the influence and contributions of a notable African American Illinoisan (related to politics, the arts or science/technology), explaining the significance of their accomplishments by using details and examples from Task 1. Their writing should clearly introduce the individual focused on, and develop their explanation using facts, details and domain-specific/related vocabulary; include linking words or phrases to group relative ideas; and include a concluding section/statement relative to the topic being developed.

Texts/Resources

Suggested Text: Literature/Informational  Pan-African History: Political Figures from Africa and the Diaspora since 1787 by Hakim Adi  The African-American Century: How Black Americans Have Shaped Our Country by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Cornel West  Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to My Daughters by Barack Obama  Alvin Ailey by Andrea Pinkney  Alvin Ailey: Celebrating African-American Culture in Dance by Sandra Cruz  Carol Moseley-Braun: Breaking Barriers by Mellonee Carrigan  Barack Obama, a Biography for Children by Sam Chekwas  Barack Obama: Son of Promise, Child of Hope by Nikki Grime  Black Pioneers of Science and Invention by Louis Haber  Mae Jemison by Sonia Black  Mae Jemison: Out Of This World by Rose Blue

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4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
   Barack Obama By Marlene Targ Jazz Tap: From African Drums to American Feet by Anne E. Johnson African Dance by Kariamu Welsh Asante

Online Resources: Politics – Barack Obama ABC News – Timeline: Barack Obama – Road to the White House http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/fullpage?id=5197404 The Washington Post – Illinois Senate Candidate Barack Obama 2004 Democratic National Convention Keynote Speech Transcript http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A19751-2004Jul27.html C-SPAN Video Library – 2004 Obama Keynote Speech http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/182718-3# Time for Kids – Barack Obama - TFK 2011 Person of the Year Nominee http://www.timeforkids.com/news/barack-obama/21796 Time for Kids – Meet Barack Obama - Here’s the Scoop on the President’s Life http://www.timeforkids.com/news/meet-barack-obama/44386 Biography True Story Video Library – Barack Obama - Mini-biography http://www.biography.com/people/barack-obama-12782369 Biography True Story – Barack Obama http://www.biography.com/people/barack-obama-12782369 ABC News - One Today: Full Text of Richard Blanco Inaugural Poem http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/today-richard-blanco-poem-read-barack-obamainauguration/story?id=18274653 El Milagro Weblog – I Am Hope by Kevin Wiley http://kriley19.wordpress.com/2008/11/10/a-poem-for-barack-obama-upon-the-inaugurationof-america/ Mother Jones – Primary Source: Obama’s Acceptance Speech http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2008/11/primary-sources-obamas-acceptance-speech-fulltext Arts – Katherine Dunham Katherine Dunham Center for the Arts & Humanities – Professional Career Timeline http://kdcah.org/katherine-dunham/ Katherine Dunham Center for the Arts & Humanities – Katherine Dunham Biography (1909-2006) http://kdcah.org/katherine-dunham-biography/ Katherine Dunham Center for the Arts & Humanities – Katherine Dunham Photo Galleries http://kdcah.org/katherine-dunham-photo-galleri Katherine Dunham National Visionary – video clips

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4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
http://www.visionaryproject.org/dunhamkatherine/ Science – Mae C. Jemison Dr. Mae Jemison Interactive Timeline http://www.timetoast.com/timelines/dr-mae-jemison Biography True Story Video Library – Mae C. Jemison - Mini-biography http://www.biography.com/people/mae-c-jemison-9542378 Biography True Story – Mae C. Jemison http://www.biography.com/people/mae-c-jemison-9542378 About Space/Astronomy – Doctor Mae Jemison Pictures Gallery http://space.about.com/od/nasapictures/ig/Mae-Jemison-Pictures-Gallery/FemaleAstronauts.htm

Learning Activities

Unit Kick-off
Engage students in activities to activate and build background knowledge of a specific topic through synthesizing – by identifying the key details from a nonfiction resource, and generating questions about those details that lead to determining the central idea. Observing Closely – Image Carousel Use the Carousel Protocol (see Resource section for link to detailed description), to immerse students in the new content being studied through moving, thinking, talking and writing about images related to African American politics, entertainment and science/technology. This kick-off experience is intended to both activate prior knowledge of the unit content, and to engage/excite students by challenging them to uncover the unit focus through a close observation of several “mystery” images/photographs related to the overall topic.  I Do Display an image related to the unit content, modeling how to notice details in images and texts, which result in questions or wonderings about the content. Think Aloud and model the language/process of noticing a detail (pointing it out, describing it), and what wonderings or questions result from discussing the detail (in the form of a question). Explain to students that they will be closely observing multiple “mystery” images and photos related to the content of the unit being launched – noticing the details and generating questions that arise from them – and predicting the topic of their current unit study/investigation.  We Do Using the same image, engage/direct students by leading them through the same process of identifying (noticing) a detail from the image, and questions (wonderings) this generates or makes them think of using the Think-Pair-Share Strategy. Chart supporting questions:

Differentiated Strategies for Varied Learning Profiles
Step-by-step directions of the Carousel Protocol, and/or icons to represent each of the concepts/steps involved in the activity (think bubbles=notice, question mark=wonder).

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4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
    What do you notice? What details do you see in this image? What does this make you wonder? What question emerges about the topic from that detail?

Give students 30 seconds to observe and Think about the image. Direct students to Pair with another student, and Share what they notice. Invite volunteers to share their partner’s idea, and chart these responses under the “What I notice” section of a class T -chart. Complete the same Think-Pair-Share process for the “What I wonder” section of the T-chart. Repeat to familiarize students with “noticing” and “wondering.”  You Do Together Combine Think-Pair-Share partners to form collaborative groups of 4, assigning them to one of the 6-7 stations around the classroom, which display another image/photograph and “What I Notice/What I Wonder” T-Chart. Direct students to begin the Image Carousel, going through the same process of observing closely, noticing details and generating questions, and charting their responses. Rotate groups every 4-5 minutes, until each group has visited every image.  We Do Close the unit kick-off experience by gathering students together, along with all image T-charts, to debrief the Image Carousel and share their thinking about the unit focus. Invite students to discuss what the unit themes or ideas might be, encouraging them to cite evidence from the T-charts to support their thinking. Gradually, lead students to the Essential Questions of the unit (chart, and refer to throughout unit). End the lesson by reflecting on the collaborative work students engaged in, relating to the class speaking/listening norms, and how their collaboration helped support and propel thinking/learning. The following are examples of images (photographs, primary sources, etc.) that could be used for the “mystery” image instruction and carousel. The image details should relate to the unit content, yet not give it away entirely.

Lincoln’s Presidential Ballot

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4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
African Dance

African American Astronaut

The following learning activities, and sequence of instructional strategies embedded in each “bend” of the unit should be employed in a consistent, logical manner. The Gradual Release of Responsibility lays the foundation for this unit, where students are receiving and engaged in a balance of learning experiences that span across contexts of explicit teaching/modeling, guided instruction, shared/social learning activities and independent practice. Considering the text, readers and task at-hand are essential in determining which learning activities employed, their flow, and how they are delivered. The “Resource” section of this unit provides additional text and non-print resources that can be used to plan for and deliver additional teaching and learning experiences.

Bend 1 – Influential African American Politicians of Illinois
The first bend of this unit focuses students on the most influential African American politician, President Barack Obama, and both traces and celebrates his contributions to our state. Review the unit’s Essential Questions revisiting the image carousel Tcharts, and relevant examples of what student’s noticed and wondered in the images, to generate enthusiasm around their thinking and questions around the unit topic.

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4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Introduce the summative performance assessment, a museum exhibit, as an opportunity to have questions answered and develop new learning of influential African American Illinoisans through visual and written displays that will be created. Share the essay component of the museum exhibit, to explain how their featured African American contributed to the political, art or science development of Illinois. Introduce the unit sequence – three bends, each focusing a whole-class study of an influential Illinoisan who has made significant contributions to politics (Barack Obama), art (Katherine Dunham) and science (Mae C. Jemison). Simultaneously, small group and independent studies of other/additional influential Illinoisans will take place and be the resulting content of the museum exhibit performance assessment. Refocus students to the current lesson, which will launch the research and learning of Barack Obama as a person whose contributions to the political development of Illinois. Share that his legacy has earned his right to be featured in the museum exhibit, and whom the whole-class research will focus on during this first unit bend. Poem Analysis & Discussion I Am Hope by Kevin Wiley Hope. I am. Hope has, even for America’s moment, Brought more than this moment of redemption. Hope. Though I am shackled and thrown upon the swollen deck, Seaborne and riding the stench of slavery to some new world- lost to life. Hope. Though I am asleep in Lincoln’s apocalypse. I am Gettysburg and Manassas and Shiloh. The dead stacked and shoveled into history’s silent pocket. In the atrocities a war wrought, even the birds were lost for song; their throats clutched In witness of humans who could be so calloused and so cruel. All in the name of Freedom. Hope. I am innocence: Emmitt Till and Little Linda Brown and Addie Mae Collins and her three young friends. Hope. I am the blessed martyrs. I am Medgar Evers. I trust Malcolm X with my fury. I marched from Selma to a Birmingham Jail. I ripped away the judge’s hood that silenced Bobby Seale and enjoined the Freedom Riders to endure the flames at Anniston. I heard the chilling voice of Bull Connor and the sting of riot dogs. The fire hose. I saw school buses ignite Roxbury and trigger decades of white flight. And still I stand. Hope…I am the preacher-prophet who foretold that we would reside one day in a promised land. He must be with us now. Though the years have kept his visage young…His eternal voice is crisp as fire As he sings from the mountaintop. This morning I heard the sky rejoice-like the

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4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
deafening wail of 10,000 hurricanes. I am Lazarus. I have redeemed the blood of a beloved brother, gone 40 years. (Bobby’s picture is still among a shrine of holy cards in a little house in San Antonio Where Abuelita says her morning rosary To Cesar Chavez and a wall of popes whose names she cannot pronounce). I am JFK for whom Ireland still weeps. I am redemption for centuries of sorrow; For a word so foul it sticks in civil throats like drying cactus– Thistle and rust, de-capacitating…A poison elixir that not all our years combined can exorcise. I am first Hope. Jackie Robinson and Thurgood Marshall. I am the first black pilot, the first black principal, the first black business owner, and the first pioneer. I am first to serve, first to play, first in science, and first to sail deep into space. And yet I am last. I am Hope. I ride a mighty wave. I stand on shouldered giants, most for whom history has not reserved a name. I am beneficiary of the wishes and the words and the blood of legions. I rise by the toil of Chisholm and Jordon; on the scaffold stairs built by Jackson and Charles Houston and Andrew Young. I am Hope– tempered, with no guarantee. But if ever He loved a people Surely now He has heard our prayers…Whispered through days and years and generations–Through all America’s time To let us be who we must be; To even once know what it means to be ONE nation. Alas…I am only Hope. My arms are thin. I speak as if all of God’s angels have somehow filled my lungs with righteous air. I am your mouth. His voice. Our hands–That the promise of humankind might at last be realized. But I cannot be who YOU will not be… So now my name is nailed above Katrina’s door, Above the Wall Street debacle and the house of cards. My name is nailed to Iraq and Jerusalem, to all ancient Persia–And to the suffering of Darfur. And as I go, so go a hundred nations. Freedom shines, A loud bell tolls the moment. We are astride a wondrous day. History will remember us as giants…Or it will not. Redemption has a name. I am Obama. And mine is a holy song. Briefly introduce poem, stating that it resulted from an open-invitation to be read at Obama’s first inaugural ceremony. Read the poem aloud with fluency and expression, and engage students in a Shared Reading of the poem to encourage the same. Encourage strategic thinking by directing students to ask: 1. What does the author want me to know? 2. How do I know this? 3. What words from the text makes me think this? Chart these discussion prompts and use them to facilitate a whole-

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4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
group discussion and collaborative analysis of the poem. Word Wall Introduce vocabulary from the poem, which will be used during subsequent Close Readings of the text. Share student friendly definitions and post on the unit word wall. martyr – a person who is made to suffer, or treated severely, due to any cause; including race and/or identity redemption – rescued, or set free, from a negative circumstance or experience righteous – acting in a way that is morally right, or justified Wall Timeline Launch the creation of a class timeline that will be used for the duration of the unit, to document the achievements and notable events in Obama’s life that led to his presidency. Engage students in a timeline conversation, identifying the date of th Barack Obama’s inauguration, January 20, 2009, as the 44 President of the United States. Invite students to contribute to the class timeline, from their independent research of African American political, entertainment and science contributions/events from individuals. Writing About Texts – Daily Routine Writing Direct students to respond in their Writing Notebooks to the prompts used during the poem discussion, to capture their ideas and evidence around the central message of the poem. Read Aloud Provide a brief introduction to the text, Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to my Daughters by Barack Obama. Explain that the text is written in the format of a letter, about the traits of individuals who have had a part in making America and how President Obama sees these traits within his own, and all of America’s children. This book celebrates the characteristics that unite all Americans, from our nation’s founders to the generations to come. Set the purpose for reading by directing to listen for/think about the traits and characteristics of people who have had influential and significant impact on society. Discuss vocabulary (see below), relating the positive power of influence to the understanding of both terms, influential and significant. Add terms to unit word wall. Read the entire text aloud, fluently and with expression (for this initial reading, do not stop to discuss the text). Word Wall influential – a person who has the power to impact the opinions, behavior and/or actions of others

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4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
significant – important, or having meaning Quote Analysis and Discussion
"The idea of being part of a community, and helping build that community, was very appealing to me, and very attractive to me," Obama said. "I think that being part of an African-American community was also important to me… what's interesting is how deeply American I feel, considering this exotic background. Some of it is the Midwestern roots of my grandparents, my mother, and the values that they reflect," Obama said. "But some of it is also a deep abiding sense that what is quintessentially American, is all these different threads coming together to make a single quilt. And I feel very much like I'm one of those threads that belong in this quilt — that I'm a product of all of these different forces — black, white, Asian, Hispanic, Native American. That, somehow, all this amalgam is part of who I am, and that's part of the reason I love this country so much." Barack Obama

Briefly introduce quote, stating that it resulted from an interview within an ABC News series titled, Who Is. This series focused on the private lives of presidential candidates. Read the quote aloud with fluency and expression, and engage students in a Shared Reading of the quote to encourage the same. Encourage strategic thinking by directing students to ask: 1. What does the speaker, or person who said these words, want me to know? 2. How do I know this? 3. Which of their words make me think this? Chart these discussion prompts and use them to facilitate a wholegroup discussion and collaborative analysis of the quote.

Writing About Texts – Daily Routine Writing Direct students to respond in their Writing Notebooks to the prompts used during the quote analysis discussion, to capture their ideas and evidence around the central message of the poem and evidence to support their thinking.

Interactive Read-Aloud Restate the original purpose, for the second reading Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to my Daughters. Stop at key points in the text to ask questions related to the purpose. Think Aloud as necessary, to model your thinking and answers to questions for students. After reading, connect the purpose of identifying traits/characteristics of influential and significant people to the read-aloud and the quote. Use the following questions to prompt student thinking/analysis:  What characteristics/traits do influential people possess?  Why are these traits important for building a community?  Does race/ethnicity/color/gender play a role in a person’s potential to impact or be influential?

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
 How are different ethnicities or cultures like the threads in the (America) quilt? Independent Reading, Research & Writing About Texts (Routine &
Analyses)

Set purpose for daily, self-selected independent reading by connecting it to the culminating project of creating a museum exhibit display and written essay about an African American who has had a significant and influential impact on Illinois. Encourage students to choose individuals who represent the same ideals that Barack Obama wrote about, and shared in his interview, as these are the types of individuals to be showcased in the museum exhibit. Direct students to capture evidence within two-column notes from their reading about various African Americans, noting the traits/characteristics of the person, and the events and/or accomplishments that make them notable. After 20 minutes of independent reading, direct students to compose a written response to reading, analyzing how the characteristics/traits of the person their reading focused on, was connected to the significance and/or impact they had on others/society.  What did they accomplish? How? Why?  What impact did it have?  How are the characteristics/traits of the person you were reading about, connected to their accomplishments? Close Reading Introduce close reading as a slow and systematic method for processing complex text, that allows the reader to engage more deeply with the important words, phrases and/or paragraphs in a text that focus on synthesizing, or understanding the author’s message, or main idea, of the text. Explain the essential components involved in close reading – repeated reading of text (or excerpts of text), annotating, thinking about and discussing ideas and/or vocabulary/important words, responding to text-dependent questions (questions that can only be answered by digging in to the words of the text). Read the biography of Barack Obama (biography.com) aloud with fluency and expression, yet without discussion. This can be done with the entire text, or excerpts of text and completed over time. Reread a section of the text, modeling metacognition through thinking aloud, to focus on the words/phrases that help uncover the author’s central message or main idea of the text. Thinking stems to support this may include:  I think this sentence/paragraph is about…  This word/phrase/sentence makes me think that…

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4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
 The author writes….which makes me think… As you read and think aloud, model using the annotation code for noting unknown or confusing words/concepts from the text, by circling the word/s or sentence. Direct students to read another section of text independently, circling confusing/unknown words or ideas with the purpose of uncovering the important/main idea/s the author is trying to communicate through that section. Use students’ annotations to plan subsequent close, repeated readings; crafting text dependent questions to support their thinking and address their noted confusion or misunderstanding. Engage students in this close reading process (within a lesson, and/or over days); asking text dependent questions, facilitating collaborative small/whole group discussion, giving a purpose for rereading and annotating (chart created/standard codes and post); all which are delivered in a sequence that focus on the words and ideas that the author uses to determine the central message/main idea of the text. Shared Reading Engage students in a shared reading of the Time for Kids article, Meet Barack Obama - Here’s the Scoop on the President’s Life. After reading, facilitate a discussion of the events and ideas uncovered through reading, encouraging students to refer to the text to share evidence that examples explicit and/or inferential understanding. Discuss the writing craft employed by the author, and structure of the text, analyzing how this influenced understanding of the text being read. Wall Timeline Engage students in a timeline discussion around important events and/or significant contributions of Barack Obama. Allow volunteers to post these events on the unit timeline. Shared Writing Engage students in composing and constructing a shared writing summary of the article, mimicking the overall structure used by the author. Primary Source Analysis and Discussion Explain a primary source as a document or artifact/object that was created during the time period being studied. Engage students in critically viewing and analyzing the primary source using the following prompts: 1. What do you notice? 2. What does this tell us about (unit content/person of focus)? 3. What does that make you think?

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4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
4. Why do you think that? Project Barack Obama’s first-term presidential acceptance speech, and read aloud with fluency and expression. Facilitate a whole-group discussion, modeling when necessary. This can be done repeatedly, using the same source or various, and within other grouping configurations (partnerships, quads, small-group). After discussing the speech using the prompts above, lead students to discuss the “doubt” Obama suggests in his speech in relation to “what happened” and “why”, and further relate this to the over all African American experience. Writing About Texts – Daily Routine Writing Direct students to respond in their Writing Notebooks to the prompts used during the primary source discussion, to capture their ideas and evidence around the central message of the speech and evidence to support their thinking. Video Analysis and Timeline Discussion Engage students in viewing and analyzing a mini-biography of Barack Obama. Direct students to use a note-taking guide to capture the significant events leading to Obama’s first presidential election. Engage students in discussing these significant events – what happened and why. Add events to the class timeline. Writing About Texts – Written Analysis Review the unit’s essential questions, reminding students of the focus for learning before closing the unit bend with a written explanation and analysis of Barack Obama’s journey to become the first Black President of the United States. Using the collection of texts read and notes taken during the first bend of learning, focused on the accomplishments of Barack Obama, direct students to compose a written explanation of the events leading to the presidential election of Barack Obama, and its significance.

Bend 2 – Influential African American Entertainers of Illinois
The second bend of this unit focuses students on an influential African American entertainer, Katherine Dunham, tracing and celebrating her contributions to dance, choreography, and entertainment within our state. Review the unit’s Essential Questions revisiting the image carousel Tcharts, and relevant examples of what student’s noticed and wondered in the images, to generate enthusiasm around their thinking and questions around the unit topic.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Revisit the summative performance assessment, a museum exhibit, exploring the field of entertainment as an area for students to choose an influential African American for the focus of their study. Brainstorm various sub-types within the field of entertainment, and introduce Katherine Dunham as a famous Illinoisan known for her contributions as dancer, and an African Dance choreographer. Video Analysis & Discussion Briefly introduce the video clip, sharing it as a sample of Katherine Dunham’s famous choreography. Encourage students to watch closely, paying close attention to the details they notice. Engage students in a discussion around how entertainment is considered significant or can have impact, especially as it relates to culture and identity. Read Aloud Provide a brief introduction to the text, African Dance by Kariamu Welsh Asante. Explain that the text is an informational text written about the cultural and philosophical roots of African Dance. Set the purpose for reading by directing to listen for/think about the purposes for, and meaning around African Dance, beside to entertain. Read the text aloud, fluently and with expression (for this initial reading, do not stop to discuss the text). Writing About Texts – Daily Routine Writing Direct students to respond in their Writing Notebooks about the multiple layers of meaning African Dance has on the culture. Interactive Read-Aloud Restate the original purpose, for the second reading of African Dance. Stop at key points in the text to ask questions related to the purpose. Think Aloud as necessary, to model your thinking and answers to questions for students. After reading, connect the purpose of the tradition and implications of African dance. Facilitate a discussion the following questions to prompt student thinking/analysis:  What is African dance used for in the African culture?  Why is African dance important in/to the culture?  What influence has this dance form had on other dance forms and cultures? Quote Analysis and Discussion “I had certain physical limitations that made me change the choreography for myself or made me more interested in choreography only rather than dancing. I have never been a person who wanted to just dance. I have always been interested in developing for other

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
people.” Katherine Dunham Briefly introduce quote from Katherine Dunham in an interview about her contributions as a choreographer. Read the quote aloud with fluency and expression, and engage students in a Shared Reading of the quote to encourage the same. Encourage strategic thinking by directing students to ask: 1. What does the speaker, or person who said these words, want me to know? 2. How do I know this? 3. Which of their words make me think this? Chart these discussion prompts and use them to facilitate a wholegroup discussion and collaborative analysis of the quote. Close Reading Re-introduce close reading as a slow and systematic method for processing complex text, that allows the reader to engage more deeply with the important words, phrases and/or paragraphs in a text that focus on synthesizing, or understanding the author’s message, or main idea, of the text. Read the biography of Katherine Dunham (biography.com) aloud with fluency and expression, yet without discussion. This can be done with the entire text, or excerpts of text and completed over time. Reread a section of the text, modeling metacognition through thinking aloud, to focus on the words/phrases that help uncover the author’s central message or main idea of the text. Thinking stems to support this may include:  I think this sentence/paragraph is about…  This word/phrase/sentence makes me think that…  The author writes….which makes me think… As you read and think aloud, model using the annotation code for noting unknown or confusing words/concepts from the text, by circling the word/s or sentence. Direct students to read another section of text independently, circling confusing/unknown words or ideas with the purpose of uncovering the important/main idea/s the author is trying to communicate through that section. Use students’ annotations to plan subsequent close, repeated readings; crafting text dependent questions to support their thinking and address their noted confusion or misunderstanding. Engage students in this close reading process (within a lesson, and/or over days); asking text dependent questions, facilitating collaborative small/whole group discussion, giving a purpose for rereading and annotating (chart created/standard codes and post); all which are delivered in a sequence that focus on the words and ideas that the

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
author uses to determine the central message/main idea of the text. Wall Timeline Document the achievements and notable events from Katherine Dunham’s life that led to her notoriety. Shared Writing Engage students in composing and constructing a shared writing summary of the text, mimicking the overall structure used by the author. Writing About Texts – Written Analysis Using the collection of texts read and notes taken during the second bend of learning, focused on the accomplishments of Katherine Dunham, direct students to compose a written explanation of the events leading to the success of Katherine Dunham, and her significance.

Bend 3 – Influential African American Scientists of Illinois
The final bend of this unit focuses students on an influential African American scientist, Mae Jemison, tracing and celebrating her contributions to science and space exploration. Review the unit’s Essential Questions revisiting the image carousel Tcharts, and relevant examples of what student’s noticed and wondered in the images, to generate enthusiasm around they’re thinking and questions around the unit topic. Revisit the summative performance assessment, a museum exhibit, exploring the field of science as an area for students to choose an influential African American for the focus of their study. Brainstorm various sub-types within the field of science, and introduce Mae Jemison as a famous Illinoisan known for her contributions to science, as a doctor and scientist. Share Reading and Timeline Discussion Engage students in viewing and analyzing an interactive timeline of the accomplishments of Dr. Mae Jemison. Engage students in a shared reading and discussion of these events, comparing them to the accomplishments of additional influential Illinoisans studied. Engage students in discussing these significant events – what happened and why. Add events to the class timeline. Read Aloud Provide a brief introduction to the text, Mae Jemison: Out Of This World by Rose Blue. Explain that the text is informational, noting the accomplishments of Mae Jemison as the first African American woman

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
to enter space. Set the purpose for reading by directing to listen for/think about the cause/effect relationship of Mae Jemison’s contributions to science. Read the entire text aloud, fluently and with expression (for this initial reading, do not stop to discuss the text). Interactive Read-Aloud Restate the original purpose, for the second reading of Mae Jemison: Out of this World. Stop at key points in the text to ask questions related to the purpose. Think Aloud as necessary, to model your thinking and answers to questions for students. After reading, connect the cause/effect relationship around her accomplishments to the characteristics and traits of Jemison. Facilitate a discussion the following questions to prompt student thinking/analysis:  What choices did Jemison make that led to her contributions to science?  What traits does she possess that contributed?  What influence has she had on science and space exploration? Writing About Texts – Daily Routine Writing Direct students to respond in their Writing Notebooks about the series of events and accomplishments leading to Jemison’s visit to space. Quote Analysis and Discussion “Never be limited by other people's limited imaginations. If you adopt their attitudes, then the possibility won't exist because you'll have already shut it out...You can hear other people's wisdom, but you've got to re-evaluate the world for yourself.” Mae Jemison Briefly introduce quote from Mae Jemison. Read the quote aloud with fluency and expression, and engage students in a Shared Reading of the quote to encourage the same. Encourage strategic thinking by directing students to ask: 4. What does the speaker, or person who said these words, want me to know? 5. How do I know this? 6. Which of their words make me think this? Chart these discussion prompts and use them to facilitate a wholegroup discussion and collaborative analysis of the quote. Writing About Texts – Daily Routine Writing Direct students to respond in their Writing Notebooks to the prompts used during the quote analysis discussion, to capture their ideas and evidence around the central message of the poem and evidence to support their thinking.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Close Reading Introduce close reading as a slow and systematic method for processing complex text, that allows the reader to engage more deeply with the important words, phrases and/or paragraphs in a text that focus on synthesizing, or understanding the author’s message, or main idea, of the text. Read the biography of Mae Jemison aloud with fluency and expression, yet without discussion. This can be done with the entire text, or excerpts of a text and completed over time. Reread a section of the text, modeling metacognition through thinking aloud, to focus on the words/phrases that help uncover the author’s central message or main idea of the text. Thinking stems to support this may include:  I think this sentence/paragraph is about…  This word/phrase/sentence makes me think that…  The author writes….which makes me think… As you read and think aloud, model using the annotation code for noting unknown or confusing words/concepts from the text, by circling the word/s or sentence. Direct students to read another section of text independently, circling confusing/unknown words or ideas with the purpose of uncovering the important/main idea/s the author is trying to communicate through that section. Use students’ annotations to plan subsequent close, repeated readings; crafting text dependent questions to support their thinking and address their noted confusion or misunderstanding. Engage students in this close reading process (within a lesson, and/or over days); asking text dependent questions, facilitating collaborative small/whole group discussion, giving a purpose for rereading and annotating (chart created/standard codes and post); all which are delivered in a sequence that focus on the words and ideas that the author uses to determine the central message/main idea of the text. Writing About Texts – Written Analysis Using the texts read and notes taken during the last bend of learning, focused on the accomplishments of Mae Jemison, direct students to compose a written explanation of the events leading to her contributions to science, and the significance/impact. Unit Close – Museum Exhibit Using the informational essays that students wrote about influential African American Illinoisans in the fields of politics, entertainment or science, allow students to present and display their museum creation.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE
Professional Resources to Support Instructional Methods

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 2 Unit Plan
Close Reading of Informational Texts Assessment-Driven Instruction in Grades 3-8 by Sunday Cummins A Curricular Plan For The Reading Workshop by Lucy Calkins Carousel Protocol http://www.engageny.org/resource/grades-3-5-ela-curriculum-appendix-1-teaching-practicesand-protocols

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