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2014

ALABAMA POVERTY DATA SHEET
Jackson

ALABAMA IS THE NATION’S
SEVENTH POOREST STATE.

16.4%

Cherokee
19.6%

Alabama Possible is a statewide nonpro t organization that works to

21%

reduce systemic poverty and its root causes by inspiring Alabamians
to pursue a state in which no individual’s quality of life is diminished by

16.2%

Lamar
22.5%

Walker

Fayette

Calhoun

21%

17.6%

St. Clair

Lauderdale
20.2%

Jefferson
18.6%

Pickens

16.2%

20%

8.7%

Marion

27.9%

Sumter

23.4%

36.5%

Choctaw

Dallas

23.5%

21.5%
Calhoun

15.8%

Elmore
13.8%

Choctaw
20.8%

Clarke

21.7%

Hale

30.9%
Coosa
21%

23.6%

Lee

Autauga32.3% 13.8%

26.3%

23%

Macon

Barbour 30.9%
Montgomery

Pike

21.7%

Lowndes
26.7%

Crenshaw

Butler

Clarke

26.3%

21.5%

Coffee

Monroe

Covington

Covington

Escambia
27.9%

Geneva
20.9%
22.8%

29%

19.2%

Coffee

31.3%

FEMALE-HEADED
HOUSEHOLDS
WITH RELATED
CHILDREN

Barbour

26.7%

20.1%
19.1%

Conecuh

20.9%

27.9%

Crenshaw
Dale

PikeHenry

15.1%

Dale

19.1%

Houston
19%

Geneva
22.8%

19.2%

Houston
19%

REGION10
METROPOLITAN

21%

21%

ALL
HOUSEHOLDS
WITH RELATED
CHILDREN

Henry

Mobile

Mobile

LATINO OR
HISPANIC

HOUSEHOLD TYPE3

32.3%

15.1%

21.1%

23.6%

Bullock

20.1%
36.5%

BLACK

Russell

29%

26.6%

Wilcox

31.3%

Washington

36.8%

WHITE

21.5%

23.5%

BullockElmore

Dallas

RACE3

22.8%

Talapoosa
Chambers
Russell

20.1%

36.6%

Marengo

26.5%
Butler

Conecuh

Escambia

Randolph

19.1%

12.7%

21.1%

21%

Chilton

Perry

26.6%

Monroe

21%

23%
Clay

23.3%

Macon

Montgomery

18.6%

TalladegaLee

Shelby

36.5%

36.5%

Cleburne

8.7%

27.9%
Lowndes

Sumter

21.4%

St. Clair

21.5%

34.1%

POVERTY BY:

Talapoosa Chambers

19.5%

Greene

36.8%

Wilcox

Washington

21%

Bibb

20.8%

21.5%

12.7%

19.6%

16.2%

18.6%

Pickens
Autauga
Tuscaloosa

Cherokee

Blount

Jefferson

36.6%

26.5%

22.8%

Etowah

21%

Perry

Marengo

ClayMarshall
18.1%
21.5%
Randolph
19.1%

18.7%

Walker
21%

20.1%
17.6%

22.5%

Initiative, Higher Education Alliance, and the Community Action
Poverty Simulation.

DeKalb

Cullman

Coosa

Chilton
Lamar
Fayette

Hale

16.2%

26.4%

Bibb

34.1%

23.3%Morgan

Winston

22.2%

21.5%

on poverty-reduction activities, and advocates for fact-based policy
decisions. Our programs include the Blueprints College Access

16.4%
18.6%

12.6%

Talladega

Shelby

Greene

Cleburne
Jackson

Madison

12.8%

Lawrence

19.5%

19.5%

Limestone

Colbert

Franklin

Tuscaloosa

23.4%

15.8%

poverty. Through its work and activities, AP educates Alabamians about
poverty, collaborates with higher education and faith-based institutions

21.4%

33.7%

Blount

22.1%

Etowah

26%

18.7%

25.3%

Cullman

26.4%

17.2%

21.5%

22%

Winston

22.2%

Nearly 900,000 of our neighbors – including
300,000 children – live below the poverty line.

18.1%

32.2%

Marion

DeKalb

Marshall

16.2%

27.8%

Morgan

20%

19.5%

47.6%

Lawrence

Franklin

21%

POVERTY RATE IN ALABAMA

16.2%

13.7%

12.6%

Colbert

39.1%

Madison

12.8%

20%

Limestone

20.2%

12.8%

Lauderdale

Less than 10% in poverty

NONMETROPOLITAN

Less
10% - 19% in poverty
Baldwinthan 10% in poverty
Baldwin
13.9%

13.9%

10% - 19% in poverty19.1% - 24.9% in poverty
25% and up in poverty

EDUCATION LEVEL3

19.1% - 24.9% in poverty
25% and up in poverty

POVERTY RATE BY STATE

POVERTY RATE BY STATE

29.5%
26.5%

NO HIGH
SCHOOL
DIPLOMA

15.0%
13.1%

HIGH
SCHOOL
DIPLOMA
OR GED

11.1%
9.6%

SOME
COLLEGE OR
2-YEAR
ASSOCIATE’S
DEGREE

United States

3.8%
4.1%

BACHELOR’S
DEGREE OR
HIGHER

Alabama

Less than 10% in poverty
10% - 15.8% in poverty
15.9% - 19% in poverty
19.1% and up in poverty

PO BOX 55058 | BIRMINGHAM, AL 35255
205.939.1408
Maps developed from U.S. Census Bureau, Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (2012)

2014

alabama Poverty data sheet
Poverty rate

Total
Population1

All
Persons2

Children2

Adults
Over 653

Families
With Related
Children3

Female-Headed
Households
With Related
Children3

Individuals
25 & Over
Who Are
Less Than
High School
Graduates3

education
Individuals
Individuals
25 & Over
25 & Over
Who Graduated Who Have Some
From High
College or an
School or
Associate
3
Have a GED
Degree3

Individuals
25 & Over
Who Have a
Bachelor’s
Degree
or Higher 3

Population
25 & Over
Who Is a
High School
Graduate
or Higher3

Population
25 & Over
Who Has a
Bachelor's
Degree or
Higher3

emPloyment

Annual
Unemployment
Rate4

Median
Household
Income2

HealtH & Food Security

Teen
Birth Rate5

Adults
Who Are
Obese6

Adults With
Diabetes6

SNAP
Recipients7

Food
Insecurity8

Childhood
Food
Insecurity8

K-12 Free
or Reduced
Lunch
Recipients9

United States
Alabama

37.7

35.3

35.0
Dale
Dallas
DeKalb

30.7
30.5

Fayette
Geneva
Greene

Lamar
Lauderdale
Lawrence
Lee
Limestone
Lowndes
Macon
Madison

31.3
15.7

Marion
31.7
Mobile
Monroe

33.1
33.1

Perry

15.0

30.1
Russell
13.0
Sumter
31.5
Tallapoosa
Tuscaloosa
33.3
Wilcox
Winston

30.3

homeless Persons
610,042
4,689
1,469
905

11

U.S.
Alabama

586
515
493
399
223
99

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11

U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division (2013)
U.S. Census Bureau, Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates (2012)
U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates (2008-2012)
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Local Area Unemployment Statistics (2013)
Alabama Department of Public Health Center for Health Statistics, Alabama Vital Statistics (2012), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012)
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Diabetes Surveillance System (2010)
U.S. Department of Agriculture (2013); Alabama Department of Human Resources (2013)
Feeding America (2011)
U.S. Department of Agriculture (2013-2014); Alabama State Department of Education, Free or Reduced Lunch Report by System (2013-2014)
Kaiser Family Foundation (2012)
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (2013)

Children – Individuals under the age of 18.
Food inseCurity – reduced quality, variety, or desirability of diet. Also includes disrupted eating patterns and reduced food intake.
homelessness – The United States Department of Housing and Urban Development use a point-in-time homelessness count, which is a locally
planned and coordinated count of sheltered and unsheltered homeless persons on a single night in January.
inFant mortality rate – Annual number of deaths of infants under age 1 per 1,000 live births.
obese – Adults with a Body Mass Index of 30 or higher.
Poverty rate – The percent of persons (or families) who live below the federal poverty line as calculated by the Census Bureau.
teen birth rate – Live births per 1,000 estimated teen female population. The source for national and state-level data, the Center for Disease

unemPloyment rate – The annual percentage of all people in the labor force who did not have a job, actively looked for work, and were available
for work for at least 4 consecutive weeks.
Questions? Want more copies?
Please contact Alabama Possible, P.O. Box 55058, Birmingham, AL 35255. Phone (205) 939-1408, Fax (205) 933-7774,
info@alabamapossible.org