LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

5th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson

THEME: Culture, Dignity, and Identity
CONCEPT: Africa, Us, and the World-

African Explorers in the Americas - Africans as constant travelers, to Africans in the Americas, to Africans and African Americans in the development of the Atlantic world CONTENT TOPIC: Examining African peoples’ roles in the exploration and development of early North and South Americas through fiction and nonfiction texts UNIT TITLE: Beginning of European Migration Quarter: 4 Unit: 1 Week 1 of 6 Day 1 Objective(s): Students draw conclusions through the synthesis of their prior knowledge and information gathered in a non-fiction text. Materials/Resources: ● African Conquistadors: Juan Garrido, Hernando Cortez and the Conquest of Mexico http://africanus.hubpages.com/hub/Bl ack-Conquistadors-Pedro-Garrido-andthe-Conquest-of-Mexico ● Response notebooks ● Charted Enduring Understandings & Essential Questions ● Close Reading chart ● Chart paper ● Projector

CCSS Standards: RI.5.1, RI.5.2, RI.5.4, SL.5.1, SL.5.4 Sample Student Outcome Statements Students will be able to --- with African and African American Studies Connections Students will be able to examine ● African peoples’ roles in the exploration and development of early ● North and South Americas through fiction and nonfiction texts; summarizing them and explaining the ● key details that lead to the main idea/s. Students will be able to --- from Literacy and Social Science Planning Guides Use textual evidence when asking and answering questions. Integrate knowledge and ideas by describing logical connections within a text. Synthesize key details to determine multiple main ideas of a text in order to summarize. ● Determine the meaning of domainL1

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

5th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
specific words in grade appropriate texts. “YOU DO IT TOGETHER” Engaging Students Arrange students in groups of four with chart paper and markers, directing them to write the words ethnological minimalism in the center of their group chart. Direct students to discuss their ideas first, about what each of the words or phrase means (using their prior knowledge of prefixes, suffixes and roots); and then write or draw pictures using the same color to illustrate their interpreted meaning of the words/phrase. As groups work, circulate to support or prompt their thinking about the meaning of the term, cueing them to their knowledge of prefixes, suffixes and roots as well as prompting them to explain their reasoning. Close Reading Teacher facilitates analytic reading through a series of text-dependent questions to understand the concept of ethnological minimalism, and the role it played in under representing the contributions of Africans to the early development of the North and South Americas. ● Encourage close reading habits: ⇒ Reading for general understanding and to annotate the text with margin notes of questions, connections and reactions; circling confusing words, and underlining main ideas and key points. ⇒ Rereading to determine key details, L2 Collaborative Learning

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

5th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
author’s purpose, and to synthesize information through collaborative conversations and text dependent questions. ⇒ Reading, discussing and writing from sources. Have students return to their original brainstorming, to revise their earlier ideas about ethnological minimalism according to what they now know. Introduction Teacher will introduce the unit by explaining the topic and content, and its relationship with the year-long theme of culture, dignity and identity. Teacher will share charted Enduring Understandings and Essential Questions that will drive the unit lessons and learning.

“I DO IT” Input & Modeling Teacher says and does… “Today we will start a new unit where we will uncover the role of one perspective around why the influence of Africans in the development of the Americas may have been distorted or untold. One important step in doing this is to gather the key details from the text, in order to add to what we already know about how the story of African influence has played out, in order to synthesize our understanding.” “Watch me as I…” or “Let me show you how I…” L3

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

5th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
“How to closely read a nonfiction resource to gather and synthesize the key details to identify the central meaning. I will be paying attention to key words and phrases such as dates, people, places, and events. First, though, I’m going to read it once through just to get the ‘gist’.” Teacher reads the first paragraph aloud, while students follow along on either their text or on an enlarged text (elmo, promethean board, etc.), “As I finish reflecting on my annotations, I am going to synthesize all the key details by making connections to what I already know and making a general statement. To do this, I would ask myself, ‘Why did the author take the time to write this article?’ and ‘What is the author trying to teach me about Africans’ contributions to Americas?’ or ‘What did the author want me to learn from this article?’ This synthesizing of my gathered key details is going to allow me to determine the central ideas of this text.” Teacher says “Did you notice how I…” “How I reread the text 3 different times, made notes of any key words or phrases related to my purpose for reading, and synthesized all the gathered key details together to determine the author’s central idea? This is going to help me gain insight into the author’s perspective or intentionality of the information he or she chose to include related to the topic.”

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

5th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
“WE DO IT” Teacher says and does “Now we are going to try… We are going to…” “Closely read another paragraph of the text together and gather the key details by identifying the key words and phrases through annotations. You are going to annotate on your copy of the text while I annotate the one projected. Feel free to add your own annotations along the way as we are closely reading.” Teacher reads aloud through the next paragraph, stopping to take student suggestions to what key words and phrases should be annotated and prompts students to explain why they feel those key details should be identified as important to Africans’ influence in the development of the early Americas. Student does Students follow along as the teacher reads, offering suggested annotations of key words and phrases and an explanation of why they feel it is important to be identified as important details to Africans’ presence in the early Americas. Teacher says and does “Now that you have gathered your key details, go back and reread the paragraph to yourself, stopping to reflect on your annotations and why they are important to Africans’ presence in the early Americas.” Guided Instruction

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

5th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
Student does Students reread through their text and annotations, reflecting on them to find connections and similar trends. Teacher says and does “Now that you have reflected on all the key details you gathered, discuss with your partner, what the author’s central ideas are and support your thinking with the evidence you collected from the text. You and your partner may want to use the questions I mentioned before to help guide your discussion; ‘Why did the author take the time to write this article?’ and ‘What is the author of this article trying to teach me about African presence in the early Americas?’ or ‘What did the author want me to learn from this text?” Student does Students work with their partners, their annotated text, and the sample thinking questions to synthesize their gathered details. Teacher says and does Teacher circulates and facilitates partner discussions by probing through questioning and supporting the listening and speaking skills of good discussion. *Teacher gives students enough time to really dig deeply into their gathered details and engage in a discussion that allows students to respond off of each other’s thoughts through multiple exchanges. Teacher says and does Teacher calls the whole group back L6

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

5th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
together. “I heard so many evidence based discussions of what we think the central ideas are. Let’s take some time to share them with the whole group and capture them in writing, so we can compare the central ideas of this text to others as we continue the unit.” Student does Students volunteer their central ideas and the evidence they found to support them. Teacher says and does Teacher captures student responses through a shared writing on a large piece of chart paper. *When students are through sharing their responses… Teacher prompts students to reread through the central ideas that their classmates and themselves synthesized. “YOU DO IT ALONE” Teacher says and does “Now you are going to go off and try this on your own… You are going to…” “You are now going to continue reading the remainder of the article, gathering more key details and synthesizing the entire piece.” “If you feel as though it would help you to jot some notes while analyzing, feel free to do so in your response notebook or directly on your articles.” Teacher says and does “Let’s discuss what views you concluded from critically analyzing the L7 Independent Practice

LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

5th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson
text, related to Africans’ presence in the early Americas.” Teacher acts as a facilitator for student discussion. He/she is merely a facilitator here and not a teacher of new learning. Teacher allows students to freely and openly discuss their thoughts and views around the central idea of the text. Teacher says and does “You are now going to write a response in your response notebooks, reflecting on the discussion we just had about the text. Even when you are reflecting for yourself, it is important to embed evidence to support your views.” Student does Students independently write in their response notebooks to reflect on the class discussion of the text related to Africans presence in the early Americas and their contributions to the development.

ASSESSMENT

What will you ask? When will you ask during the lesson? What will kids say or do to demonstrate understanding of the objective? Formative: ● Student written
responses ● Student oral responses ● Student annotations

Summative: ● Summative assessment will happen at the end of the unit, not at the end of the lesson.

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LITERACY & SOCIAL SCIENCE

5th Grade Interdisciplinary African and African American Studies Quarter 4 Launch Lesson

Anecdotal records taken from student discussions

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