LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan

THEME: Culture, Dignity, and Identity CONCEPT: Africa, Us, and the World - Chicago: African American Influence From DuSable to Obama - The vibrant African American culture in Chicago changes the face of society, art, and culture CONTENT TOPIC: Examining the impact African Americans’ contributions to the culture of Chicago and other global cities through fiction and nonfiction texts UNIT TITLE: Chicago Today-African American Influence on Modern-Day Chicago
Unit Description: This unit will examine the impact of African American’s contribution to the culture of Chicago and other global cities through fiction and nonfiction texts. Students will research African American’s influence in modern-day Chicago (1915-today), describing the relationships between a series of historical events in order to conduct a short research project on a related topic. Key Themes: Individuals, Groups, and Institutions Length: 5 weeks Enduring Understandings    Various social and political issues impact and are impacted by the economy. Culture is a way of life of a group of people who share similar beliefs, values, and customs. All communities have important civic and cultural resources that can enhance, strengthen, and sustain individual and community life.  Readers and writers support their findings with textual evidence.  Readers describe relationships between a series of historical events by using language pertaining to time, sequence and cause/effect.  Writers conduct research projects to build their knowledge about a topic.  How do culture and identity influence who we are?  How do time, culture and history influence works of art and/or the advancement of science and technology?  What can I do to positively impact my community? Primary: Standards Assessed RI.3.3 Describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text, using language that pertains to time, sequence, and cause/effect. RI.3.8 Describe the logical connection between particular sentences and paragraphs in a text (e.g., comparison, cause/effect, first/second/third in a sequence). W.3.7 Conduct short research projects that build knowledge about a topic. W.3.8 Recall information from experiences or gather information from print and digital sources; take brief notes on sources and sort evidence into provided categories. SL.3.2 Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally. SL.3.4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

Essential Questions

Common Core Standards Primary Secondary

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Secondary: Standards Addressed RI.3.1, RI.3.2, RI.3.4, RI.3.5, RI.3.7, RI.3.9, RI.3.10, W.3.2, W.3.4, W.3.5, W.3.10, SL.3.1, SL.3.5

Cognitive Skills

Content

Reading, Writing, and Citing Textual Evidence Literal and inferential comprehension Synthesize inferential information Summarizing and sequencing Comparing and contrasting Close reading and analysis Applying qualities of explanatory/informative writing Building Knowledge through Texts African American Influence in Modern-Day Chicago (1915-today)  Great Migration  Chicago Renaissance o Bronzeville o Richard Wright  Chicago Defender  Gwendolyn Brooks  Dr. Margaret Burroughs (founder of the DuSable Museum of African-American art)  Martin Luther King Jr. in Chicago  NAACP, Rainbow PUSH Coalition o Jesse Jackson  Politicians o Harold Washington o Barack Obama o Toni Preckwinkle Diagnostic (Pre-Assessment) *Same as summative assessment with the use of variation informational texts on the related topic. Formative Assessments Student summaries Student annotations and notes Student small and whole group discussion Summative Performance Assessment Task 1: As they read, students should gather key details from print and digital resources that explicitly relate to the key people and events of modern-day Chicago’s African Americans, using information from within and across texts and resources. Task 2: After task 1 is completed, the students will create and present a visual display using their gathered information from Task 1, which will be accompanied by a written explanation of how subsequent events in history have influenced the notability of their topic focus.

Assessments (D) Diagnostic (F) Formative (S) Summative

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Texts/ Resources

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Suggested Resources Literature/Informational Read Aloud Chicago History for Kids: Triumphs and Tragedies of the Windy City by Owen Hurd Bronzeville Boys and Girls by Gwendolyn Brooks The Great Migration: Journey to the North by Eloise Greenfield and Jan Spivey Gilchrist The Great Migration: An American Story by Jacob Lawrence Harold!: Photographs from the Harold Washington Years by Salim Muwakkil (Author), Ron Dorfman (Editor), Antonio Dickey (Photographer), and Marc PoKempner (photographer) Barack Obama, A Biography for Children by Sam Chekwas Barack Obama: Son of Promise, Child of Hope by Nikki Grime Let’s Go to Chicago by Karen Dean Barack Obama, by Robin Doak Jesse Jackson, by Charmon Simon Bronzeville Boys and Girls by Chicago Poet Gwendolyn Brooks Bronzeville: Black Chicago in Pictures, 1941-1943 by Maren Stange, International Center of Photography Poems “Times Is Gettin Harder”: Blues of the Great Migration www.historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5333/ “One Wants a Teller In Time Like This” by Gwendolyn Brooks http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/one-wants-a-teller-in-a-time-like-this/ Haikus by Richard Wright http://krisl.hubpages.com/hub/Haiku-by-Richard-Wright-An-Unknown-Treasure-of-Black-Poetry Thomas Miller Mosaics http://www.dusablemuseum.org/exhibits/details/thomas-miller-mosaics “Standing Tall” by Jamie McKenzie http://fno.org/poetry/standing.html “Pop” by Barack Obama Primary Sources http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/african/afam011.html http://discoverblackheritage.com/the-great-northern-migration-chicago-il/ http://blackpast.org/?q=aah/chicago-defender-1905 Slideshow and Essay: "From Riots to Renaissance: The Black Renaissance" [DuSable to Obama: Chicago's Black Metropolis, WTTW 11, Chicago, IL] www.govst.edu http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/politics/chi-chicagodays-martinlutherkingstory,0,4515753.story http://www.wbez.org/story/garys-national-black-political-convention-40-years-97111 Community Resources Lorenzo Young Master Storyteller – Under the Oak Tree Productions  Storytelling and tours of historic Bronzeville

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Online Resources http://www.chicagohistoryfair.org/for-teachers/curriculum/black-chicagorenaissance.html#lesson%20plans http://school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonplans/programs/tpl-sweethomechicago/ http://dcc.newberry.org/collections/chicago-and-the-great-migration http://discoverblackheritage.com/the-great-northern-migration-chicago-il/ http://www.inmotionaame.org/migrations/topic.cfm?migration=8&topic=2&tab=image http://blackpast.org/?q=aah/chicago-defender-1905 http://www.chicagohistoryfair.org/for-teachers/curriculum/black-chicagorenaissance.html#lesson%20plans http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/171.html http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/brooks/life.htm http://www.dusablemuseum.org/about/history http://www.peoplesworld.org/dr-margaret-burroughs-1917-2010-what-will-your-legacy-be/ http://galleries.apps.chicagotribune.com/chi-120116-rev-martin-luther-king-jr-chicago-historicpictures/ http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/index.php/encyclopedia/encyclopedia/enc_chicago_campaign/ http://rainbowpush.org/pages/brief_history http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/washington-harold-1922-1987 http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/17/toni-preckwinkle-cps-schoolclosings_n_3293104.html http://www.thehistorymakers.com/biography/toni-preckwinkle-5 http://www.biography.com/people/barack-obama-12782369 http://www.theroot.com/views/chicago-power http://www.chicagohistory.org/education/resources/hands/great-migration (Chicago History Museum) http://greatchicagostories.com/bronzeville/index.php (Chicago History Museum) http://www.chicagohistoryfair.org/images/stories/pdfs/art%20migration%20and%20identity.pdf (Chicago Metro History Education Center) http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=76,3 (WTTW) http://www.biography.com/people/jesse-jackson-9351181/videos (Biography.Com) http://www.biography.com/people/barack-obama-12782369 (Biography.Com) http://www.naacphistory.org/naacp/ (NAACP) http://peoplesworld.org/the-chicago-freedom-movement-summer-1966/ (People’s World) Chicago History Museum: Great Chicago Stories: www.GreatChicagoStories.org Center for Chicago Education: Chicago--A History of Choices and Changes http://teacher.depaul.edu/Chicago_3rdGrade_Oct2009_Edition/Part%201_Chicago-

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
A%20History%20of%20Choices%20and%20Changes.pdf http://burnhamplan.100.lib.uchicago.edu Film DuSable to Obama: Chicago’s Black Metropolis http://video.wttw.com/video/1522918184/ (PBS)

Learning Activities

Unit Kick-Off (Introduction of Map & Timeline Conversations) Teacher sets the context for Timeline and Map Conversations by introducing students to the Timeline that will collect and sequence the key events in which they occur and where they were located, to identify the main idea of how African Americans have influenced Chicago from 1915 to the present. Teacher introduces students to the content they will be immersed in throughout this unit in a chronological order to identify the main idea of how African Americans influenced early Chicago by fostering such learning activities:  Students watch DuSable to Obama: Chicago's Black Metropolis (http://video.wttw.com/video/1522918184/) to frontload the course of events that occurred during the time period of early Chicago and the influence made by key African Americans. *Teacher starts video at events starting in 1915.  Students will gather key details related to the different key people and events and where and when they occurred by capturing them on their personal timelines.  Students will work with partners to discuss their findings and cross check events and people they may have missed.  Students groups share out during a whole class discussion as teacher captures their responses on Post-it notes. Teacher introduces students to the method of plotting key events on a timeline for the purpose of understanding the significance of the sequential order events occur by fostering such learning activities:  Using butcher paper, prepared and posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations, state that when researching African American influences on Chicago from 1915 to the present. The class will mark the timeline with a date and key details of the events that occurred in chronological (date) order.  Students will work as a group to plot the temporary Post-its, from the above activity, on the timeline. These will be cross checked, modified, added-to and permanently written on the timeline throughout the unit.  Students turn and discuss with a partner the importance of the timeline to

Strategies for Varied Learner Profiles  Have the copies of the articles printed out for all students.  Read aloud the articles first so that lower-level readers have access to it.  Pair higher reading level students with lower reading level students to further support access to the articles.  Allow students to illustrate ideas.  Record the articles onto a tape so that students can reread the article a second time while you are

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3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
their learning of the related content.  Students capture, in writing, what they believe the importance of a timeline is to their learning in their response notebook, using ideas they discussed with their partner.  Students cross check their personal timelines with the class time line to include anything they may have missed. Suggested Text Timeline of the Black Chicago Renaissance from 1932 to 1955 http://school.discoveryeducation.com/lessonplans/programs/tplsweethomechicago/ reading it aloud (via the tape).

Teacher introduces students to the method of identifying where key events occurred for the purpose of understanding the significance of where different events took place and their relationship to each other by fostering such learning activities:  Using a posted map, state that during the research they are conducting of African American influences on Chicago between 1915 to the present. The class will place markers on the many places that key events take place during this time period to build an understanding of the locations significance and the relationship amongst different locations.  Students will work as a group to plot the temporary Post-its, from the above activity, on the map. These will be cross checked, modified, addedto and parentally marked on the map throughout the unit.  Students to turn and discuss with a partner the importance of the map to their learning of the related topic.  Students capture, in writing, what they believe the importance of a timeline is to their learning in their response notebook, using ideas they discussed with their partner. Great Migration Teacher engages students in exploring the Great Migration. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view. Provide students with their own copy of the poem to glue into their Response Notebooks.  Briefly introduce the poem by giving a generic explanation of what the poem is about.  1st Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 2nd & 3rd Read – engage students in reading the poem twice with a partner.  Using 3 determined and posted questions, engage students in writing 1-2 sentences about the poet’s main idea on a sticky note. o What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem? o How do I know? o What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students share their sentences with any nearby small group.  Students place their sticky notes into their Response Notebooks on the same page where they glued in their poem. Suggested Text “Times Is Gettin’ Harder”: Blues of the Great Migration www.historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5333/ Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Project Primary Sources – Photos  Introduce and define concept of selected key words by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Explain that these photos were taken during the Great Migration and that these are Primary Sources.  Project images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships.  What do you notice?  What does this photo tell us about ________?  What does that make you think?  Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of selected terms.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Suggested Primary Sources

http://discoverblackheritage.com/the-great-northern-migration-chicago-il/ Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain the concept of Close Reading. “Today I want to share an important way to help you understand what you read in a deeper way. It is called Close Reading. Close Reading is when we read a passage closely and it allows us to systematically determine the most important words in a sentence or a paragraph, what the author wants us to remember. If we know what is important to remember, then we can synthesize or understand the author’s main idea. When we read closely, we read carefully and slowly. If we need to, we reread sections of the text. In short text, we may reread the whole text. We stop and think and sometimes we write notes about our thinking when we read closely. When we are done, we feel we have a real understanding of what the author is trying to tell us. Let’s try to do this together with chunks of our text.”  Project an excerpt to model Close Reading on the first chunk of text.  Teacher thinks-aloud as she goes through the process of closely reading the text. “I need to remind myself that I’m reading closely to figure out what the author’s main idea is and to determine which words and phrases are important to remember when I think about the author’s main idea.  Teacher reads aloud the whole first section. “Now I’m thinking this paragraph is about _____, a word we talked about earlier and the author is describing ______.” “What word or phrases make me think that? Let me reread the first sentence.”  Teacher underlines the word or phrase that made them think that. “Let me reread the next sentence.”  Teacher underlines important words or phrases, related to their thinking. “I think these words describe ______ and the author wants me to know that _____. I am going to even write the word ______ in the margins.”  Teacher writes the word _____ in the margin. “So what was the author’s main idea? I need to summarize what I learned to really think about this. Before I summarize, I need to reread the phrases I

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3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
underlined.  Teacher pauses to reread the underlined phrases. “So if I want to summarize what’s important in this paragraph, I would try to use all of these phrases. I would say that the author wants me to know that ______.  As the teacher summarizes using key words and phrases, the teacher points at the phrases from the text being used.  Teacher models writing the summary on chart paper while thinking aloud. Suggested Text: The Great Migration Overview http://www.inmotionaame.org/migrations/topic.cfm?migration=8&topic=1 Teacher engages students in Close Reading through actively engaging them in a shared Close Read and summary writing using the 2nd chunk of the text during teacher modeling by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher Continues to model reading aloud and rereading to determine what is important; if the students are ready, teacher asks them to help you pick out important words and phrases to underline as the teacher thinks aloud.  Teacher prompts students to share sentences, using the key words and phrases to write a summary of the paragraph as a class. Suggested Text: The Great Migration Overview http://www.inmotionaame.org/migrations/topic.cfm?migration=8&topic=1 Teacher engages students in collaborative learning prompting them to work with their partners to closely read the last chunk of the text by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher sets the purpose for reading the last chunk by reviewing the definition of Close Reading.  Teacher reminds students of the context of the text, of how it is an overview and does not go into detail, but they will read more in depth about the Great Migration closely during independent reading.  Students work with their partners to closely read the text, annotate for key words and phrases, and discuss to then write a summary of the paragraph.  Teacher facilitates a discussion by prompting students to synthesize the author’s main idea of each paragraph to determine the main ideas of the text.  Suggested Text: The Great Migration Overview http://www.inmotionaame.org/migrations/topic.cfm?migration=8&topic=1 Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the read texts through Map & Timeline

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3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Conversations by fostering such learning activities:  Using the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations and to mark on the enlarged timeline the key details related to the events. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Using the posted map, ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the events took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. Teacher engages students in independently diving deeper into the details of the Great Migration through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher provides students with two different articles related to the Great Migration for student to choose one to read independently.  Students choose an article, closely read the text, and construct a summary of each paragraph.  Students use their summaries to construct a summary of the author’s main ideas of the text in their Response Notebooks. Suggested Texts: Teacher selected short articles from: http://www.inmotionaame.org/migrations/topic.cfm?migration=8&topic=2 &tab=image Chicago and the Great Migration, 1915-1950 http://dcc.newberry.org/collections/chicago-and-the-great-migration

Teacher engages students in developing a response to the activities related to the Great Migration through a closing reflection by fostering such activities:  Prompt students to use a fresh piece of paper in their journal (lined notebook).  Ask students to respond to the following question: What have we learned about reading and writing today?  Teacher writes responses on a large piece of chart paper and writes the students’ name or initials next to the comment they provided.  Ask students to share what their most impactful take-away from the text and relating activities. Chicago Renaissance Teacher engages students in exploring the Chicago Renaissance. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view. Provide students with their own copy of the poem to glue into their Response Notebooks.  Briefly introduce the poem by giving a generic explanation of what the poem is about.  1st Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy.  2nd & 3rd Read – engage students in reading the poem twice with a partner.  Using 3 predetermined and posted questions, engage students in writing 12 sentences about the poet’s main idea on a Post it. o What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem? o How do I know? o What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students share their sentences with any nearby small group.  Students place their Post-its into their Response Notebooks on the same page where they glued in their poem.  Suggested Text Haiku by Richard Wright: Their watching faces, as I walk the autumn road make me a traveler http://krisl.hubpages.com/hub/Haiku-by-Richard-Wright-An-UnknownTreasure-of-Black-Poetry Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Project Primary Sources – Photos  Introduce and define concept of selected key words by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Explain that these photos were taken during the time of the Chicago Renaissance.  Project images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships.  What do you notice?  What does this photo tell us about ________?  What does that make you think?  Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.

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3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of selected terms. Suggested Primary Sources: Slideshow and Essay: "From Riots to Renaissance: The Black Renaissance" [DuSable to Obama: Chicago's Black Metropolis, WTTW 11, Chicago, IL] http://www.wttw.com/main.taf?p=76,4,4,11 Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, thoughtfully planned introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire text aloud. Suggested Text: Black Chicago Renaissance http://www.chicagohistoryfair.org/for-teachers/curriculum/black-chicagorenaissance.html#lesson%20plans Teacher engages students in collaborative learning prompting them to work with their partners to closely read the text by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher sets the purpose for reading by reviewing the definition of Close Reading.  Teacher reminds students of the context of the text, of how it is an overview and does not go into detail, but they will read more in depth about the Chicago Renaissance closely during independent reading.  Students work with their partners to closely read the text, annotate for key words and phrases, and discuss the main ideas of the text. Students should be prompted to jot notes or summarize in their Response Notebooks  Teacher facilitates a discussion by prompting students to synthesize the author’s main idea of each paragraph to determine the main ideas of the text. Suggested Text: Black Chicago Renaissance http://www.chicagohistoryfair.org/for-teachers/curriculum/black-chicagorenaissance.html#lesson%20plans Teacher engages students in writing a 5-sentence paragraph through shared writing by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher prompts students to refer to their notes from the Close Reading they did with their partner.  Teacher engages students in a shared writing, teacher thinks aloud and

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3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
prompts students to think about what they are doing as writers, using the possible guiding questions: o How do we want to start our response? o What can we write as evidence to support our point? o Why is that evidence? o How can we close our response? *Other prompts that may be used during shared writing: o What happened in the text that makes us think that? o What evidence is there in the text to support our point? o What is another piece of evidence in the text to support our point? o How can we say that in our own words? Teacher engages students in independently diving deeper into the details of the Chicago Renaissance and through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher provides students with a different article related to the Chicago Renaissance for student to choose one to read independently.  Students closely read the text, annotating by underlining and making notes in the margins. Suggested Texts: Bronzeville http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/171.html Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the read texts through Map & Timeline Conversations by fostering such learning activities:  Using the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations and to mark on the enlarged timeline the key details related to the events. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Using the posted map, ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the events took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Teacher facilitates a discussion focusing on the following prompt: o What relationships do we notice between the events on the timeline and map have influenced Chicago’s past and present?  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. Teacher engages students in an independent writing activity by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher prompts students to share the key words and phrases or summarized key points.  Teacher writes bulleted points as students share.  Students use the shared bulleted points to construct and independent

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3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
response.  Teacher confers with students as they write, using the possible following prompts: o What are you thinking about writing next? o Tell me more. o What happened in the book that makes you think that? o How do you want to end your response?  Teacher closes by asking students to share their writing in small groups.  Teacher ends with a conversation about what they did as writers to support the point of their writing relating to the Chicago Renaissance. Chicago Defender and Gwendolyn Brooks Teacher engages students in exploring the Chicago Defender and Gwendolyn Brooks. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view. Provide students with their own copy of the poem to glue into their Response Notebooks.  Briefly introduce the poem by giving a generic explanation of what the poem is about.  1st Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy.  2nd & 3rd Read – engage students in reading the poem twice with a partner.  Using 3 predetermined and posted questions, engage students in writing 12 sentences about the poet’s main idea on a Post it. o What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem? o How do I know? o What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students share their sentences with any nearby small group.  Students place their Post its into their Response Notebooks on the same page where they glued in their poem.  Suggested Text: “One Wants a Teller In Time Like This” by Gwendolyn Brooks Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Project Primary Sources – Photos

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 Introduce and define concept of selected key words by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Explain that these photos were taken during the time, which Gwendolyn Brooks worked with the Chicago Defender, a newspaper in Chicago.  Project images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships.  What do you notice?  What does this photo tell us about ________?  What does that make you think?  Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of selected terms. Suggested Primary Sources:

http://blackpast.org/?q=aah/chicago-defender-1905 Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, thoughtfully planned introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire text aloud. Suggested Text: The Chicago Defender (1905- ) http://blackpast.org/?q=aah/chicago-defender-1905 Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 Teacher engages students in collaborative learning prompting them to work with their partners to closely read the text for a second time.  Teacher sets the purpose for reading by reviewing the definition of Close Reading.  Teacher reminds students of the context of the text, of how it is an overview and does not go into detail, but they will read more in depth about The Chicago Defender closely during independent reading.  Students work with their partners to closely read the text, annotate for key words and phrases, and discuss the main ideas of the text. Students should be prompted to jot notes or summarize in their Response Notebooks  Teacher facilitates a discussion by prompting students to synthesize the author’s main idea of each paragraph to determine the main ideas of the text. Suggested Text: The Chicago Defender (1905- ) http://blackpast.org/?q=aah/chicago-defender-1905 Teacher engages students in independently diving deeper into the details of the Chicago Renaissance and through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher provides students with a different article related to the Chicago Renaissance for student to choose one to read independently.  Students closely read the text, annotating by underlining and making notes in the margins. Suggested Texts: Brooks’ Life and Career http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/poets/a_f/brooks/life.htm Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the read texts through Map & Timeline Conversations by fostering such learning activities:  Using the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations and to mark on the enlarged timeline the key details related to the events. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Using the posted map, ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the events took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Teacher facilitates a discussion focusing on the following prompt: o What relationships do we notice between the events on the timeline and map have influenced Chicago’s past and present?  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. Teacher engages students in an independent writing activity by fostering such learning activities:

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 Teacher prompts students to share the key words and phrases or summarized key points.  Teacher writes bulleted points as students share.  Students use the shared bulleted points to construct and independent response.  Teacher confers with students as they write, using the possible following prompts: o What are you thinking about writing next? o Tell me more. o What happened in the book that makes you think that? o How do you want to end your response?  Teacher closes by asking students to share their writing in small groups.  Teacher ends with a conversation about what they did as writers to support the point of their writing relating to The Chicago Defender.

Dr. Margaret Burroughs - Founder of the DuSable Museum of African American Art Teacher engages students in exploring Dr. Margaret Burroughs, founder of the DuSable Museum of African American Art Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes and determining what is important through art work by fostering such learning activities:  Project a piece of African American Art from the DuSable Museum large enough so all students can view.  Briefly introduce the piece of art by giving a generic explanation of what the piece is about.  1st Read – Teacher closely views the piece of art, while thinking aloud what they notice.  2nd Read – Teacher engages students in closely viewing the piece of art and prompts discussion amongst partners.  Using 3 predetermined and posted questions, engage students in writing 12 sentences about the piece of art’s main idea on a sticky note. o What is the artist trying to say to me in this picture? o How do I know? o What are the details in the picture that make me think so?  Students share their sentences with any nearby small group.  Students place their sticky notes into their Response Notebooks.  Suggested Piece Of Art:

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan

445 × 685 - dusablemuseum.org Thomas Miller Mosaics - DuSable Museum of African American History http://www.dusablemuseum.org/exhibits/details/thomas-miller-mosaics Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Project Primary Sources – Photos  Introduce and define concept of selected key words by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Explain that these photos were taken during the time when Dr. Margaret Burroughs was establishing the DuSable Museum  Project images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships.  What do you notice?  What does this photo tell us about ________?  What does that make you think?  Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of selected terms.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Suggested Primary Sources:

www.govst.edu Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, thoughtfully planned introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire text aloud. Suggested Text: Museum History http://www.dusablemuseum.org/about/history Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher engages students in collaborative learning prompting them to work with their partners to closely read the text for a second time.  Teacher sets the purpose for reading by reviewing the definition of Close Reading.  Teacher reminds students of the context of the text, of how it is an overview and does not go into detail, but they will read more in depth about Margaret Burroughs closely during independent reading.  Students work with their partners to closely read the text, annotate for key words and phrases, and discuss the main ideas of the text. Students should be prompted to jot notes or summarize in their Response Notebooks  Teacher facilitates a discussion by prompting students to synthesize the author’s main idea of each paragraph to determine the main ideas of the text. Suggested Text: Museum History http://www.dusablemuseum.org/about/history

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Teacher engages students in independently diving deeper into the details of Dr. Margaret Burroughs through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher provides students with a different article related to the Dr. Margaret Burroughs for student to choose one to read independently.  Students closely read the text, annotating by underlining and making notes in the margins. Suggested Texts: Dr. Margaret Burroughs, 1917-2010: What Will Your Legacy Be? http://www.peoplesworld.org/dr-margaret-burroughs-1917-2010-what-willyour-legacy-be/ Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the read texts through Map & Timeline Conversations by fostering such learning activities:  Using the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations and to mark on the enlarged timeline the key details related to the events. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Using the posted map, ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the events took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Teacher facilitates a discussion focusing on the following prompt: o What relationships do we notice between the events on the timeline and map have influenced Chicago’s past and present?  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. Teacher engages students in an independent writing activity by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher prompts students to share the key words and phrases or summarized key points.  Teacher writes bulleted points as students share.  Students use the shared bulleted points to construct and independent response.  Teacher confers with students as they write, using the possible following prompts: o What are you thinking about writing next? o Tell me more. o What happened in the book that makes you think that? o How do you want to end your response?  Teacher closes by asking students to share their writing in small groups.  Teacher ends with a conversation about what they did as writers to support the point of their writing relating to Dr. Margaret Burroughs and the DuSable African Art Museum.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Martin Luther King Jr. in Chicago Teacher engages students in exploring Martin Luther King Jr. in Chicago. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view. Provide students with their own copy of the poem to glue into their Response Notebooks.  Briefly introduce the poem by giving a generic explanation of what the poem is about.  1st Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy.  2nd & 3rd Read – engage students in reading the poem twice with a partner.  Using 3 predetermined and posted questions, engage students in writing 12 sentences about the poet’s main idea on a Post it. o What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem? o How do I know? o What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students share their sentences with any nearby small group.  Students place their Post-its into their Response Notebooks on the same page where they glued in their poem.  Suggested Text: Standing Tall by Jamie McKenzie http://fno.org/poetry/standing.html Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Project Primary Sources – Photos  Introduce and define concept of selected key words by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Explain that these photos were taken during the time when Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was alive.  Project images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships.  What do you notice?  What does this photo tell us about ________?  What does that make you think?  Why?

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
*Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of selected terms. Suggested Primary Sources:

Martin Luther King's stay in Chicago resulted in an agreement by local real-estate agents to abide by the city's fair-housing ordinance in exchange for an end to protest marches. King is shown in November 1966, reviewing a copy of the ordinance with a West Side real-estate agent. (Tribune photo by Jack Mulcahy) Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, thoughtfully planned introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire text aloud. Suggested Text: Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Chicago Virtual photo tour with captions http://galleries.apps.chicagotribune.com/chi-120116-rev-martin-luther-kingjr-chicago-historic-pictures/ Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities: *Students need access to the internet for this activity. If that is not available then teacher may select a different text for above read-aloud and the following activities.  Teacher engages students in collaborative learning prompting them to work with their partners to closely read the text for a second time.  Teacher sets the purpose for reading by reviewing the definition of Close Reading.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 Teacher reminds students of the context of the text, of how it is an overview and does not go into detail, but they will read more in depth about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Chicago closely during independent reading.  Students work with their partners to closely read the text, annotate for key words and phrases, and discuss the main ideas of the text. Students should be prompted to jot notes or summarize in their Response Notebooks  Teacher facilitates a discussion by prompting students to synthesize the author’s main idea of each caption or paragraph to determine the main ideas of the text. Suggested Text: Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Chicago Virtual photo tour with captions http://galleries.apps.chicagotribune.com/chi-120116-rev-martin-luther-kingjr-chicago-historic-pictures/ Teacher engages students in independently diving deeper into the details of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Chicago through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher provides students with a different article related to Martin Luther King Jr. and Chicago for student to choose one to read independently.  Students closely read the text, annotating by underlining and making notes in the margins. Suggested Texts: Chicago Campaign (1966) http://mlkkpp01.stanford.edu/index.php/encyclopedia/encyclopedia/enc_chicago_ca mpaign/ Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the read texts through Map & Timeline Conversations by fostering such learning activities:  Using the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations and to mark on the enlarged timeline the key details related to the events. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Using the posted map, ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the events took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Teacher facilitates a discussion focusing on the following prompt: o What relationships do we notice between the events on the timeline and map have influenced Chicago’s past and present?  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. Teacher engages students in an independent writing activity by fostering

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
such learning activities:  Teacher prompts students to share the key words and phrases or summarized key points.  Teacher writes bulleted points as students share.  Students use the shared bulleted points to construct and independent response.  Teacher confers with students as they write, using the possible following prompts: o What are you thinking about writing next? o Tell me more. o What happened in the book that makes you think that? o How do you want to end your response?  Teacher closes by asking students to share their writing in small groups.  Teacher ends with a conversation about what they did as writers to support the point of their writing relating to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Chicago.

NAACP, Rainbow PUSH Coalition (Jesse Jackson) Teacher engages students in exploring NAACP, Rainbow PUSH Coalition. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Project Primary Sources – Photos  Introduce and define concept of selected key words by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions:  Project images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships.  What do you notice?  What does this photo tell us about ________?  What does that make you think?  Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.  Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of selected terms. Suggested Primary Sources:

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan

Google images Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, thoughtfully planned introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire text aloud. Suggested Text: Jesse Jackson, by Charmon Simon Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher engages students in collaborative learning prompting them to work with their partners to closely read the text for a second time.  Teacher sets the purpose for reading by reviewing the definition of Close Reading.  Teacher reminds students of the context of the text, of how it is an overview and does not go into detail, but they will read more in depth and closely during independent reading.  Students work with their partners to closely read the text, annotate for key words and phrases, and discuss the main ideas of the text. Students should be prompted to jot notes or summarize in their Response Notebooks  Teacher facilitates a discussion by prompting students to synthesize the author’s main idea of each paragraph to determine the main ideas of the text. Suggested Text: Jesse Jackson, by Charmon Simon Teacher engages students in independently diving deeper into the details of Dr. Margaret Burroughs and through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 Teacher provides students with a different article related to the NAACP, Rainbow PUSH Coalition for student to choose one to read independently.  Students closely read the text, annotating by underlining and making notes in the margins. Suggested Texts: A Brief Description http://rainbowpush.org/pages/brief_history Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the read texts through Map & Timeline Conversations by fostering such learning activities:  Using the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations and to mark on the enlarged timeline the key details related to the events. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Using the posted map, ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the events took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Teacher facilitates a discussion focusing on the following prompt: o What relationships do we notice between the events on the timeline and map have influenced Chicago’s past and present?  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. Teacher engages students in an independent writing activity by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher prompts students to share the key words and phrases or summarized key points.  Teacher writes bulleted points as students share.  Students use the shared bulleted points to construct and independent response.  Teacher confers with students as they write, using the possible following prompts: o What are you thinking about writing next? o Tell me more. o What happened in the book that makes you think that? o How do you want to end your response?  Teacher closes by asking students to share their writing in small groups.  Teacher ends with a conversation about what they did as writers to support the point of their writing relating to NAACP, Rainbow PUSH Coalition. Politicians (Harold Washington, Barack Obama, and Toni Preckwinkle) Teacher engages students in exploring politicians: Harold Washington,

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Barack Obama, and Toni Preckwinkle. Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and increasing fluency through poetry by fostering such learning activities:  Introduce and explain unfamiliar vocabulary and language usage.  Project the poem large enough so all students can view. Provide students with their own copy of the poem to glue into their Response Notebooks.  Briefly introduce the poem by giving a generic explanation of what the poem is about.  1st Read - read the poem aloud with expression and without stopping, while students follow along either with the projected or individual copy.  2nd & 3rd Read – engage students in reading the poem twice with a partner.  Using 3 predetermined and posted questions, engage students in writing 12 sentences about the poet’s main idea on a Post it. o What is the poet trying to say to me in this poem? o How do I know? o What are the words in the text that make me think so? *Tip – Remind students to be strategic in understanding the poem. You may say, “One way to try to understand a poem well is to think about what the author wants us to know or understand. We might ask ourselves questions as we read (pointing to questions posted in the room on chart paper).  Students share their sentences with any nearby small group.  Students place their Post its into their Response Notebooks on the same page where they glued in their poem.  Suggested Text: Pop by Barack Obama Teacher engages students in recognizing and orally articulating themes, determining what is important, and sharing orally through primary sources by fostering such learning activities:  Project Primary Sources – Photos  Introduce and define concept of selected key words by writing the word(s) on the board or on a piece of chart paper.  Explain student-friendly definitions.  Explain that these photos were taken of African American politicians whom have influenced Chicago.  Project images, using 4 questions to prompt discussions amongst partnerships.  What do you notice?  What does this photo tell us about ________?  What does that make you think?  Why? *Tip - Give students plenty of wait time, but the teacher may want to model her own thinking if students struggle to respond.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 Close the activities by summarizing the thoughts the students shared and restating definitions of selected terms. Suggested Primary Sources:

(Gene Pesek/Chicago Sun-Times) Rev. Jesse Jackson Sr. marches into the National Black Political Convention in Gary, Ind. in 1972. http://www.wbez.org/story/garys-national-black-political-convention-40years-97111 Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through an Interactive Read-Aloud of the Anchor Text by fostering such learning activities:  Give a brief, thoughtfully planned introduction to the Read-Aloud text.  Set the purpose for reading by stating what students are to focus on while engaging in the Interactive Read-Aloud. *”While I’m reading, I want you to think about…”  Read the entire text aloud. Suggested Text: Barack Obama, A Biography for Children by Sam Chekwas Teacher engages students in recognizing and articulating themes orally, determining what is important, increasing fluency, and using tier 2 words through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher engages students in collaborative learning prompting them to work with their partners to closely read the text.  Teacher sets the purpose for reading by reviewing the definition of Close Reading.  Teacher reminds students of the context of the text, of how it is an overview and does not go into detail, but they will read more in depth about Chicago African American politicians closely during independent reading.  Students work with their partners to closely read the text, annotate for key words and phrases, and discuss the main ideas of the text. Students should be prompted to jot notes or summarize in their Response Notebooks  Teacher facilitates a discussion by prompting students to synthesize the

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
author’s main idea of each paragraph to determine the main ideas of the text. Suggested Text: The Root Cities: Chicago’s Political Power Brokers http://www.theroot.com/views/chicago-power Teacher engages students in independently diving deeper into the details of Dr. Margaret Burroughs and through Close Reading by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher provides students different articles for the students to choose from related to Chicago African American politicians for student to choose one to read independently.  Students closely read the text, annotating by underlining and making notes in the margins. Suggested Texts: Washington, Harold 192201987 http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/washington-harold-1922-1987 Toni Preckwinkle Bio http://www.thehistorymakers.com/biography/toni-preckwinkle-5 Toni Preckwinkle CPS School Closings: Cook County Board President Rips Rahm, Closure Plan http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/17/toni-preckwinkle-cps-schoolclosings_n_3293104.html Barack Obama Biography http://www.biography.com/people/barack-obama-12782369 Teacher engages students in identifying and plotting important events and related key details gathered from the read texts through Map & Timeline Conversations by fostering such learning activities:  Using the butcher paper posted for ongoing Timeline Conversations and to mark on the enlarged timeline the key details related to the events. Engage students in marking the timeline.  Using the posted map, ask students where it requires a marker in relation to where the events took place. As a student volunteer to come up and mark the map of the location(s).  Teacher facilitates a discussion focusing on the following prompt: o What relationships do we notice between the events on the timeline and map have influenced Chicago’s past and present?  Direct students to use the timeline and map as a reference for when and where the important events took place and the related key details. Teacher engages students in an independent writing activity by fostering such learning activities:  Teacher prompts students to share the key words and phrases or summarized key points.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

3rd Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 Teacher writes bulleted points as students share.  Students use the shared bulleted points to construct and independent response.  Teacher confers with students as they write, using the possible following prompts: o What are you thinking about writing next? o Tell me more. o What happened in the book that makes you think that? o How do you want to end your response?  Teacher closes by asking students to share their writing in small groups.  Teacher ends with a conversation about what they did as writers to support the point of their writing relating to Chicago African American politicians.

End of Unit Culminating Project Teacher will engage students in culminating all the information they gathered throughout the unit to develop a culminating project to make connections and display their understanding of the content. Teacher will engage students in developing a culminating project focusing on a notable African American which has influence Chicago in the time period of 1915 to the present by fostering such learning activities:  Students will use all of the information they have gathered and knowledge they have acquired to create and present an informative/explanatory display that identifies a notable African American and the significance they had on contributing to the culture of Chicago today.  Students will also write an explanatory piece to accompany their visual display, based on various print and non-print resources they have examined over the course of the unit.

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