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United States Patent c191

Gaylord
[ 54] POLLUTION-FREE KITCHEN VENTILATOR
[75] Inventor: Asa K. Gaylord, Portland, Oreg.
[ 73] Assignee: Gaylord Industries, Lake Oswego,
Oreg.
[22] Filed: Aug. 2, 1971
[21] Appl. No.: 168,019
[52] U.S. Cl... ..................... 55/118, 55/120, 55/122,
55/126, 55/139, 55/217, 55/242, 55/279,
55/316, 55/DIG. 36, 98/115 K
[51] Int. Cl ............................................. BOld 50/00
[58] Field of Search ...................... 55/124, 118, 242,
55/126, 120, 139, 122, 217, 220, 316, 279,
DIG. 36; 98/115 K
[ 5 6] References Cited
2,649,727
3,207 ,058
3,260,189
3,381,453
3,490,206
3,530,784
3,654,747
3,672, 126
UNITED STATES PATENTS
8/1953 Snow et al. ........................... 98/115
9/1965 Gaylord ............................ 98/115 K
7/1968 Jensen ............................... 98/115 K
5/1968 Dills ...................................... 55/466
I /1970 Doane ............................... 98/1 I 5 K
9/1970 Courchesne ...................... 98/ I 15 K
4/1972 Remick ................................. S5/316
6/1972 Goettle ................................. 55/126
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Super Compact Line Electronic Air Cleaner Models
30
20
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2.3
L _____ _
[II] 3,785,124
[45] Jan. 15, 1974
908 to 932 Manual SC900 - C Emerson Electric dtd
11/24/69 pages 1-10
Primary Examiner-Bernard Nozick
Attorney-Lee R. Schermerhorn
[57] ABSTRACT
A ventilating hood has an ascending exhaust duct
equipped with a series of air cleaning and purifying in-
strumentalities for removing grease, smoke and fumes
generated by cooking equipment. Air rising through
the duct passes successively through a grease extrac-
tor, an electrostatic precipitator, an activated charcoal
filter and a deodorizing chemical spray. The grease ex-
tractor and precipitator are provided with hot water
and detergent washing sprays. The hood has hollow
walls containing air supply conduits for fresh air out-
lets which discharge streams of fresh air for sweeping
into the exhaust duct smokey and grease-laden air
from the cooking equipment. A control system pro-
vides an automatic wash and dry cycle for the grease
extractor and precipitator and includes thermostatic
control means for closing fire dampers and turning on
the water sprays in case of fire in the ventilator.
15 Claims, 12 Drawing Figures

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INVENTOR
Asa K. Gaylord
BY

ATTORNEY
3,785,124
1
POLLUTION-FREE KITCHEN VENTILATOR
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
This invention relates to a pollution-free kitchen ven-
tilator, particularly for restaurant use.
The ventilators of restaurant kitchens discharge large
amounts of smokey, grease-laden and malodorous air
which is often objectionable in the neighborhood. Pre-
vious kitchen ventilators have been designed primarily
5
to remove grease droplets which create a fire hazard in IO
the ventilator itself but have done little or nothing
toward preventing smoke and objectionable odors from
discharging into the atmosphere. Existing ventilators
have succeeded in providing fresh air for the workers
in the kitchen and the very effectiveness of these venti- 15
lating systems has caused even more contamination of
the outside air adjacent the restaurant.
Objects of the invention are, therefore, to provide a
pollution-free kitchen ventilator, to provide a ventila-
tor which removes smoke, fumes and cooking odors as 20
well as grease from the air discharged from the kitchen,
to provide a kitchen ventilator having an electrostatic
precipitator for removing smoke and having an acti-
vated charcoal filter and deodorizing chemical spray
means for removing cooking odors, to provide a venti- 25
lating hood having improved fresh air makeup means
arranged to sweep contaminated air into the exhaust
duct, to provide a control system having an automatic
wash and dry cycle for a grease extractor and electro-
static precipitator, and to provide a ventilator of the 30
type described having an improved fire control system
arranged to close fire dampers and activate fire extin-
guishing and quenching devices.
2
tions within the scope of the appended claims are in-
cluded in the invention.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
FIG. 1 is a perspective view, with parts broken away,
showing a ventilator embodying the invention;
FIG. 2 is a view on the line 2-2 in FIG. 1;
FIG. 3 is an end elevation view of the right end of the
ventilator in FIG. 1;
FIG. 4 is a fragmentary elevation view of an upper
portion of the fresh air supply duct;
FIG. 5 is a similar view of an upper portion of the ex-
haust duct;
FIG. 6 is an elevation view of the left end of the venti-
lator in FIG. 1 including the plumbing connections;
FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the control unit for the
electrostatic precipitator;
FIG. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view on the line
8-8 in FIG. 7;
FIG. 9 is an elevation view of the exhaust damper
control unit with parts broken away;
FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view of the con-
trol unit for the fresh air damper in FIG. 4;
FIG. 11 is a wiring diagram for the damper motor in
FIG. 10; and
FIG. 12 is a wiring diagram of the control system.
DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED
EMBODIMENT
In FIGS. 1 and 2, the numeral 9 designates cooking
equipment, such as a range, which generates smoke,
fumes and grease-laden air to be removed from the
kitchen. This air is captured by an open front hood 10
having a hollow back wall 11, hollow end walls 12 and
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
In the present construction a hood overhangs the
cooking equipment in a position to intercept smoke,
fumes and grease-laden air generated by the cooking
operations. The hood has hollow walls containing fresh
35 13 and a hollow top wall 14. The hood may also be used
with broilers, soup kettles, deep fat fryers, etc.
air supply ducts for a number of air outlet openings.
4
0
These openings direct streams of fresh air toward the
inlet opening of an exhaust duct, sweeping the smokey
and grease-laden air into the exhaust duct. The air in
the exhaust duct passes first through a grease extractor
to remove grease droplets, then through an electro-
45
static precipitator to remove smoke, then through an
activated charcoal filter to remove most of the objec-
tionable odors and, finally, through a deodorizing
chemical spray which removes any residual odors.
50
The grease extractor and precipitator are provided
with hot water and detergent washing spray means. A
control system provides a wash and dry cycle. During
the wash period the ventilating fan is turned off and the
water sprays are turned on, cleaning the grease extrac-
55
tor and precipitator. Then during the drying period of
the cycle the water is turned off and the fan is turned
on to draw a current of air through the grease extractor
and precipitator. In case of fire, the water sprays are
automatically turned on and fire dampers are closed in
60
both the exhaust and air supply ducts.
The invention will be better understood and addi-
tional objects and advantages will become apparent
from the following description of the preferred embodi-
ment illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Vari-
65
ous changes may be made, however, in the details of
construction and arrangement of parts and certain fea-
tures may be used without others. All such modifica-
As best shown in FIG. l, each end wall 12 and 13
comprises spaced apart inner and outer vertical sheets
of metal 15 and 16 defining an air inlet duct chamber
20 therebetween. As seen in FIG. 2, back wall 11 com-
prises inner and outer, vertically extending sheets of
metal 21 and 22 defining an air inlet duct chamber 23
therebetween. In a similar manner, top wall 14 com-
prises inner and outer, horizontally extending, sheets of
metal 24 and 25 defining an air inlet duct chamber 26
there between.
Each end chamber 20 extends upward through a ver-
tical duct section 30 which is adapted to connect at its
upper end with a fresh air supply duct 31 containing an
air supply fan 32 as shown in FIG. 4. Although both left
and right ducts 30 may be supplied with fresh air, the
present system is arranged to operate satisfactorily with
fresh air supplied to only one of the ducts 30, the top
of the other then being closed by a cap 29 as shown in
FIG. 1. This provides the option of using the duct 30
which is most convenient for connection with the exte-
rior supply duct. The fresh air supply duct 31 is opened
and closed by the damper 33 in FIG. 4.
Each duct 30 contains a flow balancing damper 35
and a fire damper 36. Dampers 35 are adjusted when
the unit is installed and thereafter remain in fixed posi-
tion. Fire dampers 36 are pivotally mounted to close
the ducts 30 in case of fire. Each damper 36 is con-
nected by a link 37 with an arm 38 on a main fire
damper shaft 40 which will presently be described in
detail. Removable front panels 39 provide access to
these dampers and the operating linkage.
3,785,124
3 4
Incoming fresh air follows the paths of arrows 41 in
FIG. 1. In the lower part of chamber 20 the air flow di-
vides, portions passing through hollow back wall cham-
ber 23 and hollow top wall chamber 26 to a chamber
corresponding to chamber 20 in the right side end wall 5
13.
mounted on shaft 40 which was previously mentioned
with reference to FIG. 1. When this baffle is in its open
operative position shown in FIG. 2, it functions as a
first grease extracting baffle, causing the entering flow
of grease-laden air to turn abruptly around its lower
edge. In case of fire, the baffle rotates clockwise with
The inside surfaces of end walls 12 and 13 adjacent
their front ends are provided with vertically extending
fresh air discharge slots 45. The air issuing from these
slots is directed rearwardly and the flows at the oppo-
site ends of the hood are balanced by pivotally
mounted balancing baffles 46. Baffles 46 perform the
dual function of deflecting the air from slots 45 in a
rearward direction and also acting as dampers to equal-
ize the flows from the left and right ends of the hood.
These baffles are manually adjusted at the time of in-
stallation and remain in fixed position thereafter.
Similarly, the under side of hollow top wall 14 is pro-
vided with a fresh air discharge slot 47 extending along
the front edge of the top wall. This slot is equipped with
a pivotally mounted balancing baffle 48 which directs
the air flow rcarwardly and also serves as a damper to
obtain the proper balance of air flows through the three
discharge openings 45, 45 and 47.
shaft 40 to form a damper closing the exhaust passage-
way just inside the inlet throat 50.
Damper baffle 67 closes against a stationary baffle 68
Io on the metal sheet 22. Above baffle 68 is a trough-
shaped baffle 69 on a door panel 70 hinged at 106 on
the front side of the exhaust duct. Trough 69 drains
into gutter 65. These grease extracting baffles and duct
surfaces are sprayed for cleaning and fire extinguishing
15 purposes by spray nozzles 71 connected with a hot
water and detergent supply pipe 72. A tube 73 con-
nected with the pipe 72 discharges a stream of hot
water and detergent directly into drain pipe 66 when
the sprays arc operating, to keep the drain pipe 66 free
20 of congealed grease.
The upper edge of the metal sheet 21 which forms 25
the front side of hollow rack wall 11 terminates a short
distance below the under side of top wall 14 to form an
exhaust air inlet throat opening 50 extending the length
Electrostatic precipitator 56 comprises a series of
cells extending horizontally side by side the length of
the hood between the vertical end ducts 30. The cells
have spaced apart vertical plates between which the
smoke-laden air passes in rising through the exhaust
duct. An electrostatic field between the plates causes
smoke in the exhaust flow to separate from the air
stream and deposit on the plates whereby smoke-free
air is discharged from the exhaust duct. Hence, the of the hood between its end walls 12 and 13. The fresh
30 plates in the precipitating cells must be cleaned from
time to time to remove the smokey deposits that accu-
mulate thereon. The present arrangement provides for
cleaning the plates without removing the cells from the
air 41 discharged from outlet slots 45, 45 and 47 is di-
rected rearwardly toward throat 50 so as to sweep
along with it room air from the kitchen designated by
arrows 51 in FIG. 2. All of these air currents pass rear-
wardly over the cooling equipment 9, sweeping fumes,
smoke, odors and grease-laden air from the cooking 35
equipment into exhaust throat 50. This combined ex-
haust flow coming from the various sources mentioned
exhaust duct.
is designated by arrows 52.
From inlet throat 50 the exhaust flow 52 passes up-
ward successively through an exhaust duct having a
40
grease extractor section 55, electrical precipitator sec-
tion 56, an activated charcoal filter 57 and a chemical
deodorizing spray 58. At the top of the column a collar
The precipitator is cleaned by a series of upwardly-
directed, lower washing sprays 75 and a series of down-
wardly-directed, upper washing sprays 76 used alter-
nately. The hot water and detergent from these sprays
drains down through the grease extractor 55, providing
an additional wash for the surfaces in the extractor and
passes into trough 65 for disposal through drain pipe
66. Lower sprays 75 are generated by spray nozzles 77
in a lower supply pipe 78 and upper sprays 76 are gen-
erated by spray nozzles 79 in an upper supply pipe 80. 60 connects with an exhaust outlet duct 61 containing
an exhaust fan 62 as shown in FIG. 5.
45
After the grease and smoke have been removed as
Exhaust fan 62 has a greater flow capacity than fresh
air supply fan 32 in order to remove some air 51 from
the kitchen in additon to the total inlet flow 41. This re-
lationship of the capacities of the exhaust and supply
fans draws into the exhaust duct a flow of kitchen air
51 whcih not only ventilates the kitchen but also assists
in sweeping the cooking odors, fumes and smoke back
into the exhaust throat opening 50 from the front parts
of the cooking equipment.
Grease extractor 55 comprises a series of baffles pro-
jecting from opposite sides of the exhaust passageway
to create a tortuous flow path for the air and cause
grease particles to impinge against the baffle surfaces
and be separated from the air stream by centrifugal
force. The lower end of the exhaust duct terminates at
a grease trough or gutter 65 just below and inside of the
inlet throat 50. Trough 65 spans the distance between
inner and outer metal sheets 21 and 22 and forms a top
wall in the back inlet chamber 23. The grease trough
is equipped with a drain pipe 66.
The upper side of inlet throat 50 is defined by a
downward sloping damper baffle 67 which is pivotally
50
just described, remaining fumes and odors are largely
removed by the activated charcoal filter 57 above the
upper spray pipe 80. Any remaining odors are neutral-
ized by chemical deodorizing sprays 58 generated by
upwardly directed spray nozzles 81 in a supply pipe 82.
The active ingredient in sprays 58 may be any one of
a number of substances commonly used in room fresh-
ener deodorants. With the grease, smoke and fumes
55
thus removed and the cooking odors removed, neutral-
ized or masked, the exhaust air is clean enough to be
discharged back into the kitchen, if desired, but ordi-
narily it is discharged out-of-doors in order to remove
some air from the kitchen for ventilation purposes.
60
Referring now to FIG. 6, spray pipes 72, 78 and 80
are supplied by a main water supply pipe 85 having a
manual shutoff valve 86. In this main supply line are a
pressure switch SW4 and a line strainer 87. The three
spray pipes 72, 78 and 80 are controlled by individual
65
solenoid valves SV3, SVl and SV2. Detergent from a
tank 88 is added to the hot water in the three spray
pipes by individual detergent pumps DP3, DPI and
DP2. Chemical spray pipe 82 is supplied by chemical
3,785,124
5
spray pump CPI from a chemical tank 89 containing a
float switch SW5.
6
A latch or trigger arm 155 extends horizontally above
the rod 135, its back end being pivotally mounted on
a pin 156 in a bracket 157 on the wall 151. The front
end of trigger arm 155 is connected with a link 158 on
As shown in FIGS. l and 2, the electrostatic precipi-
tator cells are contained in- four removable units 100,
each having a plurality of spaced apart vertical precipi-
tating plates 101. Each unit 100 is equipped with a han-
dle 102 so that the unit may be pulled out on a support-
5 an armature 160 in a vertical solenoid coil CL2. The
under side of arm 155 is provided with a cam surface
161 which is engageable by release plate 142 and a
notch 162 engageable with the upper end of catch plate
ing rack. These units are energized by removable plugs
PLl, PL2 connected to high voltage circuit wires 103.
Pairs of the units 100 are accessible behind two doors Io
105, each pivoted at the bottom on a hinge 106 and
equipped with a latch handle 107. In FIG. 1 the left
door 105 is open and the right door 105 is closed.
When doors 105 are closed, each door engages and de-
presses a pair of plungers 108 and 109 in a safety con- 15
trol box 110.
As shown in FIGS. 7 and 8, the closing of door 105
depresses plunger 108 to close a switch SW7 in the
power supply for the precipi-tating units. As a further
safety precaution, plunger 109 normally holds open a 20
safety grounding switch SW9 in the high voltage circuit
which energizes the circuit wires 103. When either one
145.
The parts are shown in normal operating condition
with the damper 67 open as in FIG. 2. Catch plate 145
engages switch SW3 to hold it closed and maintain
operation of the fans 32 and 62 in FIGS. 4 and 5. Sole-
noid CL2 is deenergized, allowing its armature 160 to
remain in lower position with the upper end of catch
plate 145 engaged in notch 162 of trigger arm 155.
Catch plate 145 holds spring 150 compressed with rod
135 at the leftward limit of its movement.
The damper may be closed through energization of
solenoid CL2 by the control system presently to be de-
scribed or manually by pulling handle 140 outward. En-
ergization of solenoid CL2 raises its armature 160 and
trigger arm 155 to release the catch plate 145. Coil
of doors 105 is opened, the opening of its switch SW7
disconnects the power supply from the precipitator and
spring 11 l closes the grounding switch SW9.
Charcoal filters 57 are insertable and removable
through doors 112 in FIGS. 1 and 2.
A snuffer fire extinguishing system is shown in FIGS.
1 and 3. In case of fire under the hood, a carbon diox-
25
spring 150 then moves rod 135 and sleeve 138 to the
right, swinging damper 67 clockwise to closed position
against baffle 68. As rod 135 moves to the right, catch
plate 145 leaves the switch SW3, causing it to open by
an internal spring and shut off the fans 32 and 62.
ide pressure tank 115 is arranged to discharge fire ex- 30
tinguishing gas through pipe 116 connected with gas
nozzles 117. The snuffer system is actuated by a fusible
link 120 carried by a holder 121 mounted on the under
side of the hollow top wall 14 of the hood as shown in
FIG. 2. Fusing of link 120 releases a tension cable 122 3
5
which passes around a pulley 123 and is connected with
a cylinder valve 124 in the gas line 116. Valve 124 is
spring-tensioned to open position and is normally held
closed by cable 122 and fusible link 120.
The details of damper control unit 130 in FIGS. 1 and
40
2 are illustrated in FIG. 9. As previously described,
damper 67 is mounted for rotation on a horizontal shaft
40. The damper is opened and closed by a damper arm
131 connected with an L-shaped bracket 132 on the
front of the damper whereby arm 131 has pivotal
45
movement on the axis of shaft 40. Arm 131 is an angle
iron of L-shape in cross section having an upper end ex-
tending into the control unit 130.
A flange 133 on the back side of arm 131 is equipped
with a leaf spring 134. A slidable control rod 135 has
50
a pin 136 engageable with the front side of flange 133
and a pin 137 engageable with the back side of spring
134. The front end of rod 135 projects through the
front wall of unit 130 inside of a sleeve 138 which is
slidable on the rod. The outer end of sleeve 138 is
55
equipped with a handle 140 having a stop 141 within
the sleeve to engage the end of rod 135. The inner end
of sleeve 138 is equipped with a circular latch release
~ ~ l ~ ~
A vertical catch plate 145 is secured to rod 135 by
bolt 146. A roller 147 on the lower end of catch plate
145 rolls on the bottom wall of the housing 148. A
compression spring 150 on rod 135 has an outer end
abutting catch plate 145 and an inner end abutting a
65
wall 151 in housing 148. Fan switch SW3 is mounted
on housing 148 in the path of movement of catch plate
145.
The same result is obtained by pulling outward on
handle 140. Outward movement of sleeve 138 on the
rod 135 causes plate 142 to engage cam surface 161
and raise the trigger arm 155 to release catch plate 145.
The damper is reopened by pushing in on handle 140.
As handle 140 is pushed inward, stop 141 pushes rod
135 to the left, swinging the damper counterclockwise.
Plate 142 slides on cam surface 163, lifting trigger arm
155 and allowing plate 142 to pass behind cam surface
161 while catch plate 145 engages cam surface 164 and
enters notch 162 allowing trigger arm 155 to fall back
to latched position as shown. This brings latch plate
145 back into engagement with switch SW3 to re-start
the fans 32 and 62.
The damper control unit for fresh air supply damper
33 in FIG. 4 is illustrated in FIGS. 10 and 11. The shaft
170 of motor DM 1 extends through spring housing 171
and is connected with damper shaft 172 by coupling
174. When the ventilating system is not operating,
damper 33 is held closed in vertical position against
stops 173, as shown, by spring 175. Energization of
motor DMl rotates the shafts 170 and 172 counter-
clockwise to open the damper to horizontal positon,
. tightening the spring 175.
Cam 176 is adjusted to open motor switch 177 after
90 rotation when the damper is in horizontal, wide
open position, and apply a brake to hold the damper
open. As long as motor switch 177 is closed, there is in-
sufficient current flow through brake solenoid 178 to
make the brake effective. When switch 177 opens,
there is then sufficient current flow through brake sole-
noid 178 to hold the damper open against the tension
of return spring 17 5. This is the normal position of the
parts while the ventilating system is operating.
Deenergization of the circuit at terminals 180, 181
releases the brake and allows spring 175 to return the
damper and motor in clockwise rotation to closed posi-
tion as shown in FIG. 10. As this occurs, cam 176 re-
3,785,124
7
closes switch 177 in preparation for the next operation
of the motor.
Control System
8
closed. Contacts Cl l are shunted by reset pushbutton
switch SW12.
Start-Up
The control system is illustrated in FIG. 12. The sys- 5
tern is energized from a pair of supply wires 200, 201.
The system is put into operation by pushing in handle
140 to open exhaust damper 67 to its FIG. 9 position
and then momentarily closing pushbutton start switch
SW6 in FIG. 12. This energizes wire 230 through wire
226, contact 221, timer switch arm C9, normally closed
A timing motor TM 1 is energized by the closing of
relay contacts Cl in response to the energization of
relay coil CL4. The timing motor is a conventional de-
vice which is started by the momentary closure of
contacts Cl to rotate a one revolution cam shaft 202.
When cam shaft 202 starts to rotate, a self-contained
switch, not shown, holds the timing motor energized for
one revolution and then stops the timing motor in con-
dition for re-starting by relay contacts Cl in a new
cycle of operation.
A fire alarm relay CLl and damper control coil CL2
are connected in parallel between line 200 and a wire
203. Wire 203 may be energized from line 201 either
by a manual remote fire switch SWl or a thermostatic
switch THI which appears in the exhaust duct in FIG.
2. Wire 203 also energizes a time delay relay CL3
which is arranged to close a pair of switches C2 and C3
IO stop switch arm SW2-2, fuse 229, wire 224, contact
21S, timer switch arm C7, wire 223, contact 216, timer
switch arm C6, wire 222, contact 212 and timer switch
arm C4 which is connected to supply line 201. The en-
ergization of wire 230 energizes starter coil CLS for the
15 relay controlling exhaust fan 62, starter coil CL6 for
the relay controlling fresh air supply fan 32, damper
motor DMl which opens the damper 33 in air supply
duct 31 and chemical spray pump CPL
The momentary energization of exhaust fan starter
20 coil CLS closes contacts CIO in the exhaust fan relay
to establish a holding circuit through the normally
closed switches SW3, SW4 and SWS in series to main-
tain the energization of wire 230 after pushbutton start
for an interval and then open them. Switch C2 ener-
25
gizes a wire 204 and switch C3 energizes a wire 20S.
switch SW6 has re-opened.
Wire 230 also energizes the power pack 236 of elec-
trostatic air cleaner S6 through wire 225, timer switch
arm CS, contact 220, wire 23S, plug PLl, door
switches SW7, toggle switch SWS and plug PL2. Power
pack 236 supplies high voltage power to the plates 101
Timing motor cam shaft 202 actuates a plurality of
switch arms C4, CS, C6, C7, CS and C9. These switch
arms are engageable with the contacts 211-221. Switch
arm C4 is connected with line 201. Contact 212, switch
arm CS and switch arm C6 are connected together by
30 in electrostatic cleaner cells 100. Safety grounding
a wire 222. Contact 216 and switch arm C7 are con-
nected together by a wire 223. Contacts 21S and 219
are connected to a wire 224. Switch arm CS is con-
nected to a wire 225. Contact 221 is connected to a 35
switches SW9 are normally open.
Wash Cycle
The wash cycle is initiated by the momentary pushing
of pushbutton stop switch SW2. This causes switch arm
SW2-2 to break the holding circuit just described for
exhaust fan relay CLS which then opens its relay
contacts ClO. This deenergizes wire 230 thereby also
deenergizing air supply fan relay CL6, the brake in
wire 226. Contact 213 is connected to a wire 227,
contact 215 is connected to a wire 22S, contact 217 is
connected to wire 204 and contact 211 is connected to
wire 205.
A pushbutton stop switch SW2 has a normally open
switch arm SW2-1 and a normally closed switch arm
SW2-2. The former connects timer relay coil CL4 with
wire 224 through a fuse 229 and the latter connects
timer switch arm C9 with wire 224.
A pushbutton start switch SW6 connects wire 226
with a wire 230 to energize starter coil CLS for the ex-
haust fan 62, starter coil CL6 for fresh air supply fan
32, damper motor OM 1 and chemical spray pump CPI.
In series across switch SW6 are damper switch SW3,
water pressure switch SW4, chemical tank float switch
SWS and exhaust fan starter contact ClO which is
closed by starter coil CLS.
Water solenoid valve SV3 and detergent pump DP3
are energized by wire 204. Water solenoid valve SV2
is energized by wire 22S and detergent pump DP2 is en-
ergized by wire 227. Water solenoid valve SVl and de-
tergent pump DPl are energized by wire 205.
A wire 235 connected to timer contact 220 energizes
precipitator power pack 236 through plug PLl, door
switches SW7, toggle switch SWS and plug PL2, all in
series.
Snuffer tank pressure switch SWIO connects wire
230 with wire 240 to energize electric cooking equip-
ment relay CL7. A solenoid gas valve SV4 controls the
cooking equipment operated by gas burners. This valve
is normally energized by contacts Cl2 in a gas shutoff
relay 241. Relay coil CL8 holds contacts Cll and Cl2
40 damper motor DMl, chemical spray pump CPI and
wire 22S thereby de-activating the electrostatic air
cleaner by deenergization of power pack 236. These
operations stop the ventilating functions.
The momentary pushing of stop switch SW2 also
45
closes the normally open switch arm SW2-I to ener-
gize timer relay coil CL4. The energization of relay coil
CL4 closes timer motor contacts CI to start timing
motor TMl. The operation of the timing motor main-
tains the energization of its circuit for one revolution of
50
cam shaft 202. After a short interval, timer contact arm
C4 shifts from contact 212 to contact 211, energizing
wire 20S from supply line 201. Wire 205 energizes de-
tergent pump DPl and solenoid valve SVl to open this
55
valve and activate washing spray 75 to wash the precip-
itator cells from below.
After a predetermined period of time, timer switch
arm C4 leaves contact 211 and returns to contact 212
which turns off the lower wash sprays 7S. At this time,
60
timer switch arm CS shifts to contact 213 and switch
arm C6 shifts to contact 21S to energize wires 227 and
22S from supply line 201. These switch operations en-
ergize detergent pump DP2 and solenoid valve SV2 to
supply hot water and detergent for upper wash sprays
65
76 to wash the precipitator cells from above.
After another predetermined period of time, timer
switch arm CS returns to contact 214, deenergizing de-
tergent pump DP2. Timer switch arm C6 remains on
3,785,124
9 10
Closing switches THI or SW! also energizes fire
alarm relay coil CLl to actuate a fire alarm system.
The cooling equipment is also shut off by the closing
of switches THI and SWl. Relay coil CL 7 controls the
contact 215 to hold open solenoid valve SV2 for a fur-
ther period of time to provide a hot water rinse of the
precipitator cells from above. Exhaust damper 67 re-
mains open during the wash and rinse operations to
pass the water into trough 65 and drain pipe 66. 5 supply of electrical service to electric cooking equip-
ment and solenoid valve SV4 controls the supply of gas
fuel to gas cooking equipment. Both CL7 and SV4 are
normally energized by wire 230 to maintain cooking
At the end of the rinse period, timer switch arm C6
returns to contact 216, deenergizing wire 22S and shut-
ting off the hot water rinse. At this time, timer switch
arm C7 shifts to contact 217 energizing wire 204 to
start detergent pump DP3 and open solenoid valve SV3 IO
to supply hot water and detergent through spray noz-
zles 71 and tube 73 in the grease extractor section 55.
After this wash period, timer switch arm C7 returns
to contact 218, shutting off the wash sprays in grease
extractor section 55 and, at the same time, timer switch 15
arm CS shifts to contact 219 to energize wires 225 and
230 thereby energizing the starter coils CLS and CL6
in the exhaust fan and fresh air supply fan relays. This
circuit is maintained for a predetermined period to pass
air through the exhaust duct for drying the precipitator 20
cells. It will be noted that this circuit does not energize
power pack 236 whereby the precipitator cells remain
deenergized and inactive. Fresh air damper motor
DM I is energized to open damper 33 and chemical
pump CPI is energized. At the beginning of the drying 25
period timer switch arm C9 leaves contact 221 to break
the redundant circuit from wire 224 through stop
switch arm SW2-2 to relay contacts ClO.
After a drying period, timer switch arm CS returns to
contact 220, stopping the fans and terminating the dry- 30
ing period and opening relay contacts ClO. Timer
switch arm C9 returns to contact 221. All the timer
switch arms C4, CS, C6, C7, CS and C9 have now re-
turned to their normal positions shown in FIG. 12 and,
after a brief further interval completing one revolution 35
of cam shaft 202, timing motor TMl mechanically
opens contacts Cl in its own energizing circuit to stop
the timing motor. The ventilator is then ready to re-
sume operation by momentarily closing start switch
SW6.
Fire Control Operation
Upon closing of thermostat THI or remote manual
fire switch SWl, damper control solenoid CL2 is ener-
gized to close the exhaust duct fire damper 67. This
45
mechanical action opens damper switch SW3 to deen-
ergize wire 230 and fan relay coils CLS and CL6 to stop
the exhaust and fresh air supply fans. Deenergization of
wire 230 also deenergizes power pack 236, de-
50
activating the precipitator.
Simultaneously, time delay relay coil CL3 is ener-
gized, closing switches C2 and C3 to energize wires 204
and 205. The energization of these wires opens sole-
noid valves SV3 and SYI and operates detergent
55
pumps DP3 and DPl to operate water sprays from the
nozzles 77 and 71 for fire protection. The weight of any
accumulation of water on the closed damper 67 will
slightly compress the extended spring 150 in FIG. 9 and
force the damper open sufficiently to allow the water
60
to escape to trough 65.
Upon deenergization of relay CL3 by the re-opening
of thermostatic switch THI or manual switch SWl,
switches C2 and C3 remain closed to maintain the
water sprays for a preset delay period. At the end of the
65
preset period, switches C2 and C3 open, closing sole-
noid valves SV3 and SVI and stopping detergent
pumps DP3 and DPl.
operations when the fresh air supply and exhaust fans
32 and 62 are running and are deenergized whenever
these fans are stopped, to shut off the cooking equip-
ment.
In the event of a substantial decrease in pressure in
snuffer tank 115 in FIG. 3, pressure switch SWlO opens
and deenergizes CL 7, CL8 and SV4, thereby shutting
off the supply of electrical service and gas fuel to the
cooking equipment. The snuffer tank must be re-
charged and pressurized to re-close switch SWIO and
enable CL7, CLS and SY4 to be re-energized. Upon re-
starting the fans 32 and 62 by closing start switch SW6,
the electrical and gas service to the cooking equipment
is reestablished by momentary closing of reset switch
SW12 to energize relay coil CL8, closing contacts Cl 1
and C12 and re-opening solenoid valve SV4.
Opening of either pressure switch SW 4 by low water
pressure or float switch SWS by low chemcial spray
supply breaks the circuit to CLS to stop the fans 32 and
62 and de-activate the precipitator.
Opening of any access door 105 to the precipitator
compartment deenergizes the precipitator power pack
236 by opening of the door switch SW7. Simulta-
neously, the precipitator cells and entire high voltage
system are grounded for safety by switch SW9 in FIG.
S. Removal of the cover from the power pack assembly
236 de-activates the precipitator system and isolates it
from line voltage by breaking the circuit through plugs
PLl and PL2. The precipitator may also be de-
activated by opening toggle switch SW8.
Chemical spray pump CPI and damper opening
motor DMl are activated whenever the fans 32 and 62
are running, these devices being wired in parallel with
CLS and CL6.
Having now described my invention and in what
manner the same may be used, what I claim as new and
desire to protect by Letters Patent is:
1. Ventilating apparatus for kitchen cooking equip-
ment comprising a hood adapted for mounting above
said cooking equipment, said hood having a hollow
back wall, a pair of hollow end walls and a hollow top
wall, an exhaust duct in an upper portion of said back
wall having an inlet opening under said top wall for
smoke and grease-laden air from said cooking equip-
ment, a grease extractor in said exhaust duct in said
hollow back wall, an upper air outlet opening extending
along the under side of said top wall at the front edge
thereof, a pair of end air out-let openings extending
along front edge portions of said end walls, an air sup-
ply duct in said top wall for said upper outlet opening,
and air supply ducts in said end walls for said end outlet
openings, said ducts in said end walls being connected
with said duct in said top wall.
2. Apparatus as defined in claim 1 including an elec-
trostatic precipitator in said exhaust duct downstream
from said grease extractor.
3. Apparatus as defined in claim 2 including an acti-
vated charcoal filter in said exhaust duct downstream
from said precipitator.
3,785, 124
11
4. Apparatus as defined in claim 3 including deodor-
izing chemical spray means in said exhaust duct down-
stream from said charcoal filter.
5. Apparatus as defined in claim 4 including washing
spray means for said grease extractor and precipitator. 5
6. Apparatus as defined in claim 5, said exhaust duct
extending upward from said inlet opening with said
grease extractor, precipitator, charcoal filter and de-
odorizing spray being disposed one above the other so
that wash liquid from said precipitator drains through JO
said grease extractor, and said charcoal filter and de-
odorizing spray are above said washing sprays.
7. Ventilating apparatus for kitchen cooking equip-
ment comprising a hood adapted for mounting above
said cooking equipment, an ascending exhaust duct J 5
having an inlet opening in said hood for smoke and
grease-laden air from said cooking equipment, a grease
and liquid collecting trough having a drain in the lower
end of said duct, a grease extractor in said duct above
said inlet opening, an electrostatic precipitator in said 20
duct above said grease extractor, washing spray nozzles
in said duct arranged to wash said grease extractor,
washing spray nozzles in said duct directed upward
toward the under side of said precipitator, and washing
spray nozzles in said duct directed downward toward 25
the upper side of said precipitator, the washing liquid
from said precipitator draining through said grease ex-
tractor to said trough.
8. Apparatus as defined in claim 7 including a char-
coal filter in said duct above said precipitator, and a de- 30
odorizing chemical spray in said duct above said filter.
9. Ventilating apparatus for kitchen cooking equip-
ment comprising a hood adapted for mounting above
said cooking equipment, an exhaust duct in said hood
having an inlet opening for smoke and grease-laden air 35
from said cooking equipment, an air supply duct in said
hood having an outlet opening in spaced relation to
said inlet opening, a grease extractor in said exhaust
duct, an electrostatic precipitator in said exhaust duct
downstream from said grease extractor, an activated 40
charcoal filter in said exhaust duct downstream from
12
12. Ventilating apparatus for kitchen cooking equip-
ment comprising an exhaust duct for smoke and grease-
laden air from said cooking equipment; an exhaust fan;
a grease extractor and electrostatic precipitator in said
duct; washing spray means for said grease extractor and
precipitator; a control system; a start switch in said
control system arranged to start said fan and energize
said precipitator; a timing device in said system; and a
stop switch arranged to stop said fan, deenergize said
precipitator and start said timing device; said timing de-
vice then starting said washing spray means for a wash-
ing period, stopping said washing spray means after
said washing period and starting said fan for a drying
period, and then stopping said fan.
13. Apparatus as defined in claim 12 including a ther-
mostatic switch and fire damper in said duct, and
means in said system actuated by said thermostatic
switch in case of fire in the duct to stop said fan, close
said damper and operate said washing sprays for fire
extinguishing purposes.
14. Ventilating apparatus for kitchen cooking equip-
ment comprising a hood adapted for mounting above
said cooking equipment, an ascending exhaust duct
having an inlet opening in said hood for smoke and
grease-laden air from said cooking equipment, a grease
and liquid collecting trough in the lower end of said
duct and having a drain, a grease extractor in said duct
above said inlet opening and trough, washing spray
means in said grease extractor arranged to wash said
grease extractor, an electrostatic precipitator in said
duct above said grease extractor, washing spray means
in said duct adjacent said precipitator arranged to wash
said precipitator, and means including said duct for
draining the washing liquid from said precipitator
through said grease extractor into said trough to wash
said grease extractor.
15. Ventilating apparatus for kitchen cooking equip-
ment comprising an exhaust duct for smoke and grease-
laden air from said cooking equipment, a grease extrac-
tor in said duct, said duct extending upward from said
grease extractor, an electrostatic precipitator in said
duct above said grease extractor, washing spray means
in said grease extractor, washing spray means for said
said precipitator, deodorizing chemical spray means in
said exhaust duct downstream from said charcoal filter,
and washing spray means for said grease extractor and
precipitator.
10. Apparatus as defined in claim 9 including a con-
trol system having a start switch arranged to start fans
45
precipitator, a control system having a timing device
for programming said washing spray means in a wash
cycle, said timing device initiating said wash cycle by
starting said washing spray means for said precipitator,
in said exhaust and air supply ducts, energize said pre-
cipitator and start said chemical spray means; a timing
device; a stop switch arranged to stop said fans and said 50
chemical spray means, deenergize said precipitator and
start said timing device; said timing device then starting
said washing spray means for a washing period, stop-
ping said washing spray means after said washing pe-
riod and starting said fans for a drying period, and then 55
stopping said fans.
11. Apparatus as defined in claim 10 including a ther-
mostatic switch in said exhaust duct and fire dampers
in said exhaust and air supply ducts, and means in said
system actuated by said thermostatic switch in case of 60
fire in said exhaust duct to stop said fans, close said
dampers, and operate said washing sprays for fire extin-
guishing purposes.
65
wash liquid from said precipitator draining through said
duct and grease extractor for a first washing of said
grease extractor, and said timing device thereafter
stopping said washing spray means for said precipitator
and starting said washing spray means in said grease ex-
tractor for a second washing of said grease extractor,
and further including an exhaust fan in said duct, a start
switch arranged to start said fan and energize said pre-
cipitator, a stop switch arranged to stop said fan, deen-
ergize said precipitator and start said timing device,
and means controlled by said timing device to stop said
washing spray means in said grease extractor, start said
fan for a drying period, and then stop said fan and tim-
ing device.
* * * * *