CRAZY ART

TEACHING RESOURCE FOR 11-16 YEAR OLDS

Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc.

Indiana Jones. There. THE AMAZING WORLD Global Explorer Millionaire cartoonist. the lessons and activity sheets in this resource will enable your students to test and explore their imaginations. of course.style. you’ll find the renowned exhibits that prompt even the most reserved among us to drop our jaw. Robert Ripley was. 1 Piccadilly Circus.com Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. above all a world-class explorer and collector. but what set Robert Ripley apart was his curious viewpoint and insatiable appetite for the unusual and different.com ripleys. The whole experience will stimulate curiosity but better still the projects are fun to do and fully in line with curriculum requirements. Knowing the truth of his finds. London.OF RIPLEY! Inspired Resources This education pack is inspired by one man and the amazing world he lived in. London W1J ODA ripleyslondon. creativity and observational powers to the full. Combine these with a school visit and not only are the lessons brought to life but it will make learning outside the classroom truly Oddly Educational! The London Pavilion.com T +44 (0)20 3238 0022 education@ripleyslondon. he coined the phrase “Believe It or Not” and founded the ‘Odditoriums’ that still bear his name. ODDLY EDUCATIONAL! Our teaching resource brings you some of the flavour of the world of Ripley and is designed to be used in conjunction with an Oddly Educational! school visit. and in the 1930’s voted America’s most popular. London’s latest new attraction The latest of these ‘Odditoriums’ is the showpiece Ripley’s Believe It or Not! attraction at the prestigious and newly renovated 1 Piccadilly Circus. in impressive surroundings. Quite simply. Some would even say the bizarre! Likewise. you won’t believe your eyes. the same planet as the rest of us inhabit. renowned broadcaster. he was relentless in his search for astonishing artefacts to add to his collection of the frankly unbelievable. It was. .

the secondary teaching resource for art which aims to introduce your students to a wide range of the unusual. 4. Stamps? Back in the classroom. focuses on likeness starting with students seeking to portray themselves then moving on to a portrait of a chosen famous person. Along with more conventional approaches. students are encouraged to use more unusual formats and techniques to create portraits that are positively peculiar! The scheme of work has the following stages: 1. as its title suggests. 6. The lesson. It’s Oddly Educational! Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. Finally. entitled It’s Art Believe It or Not!. A school visit to Ripley’s will make the title of this education pack become clear. there is an exhibit listing for teachers and adult group leaders. 5. leads students to discover some of the more unusual art exhibits in Ripley’s. there’s a project response card so you can give feedback on the project.W elcome to Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Crazy Art. 2. Self-portrait Self-portrait in pastels Experiment with materials Go for background Celebrity portraits Go positively peculiar On conclusion of Positively Peculiar Portraits you’ll find a range of additional activities which will enhance creative thinking and appreciation. the teaching project. can be launched. Students will be able to see a wide range of artefacts reflecting a variety of conceptual approaches to creativity that will help them extend their thinking and understanding through discussion and application. Positively Peculiar Portraits. The first lesson plan in this project is specifically for school visits. . It is designed to be fun. to help ensure that you can guide your students to spot as many as possible during their visit. 3. The most effective use of this resource is to launch it with a visit by students to Ripley’s where they can see for themselves a vast collection of art and sculpture that has been created around the world. Featured with the lesson explanation. Positively Peculiar Portraits. following a discussion about the visit. entertaining and Oddly Educational! Undertaking the whole project will assist students in the exploration of their personal identity. Also enclosed is a set of three colour portraits from Ripley’s that can be handed round to stimulate creative thinking. The project includes a poster for art room display to encourage lateral thinking with photocopiable activity sheets for those activities requiring them. odd and unbelievable.

It’s Art Believe It or Not!. is specifically to use before a class visit to Ripley’s and for subsequent class discussions. so the challenge to your students is to find exhibits in Ripley’s ‘Odditorium’ that surprise and challenge their thinking. What makes them unusual is that unconventional art materials have been used. IT’S ART BELIEVE IT OR NOT! In this activity. sculptures and constructions in Ripley’s Believe It or Not! London and ask them to say how likely they think it is that artists would work with such materials. Plenary Once back in the classroom review what students have discovered by discussing the notes they made on their worksheets during the school trip.Your School Visit! This activity. Just as Robert Ripley collected examples of the extraordinary and the surprising. Brief your students on what you want them to do whilst they are at Ripley’s. Photocopy the activity sheet for every student. Which materials do they think are the most surprising to be used for portraiture? Which portraits did they rate most and why? Have any of your students ideas about unusual materials they’d like to work with? Butterflies? Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. the topic for the scheme of work. Lesson On the day before or morning (time permitting) of your class visit. They will see examples of unusual portraits. Explain that whilst they are at Ripley’s they will see many different art-related exhibits. Discuss with your students the materials listed and see if they can imagine works of art in them. hand out copies of the It’s Art Believe It or Not! activity sheet to all your students. Once your students arrive at Ripley’s Believe It or Not! they will have to find these portraits made with the listed materials during the visit. There is a list of some of the key items on the following pages.Activity . . introduce your students to some of the materials used for art-based exhibits. Preparation Book your visit to Ripley’s. Positively Peculiar Portraits.

experience. designed by Rebekah Baquiran (nee Shuman). and abilities. as did sculptor Enrique Ramos in honouring the Beatles. STAMP ART SAINT TRAMP ART ‘LORD'S PRAYER’ OSTRICH EGG ART BEATLES SCULPTURE TOWER BRIDGE IN MATCHSTICKS PRINCESS DIANA IN LINT LINT SUSHI SACRED PAINTED LEAF INCREDIBLE SELF-PORTRAIT TOILET PAPER WEDDING GOWNS COBWEB PAINTING Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. usually wood from a cigar box. and Krishna to have died beneath it. and attached them to his sculpture! Cheap Chic Wedding’s Annual Toilet Paper Wedding Dress Contest (sponsored by Charmin toilet paper company) invites would-be Vera Wangs to create their own wedding gowns using ONLY toilet paper.345 ordinary matchsticks over 2. cleans. Painting on these delicate leaves is one of the oldest known forms of art! Discovering that he was dying. Since he never leaves his home. and glue. woodworker Masakichi carved an exact replica of himself. must you chew gum? Put it to some better use. Really. Vishnu was believed to have been born under it. He then painstakingly plucked every hair from his body. For years. These dresses. The pipal leaf is deeply revered by both Hindus and Buddhists. and stretches the webs prior to painting. ‘Lint Lady’ Slater Barron of California has created art using dryer lint as her primary medium. The Lads from Liverpool have never looked better than when formed from chewing gum. this realistic plate of sushi rendered in dryer lint simultaneously invites us to eat and somewhat dampens our appetite. was built by Reg Pollard of Manchester from 264. complete with moving parts. Please do not touch! Artist James Butman suffers from agoraphobia. Jimi Hendrix is honoured with his own patty portrait. along with his fingernails.386 hours! Though acutely arthritic. This replica of our cherished Tower Bridge. were the Grand Prize Winner and Honourable Mentions from the First Annual Contest! The ‘canvas’ of this painting by Mabel Wood of Horsehead NY is uniquely delicate: layers of spider web! Emulating a technique dating from 15th century Bavaria. she collects. the Tramp uses materials at hand. In the same culinary spirit as Andy Warhol’s famous soup cans. an abnormal fear of open spaces. Jami Anderson. The ‘Official Lint Portrait of Princess Diana’ depicts the radiant princess in the royal Kensington Palace garden. Is the focus of this painting its idealised view of the sea. friends provide him with the stamps he uses to create beautiful cards and works of art! Unfettered by societal norms and shunning artistic conventions and traditions. and Jaymi Horne. Pollard made over 550 matchstick models during his lifetime. and transforms it within the context of his own imagination.EXHIBIT JIMI HENDRIX IN DUNG DESCRIPTION Enrique Ramos personally collects the material used in his oeuvre. toenails. Mr. Buddha is said to have received Enlightenment sitting beneath a pipal tree. or the canvas itself: a perfect ostrich egg? Sea or Ostrich? The artist toys with us. mixing it with water and resin to create a more durable canvas. . Here. tape. and teeth.

Wales. Following completion of a self-portrait from traditional to positively peculiar. you may adapt to meet your students’ specific needs. 4. 2. students will then select a famous person to portray following a similar process. First they will focus on themselves and – if there is time – then on a popular icon of their choosing. you’ll find a range of additional activities which will enhance creative thinking and application. of course. working from observation. 5. Throughout the project they will consider what they have learned from the ideas.Scheme of work: POSITIVELY PECULIAR PORTRAITS Back in the classroom. At least eight hours of teaching time is delivered through this project. National curriculum mapping for England. The self-portrait activity is through lessons 1 to 4 with the celebrity portrait activity in lessons 5 and 6. Using traditional materials and processes. memory and imagination. . Self-portrait Self-portrait in pastels Experiment with materials Go for background Celebrity portraits Go positively peculiar Bubblegum balls? On conclusion of Positively Peculiar Portraits. Explain that they are going to embark on a journey of their own as a portrait artist to create a positively. after a trip to Ripley’s talk to your students to recap what they discovered and listen to which materials and executions they liked best. methods and approaches used by artists featured in Ripley’s Believe It or Not! as well as other artists you choose to introduce. Scotland and Northern Ireland follows at the conclusion of these teaching notes. The lessons are as follows: 1. Students will create images that reflect their ideas of themselves. peculiar portrait. 6. 3. although. Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. they develop their own self-portrait.

Take care to get the proportions right is the key message. The next stage is to give out copies of the A4 worksheet and then ask each student to study their face in a mirror.Lesson 1 Self-portrait Resources For lesson Pencils ‘Look in the mirror and study your face’ activity sheet for each pupil Lesson Explain that your class is going to create self-portraits. students will be creating portraits from unusual materials so suggest that students need to start collecting the items they are thinking about using to produce their portraits. Ask students how they might represent themselves in words. Open with a class discussion about the idea of representing who they are to other people. Advise that the eyes are the most important feature to get right and that placing the eyes determines the proportions for other facial features. This might be sweet wrappers. Maybe get them to write a short profile first. . Explain that they are going to use the activity sheet as a starting point for drawing their features on the oval face. leaves. tissues etc… Art Line Painting Craft Tone Collage Design Colour Print making 2-D Pattern Digital media 3-D Texture Sculpture Individual work Shape Textiles Collaborative work Form Space Junk? Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. newspapers. ChecK outcoMes Students ask and answer questions using appropriate terminology Students listen with maintained attention and show understanding of what they hear HoMeworK Later in this project. fluff. List words that students associate with identity. How would they like to be seen by others? What kind of messages would they wish to communicate to others? You might choose to read a description of a person and ask your students to visualise what that person might look like.

Art Line Painting Craft Tone Collage Design Colour Print making 2-D Pattern Digital media 3-D Texture Sculpture Individual work Shape Textiles Collaborative work Form Space Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. Each student will work at their own pace. HoMeworK Look at the work of Turner prize winner Chris Ofili. give the portrait real definition and experiment with shading. Students should then begin applying chosen materials to build up their image. Using soft pastels. Explain to students that the next stage will be to make their self-portraits positively peculiar. On completion of all the portraits create a class display. Encourage discussions between students that will develop confidence in the direction taken with their work. what unusual substance has he been known to use in his paintings? Find an example of his work. Art Line Painting Craft Tone Collage Design Colour Print making 2-D Pattern Digital media 3-D Texture Sculpture Individual work Shape Textiles Collaborative work Form Space Lesson 3 Experiment with materials Resources For lesson Mounting boards Glue Collected materials Lesson Begin by having a class a discussion. faces should be shaded in.Lesson 2 Self-portrait in pastels Resources For lesson Soft Pastels Oil Pastels Lesson Time is now devoted to the creation of a self-portrait in traditional mode. . add darkness to the edges and different shades to give a realistic skin tone. Think about inviting other members of staff to visit the display to see if they recognise the subjects of the portraits in traditional formats. give students the opportunity to question critically a range of visual and other information to help them develop ideas for independent work and learn what kinds of materials they are collecting. scale up to A3 and mount on boards. Now explain that students will take their self-portraits. HoMeworK Find an artist who uses found objects in their work. photocopy their originals. explain to the class that they should still try and show tonal values of their features. Show the class the three portraits from Ripley’s Believe It or Not! provided and discuss how the unusual materials add to the portrait.

so others can see if they can guess who the subject is. Why have they selected them? Who else do they think will be interested in their icon and why? What kind of messages would they wish to communicate about the icons? You might ask your students to find a description of their icon to read out first. . Art Line Painting Craft Tone Collage Design Colour Print making 2-D Pattern Digital media 3-D Texture Sculpture Individual work Shape Textiles Collaborative work Form Space Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. Paste the image back down on to boards with separation and twists. reports and blogs.Lesson 4 Go for background Resources For lesson Mounting board Glue Soft Pastels Oil Pastels Lesson In this lesson students begin to work on the background of their portrait. Art Line Painting Craft Tone Collage Design Colour Print making 2-D Pattern Digital media 3-D Texture Sculpture Individual work Shape Textiles Collaborative work Form Space Lesson 5 Celebrity portraits Resources For lesson Scissors Glue Black markers Acetate Images of icons MDF boards Lesson Open with a class discussion about the icons your students have selected to portray. ChecK outcoMes Students ask and answer questions using appropriate terminology Students listen with maintained attention and show understanding of what they hear Split the class into Four groups Each student should split the image of their icon into four sections. As a group choose one section from each icon to make a full portrait. Blend the colours to create a graduated effect. which will make portraits stand out. before naming. Mount portraits on black card. Suggest they use brightly coloured oil pastels to create a funky background. HoMeworK Find a picture of a popular icon for next lesson. Overlay the image with acetate and re-join the linework so icon is made positively peculiar. Direct students to alternative ways of describing people. These portraits make a great display for all your students to guess who is who now images are becoming positively peculiar. such as news stories.

Coat with PVA to give a gloss effect.Lesson 6 Go positively peculiar Resources For lesson 4 large boards of MDF or board (Approx 3’x2’) Mosaic materials. Now the groups focus on background decoration: Using for example a range of old sweet wrappers or labels from packaging create a ‘wow’ background which will add interest and a novelty element making really positively peculiar portraits. magazines or coloured card. Art Line Painting Craft Tone Collage Design Colour Print making 2-D Pattern Digital media 3-D Texture Sculpture Individual work Shape Textiles Collaborative work Form Space Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. . Use small pieces and let everyone in the group have a separate section to work on.Tissue paper or magazines or coloured card Lots of sweet wrappers or old packaging (soup labels). Try to show tone and shading with different shades of each colour. The large boards are going to be decorated in two sections. During this lesson the class will mosaic the face with either tissue paper.Background decoration PVA Glue Lesson Encourage students to discuss and question critically the spectrum of visual imagery and other information that they have absorbed to help them develop ideas. The groups continue to develop their celebrity portrait.

charcoal or pencils to produce a detailed piece of artwork in only 60 seconds! At Ripley’s you can see a Connie Gordon seascape painting that was completed in less than one minute! Sensational Sculpture! Use different materials to make the most sensational sculpture yet. watercolours. eggshells or even bread! At Ripley’s you can see painted leaves. Creative CoMputing! Create amazing artwork by using only letters typed on a computer keyboard! Numbers and symbols may also be used but points will be deducted! This method of artwork first flourished in the fifties and examples can be seen at Ripley’s Believe It or Not! Ripleys Believe It or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. .Additional activities Continuing the theme of Crazy Art. here are some suggestions for art room activity that will stretch the minds and talents of your students. decorated ostrich and quails eggs and a painted tortilla! Minute Masterpiece! Try creating a masterpiece in only a minute! Use pastels. Suggested items could be sweets. junk. Replicate or be inspired by some of the works at Ripley’s where exhibits can be seen which have been created using matchsticks. pasta or marbles. Miraculous Miniatures! Try painting or drawing tiny pictures that can only be viewed with the aid of a magnifying glass. Suggest students seek inspiration from either their own imagination or perhaps copy a famous artwork such as the Last Supper painted on a grain of rice using a human hair that is on display at Ripley’s. sweet wrappers or even toilet paper. Curious Canvases! Throw out the normal canvas and suggest using different surfaces to paint on such as leaves. chewing gum.

designing and making. tactile and other sensory qualities of their own and others work (b)  Engaging with ideas. and for pleasure (e)  Explore and develop ideas using sketchbooks. reflecting and evaluating effectively (b) Making informed choices about media.drawing and graphic media . recognising the varied characteristics of different cultures and using them to inform their creating and making (b) Understanding the role of the artist in context 1. taking different roles in teams (b)  Explore areas that are new to them. select and question critically.3-dimensional construction or prototyping n  Using the visual elements with understanding when engaging in art and design n  Evaluating and appreciating their own and others’ work through discussion and reflection Developing pupils as Individuals Young people should have opportunities to: n  Express themselves through Art and Design Work with other pupils to produce a creative response to group expressions of identity Key Element: Mutual Understanding n  Investigate and respond to works of art that inspire and relate to their lives and experiences Scotland Expressive Arts Using materials. techniques and processes (d)  Draw to express perception and invention. craft and design processes. tools and techniques (c) Taking risks and learning from mistakes 1. constructing n Use these as the basis for further development in a variety of media n  Record information visually in a variety of ways with precision and accuracy n  Systematically collate visual information by exploring stimuli from a number of different viewpoints. .2 Competence (a)  Investigating. using one or more types of visual media n  Record information visually in a variety of ways with precision and accuracy n  Direct observation in varied contexts and situations and develop more confidence in recording visual information through visits n  Identify and represent in appropriate media the subjects they choose to record n  Experiment with familiar and new two and three dimensional media in context CA . imagination and a range of traditional and digital sources n  Developing an appreciation of the work of artists. memory. and across. including both applied and fine art practices (b)  Study of a range of artefacts from contemporary. designers and craft workers from their own and other cultures.1  Explore and create Pupils should be able to: (a)  Develop ideas and intentions by working from first hand observation. selecting from a range of materials. inspiration. adapting and refining their own images and artefacts at all stages of the creative process (d)  Analyse. craft and design (b)  Appreciate how codes and conventions are used to convey ideas and meanings in and between different cultures and contexts (c)  Reflect on and evaluate their own and others’ work.4 Critical Understanding (a)  Exploring visual.Positively Peculiar Portrait / National Curriculum Mapping England and Wales Key Concepts 1. making reasoned choices when developing personal work (e) Develop ideas and intentions when creating images and artefacts (f)  Organise and present their own material and information in appropriate forms 3 Range and Content The study of art craft and design should include: (a)  Work in. drawing. historical. craft and design. observations. imagination and other sources (b)  Investigate how to express and realise ideas using formal elements and the qualities of a range of media (c) Make purposeful images and artefacts. experiences and ideas. past and present n  Developing creative thinking skills and personal creative outcomes through investigating. craft and design. the areas of fine art. techniques and processes (c) Respond to the schools location and local cultural influences (d)  Engage with contemporary art. techniques. materials. including contemporary practice (f) Make links between art and design and other subjects and areas of the curriculum Northern Ireland Art and Design Developing pupils’ Knowledge. techniques and processes 1.3 Cultural Understanding (a)  Engaging with a range of images and artefacts from different contexts.1 Creativity (a) Producing imaginative artefacts that are both original and of value (b) Exploring and experimenting with ideas. skills and media Investigating visually and recording n  Use a variety of ways of recording. working with creative individuals and in creative environments where possible (e) Work with a variety of genres. journals and other appropriate strategies 2. analysing. making. designing. images and artefacts. and identifying how values and meanings are conveyed (c) Developing their own views and expressing reasoned judgements (d) Analysing and reflecting on work from diverse contexts Key Processes 2. painting.2 Understand and Evaluate Pupils should be able to: (a) Use research and investigative skills appropriate to art. including ideas. sketching. gathering and interpreting information from direct experiences. to communicate feelings. experience. personal and cultural contexts (c)  Understanding of art. associated equipment and safe working practices 4 Curriculum Opportunities The curriculum should provide opportunities or pupils to: (a) Work independently and collaboratively. realising. Understanding and Skills Young people have opportunities to develop their own personal and creative responses by: n  Researching.

SELF PORTRAIT Look in the mirror and study your face. . use the oval provided as a starting point. CA Ripleys Believe it or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. Add your features. taking care to get the proportions right. Using a mirror begin your self-portrait.

It’s Art BelieVe it or Not! EXHibit JIMI HENDRIX IN DUNG Materials NOTES Dung mixed with water Stamps STAMP ART SAINT BEATLES SCULPTURE Chewing gum PRINCESS DIANA IN LINT Dryer lint THE DEVIL AND THE DAMSEL Wood Human hair. toenails. and teeth Paint INCREDIBLE SELF-PORTRAIT THE LAST SUPPER ON RICE PAINTED ANTS Ants. fingernails. paints OSTRICH EGG ART Paint COBWEB PAINTING Layers of spider web TOWER BRIDGE IN MATCHSTICKS Matchsticks CA Ripleys Believe it or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. .

Ripleys Believe it or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. CA .

Ripleys Believe it or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc. CA .

CA .Ripleys Believe it or Not! is a registered trademark of Ripley Entertainment Inc.