Chapter 1 with migrations from Eurasia over the Bering Strait.

The origins of human existence in North America began A. with migrations from Eurasia over the Bering Strait. B. with the explorations of Christopher Columbus. C. as a result of the development of the wheel. . long after the last ice age ended. E. from the southern tip of South America. . 11!""" #ears ago. Scholars estimate that human migration into the Americas over the Bering Strait occurred A.$!""" #ears ago. B. %!""" #ears ago. C. &!""" #ears ago. . 11!""" #ears ago. E. 1'!""" #ears ago. (lmec. The first trul# complex societ# in the Americas was that of the A. )a#a. B. A*tec. C. +nca. . ,ueblo. E. (lmec. The use of wheeled vehicles. The earl# South American civili*ations of +ncas! )a#ans! and A*tecs all shared the following characteristics E-CE,T A. the use of wheeled vehicles. B. economies primaril# based on agriculture. C. substantial cities. . complex political s#stems. E. elaborate religious and cultural s#stems. fished salmon as their principal occupation. The pre.Columbian American peoples in the ,acific Northwest A. did not have permanent settlements. B. developed political s#stems as sophisticated as the )a#ans and A*tecs. C. fished salmon as their principal occupation. . were the most peaceful of pre.Columbian societies. E. were /nown as the +nuits. Answer0C builtlarge irrigation s#stems forfarming The pre.Columbian North American peoples in the Southwest A.were primaril# hunters ofsmalgame. B. builtlarge irrigation s#stems forfarming. C. lived in smal!nomadic tribes. . created an econom# exclusivel# based on trade. E. primaril# pursued moose and caribou forsustenance. engaged in sedentar# farming. approximatel#

+n the 1reat,lains region!mostpre.Columbian societies A. B. C. . E. engaged in sedentar# farming. lived in smalnomadic tribes. hunted bufalo forsurvival. used horses. developed a harsh religion thatre2uired human sacrifice.

had the mostabundantfood resources ofan# region ofthe continent ,riorto European contact!the eastern third ofwhatis toda# the 3nited States A.was political# controled b# the Caho/ia +ndians. B. contained no permanentsettlements. C. had the mostabundantfood resources ofan# region ofthe continent. . was populated b# tribes thatengaged in hunting and gathering butdid not#etfarm. E. remained forthe mostpartuninhabited. St.4ouis Caho/ia was a large trading centerlocated nearwhatpresent.da# cit#5 A.St.4ouis B. )emphis C. New (rleans . Baton 6ouge E. etroit a rapid exploitation ofthe land. The agriculturalpractices ofpre.Columbian tribes in the Northeastwere characteri*ed b# A.extensive irrigation s#stems. B. the developmentofmetal.tipped plows. C. a sacred respectfortrees that/eptpeople from cutting them down. . a rapid exploitation ofthe land. E. an emphasis on tobacco cultivation. common linguistic roots. )an# pre.Columbian tribes eastofthe )ississippi6iverwere loosel# lin/ed b# A.the shared use ofa series offorts. B. common linguistic roots. C. economic compacts. . intertribalreligious festivals. E. the +ro2uois Confederac#. the naturalworld. Native American religions were closel# lin/ed to A.the idea ofapocal#pse. B. human sacrifice. C. ideas ofmale dominance. . visions from the world ofspirits. E. the naturalworld. +n altribes women cared forthe children and prepared meals. 7 hich statementbestdescribes the role ofwomen in pre.Columbian North American tribes5

A. +n some tribes!men too/ care ofthe children as the women tended the fields. B. +n altribes women cared forthe children and prepared meals. C. +n no tribes did women participate in the socialand economic organi*ation ofthe tribe. . +n altribes women and men engaged in hunting. E. +n altribes women were responsible forfarming.

were entirel# unaware ofthe existence ofthe Americas. +n regards to /nowledge ofthe Americas priorto the fifteenth centur#!mostEuropeans A.were aware ofthe travels ofthe Norse seaman 4eifEri/sson in the eleventh centur#. B. believed the Americas to consistoflittle more than severalsmalislands. C. were entirel# unaware ofthe existence ofthe Americas. . assumed thatthe Americas were largel# unpopulated. E. had onl# heard ofAmerica from the travels of)arco ,olo. significantpopulation growth. +n the late fifteenth centur#!the desire in Europe to loo/ fornew lands was spurred b# A.significantpopulation growth. B. the absence ofa merchantclass. C. the declining politicalpowerofman# monarchs. . the expansion offeudalism. E. a desire to escape the Blac/ eath.

,ortugal. The preeminentEuropean maritime powerin the fifteenth centur# was A.Spain. B. ,ortugal. C. 8rance. . the Netherlands. E. England. thoughtthe world was much smalerthan itwas in realit#. ChristopherColumbus A. was trained as a sailorthrough his long service to +tal#. B. was a man oflittle ambition. C. believed thatAsia could onl# be reached b# sailing east. . believed the Americas consisted ofa few islands. E. thoughtthe world was much smalerthan itwas in realit#. mistoo/ Cuba forChina. +n his firstvo#age in 19&$!ChristopherColumbus A. B. C. . E. sailed along the coastofpresent.da# :irginia. mistoo/ Cuba forChina. was briefl# captured b# natives he encountered. was forced to putdown a mutin# on the Santa )aria. crossed the Atlantic (cean in six wee/s.

he wanted to hide his discover# from rivalexplorers.

. As a resultofhis third vo#age in 19&'!ChristopherColumbus concluded A. nevertraveled to the New 7 orld. Aernando CortBs the exposure ofthe A*tecs to smalpox. he had nevercome even remotel# close to Asia. he had encountered a continentseparate from Asia. C. B.acific (cean its name5 A.Amerigo :espucci B.ortugal.acific (cean5 A. C. the brutalit# ofthe Spanish con2uistadors. C. :asco de Balboa C.once de 4e@n 1.sailed on the vo#ages with ChristopherColumbus.once de 4e@n . Asia could notbe reached b# a ship traveling westfrom Europe. . the exposure ofthe A*tecs to smalpox. B. was a leading critic ofColumbus=s claims.he believed the# came from the East+ndies in the .acific. 8erdinand )agelan E. :asco de Balboa +n 1%1>!whatEuropean became the firstto see the . he wanted to hide his discover# from rivalexplorers. .ChristopherColumbus caled the native people he encountered on his vo#ages . . E. helped populari*e the idea thatthe Americas were new continents. . Spanish co. Spanish aliances with enemies ofthe A*tecs. B. C.politicaldivisions within the A*tec leadership. Amerigo :espucci A. :asco de Balboa C. Aernando CortBs 8erdinand )agelan 7 hatEuropean explorergave the . hailed from .alofthe lands he had seen were in Asia. he had encountered a continentseparate from Asia. E. B.Amerigo :espucci B. itis whatthe natives caled themselves. ?uan .opting ofthe A*tec religion. 8erdinand )agelan $. E. +n 1%1'!Aernando CortBs=s con2uestofthe A*tecs was made possible largel# due to A. he mispronounced theiractualname. E. ?uan . helped populari*e the idea thatthe Americas were new continents. Norse seamen had firstused the term.+ndians<because A. the lands he had discovered ofered greatmineralwealth.

the rightto exacttribute and laborfrom natives. B. E. )an# helped establish elements ofEuropean civili*ation permanentl# in America. a religious ceremon#. starvation .war B.Augustine. C. B. E. a wilingness to permitthe . . To reduce conflicts!Spanish polic# toward the . an expansion ofthe encomienda s#stem.ueblos outofthe colon# to be sold as slaves. E. made eforts atsuppressing +ndian religious rituals.Augustine. an expansion ofthe encomienda s#stem. C. Santa 8e. C. disease 7 hatfactoris believed to have dramatical# reduced New 7 orld native populations aftercontactwith Europeans5 A. enslavement E. banned intermarriage between Spanish and . the rightto exacttribute and laborfrom natives.T A. Spanish colonies would form one ofthe largestempires in the histor# ofthe world. made eforts atsuppressing +ndian religious rituals. religious conversion . St. . the uniform worn b# con2uistadors. The Catholic Church was ver# interested in spreading Christianit# in )exico.attempted to convertthe . San 8rancisco.The firstSpanish settlers were mostl# interested in farming.a specialtitle given to Spanish explorers ofthe New 7 orld.ueblos to own theirown land.run communit# ofassimilated +ndians. disease C.New (rleans. B.ueblos. a stop to commandeering +ndian labor.ueblo couples. C.ueblo +ndians in the eighteenth centur# involved alofthe folowing E-CE. 7 hich statementaboutSpanish settlements in the New 7 orld is 8A4SE5 A. B. E. . C. St. a Spanish. An encomienda was A. . toleration oftribalreligious rituals. St.4ouis. demanded tribute from the +ndians. E. The firstpermanentSpanish settlementin whatis now the 3nited States was A. B.ueblos to Catholicism. The firstSpanish settlers were mostl# interested in farming.ueblo +ndians rose in revoltagainstSpanish settlers afterthe Spanish A.intensified eforts atassimilating the . . +n 1C'"!the . began to export.Spanish gold and silvermines were enormousl# productive.

+n Spanish colonialsocieties!mesti*os A.centur# Europeans benefitfrom trade between the Americas and Europe5 A.nearl# alcame againsttheirwil.+ndian societies tended to be matrilinealwhich meant A. 1. E. onl# mothers could actas politicalleaders.developed economies and politicals#stems. general# alowed certain legalprotections to the enslaved. B. C. .were considered to be atthe top ofthe socialhierarch#. horses E. was the name given to Catholic priests!friars!and missionaries. were oficial# ilegalbutgeneral# tolerated. E. B. 8orced immigration of+ndian slaves reduced laborshortages in Europe. African and American. E. nearl# alcame againsttheirwiland made up overhalfofalimmigrants to the New 7 orld. .8ood prices sharpl# rose as new crops flooded the European mar/et. had no importantcities ortrading centers. had wel. E. C. . nearl# alcame againsttheirwiland made up overhalfofalimmigrants to the New 7 orld. men could notinheritpropert#. Trade with the Americas ended future food shortages in Europe.people traced theirheredit# through theirmothers. Between 1%"" and 1'""!African immigrants to the Americas A. had little commercialcontactwith the )editerranean world. Aealth care improved as +ndian medicalpractices were widel# practiced in Europe. $.was a primitive region dominated b# warring tribalsocieties. A large numberofnew crops became available in Europe. women were in controlofthe socialinstitutions. onl# women would be the heads offamilies.developed economies and politicals#stems. B.A large numberofnew crops became available in Europe. sugar . +n whatwa# did sixteenth. were usual# sold into slaver#. B.bananas B. . was dominated b# the Christian faith. corn 7 hich ofthe folowing was N(T introduced b# Europeans to the New 7 orld5 A. made up overhalfofalimmigrants to the New 7 orld. nearl# alcame voluntaril# and made up less than halfofalimmigrants to the New 7 orld. C. nearl# alcame voluntaril#. corn came to ma/e up the largestsegmentofthe population. came to ma/e up the largestsegmentofthe population. C. C. B. people traced theirheredit# through theirmothers. pigs C. The portion of7 estAfrica thatprovided the maDorit# ofslaves forthe Spanish Empire ofthe sixteenth centur# A. had wel. .

the English!the utch!the . C. +n England!during the earl# sixteenth centur#!mercantilism thrived mostl# on the basis of A. slaves. The demand forwoolwas declining while the population was growing. 7 hatcondition in England in the sixteenth centur# provided an incentive forcoloni*ation5 A.+tpresumed thatthe world=s wealth was finite.ortuguese!the utch!the English +n whatchronologicalorderdid European countries controlthe African slave trade5 A. 4utherand Calvin encouraged the . C. the . B. . were mostrapidl# accepted in southern Europe. wool. Both the food suppl# and the population were increasing. 4utherand Calvin advocated ideas ofreligious reform thatinfluenced . C. C. 4utherand Calvin helped to brea/ the hold ofpredestination on the . produced a strong desire among his folowers to lead lives thatwere virtuous. +tincreased competition among nations. .the .spices. general# alowed certain legalprotections to the enslaved. C. E. . +treduced the desire fornations to ac2uire and maintain colonies.uritans to leave England forthe New 7 orld. C. +ts principles spread throughoutEurope in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. produced a strong desire among his folowers to lead lives thatwere virtuous The teachings of?ohn Calvin A. .ortuguese!the Spanish!the utch The availabilit# offarmland was declining while the population was growing. lumber. C. proscribed thatchildren born ofenslaved parents were also slaves. .asture land was being converted to crop production while the population was declining.was considered a permanentcondition forthe enslaved individual. were oficial# adopted b# the Church ofEngland. B. +treduced the desire fornations to ac2uire and maintain colonies.ortuguese!the utch!the English B. Both the food suppl# and the population were declining.uritan thought. 7 hich statementregarding the economic theor# ofmercantilism is 8A4SE5 A.ortuguese E. C. B. .uritan mind. B. E. C. wool.+n the fifteenth centur#!slaver# in Africa A. was made up ofan exclusivel# African slave population. the .The availabilit# offarmland was declining while the population was growing. the English!the Spanish!the utch C. +tassumed thatexporting goods was preferable to importing goods. B. corn. was introduced b# Europeans. the utch!the English!the Spanish .uritan thought. B. 4utherand Calvin advocated ideas ofreligious reform thatinfluenced .

the rise of4utheranism within the English Church. The 8rench!li/e the English!tried to remain separate from native peoples. The English concluded from theircolonialexperiences in +reland that A. the rising influence ofFua/ers within the English Church. the Caribbean. B. B. the threatofwarbetween England and 8rance. the death ofFueen Eli*abeth. a politicaldispute between Eing Aenr# :+and the Catholic Church. . Fueen Eli*abeth=s promotion ofthe English theater. harsh treatmentofindigenous populations could lead to rebelion. B. C. . The 8rench colonialeconom# was based on an extensive furtrade. Africa. . The 8rench!li/e the English!tried to remain separate from native peoples. C. The 8rench were more li/el# than the English to press inland. the defeatofthe Spanish Armada. . The 8rench often lived among the natives and married +ndian women. a politicaldispute between Eing Aenr# :+and the Catholic Church. C. The English 6eformation resulted from A. +reland. the death ofFueen Eli*abeth. militar# expenditures were fiscal# wasteful.8rench settlers exercised an influence disproportionate to theirnumbers. England=s firstexperience with coloni*ation came in A. indigenous populations were essentialas the maDorcoloniallaborsource.the suppression ofEnglish Catholics. +reland. were atodds with Catholic doctrines!butnotwith Catholic practices. English colonists should maintain a rigid separation from the indigenous population. . the end ofrule b# the Stuarts.North America. 7 hich statementabout8rench coloni*ation in the New 7 orld is 8A4SE5 A. helped to promote the doctrine offree wilso vitalto encouraging exploration. C. B. C.the# should nottr# to convertindigenous people to English religious beliefs. . B. C. C. C. E.. ?amestown. the persecution b# Eing ?ames +ofliberalpriests. English colonists should maintain a rigid separation from the indigenous population.uritan discontentwas increased b# A. Atthe beginning ofthe seventeenth centur#!English . C. Canada. C.

T A. . B. Seventeenth. England found the seas more open to theircontrol. were wel.were tightl# controled b# the English government.The firstpermanentEnglish settlementin the New 7 orld was established in A.8rance came to dominate Spain. 7 alter6aleigh. C. maintained the politicaland socialinstitutions ofEngland. B. C.centur# English colonialsettlements A. . 6oano/e.was due to a severe food shortage. ?amestown. An importantconse2uence ofthe defeatofthe Spanish Armada was that A. The colon# of:irginia was named in honorof A. England found the seas more open to theircontrol. The cause forfailure ofthe 6oano/e colon# A. 1.Boston.itwas inland so as to ofersecurit# from natives.planned and general# 2uite successfulfrom the start. deterred English from anothercoloni*ing efortforfort# #ears. Catholicism was sweptfrom western Europe. 6aleigh. Chapter $ were essential# business enterprises. The site chosen forthe ?amestown settlementincluded alofthe folowing E-CE.l#mouth.itwas low and swamp# and subDectto outbrea/s ofmalaria. resulted from the death ofthe colon#=s governor. B. $. . was due to a virulentmalarialepidemic. . C. 1. Eli*abeth +.itbordered the territories ofpowerful+ndian tribes. C.were essential# business enterprises. is historical# inconclusive. Spain was forced to relin2uish its New 7 orld empire Eli*abeth +. $. C. Fueen )ar#.:irginia are. B. . C. is historical# inconclusive. itwas inaccessible b# ship. B. the 6eformation extended into Spain. B. 1. >. Aumphre# 1ilbert.were efectivel# isolated from contactwith othernations.

B.building a famil#. $. imposing wor/ and orderon the colonists.the long. itwas inaccessible b# ship.imposing wor/ and orderon the colonists. $. converting the local+ndians to Christianit#.an influx ofrats from settlers=ships thatate much ofthe stored grains. C. C. 1. itwas surrounded b# thic/ woods. $. 1. . B.centered communit#. the sin/ing ofthe colonists=suppl# ship in the Atlantic the production oftobacco The firstimportanteconomic boom in ?amestown resulted from A. The . Between 1C"' and 1C"&!Captain ?ohn Smith strengthened the ?amestown settlementb# A.improving relations with the local+ndians.dividing the decision. 1.ma/ing authorit# among the colonists to improve morale. $.colonists being /eptbarricaded in theirpalisade b# local+ndians. B. C. the search forgold.furtrade with the +ndians.term success ofthe settlement.the extermination ofthe +ndians who used to grow crops. C.the production oftobacco.starving time<in ?amestown during the winterof1C"&G1C1" was partl# the resultof A. colonists being /eptbarricaded in theirpalisade b# local+ndians.the discover# ofgold and silver. a droughtthatled to crop failures. $.1. importing African slaves to rebuild the fort.developing peacefulrelations with the +ndians in the area. the cultivation ofcotton improved relations with the local+ndians. a developmentoffisheries and lumber. 1. the search forgold. introducing tobacco to the colonists. B. +n 4ondon!the initialpromoters of?amestown encouraged colonists to focus on A.

. 1. The :irginia Compan# developed the . cause conflictamong the neighboring +ndian tribes. 1. folowed +ndians into slaver#. raise revenue from the sale ofland. B.began a rapid stream ofAfrican slaves to the British colonies. 1.were preferred to European indentured servants.T A. $. B. itputan end to a violentuprising b# disgruntled colonists.colonists were given a share oflocalpoliticalrepresentation. B. C.owning women colonists were alowed to vote.A maDorit# ofits colonists enDo#ed significanteconomic success. 7 hen the Aouse ofBurgesses was created in :irginia in 1C1&! A. $.re2uire families to migrate together. C. C.rising prosperit# forthe colon#.attractnew settlers to the colon#.civili*e<+ndians. B. C.discourage poorpeople from moving to the colon#. The settlementsurvived despite an enormous loss oflife.The settlementwas notable forits peacefulrelations with local+ndians. C. 1. $.the rapid wearing outofthe soil. itrecommended that:irginia declare independence from England were mostli/el# indentured servants The firstblac/s imported to :irginia in 1C1& A. improved relations with the local+ndians. the expansion ofEuropean settlementinto the interior. 1. arrived as independentlandowners.The cultivation oftobacco around ?amestown resulted in althe folowing E-CE.headright<s#stem to A.land. B.itgave settlers the fulpoliticalcontroloftheircolon#.were mostli/el# indentured servants. The settlementsurvived despite an enormous loss oflife. attractnew settlers to the colon#. The settlementwas notable forits toleration ofpoliticalfreedom. colonists were given a share oflocalpoliticalrepresentation. $. $.the search fornew sources oflabor. 7 hich ofthe folowing statements bestcharacteri*es the first#ears of?amestown=s existence5 A.The settlementwas often assaulted b# Spanish invaders. created an interestin England to .

was a particularl# dificultcrop to cultivate.neversanctioned militar# action againstthe Native Americans of:irginia. found mostofits :irginia ventures to be ver# profitable. had its charterrevo/ed b# ?ames +.was primaril# a resultofreligious tensions between natives and settlers.could onl# be grown in the New 7 orld. $.ocahontas. $.was absorbed b# the crown because itwas becoming too powerful. $. C. 1.created an interestin England to . $. The :irginia Compan# A. 1. B. . could notbe grown in the swamp# land around ?amestown. B.was /idnapped b# ?ohn 6olfe. refused to convertto Christianit#.ocahontas A.owhatan +ndians and :irginian colonists. tools animalhusbandr# produced #ields greaterthan an# ofthe European grains.owhatan +ndians in :irginia A. agriculture +n which area oftechnolog# were +ndians more advanced than the :irginia colonists5 A.married Englishman ?ohn Smith. was uncommon untilthe earl# eighteenth centur#. +n the seventeenth centur#!English colonists recogni*ed thatcorn A.deepl# opposed the importation ofAfricans to the colonies.was firsttriggered b# the /idnapping of. included an +ndian attac/ on ?amestown which /iled hundreds ofcolonists. was the cause ofa warbetween the . B. C.was theirmostfinancial# valuable crop. included an +ndian attac/ on ?amestown which /iled hundreds ofcolonists. 1.civili*e<+ndians.ocean. B.The .weaponr# 1. 1. C. 7 arfare between Englishmen and . C.produced #ields greaterthan an# ofthe European grains.continued withoutinterruption untilthe earl# eighteenth centur#.owhatan +ndian . $.agriculture B.going vessels C. had its charterrevo/ed b# ?ames +.

slaver# in :irginia.Ais relations with +ndians were violentand blood#. 1. expanded to include landholding blac/ men. C. Ae extended the politicalrepresentation forfrontiersettlers. was a conflictbetween eastern and western :irginia.speled the demise ofthe :irginia Compan#. C. B# 1CH"!politicalrepresentation forcolonists in :irginia A. $. had grown more restrictive.one.was a refuge forEnglish Catholics. $. 1.experienced tremendous warfare with local+ndians. favored western counties overeastern counties.alowed no .rotestantsettlers. 1. B.had grown more restrictive. B. 1.spread throughoutseveralcolonies. +n its beginning!the )ar#land colon# A.saw the ro#algovernorof:irginia forced to resign. was led b# Captain ?ohn Smith. was a conflictbetween eastern and western :irginia. C. $. Ae extended the politicalrepresentation forfrontiersettlers.was a refuge forEnglish Catholics. experienced considerable conflictwith nearb# 8rench settlers. B.saw elections ta/e place ever# two #ears. $. . C. B.was open to alwhite men overthe age oftwent#. 7 hich the folowing statements regarding Sir7 iliam Ber/ele# is 8A4SE5 A. Bacon=s 6ebelion A.Ae was a dominantpoliticalfigure in :irginia formore than three decades. C.Ae encouraged :irginia to develop westward. The suppression ofBacon=s 6ebelion helped spur A. Ae sentexplorers across the Blue 6idge )ountains.tobacco production.European investment. B.slaver# in :irginia. carried on forseveral#ears.

began as a ro#alcolon#. C. . uring its first#earin North America!the .was little diferent.emigrated 2uietl# to northern 8rance. $. C. $. was more li/el# to advance . +n 1C$"!the . +n 1C"'!.uritans A.carried outwarfare thatwiped outmuch ofthe local+ndian population. $. C.ilgrims who came to North America A. B. B.survived in large partdue to assistance from +ndians.established theircapitalin Salem.uritan separatists who wished to leave England A.thirds ofits population die.l#mouth colon# A. $.1.l#mouth. %. the triangulartrade. C.were encouraged b# the Church ofEngland to emigrate. could notlegal# do so. could notlegal# do so. was more hostile.came overthe obDections ofthe :irginia colon#.began to see/ refuge in :irginia.was more tolerant. 1. saw two. was less li/el# to involve imprisonmentforreligious beliefs. 9. survived in large partdue to assistance from +ndians.grew rich from the surrounding productive farmlands. 1. established critical# importanttrade routes with ?amestown to the south.uritan . carried outthe largestsingle migration in the seventeenth centur#. C. were Christian missionaries. B.were led b# )iles Standish. B.uritan thoughtin England.were see/ing to escape militar# service in England.uritan merchants who founded the )assachusetts Ba# Compan# A. were Christian missionaries. cals forindependence from England. 1. The . enDo#ed a particularl# mild wintertheirfirst#ear. B. chartered a colon# in .was more hostile.intended to settle atCape Cod. Compared to Eing ?ames +!Eing Charles +=s treatmentof.

$.was a confirmed Separatist. C.lived as grim and Do#less people. were given theircolonialcharterb# Charles +. $.< 1. $.theocrac#. attempted to ta/e overthe leadership ofthe colon#. advocated the principle ofpluralmarriage.feltthe# were creating a hol# communit# thatwould be a modelforthe world.uritans A.1.said the land occupied b# the colonists belonged to the +ndians. 1. $.wanted to constructtheircommunit# on high ground to save itfrom +ndian attac/s.:ermont. Thomas Aoo/eris to be associated with establishing the colon# of A. C. created a colonial. C.< The )assachusetts Ba# . C. Connecticut. said the land occupied b# the colonists belonged to the +ndians. wanted to diferentiate theircommunit# from the materialism and ac2uisitiveness ofNew Aaven. )aine. B. soughtto create a communit# in which alpeople were treated as e2uals. Connecticut. introduced freedom ofworship to the New 7 orld.created a colonial.wanted to create a communit# thatwould be open to alpeoples ofalfaiths.argued thatthe colon# should maintain alegiance to the Church ofEngland. B. carried outthe largestsingle migration in the seventeenth centur#.theocrac#. (ne reason 6oger7 iliams was deported from the )assachusetts colon# was he A. $.6hode +sland. foughtwith the surrounding +ndians almostimmediatel#. 1. feltthe# were creating a hol# communit# thatwould be a modelforthe world The . B. 1. .too/ vows ofpovert# as evidence oftheircommitmentto theirfaith. was notable forits religious toleration.shining cit# upon a hil< A. B.New Aampshire.uritan founders in )assachusetts who described theircolon# as a .

uritans came to view +ndian societ# A.organi*ed the firstful# democratic governmentin North America. C.the Seminoles B.uritan could 4EAST accuratel# be described as a religious dissenter5 A.the Sioux 1. C. $. the 7 ampanoags the .with fearand contempt. 1.?ohn 7 inthrop C.as worth preserving. 1. was a single motherwho refused to marr#. preached againstwhatshe caled the .argued thatonl# the . +n 1C>'!Anne Autchinson was deported from the )assachusetts colon# because she A. (vertime in the seventeenth centur#!an increasing numberofNew England .had strong ties to the church in the )assachusetts colon#. $.6oger7 iliams 1.elect<were entitled to an# religious orpoliticalauthorit#. chalenged the prevailing assumptions ofthe properrole ofwomen in societ#. 1. ?ohn 7 heelwright Thomas Aoo/er with fearand contempt.7 hen itwas established in 1C99!the colon# of6hode +sland A. $. was notable forits religious toleration. as partofthe 1odl# communit#.had no ties to the )assachusetts colon#.chalenged the prevailing assumptions ofthe properrole ofwomen in societ#. $.owhatans C. B.< ?ohn 7 inthrop 7 hich New England .with condescending admiration.Antinomian heres#.was accused ofpracticing witchcraft. C. $. the . B.the . banned ?ews from emigrating. B. as helpfulneighbors and partners in commerce.e2uots +n 1C>H!hostilities bro/e outbetween English settlers in the Connecticut:ale# and whatlocalNative American tribe5 A.e2uots .Anne Autchinson B.

The English 6estoration began with the reign of A. banned the importation ofindentured servants. Charles +. The 8undamentalConstitution forthe Carolina colon# . B.arliamentand supporters ofEing Charles +. Scottish and +rish gentr# desiring to secede from England. guaranteed religious freedom to alChristians.uritans. C. 1. 1. Eli*abeth +. 1.ruled the colon# with dictatorialpowers.the matchloc/ mus/et. supporters ofEing Charles +.hilip=s 7 ar!+ndians made efective use ofthe relativel# new weapon! A. Charles +. C. 1.arliamentnorsupporters ofEing Charles +. the artiler# cannon. $. was influenced b# the English philosopher?ohn 4oc/e. The proprietors who founded the Carolina colon# A.guaranteed religious freedom to alChristians. $.reDected the headrights#stem. +n Eing .the repeating revolver.the flintloc/ rifle. +n the 1C9"s!during the English Civil7 ar!the Cavaliers were A. B. >.the flintloc/ rifle. 9.arliament!who were largel# . $. both the forces of. C. 2uic/l# made ita financialsuccess. $. supporters ofEing Charles +.1eorge +. neitherthe forces of.(liverCromwel.the forces of.?ames +. B. the gatling gun.

$. 1.the northern and southern regions were economical# and social# distinctfrom each other. saw its population grow slowl# forits firstfift# #ears. the northern and southern regions were economical# and social# distinctfrom each other. B.the colon# was able to attractlarge numbers ofsettlers from nearb# colonies. $.was influenced b# the English philosopher?ohn 4oc/e. emerged aftera struggle between the English and the utch. emerged aftera struggle between the English and the utch. its econom# was grounded in tobacco production. had greatethnic and religious diversit#. B. >. 1. made no provisions fora colonialparliament. 1. $. 1. B.)ar#land B. Althese answers are correct. )ar#land 7hich ofthe folowing was N(T a restoration colon#5 A. developed an importantclass oflarge landowners. itadvocated independence from England welbefore alothermainland colonies. initial# did notinclude slaver#. banned slaver# from its inception.saw its founding proprietors from the Carolina colon#. its founders had discouraged the use ofslaves. >.had few slaves during its earl# existence. $. B. had greatethnic and religious diversit#. The developmentofthe Carolina colon# was notable in that A. 4i/e New Ior/!the New ?erse# colon# A. The New Ior/ colon# A.Carolina .soughtto create a societ# ofgenerale2ualit# among Englishmen. was characteri*ed b# a unified and general# peacefulsociet#. 1.made a commitmentto representative assemblies.2uic/l# developed a strong localgovernment.A. 1.

7 iliam . B. 1. Althese answers are correct. believed alcould attain salvation.enns#lvania 1.enns#lvania was A.had a disregard forclass orgenderdistinctions. $. B. were pacifists. +n the seventeenth centur#!English Fua/ers A. $. elaware. Althese answers are correct. $.)ar#land.enns#lvania with a strong militar# presence. . 1. B. 1.reDected the doctrine oforiginalsin. used unscrupulous and deceptive advertising to attractsettlers.1. $.enns#lvania. >. was a man ofgreatwealth who converted to Fua/erism. paid theirclerg# handsomel#.New ?erse#. 3nli/e . Althese answers are correct. nevervisited . were notpersecuted b# the English government. B. 1.was a man ofgreatwealth who converted to Fua/erism. suppressed the local+ndians in . New Ior/ .had no paid clerg#. New ?erse# reDected the doctrine oforiginalsin.enn A.uritans!the Fua/ers A. >.accepted the conceptofpredestination. The colon# established b# people see/ing to separate from .established a moderatel# successfulbutnevercosmopolitan colon#.

Aouse ofBurgesses Fua/erism 1. concluded itwas cheaperto bu# new African slaves than to protectthose the# owned. B# 1H""!the Spanish colonies north of)exico A. proprietar# colonies were re2uired b# theircharters to use slaves. B. $. 1. developed significanteconomic success through the production oftobacco. 1. $.town halmeeting B. elaware. man# colonies gradual# embraced slaver# as a solution to theirlabortroubles. .developed theirsettlements along the same lines as in the Chesapea/e. 1. B. English racism prevented blac/s and whites from wor/ing togetheron e2ualterms. 1.were being developed through a string ofCatholic missions.had attracted considerable interestfrom the Spanish government. slaver# 7 hatsocialinstitution did Europeans in the Caribbean share with theircounterparts in North America5 A. added little economic value to the Spanish Empire.1.ro#alcolonies were re2uired b# theirgovernmentto use slaves. Eentuc/#. New Ior/. B. had a smalerpercentage ofslaves than in the North American colonies. religious tolerance slaver# man# colonies gradual# embraced slaver# as a solution to theirlabortroubles 6egarding the origins ofslaver# in the North American English colonies! A. added little economic value to the Spanish Empire. 1.the practice ofusing slave laborin England was carried overinto the colonies. The English colonialsettlements in the Caribbean A. were forced to dealwith largernative populations than those on the mainland. $. 1.concluded itwas cheaperto bu# new African slaves than to protectthose the# owned.

9. no one European or+ndian group held a cleardominance. 1. contained more than one milion Spanish citi*ens. slaves. $. b# Fua/ermissionaries. Spanish colonists were long the dominantpower.$. to 2uic/l# ma/e mone# forits investors.to create a militar# barrieragainstthe Spanish.+ndian tribes were largel# able to /eep outEuropean colonists. English colonists could onl# produce products thatwere also sold in England. English colonists 2uic/l# became the dominantpower. indentured servants. both free blac/s and slaves. >. 1. (riginal#!the 1eorgia colon# excluded A.English colonies were closed to altrade exceptthatcarried b# English ships. 1eorgia was founded A. neitherfree blac/s norslaves.Certain colonialproducts could be exported onl# to England. 1. 1. . 8rench colonists managed to hold the balance ofpower. both free blac/s and slaves.free blac/s. to create a militar# barrieragainstthe Spanish. B.no one European or+ndian group held a cleardominance. AlEuropean goods sentto the colonies had to pass through England and were subDectto taxes. 1.to provide a refuge forCatholics. $. $. 7 hich ofthe folowing statementregarding the Navigation Acts J1CC"sKis 8A4SE5 A. +n colonialNorth America!the . English colonists could onl# produce products thatwere also sold in England. included the largestSpanish cit# in the Americas. 1. as a haven forreligious dissenters. $. B. B. 1.middle grounds<refers to a region in which A.

colonialAmerican tobacco plantations. uties were imposed on the coastaltrade among the English colonies. $. was caled into being b# Eing Charles +.1. B. >. The ominion ofNew England 1. The English . $. 1. landowners. New England merchants. )assachusetts.6hode +sland. Business and planters in the British Caribbean.British business and merchants. New Ior/. Chapter > laborers. 1. $.laborers.New ?erse#. commercialagents. $. C. declared the Navigation Acts nuland void.religious dissenters.aristocrats. 1. 4eisler=s 6ebelion too/ place in A. was limited to whatnow constitutes New England.centur# English migrants to the North American colonies were A. B. 1.arliamentenacted the Navigation Acts primaril# to benefit A. caled fora single ro#algovernor. $. preserved existing coloniallegislative assemblies. Connecticut. caled fora single ro#algovernor. . B. 1. )ostseventeenth. British business and merchants. :irginian planters. New Ior/. >.

+n regards to coloniallife expectanc# during the seventeenth centur#! A.life expectanc# was highestin the southern colonies.women significantl# outnumbermen. life expectanc# in New England was unusual# high.few single adults. 1. uring the seventeenth centur#!English colonists in the Chesapea/e saw A. female indentured servants constituted one. mostindentured servants received land upon completion oftheircontracts. B.indentured servants.fourth ofthe totalarrivals.slaves. B.women.ofa declining birthrate in England. C. $. B# 1H""!English coloniallandowners began to rel# more heavil# on African slaver# because A.convicts. the English governmenthad come to discourage the practice ofindenture. ofa declining birthrate in England. C. colonialparliaments passed laws improving the status ofindentured servants. female indentured servants were t#pical# notalowed to marr# while undercontract. B. indentured servants. 1.indentured servants general# refused to wor/ in the southern colonies. C. +n the seventeenth centur#!the greatmaDorit# ofEnglish immigrants who came to the Chesapea/e region were A. B. C. C.contracts forindenture general# lasted fourto five #ears.ofworsening economic conditions in England.bac/countr# settlers had a similarlife expectanc# as settlers in coastalareas. $.the presence ofindentured servants was a source ofsocialunrest. 1. $. Alofthe folowing were characteristics ofthe English indenture s#stem E-CE.T A.mostindentured servants received land upon completion oftheircontracts.one in two white children in the Chesapea/e died in infanc#. men had a shorterlife expectanc# than women. 1.a life expectanc# formen ofDustoverfort# #ears. life expectanc# in New England was unusual# high. . $. religious dissenters. a life expectanc# formen ofDustoverfort# #ears. B.

practices ac2uired from +ndians. were more li/el# to have theirfamil# remain intact. bore an average offourchildren apiece. The seventeenth. C. Compared to women in colonialChesapea/e!New England women A.grew to understand the lin/ between bacteria and infection. the beliefthata person needed to maintain a balance ofdiferentbodil# fluids.became increasingl# professionali*ed during this period. an increasingl# unbalanced sex ratio. six milion. 1. C.general# married laterthan in England.one milion.rarel# engaged in premaritalsex. 1. eightmilion.centur# medicalpractice ofdeliberatel# bleeding a person was based on A. B# 1HH"!the non. reDected purging and bleeding as medicaltechni2ues. $.two milion.scientific experimentation and observation. $. the beliefthata person needed to maintain a balance ofdiferentbodil# fluids. averaged one pregnanc# forever# two #ears ofmarriage. eightoutoften children d#ing in infanc#.Calvinistreligious doctrine. were nearl# almales.general# had a longerlife expectanc# than theirhusbands. B. C. B. averaged one pregnanc# forever# two #ears ofmarriage. .had little orno /nowledge ofsterili*ation. +n the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries!medicalpractitioners A. $. $.evidence thatithelped in the recover# from ilness. had little orno /nowledge ofsterili*ation. two milion.1.fourmilion. 1. B. +n the seventeenth centur#!white women in colonialChesapea/e A. C. $. 1. B.+ndian population ofthe English colonies was Dustover A.were more li/el# to become widows.

uritan communities!the famil# was A. had much less legalauthorit# in theirmarriages.mar/ed b# relativel# loose parentalsupervision. E. 1. . .from Africa to the New 7 orld. C.from Africa to the New 7 orld.neitherhighl# valued norexpected to be underthe authorit# ofwomen. 1.from the Caribbean to the mainland colonies.had fewerchildren. C. $. widows tended notto remarr#. dowries were a common feature ofmarriage.were considered to be social# e2ualto males. gendere2ualit# was reinforced b# the prevailing culture. were expected to be maDorcontributors to the famil#. C. E. $.were more li/el# to have theirfamil# remain intact. were more li/el# to become pregnantbefore marriage than in the South. fourmilion.from the coastalregions ofcolonies to theirinteriors. highl# valued. 1. B. $.both highl# valued and expected to be underthe authorit# ofwomen. B. .expected to be underthe authorit# ofwomen. C.choosing a spouse independentofa parent=s wishes was common. B. C. +n colonialNew England . B.dowries were a common feature ofmarriage. losttheirhusbands earlierin life. eleven milion. +n colonialNew England .strictparentalcontrolmade premaritalsexualrelations almostnonexistent.B.uritan communities!women A.from Africa to Europe. +n colonialNew England! A. The term middle passage refers to the movementofenslaved Africans A.were expected to be maDorcontributors to the famil#. could notbe oficialmembers ofthe church.between individualNorth American colonies.highl# valued. The estimated totalnumberofAfricans forcibl# broughtto alofthe Americas as slaves is 1.were nothighl# valued. .

C. The demand forslaves led to a stead# rise in the prices paid forthem. 1.eleven milion. had a higherstatus than pure Africans in Spanish America.nothing more. uring the seventeenth centur#!the 6o#alAfrican Compan# ofEngland A. C. B.seven milion. E. had a higherstatus than pure Africans in both Spanish and English America. The diversit# ofthe American population was its mostenduring and distinctive feature. Blac/s were heavil# concentrated in a few southern colonies nothing more.nineteen milion. had a lowerstatus than pure Africans in both Spanish and English America. 9. 1. 1.sentthe maDorit# ofits enslaved Africans directl# to the Chesapea/e colonies.B. C.religion. $. $. $.would onl# ship adultAfrican men in the slave trade.twent#.laboring s/ils. C.There were about$%!""" slaves in the colonies. had a higherstatus than pure Africans in English America. 7 hatstatementregarding slaver# in English North America in 1H"" is 8A4SE5 A. +n English North American colonies!the application ofslave codes was based on race and A.Blac/s outnumbered whites in some colonies. . . The demand forslaves led to a stead# rise in the prices paid forthem. origin ofbirth.deliberatel# restricted the suppl# ofslaves to the North American colonies. +n comparing the colonialsocieties ofSpanish America and English America!people ofmixed races A. economic status.stopped importing slaves directl# from Africa. B. 7 hich statementaboutcolonialAmerica is T63E5 . E.lowered the prices forslaves to increase theirsale in the North American colonies.six milion deliberatel# restricted the suppl# ofslaves to the North American colonies.had a higherstatus than pure Africans in Spanish America.There were twice as man# blac/ men as blac/ women. >. B. had a lowerstatus than pure Africans in Spanish America.

wentthrough numerous boom.alatinate 1ermans. Agriculture was more diverse than in the southern colonies.was ver# dificultand unhealth# wor/. mostl# occurred in inland regions.To be classified as blac/!one had to have atleastone African. C.+rish. The largestcontingentofimmigrants during the colonialperiod were the A. 7 hich statementaboutthe econom# ofthe northern colonies is T63E5 A. . The seventeenth.Agriculture was notthe dominantindustr# ofthe econom#.The population characteristics ofcolonialAmerica were 2uite similarto England. B.centur# tobacco econom# ofthe Chesapea/e region A. $.and. $.Scotch. B. The diversit# ofthe American population was its mostenduring and distinctive feature. 1. saw prices rise steadil# throughoutthe period. There were more colonialAmerican Catholics than . 1.bustc#cles.wentthrough numerous boom.+rish. +rish Catholics.bustc#cles.American parent.Birth patterns and life expectanc# were similarthroughoutNew England and the Chesapea/e. 1..was a new crop to mostAfricans.lanters were more li/el# to rel# on slave labor. C. saw planters cutbac/ on production as a wa# ofraising prices. B. C. $. was found mostl# in the Chesapea/e colonies.Conditions forfarming were more favorable than in the southern colonies. $.8rench Auguenots. 1. $. Scotch.rotestants.relied largel# on free white labor. 1. C.)oravians and )ennonites. B.A. C. 6ice production in colonialAmerica A. New England was able to develop severalmaDorexportcrops. was ver# dificultand unhealth# wor/. B.and.was concentrated on man# smalfarms with few slaves. Agriculture was more diverse than in the southern colonies.often saw production notmeetdemand. .

steel. B. +n the .triangulartrade<the North American colonies primaril# contributed A. Althese answers are correct. $. B. an inade2uate transportation networ/. B. +ndustriali*ation in colonialAmerica was hampered b# A.suficient.were self. brass.papercurrenc#. 1. 1. C. Althese answers are correct.gold. Commerce in colonialAmerica relied in large parton A. gold dust. barter.manufactured goods. 1. C. silver. . B.sugar.English parliamentar# regulations. $. silver.a smaldomestic mar/et. +n the seventeenth centur#!mostcolonialfamilies A. C. 1. The firstsignificantmetals industr# in the colonies was developed forthe metal A.did notown a plow. grew and processed theirown grain. B. raw materials.iron.raw materials. used wagons to transfergoods to mar/et.gold. 1. C.barter. C.owned spinning wheels orlooms.an inade2uate laborsuppl#. $.iron. credit. did notown a plow. $.

>. $. created few new wealth# landowners. rarel# saw the landownerdo an# manuallabor. 1. 1.tended to be rough and relativel# smal.$. E.used man# more slaves than indentured servants. 1. elaware and .eighteenth centur#!a distinctcolonialmerchantclass came into existence because of A.enns#lvania.North Carolina and South Carolina. $. ilegalcolonialtrade in mar/ets outside ofthe British Empire.1eorgia and South Carolina. :irginia and )ar#land. 1.the abolishmentofthe British Navigation Acts. B.the developmentofa substantialcolonialmanufacturing industr#.both increasing class distinctions within societ# and the association ofmaterialpossessions with personalvirtue and refinement.centur# southern plantations A. . C.increasing class distinctions within societ#. uring the eighteenth centur#!rising consumerism in the American colonies was encouraged b# A.growing areas of A. B# the mid. . The firstplantations in colonialNorth America emerged in the tobacco. ilegalcolonialtrade in mar/ets outside ofthe British Empire. B. read# access to manufactured goods. C. increased access to consumercredit. tended to be rough and relativel# smal. Althese answers are correct. both increasing class distinctions within societ# and the association ofmaterialpossessions with personalvirtue and refinement. the association ofmaterialpossessions with personalvirtue and refinement. $. B.New Ior/ and New ?erse#. Seventeenth.enabled planters to controltheirmar/ets. slaves.neitherincreasing class distinctions within societ# northe association ofmaterialpossessions with personalvirtue and refinement.

C. one.reDected b# the restofthe slave communit#. C.led to the banning ofthe slave trade in )ar#land.Slaves hardl# everresisted theirmasters. %. nine. Slave religion was a blend ofChristianit# and African fol/lore.Slave religion was a blend ofChristianit# and African fol/lore. B. >.7 hites rarel# intruded upon the conventions ofblac/ societ#. subtle defiance orevasion oftheirmasters. B. . rarel# recogni*ed b# theirwhite fathers. subtle defiance orevasion oftheirmasters.$.led to the death ofdo*ens ofwhite :irginian colonists. :irginia and )ar#land. E. $. 7 hich statementregarding the lives ofslaves in colonialNorth America is T63E5 A. >. prompted 1eorgia to strengthen its laws on slaver#. three. B.running awa#. B. one. C.saw slaves in South Carolina attemptto escape from the colon#.fourth J$%L K. The mostcommon form ofresistance b# enslaved Africans to theircondition was A. saw slaves in South Carolina attemptto escape from the colon#. one.fourths JH%L K. freed atbirth. 1. 1. .tenths J&"L K.halfJ%"L K. The percentage ofblac/s living on a plantation ofatleastten slaves was approximatel# 1.fourths JH%L K.rarel# produced. $.regarded as white b# the white societ#. C. $. The Stono 6ebelion A.arson.)ostslaves wor/ed as house servants.destruction ofcrops. three. 9. led planters to resume hiring indentured servants fortheirlaborneeds. rarel# recogni*ed b# theirwhite father +n the North American colonies!mulatto children were A.Slaves had no opportunit# to develop theirown societ# orculture.third J>>L K.

selectmen.alland.both population growth and cals forgendere2ualit#.S/iled slaves were attimes hired outto otherplanters. (vertime!tensions in . $. adultmales who were church members. 7 hich ofthe folowing statements aboutslave wor/ is 8A4SE5 A. arrangementofauthorit# within New England assemblies..8ield hand was the predominantoccupation ofboth male and female slaves. C. A few slaves were able to bu# theirfreedom. poisoning offood.. $. 1. B.uritan New England!participation in town meetings was limited to A. 1.adultmales who were church members.owning males. Colonialslave codes forbade teaching slaves s/iled trades and crafts.population growth.rimogeniture<refers to the A. both population growth and commerciali*ation ofsociet#. passing ofpropert# to the firstborn son. .tending ofa servant=s indenture. $. women oflow socialposition.rightto vote. E.$. practice ofgranting land onl# to those assured ofsalvation.Some slaves on largerplantations learned trades and crafts. alchurch members. both population growth and commerciali*ation ofsociet#.passing ofpropert# to the firstborn son.uritan New England communities developed as a resultof A. land. +n . the practices ofland inheritance. . 1. cals forgendere2ualit#.owning adults.notmembers ofthe church. B. Colonialslave codes forbade teaching slaves s/iled trades and crafts.< C. $. C. B. 1. +n the outbrea/s ofwitchcrafth#steria thatmar/ed New England coloniallife!those accused were mostcommonl# A. >.

almostresulted in the revocation of)assachusetts=s charter. B# the 1HH"s!the two largestportcities in colonialNorth America were A. .was uni2ue in the histor# ofcolonialNew England. women oflow socialposition. Class divisions in colonialNorth American cities were A. B. $. ruralpopulations had few grievances with the crown.hiladelphia and New Ior/. saw the originalaccusers recanttheircharges. B. The stor# ofthe witchcrafttrials in Salem A. more realand visible than in ruralplaces.criminals. was evidence ofa decline in religious fervor. 1.sharperthan in corresponding European cities. +n the 1HC"s!the 6evolutionar# crisis in English North America began in cities because A. indentured servants. 1. 1. led to prison terms!butno executions. >. New Ior/ and Boston. smoothed overb# church and socialregisters. cities were the centers ofintelectualinformation. $. 1. B. 1.B.the maDorit# ofthe population lived in urban areas.hiladelphia and Charleston. . 1. $.. essential# nonexistent.more realand visible than in ruralplaces. Boston and Charleston. 1. wea/erin the North than in the South. .hiladelphia and New Ior/.saw the originalaccusers recanttheircharges. 1.Boston and Newport. +ndians orslaves. B. $.cities were the centers ofintelectualinformation.

could notpractice theirreligion openl# an#where.had theirlargestcommunit# in 6hode +sland. Althese answers are correct. was enhanced because no single religious code could be imposed on an# large area.flourished due to the diversit# ofpractices broughtb# settlers. enDo#ed considerable toleration.New ?erse#. grew despite laws establishing the Church ofEngland as the oficialcolonialreligion. 1. $. sufered theirgreatestpersecution in )ar#land.alofthe colonies. .was unmatched in an# European nation. 1. >. were oficial# ilegal. E. could notvote orhold ofice. sufered theirgreatestpersecution in the Carolinas. +n the English colonies!6oman Catholics A. B. cit# inhabitants tended to be rowdierthan theirruralcounterparts.did notlive in mostofthe colonies. The Church ofEngland was the oficialfaith in A. $. were general# weltreated. Althese answers are correct. $.sufered theirgreatestpersecution in )ar#land. +n the eighteenth centur#!religious toleration in the American colonies A. +n the English colonies!?ews A. >. B. 1.)assachusetts. 1. $.made up a large minorit# population ofmostcolonies.$. :irginia. :irginia. Althese answers are correct. could notvote orhold ofice. B. 1. >. B. Connecticut.

+n the mid. B. tolerance. B.highl# orthodox . A leading figure ofthe 1reatAwa/ening!?onathan Edwards preached A.uritan ministers began preaching againstthe decline of A. 1. $. $. 1. witchcraft. communit#. freedom. sermons. 1reatAwa/ening. 1. 1reatAwa/ening.uritan ideas. 1. piet#. 1. town meetings.piet#. had particularappealwith women and #oung men. Fua/ers. $.uritan ideas. The 1reatAwa/ening ofthe 1H>"s and 1H9"s A.?eremiads<referto A. . 1.uritans.began as a calfor#oung men to become ministers. Enlightenment highl# orthodox . 1eorge 7 hitefield is to be associated with the A. >. B.1C""s!New England . 1. failed to ta/e rootin southern colonies.communit# experiments.sermons.a measurementofwealth. alienated traditionalNew England .famil#. $. helped to smooth diferences within existing congregations.had particularappealwith women and #oung men.founding ofthe American BaptistChurch. B. .growth ofAmerican Catholicism.

suggested thatpeople had considerable controlovertheirown lives. almanacs. $. B.< 1. the invention ofthe printing press in the earl# 1H""s.politicalpamphlets. 1.coloniallaws which protected freedom ofspeech in the printed word. 1. $. had little influence on American intelectualthought.emphasi*ed the importance ofreligious faith. $. Alofthe folowing Americans made importantcontributions to EnlightenmentthoughtE-CE. Afterthe Bible!the firstwidel# circulated publications in colonialAmerica were A. chalenged concepts such as . Thomas ?eferson. historicalwritings. . salvation through good wor/s. the Stamp Actof1HC%. 1. suggested thatpeople had considerable controlovertheirown lives.T A.naturallaws. The wide availabilit# ofreading materialin colonialAmerica was the resultof A. 1.BenDamin 8ran/lin. thatwomen should Doin the ministr#.high rates ofmen who attended colege.reDected mostreligious thought. drin/ing songs. thatthe ideas ofpredestination were outmoded forthe times. Eighteenth. B. almanacs.aine. B. Thomas . 1.centur# Enlightenmentthought A.?ames )adison. ?ohn 4oc/e. $. 1. 1. B. 1.h#mnals. ?ohn 4oc/e.the possibilit# ofeas# salvation.B.

)ostcolonialleaders after1H"" wentabroad to stud#.7 iliam and )ar#.ruled thatcriticisms b# the press!even iffactual# accurate!were libelous.Iale.arliamentin the colonies. $. 1. 1. . E. The firstAmerican colege was A.increased freedom ofthe press in the colonies..banned alprinted attac/s on the Eing or. the invention ofthe printing press in the earl# 1H""s.Aarvard. increased freedom ofthe press in the colonies. )assachusetts.restricted the abilit# ofthe press to reporton governmentafairs. 7 hich statementregarding colonialhighereducation is T63E5 A.:irginia.resulted in the closure ofseveralcolonialnewspapers. Aarvard. C. B.New Ior/. )ostcoleges were founded b# religious groups. B. C.$..arliamentregulated the establishmentofAmerican coleges.eterMenger A. . The Church ofEngland was established as the oficialreligion in alofthe folowing colonies except A. B.rinceton. )ar#land. C.Columbia. high rates ofmale literac#. E. )assachusetts. Chapter 9 .)ostcoleges were founded b# religious groups. The verdictofthe 1H>% libeltrialofNew Ior/ publisher?ohn . 1.Colonists placed a low value on an# formaleducation. 1. . 1eorgia.)ostcolonialcoleges accepted female students. B.

were general# able and honestadministrators. was notable forits strictenforcementoftrade policies.contributed to England=s overallax controlofthe colonies. was loose!decentrali*ed!and ineficient.lan of1H%9 A.recogni*ed the land rights of+ndian tribes living within the colonies. 1.was approved b# the colonialassemblies butwas vetoed b# . 1. B.began to assertgreaterauthorit# overnewspapers and public expression. B.. C. exercised a significantdegree ofauthorit# to lev# taxes. consisted ofcolonists alapproved b# ro#algovernors. chose .exercised a significantdegree ofauthorit# to lev# taxes. the Anglican Church. uring the firsthalfofthe eighteenth centur#!ro#aloficials in America A. were petitioning the /ing to charternew colonies to the west.was intended to give the colonies greaterindependence from ro#alauthorit#.arliament. . B. B.hiladelphia as the capitalofthe colonies. uring the firsthalfofthe eighteenth centur#!England=s administration ofthe colonies A. C. 1. $. 1.the monarch#. $. B. the colonialgovernors.had no significantinfluence on colonialfinances. $. contributed to England=s overallax controlofthe colonies. C.soughtnew means to tax American merchants. +n the #ears afterthe 1lorious 6evolution!politicalpowerin England increasingl# shifted toward A.. The proposed Alban# . was loose!decentrali*ed!and ineficient.arliament.arliament. C.existed onl# to implementthe policies ofthe English . revealed the dificulties colonies had in cooperating with each other.began to increase the presence ofBritish troops in the colonies.arliament. B# the 1H%"s!American colonialassemblies A.was primaril# concerned with chec/ing the growth ofNew 8rance. $.feltlittle lo#alt# to the English government. C.the citi*ens.

attempted to create a united frontwith New 8rance against+ndian attac/s. $.Chero/ee.confirmed its commercialsupremac# and shifted its interestawa# from the Caribbean colonies. uring the eighteenth centur#!in North America!the mostpowerfulnative group were the A.the 8rench!the colonists!and the Spanish. the 8rench!the Spanish!and the English.Seminole. increased its politicalcontrolofthe settled regions. 1. $.1. forced +ndians to adDustto European wa#s. 1. the English!the +ro2uois!and the Spanish. shifted its interestawa# from the Caribbean colonies. . the +ro2uois!the English!and the 8rench.confirmed its commercialsupremac#. B. uring the eighteenth centur#!in North America!the 8rench difered from the English in +ndian relations in thatthe 8rench A. $.ofered the +ndians more and bettertrading goods. C. confirmed its commercialsupremac# and increased its politicalcontrolofthe settled regions. 1. 1. were more tolerantof+ndian cultures. B. B. made little efortto convert+ndians to Christianit#. C. E. .confirmed its commercialsupremac# and increased its politicalcontrolofthe settled regions.the colonists!the English!and the Spanish.largel# isolated themselves from +ndian tribes. Chic/asaw.the +ro2uois!the English!and the 8rench. Sioux. revealed the dificulties colonies had in cooperating with each other.+ro2uois. As a resultofthe Seven Iears=7 ar!in North America!England A. +ro2uois. $. C.were more tolerantof+ndian cultures. $. The maDorparticipants in the Seven Iears=7 ar!in North America!were A.

ended Eing 7 iliam=s 7 ar.1eorge 7 ashington . transferred territor# from the English to the 8rench in the Caribbean.failed to resolve European conflicts in North America.was a considerable victor# forSpain in North America. saw English colonists remain outofthe conflict. slowed England=s western expansion ofits American colonies. 1eorge 7 ashington 7 hatfuture American revolutionar# figure surrendered to 8rench forces in 1H%9 at8ortNecessit# in the (hio :ale#5 A. B. $. Eing 1eorge=s 7 ar A. 1.onl# England. C. 1. C. failed to resolve European conflicts in North America.was a conflictbetween England and the +ro2uois. B. 1. C. militar# activit# westofEngland=s North American colonies steadil# declined. $. C. no European powers.both 8rance and England atthe same time. the English abandoned man# oftheirfortresses in the interior. B. $. Through the firsthalfofthe eighteenth centur#!the +ro2uois Confederac# formed agreements and traded with A.England!and then 8rance.transferred territor# from the 8rench to the English in North America.the 8rench moved outofthe (hio :ale#.relations between the English!8rench!and +ro2uois deteriorated. onl# 8rance. $. 1. B. saw England ac2uire Newfoundland from the 8rench. relations between the English!8rench!and +ro2uois deteriorated.inspired the American 6evolution.both 8rance and England atthe same time. transferred territor# from the 8rench to the English in North America. The Treat# of3trechtin 1H1> A.the +ro2uois decided notto grantan# future trade concessions to the English. +n the aftermath ofEing 1eorge=s 7 ar A.

Bufalo. The 8rench and +ndian 7 arwas foughtin A. the +ro2uois were alied with the English butremained largel# passive. the colonists foughtprimaril# againstthe +ro2uois. Althese answers are correct. Althese answers are correct. uring the 8rench and +ndian 7 ar!British leader7 iliam . B. $. the North American interior. the colonists foughtwith the 8rench againstthe English. gradual# loosened his tightcontroloverthe colonists.atric/ Aenr# C..B. BenedictArnold ?ohn Adams .the 7 est+ndies. 1.English colonists foughtwith the supportofthe +ro2uois. etroit. C.?ames )adison 1. $. Europe. B. The firstclash ofthe 8rench and +ndian 7 artoo/ place nearwhatis now A. 1. 1.. C. 1.onl# the +ro2uois +ndians were alied with the 8rench.gave more authorit# to conductthe waroverto the colonists. gradual# loosened his tightcontroloverthe colonists. uring the firststage J1H%9G1H%CKofthe 8rench and +ndian 7 ar! A. $.ignored the complaints ofcolonists.the +ro2uois were alied with the English butremained largel# passive. >. Chicago. .+ndia. B.ittsburgh.ittsburgh.itt A.4ouis. St. $. B.

$.

barred the colonists from militar# service.

1. alowed +ndian triballeaders to dictate British battle strateg#. Fuebec. The beginning ofthe end ofthe American phase ofthe 8rench and +ndian 7 arwas mar/ed b# the 8rench defeatat A.)ontreal. B.Fuebec. 1. $. (ttawa. 4ouisbourg.

1. 8ortNecessit#. 8rance ceded Canada and alofits claims to land eastofthe )ississippi6iver!exceptNew (rleans!to 1reatBritain. According to the terms ofthe ,eace of,aris of1HC>! A.8rance surrendered New (rleans and Canada to the British. B.England ac2uired al8rench navalvessels doc/ed in North American ports. 1. 8rance ceded Canada and alofits claims to land eastofthe )ississippi6iver!exceptNew (rleans!to 1reatBritain. $. 8rance agreed to pa# England forthe costofthe war.

1. 8rance ceded alofits Caribbean colonies to England. sold and traded food and othergoods with the 8rench. Throughoutthe 8rench and +ndian 7 ar!American colonists A.foughton the side ofthe 8rench. B.accepted temporar# new taxes to help finance the war. 1. $. sold and traded food and othergoods with the 8rench. resented thatthe# had to do more ofthe fighting than did the British regulars.

1. saw British re2uisition and impressmentpolicies as necessar#. man# colonists resented England=s interference in theirlocalafairs. 8olowing the conclusion ofthe 8rench and +ndian 7 ar! A.man# colonists resented England=s interference in theirlocalafairs. B.colonialexpansion westward rapidl# progressed.

1. $.

man# colonists began to calforfulindependence from England. the econom# ofseveralAmerican colonies was in ruins.

1. the British and +ro2uois renewed theiraliance. had disastrous efects on theirfuture. 8or+ndians in North America!British victor# in the 8rench and +ndian 7 ar A.convinced man# tribes to cease in theirstruggle againstEuropean expansion. B.had disastrous efects on theirfuture. 1. $. was cheered onl# b# the +ro2uois Confederac#. led to an improvementin relations with English colonists.

1. encouraged tribes to Doin the +ro2uois Confederac#. suggested thatincreasing England=s controloverthe colonies would notbe eas#. The 8rench and +ndian 7 arin North America A.greatl# enriched the English government=s finances. B.began a period ofalmostcontinualwarfare forEngland. 1. $. suggested thatincreasing England=s controloverthe colonies would notbe eas#. led England to conclude thatits relationship with the colonies was strong.

1. led England to conclude thatthe American colonies were notworth protecting. was painful# immature. 7 hen 1eorge +assumed the throne ofEngland!he A.was considered to have a briliantmind forpolitics. B.was painful# immature. 1. $. faced a fulrebelion in the colonies. feared using the authorit# ofhis monarch#.

1. mandated oficialrecognition ofthe Church ofEngland in alcolonies.

believed the American colonists had been indulged forfartoo long. 7 hen he became British ,rime )inister!1eorge 1renvile A.believed the colonialeconomies could notweatherthe costofthe recentwar. B.critici*ed 7 iliam ,ittforbeing too harsh in dealing with the American colonies. 1. $. began a cost.cutting efortb# reducing the numberofBritish oficials in America. initial# soughtto furtherdecentrali*e governmentauthorit# in the American colonies.

1. believed the American colonists had been indulged forfartoo long.

was supported b# man# +ndian tribes. The ,roclamation of1HC> A.disrupted England=s western trade in the colonies. B.was general# efective. 1. $. was supported b# man# +ndian tribes. encouraged settlementofthe western edge ofthe colonies.

1. led to renewed conflictwith the remaining 8rench colonists in the west. stationing regularBritish troops permanentl# in America. +n the 1HC"s!the 1renvile ministr# increased its authorit# in the colonies b# A.stationing regularBritish troops permanentl# in America. B.banning politicalmeetings. 1. $. closing the portofBoston. closing newspapers thatcritici*ed the English government.

1. outlawing the Sons of4ibert#. Althese answers are correct. The SugarActof1HC9 was designed to A.damage the mar/etforsugargrown in the colonies. B.eliminate the ilegalsugartrade between the colonies!the 8rench!and the 7 est+ndies. 1. $. >. establish new vice.admiralt# courts in America to tr# accused smugglers. lowerthe colonialdut# on molasses. Althese answers are correct.

re2uired colonists to pa# taxes on mostprinted documents. The Stamp Actof1HC% A.established a ro#alpostals#stem between the American colonies and England. B.re2uired colonists to pa# taxes on mostprinted documents. 1. $. replaced the SugarActof1HC9. proved to be inefective as mostcolonies refused to acceptit.

1. costthe British governmentmuch more mone# than itmade in revenues. demanded tax relief.

)an# colonists believed the legislation passed b# the 1renvile ministr# in 1HC9G1HC% A. soughtto increase the authorit# oflocalcolonialgovernments.meantthe British were tr#ing to ta/e awa# theirtradition ofself. Althese answers are correct. 1. helped to unite the colonies in opposition to the English government. $.southern planters. smalfarmers.government. $. demanded independence from England. The Stamp Actof1HC% A.was consistentwith traditionalparliamentar# eforts to regulate commerce.demanded tax relief. meantthe British were tr#ing to ta/e awa# theirtradition ofself. >. B. 1.term efecton the econom# ofthe colonies. 1. B. 1.placed a heav# financialburden on American colonists. . $. $. 1. urban wor/ers. 4egislation passed b# the 1renvile ministr# in 1HC9G1HC% adversel# afected American A.The . 1. demanded the redistribution ofthe land ma/ing up the former8rench colonies. B. Althese answers are correct.feared violence from western farmers.axton Bo#s and the 6egulators both A.term success ofthe colonies.New England merchants.government.showed the British were committed to the long. would have little long. would lead to renewed hostilities with +ndians in the west. real# afected onl# a few New England merchants. signified thatthe British final# understood the desires ofthe colonists. B. helped to unite the colonies in opposition to the English government. 1.atric/ Aenr# . re2uired the consentofthe colonialassemblies before going into efect.

rescinded the Stamp Act.closed the portofBoston. +n 1HCC!in response to colonialprotests againstthe Stamp Act!the British government A. 1eorge )ason an#one who supported the rightof.:irginia 6esolves<to supportthe colonists=position.arliament=s authorit# overthe colonies. B.Stamp Actdemonstrators. British oficialThomas Autchinson A.caled forsuppression ofcolonialdemonstrations. $.< 1. 1.. The eclarator# Actof1HCC A. :irginia mustdo its partto reimburse England forthe costofcolonialdefense. SamuelAdams Thomas ?eferson 1.attempted to arrestthe authors ofthe . was murdered during colonialprotests againstthe Stamp Act.atric/ Aenr# B. 1. had his home ransac/ed b# anti. 1. . The . an#one who supported the rightof. independence from England was the onl# solution to the tax crisis. B.:irginians should notbe re2uired to pa# taxes. $. created the Currenc# Act. rescinded the Stamp Act. 1.was an earl# and outspo/en supporterofthe Stamp Act. 1.arliamentto tax was an enem# ofthe colon#. $.Ben 8ran/lin 1.Stamp Actdemonstrators. had his home ransac/ed b# anti.caused renewed protests throughoutthe colonies.:irginia 6esolves<stated that A. signed his name to the .the English governmenthad no authorit# overthe economic activities of:irginians. sentadditionaltroops to the colonies. B. was a sweeping assertion of.:irginia 6esolves.arliamentto tax was an enem# ofthe colon#. $.7 ho among the folowing too/ the lead in protesting againstthe Stamp Act5 A.

man# colonists Doining in nonimportation agreements. were withdrawn before the# too/ efect. resulted in the /iling ofseveralBritish soldiers b# colonists. Althese answers are correct. 1. 1.B. the Boston Tea . 1. 4ord North. B. B. . $.arliamentpassing a second Stamp Act. 1.the )ar2uis of6oc/ingham. B. drew no immediate obDection from the colonists. Colonialprotests againstthe Townshend uties resulted in A. was regarded b# obDecting colonists as a form oftaxation withoutconsent. The )utin# JorFuarteringKActof1HC% A. was an attemptb# outgoing minister1eorge 1renvile to save face. man# colonists Doining in nonimportation agreements.re2uired colonists to evacuate theirfarms to occup#ing British soldiers. 1. were taxes on whatwere caled externaltransactions. $. 1. 1. an increase in smuggling in portcities such as Boston.the Boston )assacre. $.was regarded b# obDecting colonists as a form oftaxation withoutconsent. declared thatalships in the colonialnav# musthave a British oficeron board. +n 1HH"!the Townsend uties were ended b# A. alowed British oficers to force colonists into militar# service forEngland. $.art#. were taxes on whatwere caled externaltransactions. B.Charles Townsend.arliament=s authorit# overthe colonies.. >.was a sweeping assertion of. threatened the colonies with militar# action should future protests develop.were ultimatel# ratified b# the New Ior/ Assembl#. The Townshend uties of1HCH A.constituted a form oftaxation 2uite similarto the Stamp Act.

SamuelAdams. turned . 1. caled on Eing 1eorge +to more firml# asserthis authorit#. B.countr# 7 higs<were English colonists who A. 1. B. considered the British governmentto be corruptand oppressive. 1. $.SamuelAdams.term profits ofAmerica. $.was transformed b# some colonists into a s#mbolofBritish oppression. +n the 1HC"s!.1.aul6evere into a mart#rforthe cause ofcolonialindependence. 4ord Chatham.aul6evere=s midnightride ofwarning. B. 1.the monarch#!the aristocrac#!and representative assemblies. The Boston )assacre A. . $.resulted in the death ofseveralBritish soldiers. the commercialand landholding classes on both sides ofthe ocean.atric/ Aenr#. 1.considered the British governmentto be corruptand oppressive. 4ord North.Thomas ?eferson. English and American supporters ofthe English constitution feltitcorrectl# divided powerbetween A. 1eorge )ason. 1. B. 1eorge +. 1. the monarch#!the aristocrac#!and representative assemblies. . included a trialin which British soldiers were convicted ofmurder. The leading colonialfigure in the Boston )assacre was A. led to . was transformed b# some colonists into a s#mbolofBritish oppression.feared the politicalprotests would damage the long. $. ?ames (tis. defended the British imperials#stem. 1. believed the politicalphilosoph# of?ohn 4oc/e gave too much powerto the /ing.England and the American colonies.

1. 1. $. the American colonies were represented in . large areas ofEngland had no directpoliticalrepresentation. 1. each memberof.arliamenton behalfofthe American colonies.large areas ofEngland had no directpoliticalrepresentation. B.arliament!and the courts.each American colon# was alowed one non.onl# American colonists were denied directrepresentation in . believed to be holding bac/ colonialexpansion. unpopularin both England and America. B. 1.the# were the onl# public places where one could legal# spea/ withoutfearofarrest.arliamentand the monarch#. +n the eighteenth centur#!the English constitution was A.$. Althese answers are correct. $. $. .arliament. +n the eighteenth centur#!underthe English government=s theor# ofrepresentation! A.the American colonies were represented in . the /ing spo/e to . the American colonies had no claim to an# politicalrepresentation.voting representative in . alseats in American colonialassemblies were appointed. The monarch#!. the empire was made up ofa federation ofcommonwealths. the American colonies were represented b# the courts. the# become centralmeeting places to discuss ideas aboutresistance. B.arliament. 1.dificultto change.arliament. >.the# become centralmeeting places to discuss ideas aboutresistance.an unwritten document.arliament.arliamentrepresented a particulargeographic area. an unwritten document. 1. itwas one ofthe few places where men and women gathered togetherto spea/. Taverns were importantin the growth ofrevolutionar# sentimentbecause A. 1. B. . 3nderthe English constitution during the eighteenth centur#! A.

both triggered acts ofresistance in othercolonialcities and too/ place afterBostonians failed to turn awa# ships laden with tea. >. had little financialefecton England. B. 9. 1. . shoc/ed the othercolonies into isolating )assachusetts. both too/ place afterBostonians failed to turn awa# ships laden with tea and shoc/ed the othercolonies into isolating )assachusetts.lowered the price oftea forAmerican colonists. B. $.art# of ecember1HH> A. Althese answers are correct. 1. 1. reducing the geographic si*e ofthe colon#.governmentin )assachusetts. too/ place afterBostonians failed to turn awa# ships laden with tea. >. $. threatening to launch a waragainstthe )assachusetts militia. B. both triggered acts ofresistance in othercolonialcities and too/ place afterBostonians failed to turn awa# ships laden with tea. resulted in the arrestofthe aughters of4ibert#.withdrawing its militar# protection of)assachusetts.folowed a few #ears ofrelative calm between England and the American colonies.triggered acts ofresistance in othercolonialcities. Althese answers are correct. $. The Tea Actof1HH> A. 1. $. .arliamentresponded to the Boston Tea .governmentin )assachusetts.reducing the powers ofself. >. was led b# women!who were the primar# consumers oftea.involved relativel# smalnumbers ofpeople. The Boston Tea . was led b# women!who were the primar# consumers oftea. provided no new tax on tea.was based on colonists=angerathaving to pa# a new tax. was intended to benefita private British compan#.art# b# A.$. reducing the powers ofself. The colonialbo#cottoftea in 1HH> A. 1. colonists increasingl# resented the heav# British duties on alcohol. Althese answers are correct.

)assachusetts became a mart#rin the cause ofresistance. was approved ofb# mostEnglish colonists. The Acts had little practicalefecton the )assachusetts colon#.Colonialbo#cotts decreased. agreed to end colonialbo#cotts ofBritish trade.proposed thatthe colonies tax themselves at.saw . 1. )assachusetts became a mart#rin the cause ofresistance. $. B. 1. The Acts were basical# ignored b# othercoloniallegislatures.caled on .ropositions A. 7 hich ofthe folowing statements regarding the Coercive Acts is T63E5 A.)assachusetts became political# isolated from the othercolonies. $. was passed b# England to appease the 8rench government.accepted a plan fora colonialunion underBritish authorit#. issued an orderforthe arrestofalcolonists lo#alto the Eing.1. caled forthe repealofaloppressive legislation passed since 1HC>. The Fuebec Act A. B. 1.reduced the boundaries ofFuebec. repealing the Tea Act.granted politicalrights to 6oman Catholics. 1. +n 1HH%!the Conciliator# . was an appealb# the British governmentto colonialmoderates. $. was an appealb# the British governmentto colonialmoderates. B. granted politicalrights to 6oman Catholics. 1.arliamentto reduce taxes forthe sa/e ofcolonialpeace. B. caled forthe repealofaloppressive legislation passed since 1HC>. .arliamentagree to the terms ofthe 8irstContinentalCongress. 1. 1. made the 6oman Catholic Church ilegal. +n 1HH9!the 8irstContinentalCongress A.arliament=s demand.

saw the colonists tr# to surprise the British b# sei*ing a British arsenal. >. The events of4exington and Concord A. Ben 8ran/lin. saw theirlargerpopulation as a /e# advantage overEngland. $.$.ublished in ?anuar# 1HHC!Common Sense was written b# A. 1. occurred before there was a formalAmerican declaration ofindependence.were deepl# divided aboutwhatthe# were fighting for. 1. 1. considered his arm# too smalto actwithoutreinforcements.aine. .made extensive eforts to prepare themselves forwar. C. B. . believed the colonists=cals forindependence were Dustified. was the firstvictor# for1eorge 7 ashington in the conflictwith England. 1. occurred before there was a formalAmerican declaration ofindependence.considered his arm# too smalto actwithoutreinforcements. temporaril# reduced tensions in the colonies.believed England was notwiling to engage in militar# operations againstthem. $. Chapter % were deepl# divided aboutwhatthe# were fighting for. 1. arrested Sam Adams and ?ohn Aancoc/ near4exington. C. forced . $.saw the Americans lose man# more men than the British.was convinced thatAmericans would neveractual# dare to fight. 1. +n 1HH%!as conflicts with England intensified!American colonists A. B.aine. B. furtheralienated )assachusetts from the more moderate colonies in the Chesapea/e.?ames )adison. considered arming slaves to help build up the colonialarm#.Tom .Thomas ?eferson. Tom . Atthe time ofthe Battle of4exington and Concord!1eneralThomas 1age!the commanderofthe British garrison in Boston! A. ofered to resign his command to avoid war. B.arliamentto send more troops to Boston.

sold ver# few copies ofhis pamphletuntilafterthe warwas won. considered the English constitution to be the greatestproblem facing the colonists. was arrested b# British oficials and charged with treason. C.spending hard currenc#. $.hard currenc# was scarce.was neverformal# approved b# the Second ContinentalCongress. borrowing from abroad.the printing ofpapermone# was ilegal. B. ?ames (tis. original# recommended thatalslaves be freed. C. borrowed heavil# from previousl# published colonialdocuments.9. considered the English constitution to be the greatestproblem facing the colonists. 1. the colonists=wealth had albeen /eptin 4ondon. $.foreign nations refused to loan mone# forits warefort. B. As commanderofthe ContinentalArm#!1eorge 7 ashington A. B.printing papermone#. B. 8inancing the 6evolution was dificultforthe American side because A. was admired!respected!and trusted b# nearl# al. C.avoided ma/ing an# directcriticism ofthe Eing.borrowing from abroad.atriots. bonds were not#etin use.borrowed heavil# from previousl# published colonialdocuments. melting down Dewelr# into specie. 1. caled forthe formation ofa two.part# democrac#.had no shortage ofAmericans wiling to volunteerto fightthe British. The authorofCommon Sense A. seling bonds. $.soughtto concentrate colonialangeron unpopularparliamentar# measures. $.had no previous actualmilitar# experience. hard currenc# was scarce. The warefortb# American colonists would be financed primaril# b# A. The eclaration of+ndependence A. 1. B. 1. C. .was an American who had neverbeen to England.

C. C.a severe shortage ofnew soldiers coming from England.atriots sufered lightcasualties and won the battle. Aessians. was admired!respected!and trusted b# nearl# al. $. saw Congress leave alimportantmilitar# decisions up to his Dudgment. 7 hich ofthe folowing too/ place during the firstphase J1HH%GHCKofthe 6evolutionar# 7 ar5 A. +n the Battle ofBun/erAil! A. B. more coherentmilitar# command structure. a series oftacticalblunders and misfortunes. 1.hiladelphia. 1. American aliances with Native American tribes in the region. British troops under7 iliam Aowe captured .American troops captured Fuebec.greatercommitmentto the war. betterrelationship with Native American tribes. the . the American capture ofthe commanding British general. 1. 1.C. greatercommitmentto the war. British troops evacuated Boston. $.atriots. B. 1.the British sufered heav# casualties.atriots. American troops too/ Nova Scotia. C.an American bloc/ade ofBritish ships. B. C. B.The British won a significantvictor# in North Carolina.largernumberoftroops.BenedictArnold was wounded. .atriots refused to withdraw and were al/iled. the British surrendered theirmain forces to the . the British sufered heav# casualties.bettere2uipped nav#. Atthe startofthe 6evolution!American advantages overthe British included a A. $.was an earl# critic ofindependence. uring the second phase J1HHCGH'Kofthe American 6evolution!British militar# eforts were hampered b# A. $.the .a series oftacticalblunders and misfortunes.British troops evacuated Boston. $.

alied itselfwith the British.disbanded and withdrew to the west. E. $.refused to al# with eithercombatantuntil8rance entered the war. $.1eneral7 iliam Aowe sta# in camp when he was supposed to have moved south. the British reta/e Boston and setitafire. B.Thomas 1age B. .Aessians. B.refused to recogni*e the 3nited States as a sovereign nation. .aris. B.?ohn Burgo#ne 1. worried thatthe 3nited States would 2uitthe waragainstthe British.1eneral?ohn Burgo#ne sufera maDordefeatatSaratoga.American 4o#alists. +n earl# 1HH'!8rance A.+ndians. Aoratio 1ates Among the folowing!who was N(T a British generalduring the American 6evolution5 A.hiladelphia. The British militar# campaigns of1HHH saw A.7 hen 1eorge 7 ashington crossed the elaware 6iveron Christmas night!1HHC!he was intenton surprising A. Aoratio 1ates Barr# St. alied itselfwith the colonists. the British surround and la# siege to 1eorge 7 ashington=s arm# at:ale# 8orge. declared its neutralit#. 7 iliam Aowe. C.a maDorAmerican victor# at. uring the American 6evolution!the +ro2uois Confederac# oficial# A. 1.declared its neutralit#. $. 1. 1. $. British regulars. C.4eger 1eneral?ohn Burgo#ne sufera maDordefeatatSaratoga.7 iliam Aowe C.expeled the colonies=diplomats!including BenDamin 8ran/lin!from .

$.an oferto return to the pre. $.American armies engaged in more large!open. $. declared waron both England and Spain. +n the finalphase J1HH'G'1Kofthe American 6evolution!the British A.C. . B.supportforindependence greatl# increased.an oferofa British surrenderifthe Americans would remain partofthe empire.field battles. large segments ofthe American population became warrefugees. C. $. .localcriticism of. a threatto destro# alAmerican forces ifthe# refused to negotiate a peace treat#. B.1HC> British policies ifthe colonies would 2uitthe war. 1.an oferofcomplete colonialhome rule within the empire ifthe# would 2uitthe war. more 4o#alists began activel# helping the British.totalwar<thatresulted in severalcities being burned to the ground.badl# overestimated the supportofAmerican 4o#alists.atriots. supportforindependence greatl# increased.agreed to give the Americans mone# and supplies butwithheld its soldiers. C. an oferofcomplete colonialhome rule within the empire ifthe# would 2uitthe war Afterthe Battle ofSaratoga!British .Canada C.the Netherlands 1.Belgium B. began a polic# of.atriots increased.made a focused efortto win public supportin the northern colonies. C. B. As the fighting in the finalphase J1HH'G'1Kofthe American 6evolution carried into communities previousl# isolated from the war! A. 1. 1. worried thatthe 3nited States would 2uitthe waragainstthe British. $. the Netherlands 7 hich ofthe folowing nations opposed England during the American 6evolution5 A. 1.rime )inister4ord North responded to the colonies with A. a threatto fomenta slave rebelion in the South ifthe American forces did not2uitthe war. concentrated its eforts on capturing individual.mounted its largestmilitar# assaultagainstthe ContinentalArm#. Arnold spentthe last#ears ofthe 6evolution as a prisonerofwar.ortugal Sweden badl# overestimated the supportofAmerican 4o#alists.

a combined 8rench and American arm# and nav#. $. treacher# on the partofBenedictArnold. 1. $.atriotstronghold at7 est. a combined 8rench and American arm# and nav#. B. 1. E. BenDamin 8ran/lin!?ohn Adams!and ?ohn ?a#.Charleston 1.Ae led American forces to victor# in the battle atIor/town. 1. Ae was one ofthe mostefective commanders in the American arm#. evidence thatthe British were executing prisoners ofwar. B.the mostblood# battle ofthe war.7 hich ofthe folowing statements regarding BenedictArnold is 8A4SE5 A. B. 1. Ae replaced Aoratio 1ates as commanderofthe southern forces in the Continentalarm#. 1. Ior/town 1uilford CourtAouse 1. Charleston 7 hich ofthe folowing was the scene ofa substantialBritish victor# in the finalphase J1HH'G'1Kofthe American 6evolution5 A. $. Arnold had previousl# foiled the advance ofBarr# St. Saratoga Ae led American forces to victor# in the battle atIor/town. The battle atIor/town involved A.moving contingents to confuse and exasperate Cornwalis. uring the war!Arnold grew convinced the American cause was hopeless.oint!New Ior/. Ae was forced to withdraw at1uildford CourtAouse afterinflicting heav# losses.4egerinto the )ohaw/ :ale#.Arnold was an American militar# hero earl# in the war.Ae divided his forces into fast. The principalAmericans who negotiated the peace terms with the British were .Arnold spentthe last#ears ofthe 6evolution as a prisonerofwar.the suicide ofthe commanding British general. 7 hich ofthe folowing statements regarding 1eneralNathaniel1reene is 8A4SE5 A.Cowpens B. $. Arnold conspired with the British to betra# a .

made the oficialreligion of:irginia. B. tried foraiding and abetting the British. 1. 1. the 3nited States received alterritor# eastofthe 6oc/# )ountains. England was forced to pa# reparations to the new American nation.atriots to move to England untilthe warhad ended. 8rance received Canada from the English. constituted perhaps as man# as one.wea/ened. were assisted b# the British to escape as a wa# to disruptthe American warefort. B.were nearl# alofice holders in the English government. . As a resultofthe American 6evolution!the Anglican Church in America was A. $. $. were forbidden b# the . wea/ened. constituted perhaps as man# as one. freed theirslaves to help augmentBritish forces in the colonies. the 3nited States gained formalBritish recognition ofAmerican independence.A. 1. 1. BenDamin 8ran/lin!?ohn Adams!and ?ohn ?a#. uring the American 6evolution!4o#alists A. $.third ofthe white colonialpopulation.atriots forits supportofindependence. B. Thomas ?eferson and BenDamin 8ran/lin. $.were forced to leave the colonies soon afterthe warbegan. ?ohn Aancoc/!BenDamin 8ran/lin!and SamuelAuntington. praised b# . >.Thomas ?eferson!SamuelAdams!and ?ohn Adams. 1. uring the American 6evolution!enslaved African Americans in the colonies A.were assisted b# the British to escape as a wa# to disruptthe American warefort. Spain received 1ibraltarfrom the English. >.aris of1H'>! 1.third ofthe white colonialpopulation. 3nderthe terms ofthe Treat# of.AlexanderAamilton and Thomas ?eferson.Doined the British arm# in large numbers to fightagainsttheirAmerican masters. the 3nited States gained formalBritish recognition ofAmerican independence. 1.banned in mostcolonies. B. 9.

term. $. were notsignificantl# afected b# the conflict. 1. tried to help 4o#alists escape to Canada in exchange fortheirfreedom.camp folowers< A.was minimaland short.1. )ost+ndian tribes ultimatel# chose to fighton the side ofthe British. often inadvertentl# betra#ed the position of7 ashington=s arm#. South Carolina. 1.enns#lvania. $.assisted in the supportofregulartroops. B.New Ior/. 1. were prostitutes. . 1. )ost+ndian tribes ultimatel# chose to fighton the side ofthe British. 1.was to dismantle the patriarchallegals#stem. +n regards to the status ofwomen!the efectofthe American 6evolution A. Some +ndians too/ advantage ofthe conflictto launch attac/s oftheirown.atriots had general# tried to persuade +ndians to be neutralin the war. uring the American 6evolution!female . 7 hich ofthe folowing statements regarding the American 6evolution and Native Americans is 8A4SE5 A. >. . were ofered theirfreedom b# Americans ifthe# foughtagainstthe British. $. assisted in the supportofregulartroops. B. B. 6hode +sland. .pla#ed traditionalfemale roles and were notinvolved in combat.+ndians general# had betterrelations with the British than the Americans. American . was to end the traditionalculturalconcepts ofthe female role in societ#. 8olowing the American 6evolution!the firststate to ma/e slaver# ilegalwas A.New Aampshire. $. 1.enns#lvania.The outcome ofthe warlargel# wea/ened the position of+ndians. led some women to 2uestion theirposition in societ#. B. served to maintain traditionalgenderdistinctions. 1.

temperance.own propert#. $. +n 1HHC!AbigailAdams was an advocate for A. $. divorce.vote.could notown propert#. +n colonialAmerica!underEnglish common law a married woman A. could onl# initiate divorce in case ofadulter#. The prominenteighteenth. serve in combat could notown propert#.$.had more legalrights than unmarried women. $. mothers. . 1. B. new protections againstabusive and t#rannicalmen. 1. led some women to 2uestion theirposition in societ#. could notearn wages greaterthan herhusband. supportforimpoverished warwidows. 8olowing the American 6evolution!as the 6epublic too/ shape in the 1H'"s!greatersocialimportance was attached to women in the role of A. citi*ens. new protections againstabusive and t#rannicalmen. nurses.fulgendere2ualit# in the new postwarnation. B.feminists. B.wives. general# wea/ened the position ofwomen in societ#. $. had legalauthorit# overherchildren. 1.a woman=s rightto vote. an education. B. an education. >. 1.centur# essa#ist?udith Sargent)urra# placed hergreatestemphasis on the rightofwomen to A. >. 1. 1. mothers. 1.

+n the thin/ing ofmostAmerican politicalleaders!the success oftheirnew republican governments depended on A. there should be e2ualit# ofrights regardless ofrace!sex!orpropert#.state legislatures were to be chosen b# a directpopularvote. E. independentlandowners. westward expansion. there should be e2ualit# ofcondition. British abandonmentofimpressments.6evolution American trade commerce was strengthened b# A. 1. B.a strong defense ofcivilliberties. 1.there should be e2ualit# ofrights and ofcondition. C. . 1.there should be e2ualit# ofopportunit# and ofcondition.the developmentofindustries. $.were notable fortheirstabilit#. uring the 1H'"s!moststate governments A.favorable trade agreements with England.an English desire to protectAmerican vessels. independentlandowners.the closing ofBritish ports to American trade. . 1. there should be e2ualit# ofopportunit#. women were denied the rightto vote.ost.propert# re2uirements forvoting were relaxed oreliminated.there should be e2ualit# ofopportunit#. $. governors were given the authorit# to tax. the creation ofa strong militar#. B. 1. $. 8ormost6evolutionar# American politicalthin/ers!the conceptofe2ualit# meant A. uring the 1H'"s!in ever# new state constitution A. . 1. moved to limitpopularpower. B.governors were prevented from holding a seatin the legislature. B. governors were prevented from holding a seatin the legislature. the flood ofimmigration afterthe war.moved to limitpopularpower. $. the closing ofBritish ports to American trade.

having him elected directl# b# the people.alowing the legislature to sethis salar#. +n the 1H'"s!which statementaboutslaver# in America was T63E5 A. remained strongl# elitist. $. B. Althese answers are correct. gotrid ofpropert# re2uirements forvoters.)an# southern states prohibited the importation ofslaves from abroad. granting him the powerto tax caled fora complete separation ofchurch and state. executive. 1. $. The strongestforces againstslaver# were found in the western colonies. 1. +n 1H'"!)assachusetts soughtto revise the powerofthe governorb# A.Dudiciar#.having him elected directl# b# the people. >. 1.was written b# ?ames )adison. $. 1. 1. 1. )an# southern states prohibited the importation ofslaves from abroad. 3nderthe Articles ofConfederation!in 1HHH there was a federal A. B. The :irginia Statute of6eligious 4ibert# of1H'C A. :irginia passed a law forbidding the manumission ofslaves. .congress. congress. $. )ostwhites believed blac/s should be integrated into American societ# as e2uals. B. ta/ing awa# his authorit# to veto legislation. onl# applied to Christian denominations. 9. found itdificultto revise theirconstitutions. B.caled fora complete separation ofchurch and state. gave alreligious denominations specialprivileges within the state.+n no state was itilegal. permitting him to sitin the legislature.1.

B. 1. .%. there could be no amendments to the Articles. plans foremancipation.evacuated its forts in America. $. 1. B. claims to western lands. Shortl# aftersigning the Treat# of. 3nderthe Articles ofConfederation!the nationalgovernmenthad the powerto A.powerto ma/e war. override state laws. bureaucrac#.alstates had to approve an# importantmeasure. 1. rightto lev# theirown taxes. attempted to purchase 8lorida.each state had one vote in Congress. restricted American access to British mar/ets. B.powerto regulate trade. $.regulate trade. 1. borrow and issue mone#. $. borrow and issue mone#.made restitution to slaveholders forslaves the British arm# had freed during the war. 3nderthe Articles ofConfederation A. each state had one vote in Congress. C. declared waron Spain to ta/e its New 7 orld colonies awa#.aris of1H'>!the British government A. Althese answers are correct. The Articles ofConfederation were adopted when states gave up their A. 1. lev# directtaxes on the people. the executive had the powerto veto legislative decisions. $. restricted American access to British mar/ets. 1. 1. B. no legislation could be passed withoutalstates voting on the issue.drafttroops. 1. claims to western lands.

>.maintain theirlands given through treaties.secured complete American access to the )ississippi6iver.was neverratified b# Congress!thus wea/ening the nation=s globalprestige. gave the 3nited States controlofTexas. provide forthe admission ofnew states into the union. 1. prohibited slaver# within the afected areas.guaranteed freedom ofreligion throughoutthe afected areas. The (rdinances of1H'9 and 1H'% represented an attemptto A. 1. $. provide forthe admission ofnew states into the union. The Northwest(rdinance of1H'H A. Althese answers are correct.compromise on the 2uestion ofslaver# expanding into the territories. Althese answers are correct. +n the earl# 1H&"s!the eforts of4ittle Turtle represented an attemptb# +ndians to A. B. $. 1. $. gave the 3nited States controlof8lorida as a territor#. B.accommodate white settlers. 1. forced the )iami+ndians into negotiations with the 3nited States. $. abandoned the s#stem created in the 1H'9 (rdinance. enhance the powerofthe centralgovernment. 1. negotiate the sale of+ndian lands. resistwhite expansion b# militar# force. encourage England to mediate a settlementbetween +ndians and the new nation.was strongl# opposed b# the New England states. gain redress from the English atthe expense ofNative Americans. 1. B. was neverratified b# Congress!thus wea/ening the nation=s globalprestige. B. +n 1H'C!a treat# negotiated between the 3nited States and Spain A. 1.created a single territor# outofthe lands north of(hio. The 1H&9 Battle of8alen Timbers .eliminate slaver# in the western states. resistwhite expansion b# militar# force.

led the 3nited States to recogni*e the sovereignt# of+ndian nations. represented the lastmaDormilitar# victor# for+ndians againstthe 3. B. contributed to the growing beliefthe nationalgovernmentneeded reform.alowed the )iami+ndians navigation rights to the )ississippi.temporaril# broughta haltto the new American government. (ne efectofSha#s=s 6ebelion was it A.the nation=s capitalbe moved to New England.led the federalgovernmentto adoptthe gold standard.compeled the )iami+ndians to move outofthe (hio :ale#. B. As leaders ofa tax rebelion the 1H'"s! anielSha#s and his supporters demanded A. the rightto vote foralwhite men!regardless ofpropert# holdings. 1. removed alrestrictions to white settlementofthe (hio :ale#. 1. renewed trade agreements with England. $.saw the 3nited States forces sufera significantdefeat. encouraged )assachusetts to adoptgradualemancipation. led the 3nited States to temporaril# evacuate from the (hio :ale#. 1.A. 1. 1. B. led to the downfalofthe state governmentin )assachusetts.S. led the 3nited States to recogni*e the sovereignt# of+ndian nations. The 1H&% Treat# of1reenvile A. Chapter C was inefective.an end to papercurrenc#. contributed to the growing beliefthe nationalgovernmentneeded reform. resulted in the death of1eneralAnthon# 7 a#ne. a moratorium on debtcolection. . $. $. 1. 1. a moratorium on debtcolection. 1.forced the )iami+ndians into negotiations with the 3nited States. was neversigned b# an# +ndian leaders. $. B.

BenDamin 8ran/lin.the countr# needed a strongercentralgovernment. $. B.aine. B.had grown too powerful. ?ames )adison.was pushing America into anotherwarwith England.theirproceeding would be open to the public. Atthe startofthe ConstitutionalConvention of1H'H the delegates agreed that A.the British refusalto evacuate the forts ofthe Northwest C. The delegates to the ConstitutionalConvention of1H'H A. the countr# needed a strongercentralgovernment.welcomed the possibilities ofdirectdemocrac#. Sha#s=s 6ebelion 7 hich event!more than an# other!convinced 1eorge 7 ashington thatthe Articles ofConfederation needed to be revised5 A. B.was too closel# tied to England. slaver# should have to be preserved within the 3nited States.the Spanish threatto ta/e New (rleans B. the countr# needed a strongerarm# to preventfurtherpopularuprisings .1eorge 7 ashington. C. the 7 his/e# 6ebelion the Battle of8alen Timbers were weleducated b# the standards oftheirtime.did notfearconcentrated governmentpower. $. Thomas .were suspicious ofwealth# propert# owners. welrepresented the diversit# ofthe nationalpopulation. C.Sha#s=s 6ebelion 1. 1. B. had sold too much western land to speculators. C. $. C.states would have proportionalvoting based on each state=s population. $.?ames )adison. +n 1H'C!AlexanderAamilton found an importantal# in his push fora strongercentralgovernmentin A. was inefective. 1. 1.Thomas ?eferson. $. 1. were weleducated b# the standards oftheirtime.B# the late 1H'"s!dissatisfaction with the Articles ofConfederation included a beliefthatthe nationalgovernment A.

a two. an end to the slave trade and gradualemancipation.politicalrepresentation.proposed a legislature consisting ofa Aouse of6epresentatives and a Senate.combining the three smaleststates into one large state.had the generalsupportofthe largerstates.women and voting. None ofthese answers is correct. a Senate in which each state would have two members.abolishing slaver#.tiernationallegislature. expansion ofslaver# into the territories. The :irginia . B. >. states versus federalauthorit#. . $. granting citi*enship to slaves. B.lan A. was proposed b# delegate Edmund 6andolph. None ofthese answers is correct. The ConstitutionalConvention of1H'H came close to A. politicalrepresentation. abolishing slaver# and granting citi*enship to slaves. $.lan. C. B. 1. 1. 9. The achievementofthe . C.the definition ofciti*enship.1reatCompromise<ofthe ConstitutionalConvention of1H'H was its resolution ofthe problem regarding A.a two. $. 1.was chosen b# the convention delegates to replace the :irginia . $. expanded the taxation and regulator# powers ofCongress.lan caled for A. expanded the taxation and regulator# powers ofCongress The New ?erse# . tiernationallegislature. C. 1. granting sufrage forfree blac/ males.retaining the Articles ofConfederation with the addition ofa nationalexecutive.

slaver# delegates was the A. +n the ConstitutionalConvention of1H'H!a maDorconcession to the pro. $. 3nderthe .individualstates. B. ?ames )adison=s ideas regarding republican government A. C. $. 1. people. denialofsufrage to free blac/ men. B. Atthe . 1.fifths ofa free person. B. B.people. 1.were drawn from the 8rench philosopherBaron de )ontes2uieu.continuation ofthe slave trade fortwent# #ears. served forlife. citi*ens.agreementthathalfofalfuture states would alow slaver#. $. assumed thatpoliticalfactions would help in preventing t#rann#. Constitution.strengthened fugitive slave provision.were appointed b# Congress. children.chec/s and balances<s#stem ofthe Constitution of1H'H!federalDudges A. rule oflaw.propert#. guarantee ofthe permanentcontinuation ofslaver# where itexisted. B. 1.Congress.non.hiladelphia convention!?ames )adison argued thatthe ultimate authorit# ofthe federalgovernmentcame from the A. C. $. Althese answers are correct. continuation ofthe slave trade fortwent# #ears.served forlife.fifths ofa free person. C. .three.three. assumed thatpoliticalfactions would help in preventing t#rann#.taxable. +n the ConstitutionalConvention of1H'H!forthe purpose ofpoliticalrepresentation!slaves were classified as A.reflected his fearthata large republic was more li/el# to resultin t#rann#. >. suggested thatthe state governments were ultimatel# sovereign.

feared thatpoorl# educated men would be elected to prominentpoliticalofices. $. could notreverse state courtrulings. >.Thomas ?eferson C.were betterorgani*ed. the Confederation Congress. 1. state legislatures.were elected b# state legislatures. B. B. 1. believed the new governmentwas notstrong enough to maintain order.AlexanderAamilton 1. $.members ofthe Senate. 1.had the supportof1eorge 7 ashington. elegates to the ConstitutionalConvention of1H'H recommended the documentbe ratified b# A. $. 1eorge )ason SamuelAdams .specialstate ratif#ing conventions. Althese answers are correct.anothernationalconvention. argued thatthe Constitution would wea/en the states. C.C.apers5 A. served atthe pleasure ofthe executive. $. 3nderthe Constitution of1H'H!the people would directl# elect A. B.1eorge 7 ashington B. federalDudges. members ofthe Aouse of6epresentatives.members ofthe Aouse of6epresentatives. argued thatthe Constitution would wea/en the states. C.a directvote ofthe people. $. 1. +n the debate overthe Constitution of1H'H!Antifederalistopponents to the document A. the president. specialstate ratif#ing conventions. AlexanderAamilton 7 ho among the folowing was one ofthe authors ofThe 8ederalist.

absence ofa specific listing ofpersonalliberties. The firststate to ratif# the Constitution in 1H'H was A.there would be a ban on the importation ofslaves. elaware. C.feared thatthe new governmentwould widel# abuse its powers.wel.saw themselves as defenders ofthe principles ofthe American 6evolution and feared thatthe new governmentwould widel# abuse its powers. $. B. 6hode +sland. B. a bilofrights would be added laterin the form ofamendments.Thomas ?eferson would become the firstpresident.wel. . feared thatthe governmenttoo much favored common people overthe .born. 1.Connecticut. saw themselves as defenders ofthe principles ofthe American 6evolution and feared thatthe governmenttoo much favored common people overthe .a provision would be added alowing forthe directelection ofpresidents.omission ofreferences to 1od. 1. :irginia and New Ior/ ratified the Constitution of1H'H underthe assumption that A. New ?erse#.New Aampshire.Antifederalists< A. The greatestcomplaintb# opponents ofthe proposed Constitution of1H'H was the A. 1. elaware.born. naming ofthe new federaldistrictafter7 ashington. failure to abolish slaver#.saw themselves as defenders ofthe principles ofthe American 6evolution.< absence ofa specific listing ofpersonalliberties.creation ofa federalmilitar#. C. The .< $. itwould notbe ratified b# enough otherstates to become binding. saw themselves as defenders ofthe principles ofthe American 6evolution and feared thatthe new governmentwould >. $. C. a bilofrights would be added laterin the form ofamendments. $. B. 1. B.

states. presidentialcabinet.hiladelphia. C. C. composed ofnine members and the Dudicialpowerforinterpreting the constitutionalit# ofstate laws.althe presidentialelectors casttheirvotes for1eorge 7 ashington.Thomas ?eferson was chosen to be vice president. $. $. The firstsecretar# ofthe treasur# underthe new governmentof1H'& was A. Aenr# Enox. courts. rights ofindividuals. +n the firstnationalelections in 1H'&! A. 9. $. Nine ofthe firstten amendments to the Constitution placed limits on the A. ?ames )adison. ?ohn Adams campaigned against1eorge 7 ashington. 1. B. $. 9.be highl# commercialand urban. >. 1.composed ofnine members. directl# elected b# the people. +n the 1H&"s!those who were labeled 6epublicans envisioned developing a nation thatwould A. new government. composed ofnine members and directl# elected b# the people. >. the Dudicialpowerforinterpreting the constitutionalit# ofstate laws. .althe presidentialelectors casttheirvotes for1eorge 7 ashington.the presidentialinauguration was held in . According to the ?udiciar# Actof1H'&!the Supreme Courtwas to be A. be largel# agriculturaland rural. 1. the Dudicialpowerforinterpreting the constitutionalit# ofstate laws. new government.8ederalists won a convincing maDorit# in the Senate.Thomas ?eferson.6obert)orris. Anti. AlexanderAamilton. 1. B.AlexanderAamilton.

Althese answers are correct.soughtto dominate nationalpolitics. avoided personalinvolvementwith the deliberations ofCongress.considered ithis dut# to resolve politicalcontroversies. $. B. Aaron Burr. C. The dominantfigure of1eorge 7 ashington=s administration was A. avoided personalinvolvementwith the deliberations ofCongress. C. supported the creation ofa nationalban/.Aenr# Enox.Thomas ?eferson.B.twelve #ears. AlexanderAamilton. grew concerned thatthe federalgovernmentwas gaining too much power. B. 1. eventual# controlmostofNorth America.had neverenvisioned a strong centralgovernment.eight#ears.opposed the federalgovernment=s assumption ofstate debts. 1. 1. twelve #ears. C. twent# #ears.wanted to eliminate the nationaldebt. . B. 8ederalists controled the new governmentunderthe Constitution forits first A. $. As Treasur# secretar#!AlexanderAamilton A.four#ears. 1. $. 1. eventual# grantpoliticalrights to women and minorities as welas white men. sixteen #ears. B.be a leading world power. AlexanderAamilton. Althese answers are correct. $.supported the creation ofa nationalban/. encouraged the federalgovernmentto focus on the needs ofthe independentfarmer. $. C. As president!1eorge 7 ashington A.1eorge 7 ashington.be largel# agriculturaland rural. C.

facilitate the colection oftaxes. was eventual# passed b# Congress essential# as Aamilton had desired. 1. actas a storehouse forfederaldeposits.give a pa# increase to governmentemplo#ees. locate the nation=s capitalbetween :irginia and )ar#land.was supported b# ?ames )adison. eliminate the nationalban/. Congress had no authorit# to create a nationalban/.was eventual# passed b# Congress essential# as Aamilton had desired.create two new states in the 7 est. C. B. 1. caled forpa#ing albondholders onl# a fraction ofthe value ofthe bonds. AlexanderAamilton recommended thatthe federalgovernmentraise revenue through A. 1. B. 9. provide loans to private businesses. an excise tax and an importtax.an importtax and a personalincome tax. B. locate the nation=s capitalbetween :irginia and )ar#land AlexanderAamilton=s plan forthe federalgovernmentto assume state debts was passed b# Congress aftera dealwas made to A. AlexanderAamilton=s funding plan A. (pponents ofAlexanderAamilton=s proposed nationalban/ argued . >.a sales tax and a propert# tax. an excise tax and a sales tax.an excise tax and an importtax. $. caled fordividing bonds between theiroriginalpurchasers and speculators.was reDected b# Congress. $. Althese answers are correct. C.appoint/e# ?eferson alies to the 7 ashington administration.3nderAlexanderAamilton=s plan!a new nationalban/ would A. a sales tax and a personalincome tax. B. >. C.be capitali*ed largel# b# private investors. $.

Thomas ?eferson and ?ames )adison. beliefthatthe powerofthe centralgovernmentneeded to be restrained. notmentioned. 1. $. Congress had no authorit# to create a nationalban/!and a nationalban/ would lead to currenc# inflation.described as dangerous.fearthatthe 8ederalists were attempting to end free elections. specifical# proscribed.resident7 ashington=s policies forwestward expansion. fearthat1eorge 7 ashington would tr# to run fora third term. a growing debate overthe nationalban/.a nationalban/ would lead to currenc# inflation and rampantspeculation.dispute over. encouraged. urban wealth#.notmentioned. The emergence ofan alternative politicalorgani*ation to the 8ederalists was prompted b# a A. B. E. B. a nationalban/ would lead to rampantspeculation. $.AlexanderAamilton and ?ames )onroe. $. smalfarmers.manufacturers. +n the Constitution!politicalparties were A. >.Congress had no authorit# to create a nationalban/. 1. 1.creditors. B. 1. 1.A. beliefthatthe powerofthe centralgovernmentneeded to be restrained. a nationalban/ would lead to currenc# inflation. The two preeminent6epublicans ofthe 1H&"s were A. viewed as temporar# factions. >. 1. $. . The mostsustained opposition to AlexanderAamilton=s economic program came from A. smalfarmers. 8ederalists.

enns#lvania to secede from the 3nion.resident7 ashington accompan# thousands oftroops into the field. B. The 7 his/e# 6ebelion of1H&9 saw A. +n America!the 8rench 6evolution was general# praised b# A. $. 1. $. uring the 1H&"s!regionalsupportin the 3nited States for8ederalists was greatestin the A.stated +ndian tribes were entitled to directrepresentation in the federalgovernment. no one. . $. mid. B.violentclashes between urban merchants and American troops. .B. a failed attemptb# .enns#lvania to secede from the 3nion.rural8ar7 est. >.rural eep South. +n reference to +ndians living in the 3nited States!the Constitution A. Thomas ?eferson and ?ames )adison.6epublicans.resident7 ashington accompan# thousands oftroops into the field. re2uired the federalgovernmentto respecttreaties negotiated underthe Confederation. 1. Southwest. 8ederalists and 6epublicans. $. Thomas ?eferson and Aaron Burr. B. >. Northeast. 1. 1. a briefl# successfulmove b# . B. ?ohn Adams and Thomas ?eferson. 6epublicans. 1.the federalgovernmentconductitselfmuch as itdid during Sha#s=s 6ebelion.?ohn Adams and ?ames )adison.8ederalists. +ndians and slaves. 1. Northeast. re2uired the federalgovernmentto respecttreaties negotiated underthe Confederation.made no mention of+ndian nations. 1.Atlantic region. .

avoided a li/el# warwith England.the freedom to use the portatNew (rleans. 1.inc/ne#=s Treat# J1H&%Kgave the 3nited States A. 1. a desired fixed northern boundar# of8lorida.the rightto navigate the )ississippi6iverto its mouth.1reatBritain. $. . B.presidentta/e ofice. declared Congress had no legalrightto regulate commerce with +ndian tribes. the Netherlands. $. Althese answers are correct. Spain. the +ro2uois Confederac#. 1. had defined a precise legalstanding for+ndians and +ndian nations. .inc/ne#=s Treat# J1H&%Kwas negotiated between the 3nited States and A. avoided a li/el# warwith England. 1.secured British compensation forrecentattac/s on American ships. assurances that+ndians in 8lorida would be prevented from launching northern raids. B.presidentta/e ofice. led to the withdrawalofBritish forces posted on the American frontier. . recogni*ed the rightofAmericans to navigate the )ississippito its mouth. a 8ederalistpresidentand a 6epublican vice. B.a 8ederalistpresidentand a 6epublican vice. B. 1. $.the 6epublicans win the presidenc# forthe firsttime. >.$. Althese answers are correct. prompted England to send its firstministersince the 6evolution to the 3nited States.8rance. ?a#=s Treat# J1H&9K A. Spain. The election of1H&C saw A. 1.

The Alien and Sedition Acts J1H&'K A.gave the federalgovernmentefective authorit# to stifle an# public criticism. The . gave the federalgovernmentefective authorit# to stifle an# public criticism!and were aggressivel# used b# the Adams administration to thatefect. $. were aggressivel# used b# the Adams administration to suppress public criticism. B. the Tenth Amendmentto the Constitution was unDust.involved secretforeign treaties with nearb# +ndian nations. led to an undeclared warbetween the 3nited States and 8rance gave the federalgovernmentefective authorit# to stifle an# public criticism. was prompted b# a feud between ?ohn Adams and AlexanderAamilton. the Aouse of6epresentatives determine the presidentialvictor. 1.-IM Afair< A. 9. the 8ederalists reach theirheightofpowerand unit#. were declared unconstitutionalb# the Supreme Court. >. $. 1. the 3nited States was deepl# and bitterl# divided. led to an undeclared warbetween the 3nited States and 8rance. increased tensions between the 3nited States and 1reatBritain. the Supreme Courthad no constitutionalauthorit# to invalidate federallaws.the federalgovernmenthad the rightto void state laws. 1. +n the late 1H&"s!on the politicalscene! .the 6epublicans had betra#ed the spiritofthe Constitution. states had the rightto nulif# federallaws. B. ?ohn Adams become presidenton the 6epublican tic/et. were aggressivel# used b# the Adams administration to suppress public criticism!untilthe# were declared unconstitutionalb# the Supreme Court states had the rightto nulif# federallaws. >. 1. 1.involved foreign interference in an American presidentialelection. $. 9.1. +n the :irginia and Eentuc/# 6esolutions!itwas asserted that A.

.was notable forthe sensationalpersonalslandering ofboth candidates. The presidentialcampaign in 1'"" A. The ?udiciar# Actof1'"1 A.part# s#stem.the 3nited States was deepl# and bitterl# divided. saw leading 8ederalists in Congress attemptto engineerthe election ofAaron Burr. there was considerable agreementovermostimportantforeign polic# 2uestions. $. $.6evolution of1'""<5 A. was furthercomplicated b# the emergence ofa third part#!the 7 higs.was notable forthe sensationalpersonalslandering ofboth candidates. 1. $. B. ?ohn Adams ?ames )adison 1. 1. 1. 1eorge 7 ashington was an attemptb# 8ederalists to secure theirhold on the courts. 1. 1. was an attemptb# 8ederalists to secure theirhold on the courts. was declared unconstitutionalb# the Supreme Court.saw the 6epublicans win a decisive victor# overthe 8ederalists.was passed b# the new 6epublican Congress. . the 3nited States had developed a cleartwo. 1.the republican form ofgovernmenthad won overmosts/eptics. Thomas ?eferson 7 ho described the election of1'"" as the . the powerofthe 6epublicans was declining.Thomas ?eferson B. $.AlexanderAamilton 1. B.A. was decided b# a newl# elected 6epublican Congress.increased the si*e ofthe Supreme Courtb# two seats. resulted in the 8ederalists losing controlofthe Dudiciar#. B.