LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan

THEME: Culture, Dignity, and Identity CONCEPT: Africa, Us, and the World - Illinois: The impact of African Americans on the emergence of our state From Jean Baptiste Pointe DuSable to A. Phillip Randolph and Pullman Porters to Barack Obama’s trail to the presidency CONTENT TOPIC: Illinois: The Impact of African and African American Pioneers on the Emergence of Illinois: The African and African American influence in the cities UNIT TITLE: U.S. Regional Movement and Culture
Unit Description: Students will read selections that highlight the relationship between the African culture, their state, and their identity. Students will also read and respond to several shorter informational texts on the same topic. By the end of the unit, students will have read a variety of literature and informational texts, and they will reference those texts to communicate their understanding of how the African culture influences our community and our own identity through the creation of an opinion piece. Key Themes: Culture and Dignity Length: 5 weeks Enduring Understandings       Essential Questions     People study political, economic, and social patterns to reveal continuity and change over time. People use maps to navigate the world in its past and present states. A person’s culture is a way of life of a group of people who share similar beliefs, values, and customs. Readers use textual evidence when asking and answering questions. Readers integrate knowledge and ideas by describing logical connections within a text. Writers support their point of view and opinion on topics or texts by providing strong reasons. How do culture and identify influence who we are? How do time, culture and history influence works of art and/or the advancement of science and technology? What can I do to positively impact my community? How do events in the past affect the present?

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan

Common Core State Standards Primary Secondary 

Primary: Standards Assessed CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.2 Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.4.1 Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. Secondary: Standards Addressed RI.4.3, RI.4.4, RI.4.5, RI4.7, RI.4.10, W.4.2, W.4.4, W.4.7, W.4.10, SL.4.1, SL.4.2, SL.4.4

Cognitive Skills

Content

Assessments (D) Diagnostic (F) Formative (S) Summative

Reading, Writing, and Citing Textual Evidence Literal and inferential comprehension Synthesize inferential information Summarizing and sequencing Comparing and contrasting Close reading and analysis Applying qualities of persuasive writing (e.g., structure, elaboration, point of view, stance {stance}, significance) Building Knowledge through Texts Great Migration  Reasons for Migration  Neighborhoods that were influenced in form and developed a unique culture as a result of a significant amount of African Americans migrating from the South o Chicago's Black Belt o NYC-Harlem o LA-Watts, Compton o St. Louis o Detroit Diagnostic (Pre-Assessment) *Same as summative assessment with the use of varying informational texts on the related topic. Formative Assessments Student summaries Student annotations and notes Student small and whole group discussion Student written responses to texts Summative Performance Assessment Task 1: As they read across texts, students should gather key details through annotation and provided

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
graphic organizers that explicitly relate to life before and after the Great Migration. Based on the text evidence collected through their reading, students will form an opinion whether life for African Americans was better in the North or South during the Great Migration. Task 2: After task 1 is completed, the teacher will tell the students that they are going to craft an opinion piece on whether life was better for African Americans in the North or South during the Great Migration. Their writing should include all the components of an opinion piece as outlined in Writing Standard 4.1 and include the research they gathered in Task 1. Prompt example: Many families saw the North as an escape from their current lives and the discrimination they faced in the South. When they arrived at their destination in the North, families faced many hardships. Using text evidence and details from your notes and graphic organizers determine whether life was better in the North or South for African Americans during the years of the Great Migration. Anchor Texts Part 1 Bound for the Promise Land by Michael L. Cooper Heart and Soul: The Story of American and African Americans by Kadir Nelson Part 2 The Great Migration: Journey to the North by Eloise Greenfield The Great Migration: An American Story by Jacob Lawrence Bound for the Promise Land by Michael L. Cooper Heart and Soul: The Story of American and African Americans by Kadir Nelson Harlem by Walter Dean Myers

Texts/ Resources

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Images: Part 1: Life After Slavery  Klu Klux Klan http://kids.britannica.com/elementary/art-85060/Members-of-the-Ku-Klux-Klan-takepart-in-a

Sharecropping http://www.loc.gov/pictures/item/fsa2000032533/PP/

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
 Jackson Segregated Railway Terminal http://e34.courseblock.com/?p=46

African American Population Growth between 1920 and 1930 https://danvershighlibary.wikispaces.com/The+Great+Migration

Great Migration Political Cartoon "The Color Line has Reached the North" http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/3879.html

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan

Websites and Primary Resources Part 1:Life After Slavery  13th Amendment http://ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=true&doc=40  14th Amendment http://ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=43  15th Amendment http://ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?doc=44 Part 2: The Great Migration Detroit  http://bentley.umich.edu/research/publications/migration/ch4.php St. Louis  http://stlouis-mo.gov/government/departments/planning/culturalresources/preservation-plan/Part-I-African-American-Experience.cfm Watts  http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aaw/watts-los-angeles-1903 Video: Part 1:Life After Slavery  Short Video on general reconstruction http://www.history.com/topics/great-migration/videos#the-failure-of-reconstruction  Billie Holiday performing "Strange Fruit" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4ZyuULy9zs Learning Performance Outcomes/ Activities Part 1: Life after Slavery  Review your timeline from Quarter 1. Continue keeping the large timeline to track events as they are covered. Also have a United States map where you track different locations as the unit progresses. Create a graphic organizer including the following 4 sections: What I think I know about The Great Migration, Oops (misconceptions), Strategies for Varied Learner Profiles  Work in small groups to practice listening and speaking skills needed to develop academic language in the context

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Yes (confirmations), and Questions I Have. As students learn more they can move their thoughts to the oops or yes column depending on the evidence they find.  Watch the video on reconstruction from the History Channel. As students watch have them adjust and add to their graphic organizer. Then pass out copies of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments (printed from site provided above) for students to look at with a partner. Have students discuss what these meant for the South.  Use the text, Heart and Soul: The Story of America and African Americans, Chapter 5: Reconstruction (pg 43, focusing on the paragraphs for reconstruction) Written Response: Using details and inferences in the text describe the author's opinion of Reconstruction. How do you know he felt this way?  Plantation Life, share cropping Text: Bound for the Promise Land pg. 5-8) Discuss the idea of sharecropping with students, review the some of the ideas of sharecropping from the text used the previous day. Written Response: With a partner think about the quote regarding sharecropping; "We had to mind them as our children mind us," said one woman. "it was just like slavery time." Using details and inferences from the text explain the similarities between slavery and sharecropping.  Dangerous Times: Lynching and the Klu Klux Klan Show students the image of the Klu Klux Klan performing the ceremony. Have students discuss the photograph with a partner and how scenes like this would impact African Americans. Review with students the dangers from slave times. Then have students read the Text: (Heart and Soul: The Story of America...bottom of pg. 43 and all of pg. 44) Have students discuss the new dangers in the Reconstruction time period in the south.  Have students follow along with lyrics as they listen to Billie Holiday perform "Strange Fruit". With students reread the text, discussing line by line the meaning behind her words. Use text from Heart and Soul: The Story of America that was covered in the previous lesson.  Using copies of the political cartoon "The Reason” have students discuss the cartoon with a partner. Then provide the following questions for a focused discussion: Using knowledge from previous sessions, discuss who or of learning critical concepts.

The use of graphic organizers to chunk pieces of content knowledge and information to manipulate in the new languages (use of cognates for example). Gives the varied learner reasons to use language for real purposes. Classroom discourse and the use of visual aids to use academic language to engage in learning activities which builds content and language knowledge in a natural context.

Facilitate the selection of a text by asking the student to connect something in the text to their lives. If the students see themselves in the theme or character of the text they will be more inclined to engage in discussions about the text they read. Access visual representations of texts, when necessary, to support explicit

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
what the man in the black suit represents. Who or what does the man in the white suit represent? How do you think African Americans in the south reacted to this cartoon? How do you think members of the Klu Klux Klan reacted to this cartoon? Part 2: The Great Migration  Text: Have copies of the following excerpt from Heart and Soul: The Story of America, pg. 54; "My family went by train like most black folks, but some drove, rode on horseback or on a mule, or even walked. It took almost a full day to ride by train from Virginia to Chicago. We celebrated when we made it across the Mason-Dixon Line and moved from the Jim Crow car to cars where white folks sat. Some people even started praying and singing. The train was full of black folks on their way to Chicago, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, Detroit, or New York City." Text Response: With a partner read and think about the excerpt from the text Heart and Soul: The Story of America. Crossing the Mason-Dixon Line was an important step in the Great Migration. What did crossing the Mason-Dixon line symbolize?  The Great Migration :Journey to the North by Eloise Greenfield whole book read aloud  The Great Migration: An American Story by Jacob Lawrence whole book read aloud Great Migration to Chicago  Text: Koko Taylor, blues singer, "When I was 18 years old, I left Memphis, my husband and I. And we got the Greyhound bus up Highway 61 and headed north to Chicago. He didn't have no money and I didn't have no money. We had one box of Ritz crackers that we split between us. With no money, nowhere to live, no nothing; we was just taking a chance. And I figured, "If he got enough nerve to take a chance with nothin', I have too. So that's what we did." Text Response: Using details from previous lessons about the current state of the south, would you have made the same choice as Ms. Taylor? Do you think she made the right choice?  A Better Life?: working conditions and the Red Summer Text: Have students work in groups reading connects to the elements of culture. Can provide text in an alternate print format.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
and discussions one of the text portions below. Have students take notes using a graphic organizer to then present to other groups. o Housing (Bound for the ....32-34) o WWI and Factory working (Bound for the ....pg 25-27) o Discrimination (Bound for the ....pg. 24) o 1919 Red Summer- bombings, loss of jobs, lynching, riots, Eugene Williams(Bound for the ....pg. 36-38) o Education (Bound for the ....pg. 39-45) o Social (Heart and Soul:...pg 65)  Using copies of the political cartoon "The Color Line has Reached the North", have students discuss what this means in the context of the texts read in the previous lesson, as well as the shared graphic organizers. Have students then focus their conversations with the following questions: Why did the illustrator choose this title? What events support the idea in this illustration? How do you think people reacted when seeing this cartoon? Do you think this cartoon was an accurate representation of that time?

Great Migration to Harlem  Read Aloud: Harlem by Walter Dean Myers  Text: The Churches role in real estate (Bound for the Promise... pg. 50) Text Response: Discuss with partner: How pivotal was the church was in the success of Harlem? Use text evidence to support your claim.  The Harlem Renaissance (Bound for the Promise...pg. 56-67) o Music and Dancing o (Harlem by Walter Dean Myers) read aloud o Split students into groups to cover the following list of people: Florence Mills, Josephine Baker, Ethel Waters, Duke Ellington, Fats Waller, Langston Hughes, Dubois, Zora Neale Hurston, and Countee Cullen. Then have students share their information with their group. (bolded names are mentioned in Walter Dean Myers Harlem)

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Response to the Great Migration in Watts, St, Louis, and Detroit  Using the separate texts about Watts, St. Louis, and Detroit provided below, have students take notes as they focus on response to the great migration in these three cities. Guide the connection to how blacks migrated to a central location in each of the three cities.

Billie Holiday-Strange Fruit Lyrics Southern trees bear a strange fruit, Blood on the leaves and blood at the root, Black bodies swinging in the southern breeze, Strange fruit hanging from the poplar trees. Pastoral scene of the gallant south, The bulging eyes and the twisted mouth, Scent of magnolias, sweet and fresh, Then the sudden smell of burning flesh. Here is fruit for the crows to pluck, For the rain to gather, for the wind to suck, For the sun to rot, for the trees to drop, Here is a strange and bitter crop.

Detroit Text http://bentley.umich.edu/research/publications/migration/ch 4.php During World War I, when foreign immigration slowed and African-American migration accelerated, Blacks steadily began to achieve a majority status in the St. Antoine district, which soon became known as the "East Side Colored District" [4]. Because the city's business district lay to its west, the St. Antoine district could not expand in that direction to accommodate its residents. It was able, however, to expand slowly northward. Since homes there were, in the main, too costly for migrants, they remained mainly in the center of the district and continued to move into dilapidated houses left behind wealthier Blacks or to crowd into homes already overflowing with residents [5]. Housing for the poorer migrants became slowly available as

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
the East Side District expanded to the east and south. Eventually, the neighborhood extended all the way to the Detroit River. The southernmost blocks of the district, the most dense in the neighborhood, became known as the "Black Bottom" of Detroit [7. In a three-square mile portion of the East Side, 313,600 people were "huddled together as closely as it is possible for humans to exist" [8].

St. Louis Text http://stlouismo.gov/government/departments/planning/culturalresources/preservation-plan/Part-I-African-AmericanExperience.cfm The 'Hoods: Segregated Housing Segregated housing patterns were far from mere coincidence or happenstance. Who lived where reflected social attitudes about race. African-Americans lived in separate and discrete areas, even more accentuated than those of other recent urban arrivals living in Irish, German, Polish, or Italian neighborhoods. However, these Euro-American groups could eventually blend into the larger society. African-Americans' color always identified them as different from the prevailing white culture, making it easier to force them into separate areas. Those areas tended to be similar to other tenement areas: substandard housing, overcrowded, unsanitary. This is not to say that all black neighborhoods were slums. Before the Civil War St. Louis boasted a "black aristocracy" of middle-class African-Americans. Eventually The Ville stood as the neighborhood for middle-class black families. These housing lines along racial boundaries held legal sway at times. By a three-to-one margin, voters enacted a segregation ordinance in 1916, holding that no one could move to a block on which more than 75 percent of the residents were of another race. The NAACP successfully fought the order in the courts. White separatists responded by creating associations of white residents living in neighborhoods near black residential areas to solidify segregated housing. The United Welfare Association, who orchestrated the ordinance based on such a law in Baltimore, continued with its support from the Real Estate Board of St. Louis. One member organization, the

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

4th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 3 Unit Plan
Marcus Avenue Improvement Association, sought to ban blacks from moving into an area bound by Kingshighway, Natural Bridge, Newstead, and Easton. Each property had attached to it a fifty-year covenant forbidding sale of the house to "persons not of Caucasian race." The Ville stood as the primary neighborhood for middle class blacks. Watts Text http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aaw/watts-los-angeles-1903 Watts, one of the most famous neighborhoods in Los Angeles, is located approximately seven miles southeast of downtown. Originally part of the Rancho La Tajauta Mexican land grant, Watts was incorporated in 1903 and began to grow as a community in 1907, when the Watts Station was built and transportation within Watts became easier. The town was attractive to working class families and differed from other suburban communities in that it welcomed white, black, and Latino families. By 1920, 14% of Watts' population was African American which at that time was the highest in California. In 1926, Los Angeles annexed Watts. The African American population continued to grow after annexation and by World War II the community was inhabited mostly by middle class blacks. World War II brought tens of thousands of black and white migrants from Louisiana, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Texas. The city built new public housing projects to accommodate the increased population, most of which were located in Watts. By the early 1960s, these projects had become largely dominated by African Americans, as whites moved to the surrounding suburbs which excluded black settlement. Watts increasingly became an island of black poverty surrounded by middle class white suburbs.

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