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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

T#E$E% Culture, Dignity, and Identity CONCE&T% Africa, Us, and the World-African Explorers in the Americas Africans as constant travelers, to Africans in the Americas, to Africans and African Americans in the development of the Atlantic world CONTENT TO&IC% Examining African peoples roles in the exploration and development of early North and South Americas through fiction and nonfiction texts 'NIT TITLE% Development of the Americas ( orth, !outh, and Central" #uarter$ % Unit$ & Wee' & of ( Day & CC!! !tandards$ 1I.(.5, W.(.6, !7.(.& Sample Student Outc"me Statements )*+ective(s"$ !tudents ,ill *e a*le
to critically analy-e different perspectives related to a similar topic *y synthesi-ing 'ey details in order to identify the central idea.

/aterials01esources$

History as an account vs. event graphic 1esponse note*oo's Charted 2uotes and 2uestions Chart paper 3ro+ector 4 !pea'ers
Students (ill )e a)le t" *** fr"m Literacy and S"cial Science &lannin+ Guides

Students (ill )e a)le t" *** (it! African and African American Studies C"nnecti"ns

!tudents ,ill *e a*le to understand that history is told from various and differing perspectives8 examine African peoples9 roles in the discovery of America through fiction and nonfiction texts8 summari-ing them and explaining the 'ey details that lead to the main idea0s.

1eaders use textual evidence ,hen as'ing and ans,ering 2uestions. 1eaders integrate 'no,ledge and ideas *y descri*ing logical connections ,ithin a text. 1eaders synthesi-e 'ey details to determine multiple main ideas of a text in order to summari-e.

GRA,'AL RELEASE

I o, !e o, "ou o #ogether, "ou o Alone

Adapted from :arden :rove Unified !chool District, )ffice of !econdary Education Department of ;-&< Instructional !ervices

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

-. Teac!er says and d"es / I ," =>oday ,e ,ill start a ne, unit ,here ,e ,ill engage ,ith the controversial 2uestion, !ho really discovered America, and does it even matter$ In this unit, ,e ,ill examine many different theories of America9s discovery, starting ,ith the traditional story that ,e 'no, a*out Christopher Colum*us. After revealing our *ac'ground 'no,ledge of Colum*us, ,e9ll spend significant amounts of time analy-ing texts that support ideas that other cultures and groups of people ,ere in America, some long *efore Colum*us. ?our culminating pro+ect from this unit ,ill *e a group research pro+ect a*out one of those theories other than that of Colum*us. ?ou9ll also ,rite an independent opinion essay supporting ,hich theory you *elieve provides the most compelling evidence of America9s discovery. 0. Teac!er says and d"es / Y"u ," =I ,ant you to thin' a*out ,hat you 'no, a*out the story of America9s discovery and Christopher Colum*us. >a'e a fe, minutes to +ot do,n ,hat you 'no,.@ Allow students to write for %&' minutes (efore prompting with the next )uestions. = o, that you9ve captured ,hat you 'no, a*out Christopher Colum*us and his story of America9s discovery, I ,ant you to ,rite a*out ho, you 'no, that. What is your evidence to support this 'no,ledge you haveA@ Allow students to write for %&' more minutes (efore transitioning into the next lesson segment.

. Teac!er says and d"es / I ," Display the Bistory as an event vs. Bistory as an account representation *y Co* Cain$

=>a'e a loo' at this graphic. >his is a visual representation made *y a historian, Co* Cain, representing ho, history ,or's. >here are t,o important concepts in play hereD Bistory-as-Event B(ev" 4 Bistory-as-Account B(ac".@ Engage students in discussing the meaning of *account+ and *event,+ then relating it to history and understanding the past. =In order for history to *e understood as an eventDsomething that actually happenedDthere must *e evidence to support it. >his is a very different idea than history as an account, ,hich is more li'e a story of ,hat happened.@ 1. Teac!er says and d"es / 2e ," =7et me sho, you ,hat I mean.@ Engage students in comparing their experience with an event, with other accounts of
Adapted from :arden :rove Unified !chool District, )ffice of !econdary Education Department of ;-&< Instructional !ervices

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

the same event ,shared class experience, or created experience-. =7ast ,ee' ,e had an emergency evacuation. Does every*ody remem*er thatA I ,ant a fe, of you to tell me your version of that account. What happenedA@ Allow %&' volunteers to share their experience of the event. = o,, let9s ta'e a loo' at these charted 2uestions and discuss them as a group.@ Engage students in a discussion of the various accounts with the following ,charted)uestions. Bo, ,ere the accounts related to the eventA Did the accounts capture the full eventA Is it possi*le for accounts to capture events fullyA Bo, did the accounts differA Did they use different facts or sourcesA Different picturesA Different languageA Did the accounts identify different turning points or significant eventsA Are there other possi*le accounts of the eventA Did the accounts serve different purposesA Bo, do people studying0experiencing the same event create different accountsA Can one account *e *etter than anotherA Bo, can ,e 'no, ,hich one is trueA 5. Teac!er says and d"es / Y"u ," It T"+et!er =7isten as I read this 2uote from Chimamanda go-i Adichie, an African storyteller and author.@ !hen we re/ect a single story, when we reali0e that there is never a single story a(out any place, we regain a 1ind of paradise. =In your 2uads, I ,ant you to thin' a*out ,hat this person ,as saying a*out a =single story.@ >hin' a*out ho, many versions of the account ,e +ust heard a*out the evacuation last ,ee'. Why ,ould ,e re+ect, or hold onto a single storyA As you9re having your group discussions, reference the charted 2uestions to move your conversation a*out this 2uote along.@ 2acilitate small group discussions to answer ,charted- )uestions. What does the author mean *y thisA What is he0she trying to sayA Bo, do you 'no, thisA What ma'es you thin' thatA What do you thin' a(out thatA What9s your opinionA 3ead a whole group discussion to compare4contrast the ideas of history told through multiple accounts, versus a *single story+. Exercise Accountable Talk teacher moves during group discussion. 5ar1ing important0valua*le points and revealing ,hy 6hallenging students *y as'ing ,hat >BE? thin' to explain reasoning 5odeling *y sho,ing reasoning or thin'ing 7ecapping a shared understanding in a concise, coherent form

3CLOS'RE "f LESSON4

reflection
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Adapted from :arden :rove Unified !chool District, )ffice of !econdary Education Department of ;-&< Instructional !ervices

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

Grade 5 Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter Launc! Less"n

5. Teac!er says and d"es isplay charted )uote. =:ood readers construct meaning from text +ust as s'illed historical thin'ers construct understanding of the past (not =truth@" from the evidence left *y past events.@ Co* Cain =>his 2uote *y Co* Cain, the same man ,ho created the graphic that ,e loo'ed at in the *eginning of this lesson, is challenging us to understand the past, our history, *y loo'ing at the evidence left *y past events.@ 6lose the lesson (y listening to an audio&clip of 8eter !inn of #ufts 9niversity discussing the relationships (etween perspective, memory and historical *truth+. =Cefore ,e close this lesson, I ,ant you to listen closely to a *rief audio clip descri*ing the relationship *et,een perspective, memory and historical =truth@. Eot notes in your 1eader9s ote*oo's, and after,ard I9m going to as' you to free-,rite some thoughts a*out today9s lesson and our upcoming unit.@ Allow students time to reflect on todays lesson and the upcoming unit, and record their thin1ing in their 7eaders Note(oo1s.

ASSESS$ENT
What ,ill you as'A When ,ill you as' during the lessonA What ,ill 'ids say or do to demonstrate understanding of the o*+ectiveA

Formative$ !tudent ,ritten responses !tudent oral responses !tudent notes Anecdotal records ta'en off of student discussions

!ummative$ !ummative assessment ,ill happen at the end of the unit, not at the end of the lesson.

Adapted from :arden :rove Unified !chool District, )ffice of !econdary Education Department of ;-&< Instructional !ervices

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