LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

2nd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Launch Lesson

THEME: Culture, Dignity, and Identity
CONCEPT: Lessons from Africa - African and African American Community

The role of community related to African and African American Ideals CONTENT TOPIC: Exploring the concept of community and its impact on African and African American identity and culture through fiction and nonfiction texts UNIT TITLE: Communities Across Chicago Quarter: 3 Week 1 of 5 Day 1 CCSS Standards: RI./RL.2.1 Ask and answer questions (Who, What, When, Where, Why and How) to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. Objective(s): By Asking and answering Materials/Resources: questions of self, others, and texts,  Bronzeville Boys and Girls, by student’s will be able to explain ways in Gwendolyn Brooks which people in different communities  Me on the Map, by Joan share common experiences, and Sweeney explain why diversity should be  Apple Pie 4th of July, by James celebrated. Wong  The Rainbow Stick Boy, Michael Santolini  Two Mrs. Gibbons, Toyomi Igus  How My Parents Learned to Eat, Ina Friedman  Everybody Cooks Rice, Norah Dooley  Everybody Bakes Bread, Norah Dooley  Everybody Brings Noodles, Norah Dooley  Chicago History for Kids: Triumphs and Tragedies of the Windy City, by Owen Hurd
Students will be able to --- with African and African American Studies Connections Students will be able to --- from Literacy and Social Science Planning Guides

Sample Student Outcome Statements

Students will be able to explain ways in which culture and diversity are represented within various communities within Chicago.

Students will be able to understand the events, trends, individuals and movements shaping the history of Chicago and Illinois.

Adapted from Garden Grove Unified School District, Office of Secondary Education Department of 7-12 Instructional Services

L1

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

2nd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Launch Lesson
“I DO IT” Input & Modeling Teacher will state, “Today I am going to model how we can use our ask/answer questions strategy during reading. When we ask and answer questions about a text while we are reading, we can develop a deeper understanding of the material. This strategy also helps us to build reading comprehension. This is an important strategy to use because it helps us monitor our reading and also helps us keep track of what we are learning.” Teacher will continue by stating, “Today we are going to discuss communities. We already know that a community is the area where people live, work, and grow. Communities in Chicago are diverse…this means that in some areas there are many different groups of people living there. You might have people from Russia, Poland, Mexico…living in one community. In other areas there is a specific racial make-up that is specific to one area. For example, there is an area in Chicago called Chinatown (teacher will show area on map). In this area there are many residents mainly from China, Asia, maybe even Vietnam. They speak a language that is specific to them or their culture and maybe have holidays, customs, or traditions that are similar. In Humboldt Park, there are many residents there that speak Spanish as their first language and many families in this community come from places like Mexico, Puerto Rico, or perhaps even the Dominican Republic. I notice that in the community in which our school is located…” (Teacher will discuss cultural make-up of school community.) Teacher will continue, “Today I am going to read a story titled Apple Pie 4th of July. We celebrate the 4th of July here in the United States. I know that celebrations here for the 4th of July are different for each family, but usually include picnics, BBQs and fireworks. This is our national holiday to celebrate America’s independence. In this book we see a young girl who is upset at the thought that her family eats Chinese food on the 4th of July. She comes to realize that it is okay to have a different tradition than other people. Let’s read to learn about these differences in traditions and customs, and learn why it’s important to appreciate differences in others.”

Adapted from Garden Grove Unified School District, Office of Secondary Education Department of 7-12 Instructional Services

L2

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

2nd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Launch Lesson
“WE DO IT” Guided Instruction After reading the book the whole class will be broken up into small groups of two or three students to discuss and write down a tradition that their own family does. Teacher can give the students an example of their own personal family tradition as a starting point as well as refer back to an example in the book. Then come back together as a large group and share family traditions. Teacher will discuss and call to the students’ attention all of the different traditions and customs that are present in their own classroom and remind them that differences in others are interesting and worth learning about. You can post the family traditions in the classroom to remind students of their differences in traditions. Teacher will remind students that good readers ask/answer questions of themselves and the text in order to build understanding. Teacher will review 5 w’s and model asking/answering questions of text from specific page selected. Students will work in pairs to reread specific pages (teacher will assign same to group) and generate two questions to share with small group using ask/answer strategy. Teacher will model think aloud and writing ‘same’ on large chart paper. “YOU DO IT TOGETHER” Collaborative Learning Students will work in pairs to reread specific pages (TW assign pages to reread) and students will generate 2 questions to share with small group using ask/answer strategy. “YOU DO IT ALONE” Independent Practice Students will read (teacher will determine texts to be assigned) The Rainbow Stick Boy Two Mrs. Gibbons Bronzeville Boys and Girls (Several Poems) How My Parents Learned to Eat Everybody Cooks Rice Everybody Bakes Bread Everybody Brings Noodles Students will generate 4 questions using ask/answer questions strategy. Students will also generate a written response to the following question: Do you think that it is important for people to recognize and celebrate differences? Explain.
Adapted from Garden Grove Unified School District, Office of Secondary Education Department of 7-12 Instructional Services

L3

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

2nd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Launch Lesson
“CLOSURE of LESSON” whole group reflection

Teacher will state, “Good readers always analyze stories to look for deeper meaning. This breakdown of the story … specifically asking and answering questions… and deeply looking at the text will help us build understanding and develop deeper meaning. It is also important to remember that people are different. We have different customs and cultural celebrations that are important to us. The color of our skin, the foods that we eat, and the ways in which we celebrate do not dictate who we are and what we can achieve. Today, while reading the various texts, we learned that people are different. It is through these differences that we can learn from each other. We have to be welcoming and accepting of all people, races, and even more important, respectful of each other.” ASSESSMENT
What will you ask? When will you ask during the lesson? What will kids say or do to demonstrate understanding of the objective?

Formative:     Teacher observes students working in groups. Collects anecdotal records. Listens to student discussions in small groups. Analyzes independent student work and written responses.

Adapted from Garden Grove Unified School District, Office of Secondary Education Department of 7-12 Instructional Services

L4