EDRS 8900 Applied Field Research Spring 2008 I. INSTRUCTORS: Dr. Harriet Bessette Office: KH 3121 Dr.

Susan Stockdale Office: KH 1005 II. CLASS MEETINGS: E-mail: hbessett@kennesaw.edu Office phone: 770-423-6893 E-mail: sstockda@kennesaw.edu Office Phone: 678-797-2060

Dates: Jan. 10, 2008 – Apr. 24, 2008 Day/Times: Thursdays, 5:00 p.m. – 7:45 p.m. Room: KH 1302 and KH 1106 WebCT VISTA: Utilized in tandem with on-site attendance (Hybrid) III. TEXTS Required: George, D. & Mallery, P. (2008). SPSS for windows, step –by–step (8th ed.) Boston: Pearson Recommended: Bazeley, P. (2007). Qualitative Data Analysis with NVivo. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Golden-Biddle, K., & Locke, K. (2007). Composing Qualitative Research. (2nd Ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Grbich, C. (2007). Qualitative Data Analysis. Thousand Oaks, CA:

Sage. Holliday, A. (2007). Doing and Writing Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Miles, M. B., & Huberman, A. M. (1994). Qualitative Data Analysis. (2nd Ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. American Psychological Association. (2001). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (5th ed.) Washington, DC: Author.

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Also Recommended:

Membership in AERA, Division K, Teaching and Teacher Education & MidSouth Educational Research Association. Student rates available.

IV. CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION: In this course, students will complete a field research project in a P-12 or higher education setting which focuses on improving student learning. The project serves as the capstone experience for the Ed.S. degree and may serve as a pilot study for the dissertation for those continuing into the Ed.D. program. Prerequisite: EDRS 8000, Applied Quantitative and Qualitative Research. V. CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK SUMMARY: Collaborative Development of Expertise in Teaching, Learning, and Leadership “The Collaborative Development of Expertise in Teaching, Learning, and Leadership” is the basis for all of Kennesaw State University’s teacher education and teacher leadership programs. Working from a solid content background, the teacher as facilitator and leader demonstrates proficient and flexible use of different ways of teaching to actively engage students in learning. As facilitators and leaders in their field, teachers are well versed in the characteristics of students of different ages, abilities and cultural backgrounds. They are skilled in integrating technology into instruction and create an environment in which students can be successful and want to learn, knowing when and how to assess learning by means of various forms of traditional and authentic assessments. They are well prepared for successful careers in teaching and teacher leadership, and are expected to act in a professional manner in all circumstances with colleagues, parents, community members and their own students. As a professional educator and leaders, the teacher values collaboration and seeks opportunities to work with other professionals and community members to improve the educational experiences for children and youth. This course contributes to candidates’ understanding of their developing role by supporting educational growth, development, and learning across the lifespan. The Professional Teacher Education Unit (PTEU) at Kennesaw State University is committed to developing expertise among candidates in initial and advanced programs as teachers and leaders who possess the capability, intent and expertise to facilitate high levels of learning in all of their students through effective, research-based practices in classroom instruction, and who enhance the structures that support all learning. To that end, the PTEU fosters the development of candidates as they progress through stages of growth from novice to proficient, from proficient to expert, and finally, from expert to leader. Within the PTEU conceptual framework, expertise is viewed as a process of continued development—not an end-state. To be effective, teachers and educational leaders must embrace the notion that teaching and learning are intertwined and that only through the implementation of validated practices can all students construct meaning and reach high levels of learning. In that way, candidates are facilitators of the teaching and learning process. Finally, the PTEU recognizes, values and demonstrates collaborative practices across the college and university and extends collaboration to the community-at-large. It is through this collaboration with professionals in the university, public and private schools, parents and other professional partners, that the PTEU meets the ultimate goal of assisting Georgia’s schools in bringing all students to high levels of learning. Use of Technology: As part of our conceptual framework, the faculty in the Professional Teacher Education Unit (PTEU) at KSU is committed to preparing professional learning facilitators who are technologically competent. As such, technology has been infused into each BCOE course. During this course, graduate candidates will be provided with opportunities to explore and research data-bases from the various fields of education and psychology. Library research required in this course is supported by the Galileo system. As a member of the University Center in Georgia, a consortium of major libraries provides electronic, as well as hard copy access. Students have access to additional resources through the Educational Technology Center and the Teacher Resource and Activities Center. During the course, the instructor will use a variety of technologies (both low and high tech) such as videos, overheads, and multi-media presentations. NOTE: KSU is moving to a new student email system powered by Google(TM). This system is very similar to Google Gmail, and has a streamlined look and added functionality.

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The new system will be available beginning August 10, 2007. The old Student Email system will continue to be available until February 1, 2008, in order to give everyone time to move your messages into the new Student Google Email system. Please note, however, that you will no longer be able to send or receive mail in the old student email system as of August 10. It will be used only to store your existing mail until you move it. Moving your existing student email to the new system is a simple matter. For step-by-step instructions, click here: http://students.kennesaw.edu/docs/move_student_email.pdf To log in to the new Student Google Email system, click here: https://auth.kennesaw.edu To log in to the old Student Email system, click here: https://students.kennesaw.edu/oldmail Diversity Statement: A variety of materials and instructional strategies will be used to meet the needs of different learning styles of diverse learners in the class. Candidates will explore the literature for research pertaining to differentiated strategies and curricula within diverse classrooms. One element, therefore, is raising candidate awareness of critical multicultural issues affecting instructional practice. A second element is to cause candidates to explore how multiple attributes of multicultural populations influence decisions in identifying fertile ground for action research. Among these attributes are disability, ethnicity, family structure, gender, geographic region, giftedness, language, race, religion, sexual orientation, and socioeconomic status. Kennesaw State University provides program accessibility and reasonable accommodations for persons defined as disabled under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the American with Disabilities Act of 1990. A number of services are available to help students with disabilities with their academic work. In some cases, certification of disability is required. Please be aware that there are other support/mentor groups on the campus of Kennesaw State University that address each of the multicultural variables outlined above. For more information contact the Student Life Center at 770-423-6280. Statement for school-based activities: While completing the graduate program at Kennesaw State University, candidates are required to be involved in a variety of leadership and school-based activities directed at the improvement of teaching and learning. Appropriate activities may include, but are not limited to, attending and presenting at professional conferences, actively serving on or chairing school-based committees, attending PTA/school board meetings, leading or presenting professional development activities at the school or district level, and participating in education-related community events. As candidates continue their educational experiences, they are encouraged to explore every opportunity to learn by doing. Additional Requirements for Student-Researchers Carrying Out Course-based Research Student-researchers who conduct projects at variance from or extending beyond a class assignment must consult with their faculty instructor about securing KSU IRB approval and must contact any IRB-type organization available in their own workplace setting. For those in teacher education, it is important to remember that every district has a federally mandated requirement for IRB review of proposals for conducting research in public schools. It is up to each student-researcher to learn the appropriate IRB procedures to be followed in his/her district. More specifically, KSU teacher education candidates are required to complete district-level IRB forms or to follow accepted policies and gain approval in writing, consistent with school/district guidelines, prior to beginning any assigned research project. Once school district IRB approval is obtained, Kennesaw State University will honor the approval by submitting a copy of the county proposal, approval and Human Participants Online Certificate to the KSU IRB Committee. Diversity A variety of materials and instructional strategies will be employed to meet the needs of the different learning styles of diverse learners in class. Candidates will gain knowledge as well as an understanding of differentiated strategies and curricula for providing effective instruction and assessment within multicultural classrooms. One element of course work is raising candidate awareness of critical multicultural issues. A second element is to cause candidates to explore how multiple attributes of multicultural populations influence decisions in employing specific methods and materials for every student. Among these attributes are ethnicity, race, socioeconomic status, gender, giftedness, disability, language, religion, family structure, sexual orientation, and geographic region. An emphasis on cognitive style differences provides a background for the consideration of cultural context.

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Kennesaw State University provides program accessibility and accommodations for persons defined as disabled under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 or the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. A number of services are available to support students with disabilities within their academic program. In order to make arrangements for special services, students must visit the Office of Disabled Student Support Services (770-423- 6443) and develop an individual assistance plan. In some cases, certification of disability is required. Please be aware that there are other support/mentor groups on the campus of Kennesaw State University that address each of the multicultural variables outlined above. For more information contact the Student Life Center at 770-423-6280. Doctorate of Education (EdD) The knowledge, skills and dispositions (KSD’s) demonstrated by graduates of The Kennesaw State University Doctorate of Education program of the Bagwell College of Education reflect the unique aspects of this degree. Collaboratively developed by faculty from across the university and in consultation with community/school partners, these outcomes and proficiencies delineate the high expectations we have for graduates who will be Leaders for Learning. The proficiencies reflect the complex nature of student learning in advanced degree programs leading to a terminal degree. Consequently, many of the proficiencies listed below incorporate aspects of knowledge, skills and dispositions within a single proficiency and are clearly linked to our conceptual framework, The Collaborative Development of Expertise in Teaching, Learning, and Leadership. VI. Goals and Objectives: The goals of this course are to provide candidates with knowledge, skills, and experiences germane to both standard and advanced methods of quantitative and qualitative inquiry in education. EDRS 8900/EDRS 8000/EDL 8000 Course Objectives (KSD) Demonstrate a profound understanding of Qualitative & Quantitative paradigms that frame DSL. (K) Application of quantitative & qualitative methods of data collection and analysis. (S) Develop collaborative research proposal that addresses the nature of leadership practice (DL) & collective interactions that occur among administrative and teacher leaders, their roles in school change & process improvement (T & L; CRSC) (K) Extend knowledge into educational setting to conduct field research. (S) Explore aspects of qualitative & quantitative research and examine application to education Apply the principles of DSLP to influence the GLISI Distributed School Leadership Role ● Relationship Development Leader ● Process Improvement Leader ● Operational Leader ELCC Standards PSC/NCATE Standards

EDD Performance Outcome

Fostering an organizational culture that facilitates development of a shared vision, school improvement, & increased learning for all students. Implementing sustainable educational change and process improvement.

Standard 1 Standard 2

1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5, 1.6, 1.7

● Change Leader ● Process Improvement Leader ● Operational Leader ● Data Analysis Leader

Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4

1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5, 1.6, 1.7

Creating 21st century learning environments that advance best practices in curriculum, instruction, and assessment.

● Curriculum, Assessment, Instruction Leader ● Learning and Performance

Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4 Standard 5

1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5, 1.6, 1.7

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Engaging in applied research that supports data-driven planning and decision making for the improvement of schools and learning.

Building collaborative relationships, teams, and community partnerships that communicate and reflect distributed leadership for learning.

Embracing diversity by demonstrating intercultural literacy and global understanding.

organizational behavior of others as they improve curriculum, instruction and assessment. (S) Carry out field research to effect school change and improved student learning. (S) Acquire skills in designing and analyzing research using qualitative/quantitative or mixed design. Apply the principles of DSLP in developing studies that focus upon school improvement and student learning in a number of situations within schools. (S) Use skills in collecting, analyzing, and writing up findings of applied field research. (S) Design collaborative research proposal. Apply principles of DSLP to increase positive interactions and build a more intentionally inviting and inclusive school culture. (D) Engage in collaborative relationships among peers, colleagues, research subjects. (D) Develop commentary that considers assumptions about, and implications for, teaching and learning (T & L); distributed leadership (DL); or improved P-12 learning outcomes, i.e., culturally responsive school and classrooms for traditionally marginalized or disenfranchised students (CRSC).Engage in courageous conversations to increase the equity and close achievement gap. (S/D). Develop Research Report that addresses biases & assumptions about, and implications for, teaching and learning (T & L); distributed leadership

Development Leader ● Operational Leader

Standard 6

● Data Analysis Leader ● Process Improvement Leader ● Learning and Performance Development Leader

Standards 1-6

1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5, 1.6, 1.7

● Relationship Development Leader ● Operational Leader

Standard 1 Standard 2 Standard 3 Standard 4

1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5, 1.6, 1.7

● Curriculum, Assessment, Instruction Leader ● Learning and Performance Development Leader

Standards 1-6

1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5, 1.6, 1.7

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Facilitating professional learning & development that enhance and improve professional practice and productivity.

Exercising professionalism and ethical practice.

(DL); or improved P-12 learning outcomes, i.e., culturally responsive school and classrooms for traditionally marginalized or disenfranchised students. (S/D) Develop ability to effectively read, access, and interpret research literature. Apply the principles of DSLP in developing collaborative research proposal that focuses upon school improvement and student learning in a number of situations within school/class (S) Reflection on application of skills in field; data collection & analysis; and positionality as researcher to enhance professional development and practice. Present research in public forum (conference) (D) Obtain IRB approval to conduct study on human subjects. Demonstrate a personal orientation toward and commitment to ethical professional practice. (D) Conduct applied field research using highest ethical standards. (D)

● Learning and Performance Development Leader ● Curriculum, Assessment, Instruction Leader

Standard 2 Standard 4 Standard 5 Standard 6

1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5

● Learning and Performance Development Leader ● Operational Leader

Standard 5 Standard 6

1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5, 1.6, 1.7

VII. COURSE REQUIREMENTS AND ASSIGNMENTS:

1. It is an expectation that all students will attend every class and participate actively and thoughtfully in
whole and small group discussions and activities. Students must read each group of selections prior to the appropriate class session and come prepared to interrogate texts, raise questions, and connect readings to theory and practice. For some sessions, candidates will be given choices among the readings and/or primary readings will be designated. Note that WebCT Vista discussions and activities are among those which will be evaluated.

2. Reflective Journals (3 @ 25 pts. = 75 pts. total) Students are required to submit a minimum of three (3)
reflective logs during data collection/analysis, in which they must address any two (2) of the following: (a) Early issues in gaining entry or establishing rapport with research participants; (b) Update on data collection/analysis; (c) Challenges encountered; (d) Results that were surprising; and (e) Implications for practice, policy, and future research.

3. Midterm Examination (75 points) Mid-point review of basic applications, approaches, definitions, and/or
analyses in both quantitative and qualitative research.

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4. Research Report (100 pts.) Write a 15-page (maximum) paper outlining the results of your study with
discussion related to the findings. Include: (a) Brief summary of the purpose and significance of your study, and the original research questions; (b) Brief summary of methods, data sources, & analysis; (c) Results of data collection (in narrative & display formats); (d) Limitations; (e) Discussion and Conclusion (implications for practice, policy, leadership, and future research; and (f) Appendixes. At least 80% of your report must be devoted to c, d, and e. The 15-page limit excludes Appendixes. A rubric will be provided. This paper must be completed in a timely way for presentation at conference.

5. Presentation at Conference (50 pts.) Completed Research Report must be submitted and approved prior to
presentation at conference. Conference presentation will follow a rubric and serve as final for the course. VIII. EVALUATION AND GRADING: Performance Activity Reflective Logs (3 @ 25 pts.) Midterm Examination Research Report (Plan & Final Draft) Presentation at Conference Total Numeric Scale A = 92-100% B = 84-91% C = 75-83% F = 74% or lower 276-300 252-275 225-251 <251 Due Date 2/14; 3/13; 4/17 2/28/08 3/27/08; 4/24/08 5/2/08; 5/3/08 Points 75 75 100 50 300

All written work should be word processed, double-spaced only, 12 size font. All work submitted should follow APA format. Manuscripts must be proof read to ensure accuracy in spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Written work must conform to standards commensurate with doctoral level expectations. Therefore, any work in which 3 or more grammatical inconsistencies/typos/spelling or APA errors/etc. are detected in the same paragraph will be automatically returned to candidate.

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IX. COURSE OUTLINE (Note: Mar. 10th is final day to withdraw without academic penalty) ALL FIELD WORK DATES HIGHLIGHTED IN GOLD DATE SMALL SMALL TOPIC ASSIGNMENT/ GROUP/READINGS GROUP/READINGS PRODUCT 1/10/08 Whole Group Whole Group Syllabus Movie: Misleading, On Campus Requirements Distorting, and Lying 1/17/08 Whole Group Whole Group From Data Collection Interpreting & to Research Report: Presenting Results; On Campus How to present results Discussion 1/24/08 Whole Group Whole Group Beginning FIELD WORK Off Stages/Gaining Entry/ Campus Establishing Rapport 1/31/08 Blue Group-Bessette Yellow GroupMiles & Huberman Stockdale Coding Exercise-If you On Campus Ch. 4 (Handout) Pre-Reading: Step-Byhave data, please bring “Coding” Step: Chapters 1 -5 to class 2/7/08 Whole Group Whole Group Establishing FIELD WORK Off Rapport/Data Campus Collection & Analysis 2/14/08 Blue Group-Bessette Yellow GroupGlanz, Appendix B Stockdale REFLECTION #1 DUE On Campus pp. 279-293 Pre-Reading Step: Bring your own data Sample Write Up Chapters 6-8 2/21/08 Blue Group-Bessette Yellow GroupUsing Qualitative Stockdale PreLab (upon availability) On Campus Software for Storage Reading Step: & Retrieval Chapters 9-11 2/28/08 Whole Group Whole Group Mid-way Point in FIELD WORK Off Semester/Data Campus Collection & Analysis MID-TERM EXAM 3/6/08 Yellow GroupBlue GroupBessette Stockdale Coding Exercise-If you On Campus Miles & Huberman Pre-Reading: Step-Byhave data, please bring Ch. 4 “Coding” Step: Chapters 1 -5 to class 3/13/08 Yellow GroupBlue GroupREFLECTION #2 DUE Bessette Stockdale Bring your own data On Campus Glanz, pp. 279-293 Pre-Reading Step: Sample Write Up Chapters 6-8 3/20/08 Yellow GroupBlue GroupLab (upon availability) Bessette Stockdale Bring your own data On Campus Using Qualitative Pre-Reading Step: Software (NVIVO) Chapters 9-11 3/27/08 Yellow GroupBlue GroupLab (upon availability) Bessette Pre-Reading Step : PLAN for Research On Campus NVIVO Chapters 12, 18 Report DUE 4/3/08 Whole Group Whole Group Analysis/Report FIELD WORK Off Writing
Campus

4/10/08 4/17/08
Off Campus

SPRING BREAK
Consultation as Needed Consultation as Needed Consultation as

No class
Analysis/Report Writing FIELD WORK REFLECTION #3 DUE FINAL DRAFT OF RESEARCH REPORT REVISION OF

4/24/08
On Campus

5/1/08

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Off Campus

Needed Conference – Fri. & Saturday

RESEARCH REPORT CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

5/2/08 & 5/3/08

X. ACADEMIC HONESTY STATEMENT: The KSU Graduate Catalog states “KSU expects that graduate students will pursue their academic programs in an ethical, professional manner. Any work that students present in fulfillment of program or course requirements should reflect their own efforts, achieved without giving or receiving any unauthorized assistance. Any student who is found to have violated these expectations will be subject to disciplinary action.” XI. REFERENCES AND BIBLIOGRAPHY Ary, D., Jacobs, L. C., & Razavieh, A. (1996). Introduction to research in education. New York, NY: Harcourt Brace College Publishers. Creswell, J. W. (2007). Qualitative Inquiry and Research Design: Choosing Among Five Traditions. (2nd Ed.) Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Creswell, J. W. (1994). Research Design: Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Johnson, A. P. (2002). A short guide to action research. Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon. Lester, P. E., & Bishop, L. K. (2000). Handbook of tests and measurement in education and the social sciences. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. Marzano, R. J. (2003). What works in schools: Translating research into action. Alexandria, VA: Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development. McEwan, E. K., & MeEwan, P. J. (2003). Making sense of research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. McMillan, J. H., & Schumacher, S. (1997). Research in education. New York, NY: Longman. Shadish, W. R., Cook, T. D., & Campbell, D. T. (2002). Experimental and quasi-experimental designs for generalized causal inference. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Co. Thomas, R. M. (2003). Blending qualitative and quantitative research methods in theses and dissertations. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press. Wiersma, W., & Jurs, S. G. (2005). Research methods in education: An introduction. (8th Ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

Standards of Performance

U N D E V E L O P E D (0-3 PTS) Candidate does not describe the purpose, significance or research questions.

D EVE LOPI NG (4-5 PTS.)

MEETS EXPEC TATIO NS (6-9 PTS.)

E XEMP LARY (10 PTS.)

TOTA L POIN TS=10 0

SUMMARIZE PURPOSE, SIGNIFICANC E OF STUDY, & RESEARCH QUESTIONS

Candidate does not clearly describe how the research is related to best practices in curriculum, instruction, and assessment; vaguely describes the significance, importance and/or the potential impact of the research on the classroom, school or district curricular, instructional or assessment practices; &/or minimally addresses research questions.

The candidate presents the following: 1. The candidate clearly describes the purpose of the research project. 2. He/she provides documentation through prior research and/or theory that the study is linked to best practices in curriculum, instruction and assessment. 3. The candidate clearly describes the significance/importance of the research and offers a realistic view of the potential impact of the research on the classroom, school or district curricular, instructional or assessment practices, tying back to original research questions.

The candidate thoroughly presents the following: 1. The candidate clearly describes the purpose of the research project. 2. He/she provides documentation through prior research and/or theory that the study is linked to best practices in curriculum, instruction and assessment. 3. The candidate clearly describes the significance/importance of the research and offers a realistic view of the potential impact of the research on the classroom, school or district curricular, instructional or assessment practices. Content, Clarity, Coherence, Control (writing mechanics), & Citations (APA) are outstanding. Research questions are expressed clearly and

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results
precisely. Candidate demonstrates a deep understanding of the complexity of issues by recognizing assumptions and to analyzing those assumptions for justifiability. Candidate adequately, accurately, & professionally describes in appropriate detail the methods used in the research process. Candi date uses data source s with appro priate and rich detail provid ing inform ation to answe r resear ch questi ons, suppo rt planni ng and decisio n makin g

SUMMARIZE METHODS, DATA SOURCES & ANALYSIS

T h e c a n d i d a t e p r e s e n t s a n i n a p p r o p r i a t e

While candidate focuses on how research was conducted, instrumentation, data collection & analysis with moderate accuracy, he/she does not adequately or accurately describe in detail the methods used in the research process Cand idate uses insuff icient data to answ er resea rch quest ions, supp ort plann ing or decisi onmaki ng/or data sourc

The candidate adequately and accurately describes in appropriate detail the methods used in the research process. Candid ate clearly focuses on specific s of how researc h was conduct ed, specific s of instrum entation , data collectio n& analysis ; uses data sources which provide approp riate informa tion to answer researc

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

m e t h o d o l o g y a n d d a t a c o l l e c t i o n , a n d / o r c a n d i d

es utiliz ed do not provi de adeq uate infor matio n to supp ort plann ing or decisi onmaki ng relate d to impr oving stude nt learni ng.

h questio ns, support plannin g and decision making related to student learnin g

relate d to studen t learni ng. Da ta source s are numer ous includi ng but and not limite d to demog raphic data and data relate d to studen t learni ng. Ca ndidat e strong ly focuse s on specifi cs of how resear ch was condu cted, specifi cs of instru menta

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

a t e ’ s f o c u s o n h o w r e s e a r c h w a s c o n d u c t e d , i n s t r

tion, data collect ion & analys is.

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

u m e n t a t i o n , d a t a c o l l e c t i o n , & / o r a n a l y s i s i s w e a k

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

.

RESULTS – NARRATIVE & DISPLAY

C a n d i d a t e m i s i n t e r p r e t s f i n d i n g s o r m a k e s c l a

Cand idate inter prets data and key findi ngs clearl y& accur ately. Cand idate begin s to make logica l concl usion s and descr ibes reaso nable conne ctions betwe en resea rch quest ions, schoo l impr ovem ent

Candid ate interpre ts data clearly and accurat ely, elabora ting and exempli fying key findings . Candid ate comes to logical conclusi ons and describ es reasona ble connect ions between researc h questio ns, school improve ment and student learnin g. Resul

Candidate interprets data clearly, precisely and accurately, elaborating and exemplifying key findings. Candidate distinguishes between consistent and inconsistent findings and comes to logical conclusions. Candi date unders tands assum ptions and infere nces and create s intenti onal, insight ful connec tions betwee n resear ch questi ons, school impro vemen t and

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

i m s u n s u p p o r t e d b y d a t a ; O R c a n d i d a t e f a i l s t o

and stude nt learni ng. R esults follo w some what from the analy ses.

ts follow from the analyse s.

studen t learni ng. Cogen tly presen ts insight s gained from the data which emerg e from deep, critica l analys es.

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

m a k e l i n k b a c k t o r e s e a r c h q u e s t i o n a n d / o r f a

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

i l s t o l i n k f i n d i n g s t o s c h o o l i m p r o v e m e n t o r s t u

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

d e n t l e a r n i n g . R e s u l t s d o n o t f o l l o w d i r e c t l y f r

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

o m t h e a n a l y s e s .

LIMITATIONS

D o e s n o t i d e n t i f y s t r e n g t h s a n d

Mini mally identi fies stren gths and limita tions

Clearly identifie s strengt hs and limitati ons; includes in discussi on section

Clearl y identif ies & explic ates streng ths and limitat ions in discus sion section

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

l i m i t a t i o n s

DISCUSSION/C ONCLUSIONS

C a n d i d a t e f a i l s t o s u m m a r i z e f i n d i

Cand idate parti ally sum mariz es findi ngs accur ately OR provi des limite d persp ective on them. Mak es quest ionab le link back to resea rch quest

Candid ate accurat ely summa rizes findings and provide s informe d perspec tives on them. Links to researc h questio ns, theoreti cal and researc h framew ork. Ties findings clearly to datadriven

Candi date accura tely summ arizes findin gs and provid es inform ed perspe ctives on them. Links to resear ch questi ons, theore tical and resear ch frame work. Ties findin

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

n g s a c c u r a t e l y O R t o p r o v i d e i n f o r m e d p e r s p e c t

ions, theor etical or resea rch fram ewor k. Mini mally descr ibes the impa ct of the findi ngs on datadrive n plann ing, schoo l impr ovem ent or stude nt learni ng.

plannin g, decision making. school improve ment, or student learnin g.

gs clearly to datadriven planni ng and decisio n makin g and makes recom menda tions for policy/ practi ce at the classro om, school or distric t level.

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

i v e o n t h e m . D o e s n o t m a k e l i n k b a c k t o r e s e a r c

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

h q u e s t i o n s , t h e o r e t i c a l o r r e s e a r c h f r a m e w o r k .

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

F a i l s t o d e s c r i b e t h e i m p a c t o f t h e f i n d i n g s o n d a t

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

a d r i v e n p l a n n i n g , s c h o o l i m p r o v e m e n t o r s t u d e n t l

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

e a r n i n g .

IMPLICATION S FOR PRACTICE

D o e s n o t i d e n t i f y i m p l i c a t i o n s f o r p r a c

Impli catio ns for pract ice that inclu de diver se popul ation s& impr oved P-12 learni ng are inclu ded, but uncle ar/un relate d.

Identifi es implicat ions for practice that include diverse populat ions & improve d P-12 student learnin g.

Identif ies & explic ates implic ations for practi ce that includ e divers e popula tions & impro ved P12 studen t learni ng.

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

t i c e t h a t i n c l u d e d i v e r s e p o p u l a t i o n s & i m p r o v e d

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

P 1 2 l e a r n i n g .

IMPLICATION S FOR POLICY

D o e s n o t i d e n t i f y i m p l i c a t i o n s f

Impli catio ns for polic y that inclu de diver se popul ation s& impr oved P-12 learni ng are uncle ar/un subst antiat ed.

Identifi es implicat ions for policy that include diverse populat ions & improve d P-12 learnin g.

Identif ies & explic ates implic ations for policy that includ e divers e popula tions & impro ved P12 learni ng.

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29

Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

o r p o l i c y t h a t i n c l u d e d i v e r s e p o p u l a t i o n s & i m p r o

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

v e d P 1 2 l e a r n i n g .

IMPLICATION S FOR LEADERSHIP

D o e s n o t i d e n t i f y i m p l i c a t i

Impli catio ns for leade rship that inclu de diver se popul ation s& impr oved P-12 learni ng are uncle ar or unsu bstan tiated .

Identifi es implicat ions for leaders hip that include diverse populat ions & improve d P-12 learnin g.

Identif ies & explic ates implic ations for leader ship that includ e divers e popula tions & impro ved P12 learni ng.

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

o n s f o r l e a d e r s h i p t h a t i n c l u d e d i v e r s e p o p u l a t i o n

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

s & i m p r o v e d P 1 2 l e a r n i n g .

IMPLICATION S FOR FUTURE RESEARCH

D o e s n o t i n c l u d e r e

Reco mme ndati ons for futur e resea rch are uncle ar or unrel ated to findi

Recom mendati ons are made for future researc h.

Recom menda tions for future resear ch are expert ly tied to findin gs.

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

c o m m e n d a t i o n s f o r f u t u r e r e s e a r c h

ngs.

APPENDIXES

D o e s n o t c o n t a i

Cont ains some mate rials that are of limite d value to reade rs.

Contain s pertine nt materia ls that are mostly of value to readers.

Contai ns pertin ent materi als that are of signifi cant value to reader

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Rubric for Research Report: Writing Up Your Results

n p e r t i n e n t m a t e r i a l s t h a t a r e o f v a l u e t o r e a d e r s .

s.

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TOTAL

______ ______ _/100

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