LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

T#E$E% Culture, Dignity, and Identity CONCE&T% Africa, Us, and the World-African Explorers in the Americas Africans as constant travelers, to Africans in the Americas, to Africans and African Americans in the development of the Atlantic world CONTENT TO&IC% Examining African peoples’ roles in the exploration and development of early North and South Americas through fiction and nonfiction texts 'NIT TITLE% Development of the Americas ( orth, !outh, and Central" #uarter$ % Unit$ & Wee' & of ( Day & CC!! !tandards$ 1I.(.5, W.(.6, !7.(.& Sample Student Outc"me Statements )*+ective(s"$ !tudents ,ill *e a*le
to critically analy-e different perspectives related to a similar topic *y synthesi-ing 'ey details in order to identify the central idea.

/aterials01esources$

• History as an account vs. event graphic • 1esponse note*oo's • Charted 2uotes and 2uestions • Chart paper • 3ro+ector 4 !pea'ers
Students (ill )e a)le t" *** fr"m Literacy and S"cial Science &lannin+ Guides

Students (ill )e a)le t" *** (it! African and African American Studies C"nnecti"ns

!tudents ,ill *e a*le to understand that history is told from various and differing perspectives8 examine African peoples9 roles in the discovery of America through fiction and nonfiction texts8 summari-ing them and explaining the 'ey details that lead to the main idea0s.

• • •

1eaders use textual evidence ,hen as'ing and ans,ering 2uestions. 1eaders integrate 'no,ledge and ideas *y descri*ing logical connections ,ithin a text. 1eaders synthesi-e 'ey details to determine multiple main ideas of a text in order to summari-e.

GRA,'AL RELEASE

I o, !e o, "ou o #ogether, "ou o Alone

Adapted from :arden :rove Unified !chool District, )ffice of !econdary Education Department of ;-&< Instructional !ervices

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

-. Teac!er says and d"es / I ," =>oday ,e ,ill start a ne, unit ,here ,e ,ill engage ,ith the controversial 2uestion, !ho really discovered America, and does it even matter$ In this unit, ,e ,ill examine many different theories of America9s discovery, starting ,ith the traditional story that ,e 'no, a*out Christopher Colum*us. After revealing our *ac'ground 'no,ledge of Colum*us, ,e9ll spend significant amounts of time analy-ing texts that support ideas that other cultures and groups of people ,ere in America, some long *efore Colum*us. ?our culminating pro+ect from this unit ,ill *e a group research pro+ect a*out one of those theories other than that of Colum*us. ?ou9ll also ,rite an independent opinion essay supporting ,hich theory you *elieve provides the most compelling evidence of America9s discovery. 0. Teac!er says and d"es / Y"u ," =I ,ant you to thin' a*out ,hat you 'no, a*out the story of America9s discovery and Christopher Colum*us. >a'e a fe, minutes to +ot do,n ,hat you 'no,.@ Allow students to write for %&' minutes (efore prompting with the next )uestions. = o, that you9ve captured ,hat you 'no, a*out Christopher Colum*us and his story of America9s discovery, I ,ant you to ,rite a*out ho, you 'no, that. What is your evidence to support this 'no,ledge you haveA@ Allow students to write for %&' more minutes (efore transitioning into the next lesson segment.

. Teac!er says and d"es / I ," Display the Bistory as an event vs. Bistory as an account representation *y Co* Cain$

=>a'e a loo' at this graphic. >his is a visual representation made *y a historian, Co* Cain, representing ho, history ,or's. >here are t,o important concepts in play hereD Bistory-as-Event B(ev" 4 Bistory-as-Account B(ac".@ Engage students in discussing the meaning of *account+ and *event,+ then relating it to history and understanding the past. =In order for history to *e understood as an eventDsomething that actually happenedDthere must *e evidence to support it. >his is a very different idea than history as an account, ,hich is more li'e a story of ,hat happened.@ 1. Teac!er says and d"es / 2e ," =7et me sho, you ,hat I mean.@ Engage students in comparing their experience with an event, with other accounts of
Adapted from :arden :rove Unified !chool District, )ffice of !econdary Education Department of ;-&< Instructional !ervices

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

the same event ,shared class experience, or created experience-. =7ast ,ee' ,e had an emergency evacuation. Does every*ody remem*er thatA I ,ant a fe, of you to tell me your version of that account. What happenedA@ Allow %&' volunteers to share their experience of the event. = o,, let9s ta'e a loo' at these charted 2uestions and discuss them as a group.@ Engage students in a discussion of the various accounts with the following ,charted)uestions. ⇒ Bo, ,ere the accounts related to the eventA ⇒ Did the accounts capture the full eventA ⇒ Is it possi*le for accounts to capture events fullyA ⇒ Bo, did the accounts differA ⇒ Did they use different facts or sourcesA Different picturesA Different languageA ⇒ Did the accounts identify different turning points or significant eventsA ⇒ Are there other possi*le accounts of the eventA ⇒ Did the accounts serve different purposesA ⇒ Bo, do people studying0experiencing the same event create different accountsA ⇒ Can one account *e *etter than anotherA ⇒ Bo, can ,e 'no, ,hich one is trueA 5. Teac!er says and d"es / Y"u ," It T"+et!er =7isten as I read this 2uote from Chimamanda go-i Adichie, an African storyteller and author.@ !hen we re/ect a single story, when we reali0e that there is never a single story a(out any place, we regain a 1ind of paradise. =In your 2uads, I ,ant you to thin' a*out ,hat this person ,as saying a*out a =single story.@ >hin' a*out ho, many versions of the account ,e +ust heard a*out the evacuation last ,ee'. Why ,ould ,e re+ect, or hold onto a single storyA As you9re having your group discussions, reference the charted 2uestions to move your conversation a*out this 2uote along.@ 2acilitate small group discussions to answer ,charted- )uestions. ⇒ What does the author mean *y thisA What is he0she trying to sayA ⇒ Bo, do you 'no, thisA What ma'es you thin' thatA ⇒ What do you thin' a(out thatA What9s your opinionA 3ead a whole group discussion to compare4contrast the ideas of history told through multiple accounts, versus a *single story+. Exercise Accountable Talk teacher moves during group discussion. ⇒ 5ar1ing important0valua*le points and revealing ,hy ⇒ 6hallenging students *y as'ing ,hat >BE? thin' to explain reasoning ⇒ 5odeling *y sho,ing reasoning or thin'ing ⇒ 7ecapping a shared understanding in a concise, coherent form

3CLOS'RE "f LESSON4

reflection
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Adapted from :arden :rove Unified !chool District, )ffice of !econdary Education Department of ;-&< Instructional !ervices

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

5. Teac!er says and d"es isplay charted )uote. =:ood readers construct meaning from text +ust as s'illed historical thin'ers construct understanding of the past (not =truth@" from the evidence left *y past events.@ Co* Cain =>his 2uote *y Co* Cain, the same man ,ho created the graphic that ,e loo'ed at in the *eginning of this lesson, is challenging us to understand the past, our history, *y loo'ing at the evidence left *y past events.@ 6lose the lesson (y listening to an audio&clip of 8eter !inn of #ufts 9niversity discussing the relationships (etween perspective, memory and historical *truth+. =Cefore ,e close this lesson, I ,ant you to listen closely to a *rief audio clip descri*ing the relationship *et,een perspective, memory and historical =truth@. Eot notes in your 1eader9s ote*oo's, and after,ard I9m going to as' you to free-,rite some thoughts a*out today9s lesson and our upcoming unit.@ Allow students time to reflect on today’s lesson and the upcoming unit, and record their thin1ing in their 7eader’s Note(oo1s.

ASSESS$ENT
What ,ill you as'A When ,ill you as' during the lessonA What ,ill 'ids say or do to demonstrate understanding of the o*+ectiveA

Formative$ • !tudent ,ritten responses • !tudent oral responses • !tudent notes • Anecdotal records ta'en off of student discussions

!ummative$ • !ummative assessment ,ill happen at the end of the unit, not at the end of the lesson.

Adapted from :arden :rove Unified !chool District, )ffice of !econdary Education Department of ;-&< Instructional !ervices

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