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prepared for Manayunk Development Corporation by Whitman, Requardt & Associates Interface Studio

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

A.D. Marble & Company Ruggiero Plante Land Design April 2014

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Manayunk Development Corporation (MDC) commissioned the preparation of this feasibility study for the design and planning of the Ivy Ridge Trail. The project was led by Kay Sykora, Director, Destination Schuylkill River. MDC is a non-profit community development corporation formed to encourage economic development that benefits the entire community. Incorporated in 1985 and first staffed in 1988, MDC was originally known as the New Manayunk Corporation. The New Manayunk Corporation took responsibility for parking, the Canal and capital projects within the district. A separate entity, the Business Association of Manayunk (BAM), worked to promote the district by creating a number of festivals including the Main Street Stroll, the Manayunk Arts Festival, and the Indian Summer Festival. In 1992, BAM and the New Manayunk Corporation were merged to form MDC. Under MDC, the functions of the original two groups have continued and grown. This project was financed in part by a grant from the Community Conservation Partnerships Program, Environmental Stewardship Fund, under the administration of the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Recreation and Conservation. The project was also financed in part by the William Penn Foundation. The feasibility study was developed in close coordination with the following stakeholder groups: Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia Canton Street residents City of Philadelphia Department of Parks and Recreation City of Philadelphia Department of Streets Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission Friends of the Ivy Ridge Trail Ivy Ridge Green Manayunk Development Corporation Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Philadelphia City Planning Commission Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority

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IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Introduction............................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1 Background............................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 4 Process ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 13 Trail user experience ............................................................................................................................................................................................................ 17 Trail segments ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 19 Leverington Avenue bridge area Canton Street area Fountain Street area Ivy Ridge station Schuylkill River Trail / canal towpath connection alternatives ............................................................................................................................................ 34 Amenities, materials, and landscape.................................................................................................................................................................................... 38 Safety, maintenance, and operations .................................................................................................................................................................................. 42 Final design requirements .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 43 Costs and implementation ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 46 Appendix summary of public comments ................................................................................................................................................... following page 47

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Introduction

INTRODUCTION
The primary goal of the Ivy Ridge Trail study is to provide a safe, user friendly pedestrian and bicycle connection between the Manayunk Bridge Trail and the Umbria Street bike lanes at Ivy Ridge Station. This trail connection will enhance the Greater Philadelphia Regional Trail Network (also known as the Circuit) by adding approximately eight tenths of a mile of a hard-surface, accessible trail, as an alternative to the unpaved section of the Schuylkill River Trail. Although this segment is relatively short, as an extension of the Manayunk Bridge Trail, this rail-to-trail provides a key link in the network while meeting the goals of the Philadelphia Trail Network as outlined in the 2013 City of Philadelphia Trail Master Plan. In order for this goal to be achieved, a successful trail study fully engages the public early in the design process. The purpose of this planning effort was to develop a plan that has been fully vetted through a series of public meetings and achieves the goals of the project while meeting the wants and needs of the community. In addition to developing a plan based on public input, the purpose of this plan is to develop a concept design that has been sufficiently advanced to provide concept level costs and potential implementation steps. Performing a detailed concept design reduces the level of uncertainty as the project moves into final design. Planning-level cost estimates allow the project to be broken into phases for stakeholders to obtain funding for final design and construction. This report was funded by grants from the Community Conservation Partnerships Program, Environmental Stewardship Fund, under the administration of the Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Recreation and Conservation; the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC); and the William Penn Foundation.

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Introduction Benefits of trails

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

In general, trails offer a number of benefits to a community. This is particularly true of the Ivy Ridge Trail and potential surrounding connections. Recreation, Health and Fitness Americans place a high priority on having trails and open space in their community for recreation purposes. Trails encourage healthier lifestyles by serving as nearby outdoor fitness resources for walking, jogging, bicycling, and other forms of exercise. As an extension of the Manayunk Bridge Trail, the Ivy Ridge Trail provides a unique opportunity to provide a connection between the urban setting of Philadelphia and the suburban, natural, rolling hills of Lower Merion, allowing for distinctly different recreational opportunities for residents of both communities. Transportation Choices Many Americans are choosing to reduce or eliminate motor vehicle use. Transportation is typically the second largest cost in a household budget, behind only housing. Increasing gasoline prices, traffic congestion, and interest in sustainability also factor into reduced car usage. Trails provide people safe means to travel without a car. The Ivy Ridge Trail is expected to serve as a commuter corridor as well as a destination. The direct trail connections proposed in this report link the Cynwyd Heritage Trail in Lower Merion Township via the Manayunk Bridge to the south with the existing Umbria Street bike lanes to the north, providing a continued linear commuter connection paralleling I-76, which is prone to daily congestion. Just as important as the linear trail extension is the proposed trail connections to the community via the Schuylkill River Trail (SRT) which is heavily used as a commuter route connecting the many major employment centers along the Schuylkill River. Safety and Community Trails encourage safe and interpersonal interaction by linking neighborhoods. Trails also ensure that people who wish to travel without a car have a safe means to do so without walking or riding in motor vehicle traffic. Direct connections with the Ivy Ridge Station will also allow users to safely walk or ride to public transit. Equity Trails provide safe, comfortable opportunities for people who cant drive to travel to their destinations. Making these facilities accessible ensures that people with mobility impairments can enjoy them as well. 2 April 2014

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Introduction

Project Partners A Study Committee composed of project stakeholders representing community interests guided the entire course of the study. The committee met on a monthly basis to discuss the design process and determine preferred alternatives based on public input. The study committee consisted of the following organizations: Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) property owner, lessor Philadelphia Parks and Recreation lessee, responsible for trail maintenance and operations Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC) design funding source Manayunk Development Corporation grant applicant and community coordination lead Philadelphia Bicycle Coalition bicycle community representation Friends of Ivy Ridge Trail and local residents community representation

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Background

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

BACKGROUND
History The Ivy Ridge Trail corridor has a long history of various freight and commuter rail use since the early 1800s. The original alignment was owned by the Pennsylvania Schuylkill Valley Railroad (PSV) and extended from Philadelphia to Reading paralleling the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad. In 1902 the Pennsylvania Railroad (PRR) purchased the Pennsylvania Schuylkill Valley Railroad. Soon after the PRR replaced the steel structure built in 1884 with the current S-shaped structure, constructed in 1918, to allow for heavier train use. In 1976, SEPTA took over the rail corridor and ran commuter trains as part of its R6 regional rail line. SEPTA built the Ivy Ridge Station in 1980 and ran commuter trains for ten years until structural concerns with the Manayunk Bridge led to discontinuation of rail service beyond the Cynwyd station. SEPTA rehabilitated the bridge in 1999. However, commuter service has not been restored and the Ivy Ridge Station was removed in 2012. An adjacent Ivy Ridge Station on the Manayunk/Norristown Line, down the hill from the previous station, continues to serve commuters.

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IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY Land use

Background

Historically, Manayunk was known for being a manufacturing village. When looking at the 1942 land use map, much of the area north of Parker Street along the rail line was not yet developed. The area south of Parker Street, however, contained a mix of industrial uses, including coal storage, the Manayunk Plush Manufacturing Company, the Glen Willow Ice Manufacturing Company, the S.S. Keeley & Sons Lumber Yard, and the Container Corporation of America. Parcels in the area also included many residential properties, particularly fronting Canton and Umbria Streets. By 1962, the area north of Parker Street had started to fill in with auto-related commercial properties, but still remained largely vacant.

1942 land use: Philadelphia Geo History

1962 land use: Philadelphia Geo History

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Background

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

Today many of the residential properties have remained the same. However, many of the active industrial properties have left the area, leaving large swaths of vacant land. Redevelopment of some of these properties is taking place, such as the proposed 168 apartments at Umbria Village at the former location of the Glen Will Ice Manufacturing Company.

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IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY Cultural resources

Background

The proposed Ivy Ridge Trail comprises the former right-of-way of the Pennsylvania Railroad Schuylkill Valley Branch, which was previously determined not eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places and does not contribute to the National Register-listed Manayunk Historic District. The former railroad corridor no longer retains features such as rails and catenaries that were associated with the active use of the rail line. A review of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission (PHMC) Cultural Resources Geographic Information System (CRGIS) revealed the presence of nine other historic resources with previous eligibility determinations in the vicinity of the project area: Manayunk Main Street Historic District (Listed) Manayunk Bridge (Eligible, Not Contributing) Schuylkill Navigation Company Canal/Manayunk Canal (Eligible and Contributing) Philadelphia, Georgetown & Norristown Railroad (Eligible, contributing status is undetermined) S.S. Keeley & Sons Mill, 100 Leverington Street (Eligible and Contributing) Leverington Avenue Bridge (Not Eligible, Not Contributing) Fountain Street Bridge (Not Eligible, Not Contributing) Green Lane Bridge (Not Eligible, Contributing) James Dobson School (Listed)

Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 (NHPA) requires Federal agencies to take into account the effects of their undertakings on historic properties. In order to complete the Section 106 process for the project (assuming Federal funds may be used), an Area of Potential Effect (APE) should be finalized that includes all areas of potential direct effects as well as all resources within the viewshed of the proposed improvements. Coordination should be initiated with PHMC and consulting parties in order to identify any other potential historic resources within the project area and evaluate the effects of the project on historic resources. As the project limits extend within the National Register-listed Manayunk Historic District and are adjacent to the National Register-eligible Philadelphia, Georgetown & Norristown Railroad, efforts may need to be made to minimize the impacts of the improvements on the surrounding historic resources. It is anticipated that effects will be minimal due to the nature of the project along an existing railroad right-of-way, and the majority of the project improvements taking place at a distance from known historic resources. Archaeology As previously mentioned, the APE should be finalized to include all areas of potential direct effects in relation to the proposed development as they pertain to potential archaeological resources. Considering the nature of the project along an existing railroad right-of-way placed on ballast, and along existing roads and sidewalks for access, it is anticipated that the potential for the presence of unrecorded archaeological resources is extremely low. However, in the event project designs include areas outside the railroad right-of-way, further evaluation of archaeological potential will be necessary. For example, the proposed project limits include a forested area southeast of the Ivy Ridge Station parking lot and an access area to the Leverington Avenue bridge that could require further investigation. Prior to the onset of any project-related activities, coordination with the PHMC will be initiated. April 2014 7

Background

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

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Background

Connectivity to regional trail network Phase one of this project includes the final design of the Manayunk Bridge, completed in 2013. Scheduled to open in 2015, the bridge will connect the Cynwyd Heritage Trail with an entrance at Dupont Street that is suitable for bicycle and pedestrian traffic. This first phase will make it possible for residents in Lower Merion Township to access Manayunk shops and restaurants by walking or biking without having to interact with the two active railroad lines and major highway that currently exist in their path. This report is focused on the second phase of the project, the Ivy Ridge Trail. This trail will connect the Manayunk Bridge with the Ivy Ridge Station and the Umbria Street bike lanes. This connection is an integral part of The Circuit, a trail planning initiative to integrate 750 miles of bicycle and pedestrian paths in the Greater Philadelphia Region, and includes the Schuylkill River Trail, the Cynwyd Heritage Trail and the Wissahickon Valley Trail. The Ivy Trail will directly connect to the following regional trails: Schuylkill River Trail and the Manayunk Towpath - The Schuylkill River Trail, once completed, will be a 130-mile multi-use trail that will connect Philadelphia and Pottsville. From the north, the off-road trail currently comes to an end at the intersection of Nixon Street and Port Royal Avenue. Users continue on Nixon Street until its end, making a slight right to access the Manayunk Towpath just north of the Flat Rock Dam. The towpath continues along the Manayunk Canal until its end at Lock Street, where users can access Main Street, following it to connect to the Wissahickon Valley Trail and the Kelly Drive path at Ridge Avenue. Cynwyd Heritage Trail - This 2.5-mile trail starts at the Cynwyd SEPTA Station and runs to Belmont Avenue and Rock Hill Road. It is the first piece of the former Ivy Ridge April 2014 9

Source: Philadelphia Trail Master Plan, 2013

Background

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

Branch to be completed. It opened in October 2011 and has separate bicycle and pedestrian trails. Users of the Ivy Ridge Trail will be able to access this trail directly via the Manayunk Bridge. They can then continue on until its end at the Cynwyd SEPTA Station, or continue down to the other side of the Schuylkill River via the proposed Cynwyd Spur. In the future, this spur will connect to the Wissahickon Valley Trail and Kelly Drive via the Pencoyd Bridge as part of proposed development project in Lower Merion Township, allowing Schuylkill River Trail users to avoid Main Street in Manayunk.

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Background

On July 24, 2012, the project team performed a visual inspection of the Ivy Ridge Trail site to determine the conditions of the existing structures and discuss options for a trail across those structures. The visual inspection was performed from under and on those spans which were readily accessible from the ground or street. The following SEPTA-owned structures were evaluated: High Street / Leverington Avenue bridge approach retaining wall Elevated rail bed with ballast fill

Leverington Avenue bridge Concrete arch structure

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Background

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Fountain Street bridge Concrete encased steel girder

Full descriptions of each structure and proposed modifications can be found in subsequent sections of this report. As a result of the visual inspection of the aforementioned structures it was determined that there are no significant structural issues that should prevent development of the Ivy Ridge Trail. As these structures were originally designed to carry railroad loads, which are far more than expected from a trail, it is the project teams opinion that structural analysis of these spans will not be required. The key issues to be addressed are the railing and protective fence requirements across the structures, as well as SEPTA drainage and waterproofing requirements. Each system must meet standards for structural integrity and functionality, as well as possess properties that will support the goal of providing the public with a safe and aesthetically pleasing trail.

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Process

PROCESS
A fully engaged public during the feasibility and concept stage is one of the most essential aspects of successful trail development. The project embarked on an ambitious public involvement program. The following public involvement activities were undertaken. More detailed information on the alternatives that were considered may be found in subsequent sections of this report. A stakeholder committee, composed of the project partners representing community interests, guided the entire course of the study. The committee met frequently to discuss the design process and determine preferred alternatives based on public input to ensure meaningful stakeholder involvement in the conduct of this study. The project team held three public meetings throughout the concept design process. A full summary of all public correspondence can be found in the appendix.

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Process

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Public Meeting No. 1, November 19, 2012 The goal of this meeting, held at the Manayunk Brewing Company, was to introduce the project to the public and obtain input on the publics needs and desires for the trail. The design team presented the project limits and the following requirements of the trail as determined by the steering committee: The trail must have a hard surface so that it is viable for both commuting and recreation The trail must link the Umbria Street bike lanes with the Manayunk Bridge The trail must be safe and secure The trail must fall within SEPTAs right-of-way The trail must be financially reasonable to build The trail must be easy to maintain

The project was broken down into four distinct areas and aerial photo mapping was presented for each area for discussion and markup. No concepts were presented by the design team at this time, as the primary purpose was to generate ideas based on the publics input. Based on input received from this meeting, the steering committee felt it was necessary to hold an additional public meeting with the residents along Canton Street to discuss parking impacts. Meeting with Canton Street residents Currently, there are many automobiles parked on the SEPTA parcel at Canton Street. Concerns over loss of parking prompted a separate meeting discussing parking scenarios with nearby residents. Residents agreed that maximizing parking at this location was a priority. Also discussed at this meeting was the potential for changing traffic direction to one way along Canton Street in order to limit

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Process

the amount of pavement needed for two travel lanes and utilize the extra pavement for parking. It was decided that, because of the excessive traffic on Leverington and Umbria Streets, this option was not viable. Public Meeting No. 2, April 22, 2013 The second public workshop was held at the North Light Community Center in Manayunk. The design team presented alternatives to the trail design for each of the four sections of the trail. These alternatives included: Path separation: The Cynwyd Heritage Trail and the Manayunk Bridge both have separate pedestrian and bicycle lanes. Public criticism of the way the lanes are actually being used, where pedestrians use the bike lanes and vice versa, prompted a discussion of whether or not splitting the width of the trail by mode of travel was necessary for the Ivy Ridge Trail. Path width: Two different path widths were explored during this process: 16 feet and 20 feet. While a 20-foot path would offer the option of two bicyclists being able to ride comfortably side-by-side in both directions, a 16-foot path might be scaled more appropriately for the community. Path connections: Several scenarios on how to access the Manayunk Towpath were explored as part of this process. Solutions include a simple stairway down to the Fountain Street steps, a long ramp traversing the hillside down to the base of the Fountain Street steps, cutting through Leverington Park to the Towpath entrance on Main Street from the Canton Street entrance, as well as other options for navigating from the Canton Street entrance down to the Manayunk Towpath entrance. Parking on Canton Street: The same scenarios for parking on Canton Street that were presented to the Canton Street neighbors were presented during this workshop.

After the alternatives were presented, comment cards were handed out. Participants were asked to respond to large format prints of each of the trail sections and alternatives. The cards had two columns, one for stating elements they liked about each design, and one for elements they would rather see. A full list of these responses can be seen in the appendix. In general, participants preferred creating landscaping along otherwise unused space along Canton Street, 90-degree parking on Canton Street, landscaping on the Leverington Avenue bridge, and a connection to the Towpath via Fountain Street, preferably one that could readily be negotiated by bicyclists. Some additional suggestions included providing bicycle parking at the Ivy Ridge Station; making the Umbria Street connection as safe as possible with traffic calming measures; creating clear signage that includes trail maps, digital QR codes and historical information; and residential permit parking along Canton Street to alleviate trailhead parking concerns. April 2014 15

Process

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Meeting No. 3, July 7, 2013 The final public meeting was a presentation of preferred alternatives at the North Light Community Center. After the presentation, concerns were raised regarding the ramp down to the Fountain Street steps and its connection to the steps. Neighbors who maintain the steps would like the proposed interventions not to interfere with their work. Other concerns were echoed from the last meeting in making sure the Umbria Street intersection was as safe as possible.

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Trail User Experience

TRAIL USER EXPERIENCE


Several trail types and configurations were evaluated during the design process. Through public input and stakeholder comments it was determined that a minimum width of 16 feet would create a safe multi-use trail environment for all potential users. Each corridor segment was evaluated for various trail applications based on available space and constraints. The following trail design alternatives were developed for the Leverington Bridge section and evaluated for potential conflicts, constructability, and ease of maintenance. A. 25-foot fully paved multi-use trail B. 16-foot fully paved multi-use trail with landscaping C. Separated 8-foot pedestrian and 12-foot bicycle trails

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Trail User Experience

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY Stakeholders felt that the 16-foot-wide section would be scaled more appropriately for a typical trail experience and would allow for landscaping and site amenities along the length of the trail. While the separate paths were supported by some in the community because of perceived safety advantages, the narrow landscaping strip would not be enough to sustain plantings. In later discussions, certain users asked that a two-foot soft surface, such as gravel, be included parallel to the trail for as a soft surface for joggers. If it is determined during final design that plantings are not feasible on the Leverington Bridge part of the trail due to structural and drainage constraints, a fully-paved section may be used. The Manayunk Bridge trail includes sections that separate bicycles and pedestrians, and care must be taken when transitioning between the shared section of the Ivy Ridge Trail and the separate trails of the Manayunk Bridge. While the Ivy Ridge Trail is proposed to consist of an asphalt trail surface, the Manayunk Bridge Trail includes multiple paving types, and a transition needs to be considered during final design. Trail surface type will depend on the drainage requirements of the Leverington Bridge and will determine whether this transition should occur at the termination of the Manayunk Bridge Trail or once the trail is off structure at Canton Street. One of the requirements of the trail is to provide accessibility in accordance with the latest appropriate design standards and guidelines. The following must be followed during final design: o o o o o o Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Accessibility Guidelines U.S. Access Board, Draft Public Right-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines U.S. Access Board Accessibility Guidelines for Outdoor Developed Areas City of Philadelphia Streets Department ADA standards PennDOT District 6-0 ADA Design Guidance (depending on funding source) Federal Highway Administration Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD)

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Trail Segments

TRAIL SEGMENTS
Early in the design process the design team determined there were four distinctly different segments of the inactive rail corridor that would define the trail based on existing structures, land use, ease of construction, and connectivity.

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Trail Segments

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

Leverington Avenue Bridge Area. The Leverington Avenue section extends approximately two tenths of a mile along the elevated, inactive SEPTA rail bed from the Manayunk Bridge Trail terminus at Dupont and High streets across Leverington Avenue to Canton Street. The first segment of this elevated section consists of railroad ballast retained by stone and concrete retaining walls on either side. Overhead catenary towers carry active PECO and Amtrak high voltage transmission lines. The steel rails have been removed by SEPTA, but the railroad ties remain in place on the eastern half of the corridor. Remnants of the Pennsylvania Railroad Manayunk East Station platform can be found just beyond the northern end of the steel through-plate girder structure over SEPTAs Norristown line. The Leverington Avenue bridge was constructed in the early 1900s and consists of four concrete arch spandrels varying in length. The surface out-to-out width is approximately 28 feet extending from outer edge of the parapets. The existing ballast width is approximately 25 feet and was considered the effective width for the trail design.

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Trail Segments

High Street / Leverington Avenue Bridge Approach Retaining Wall - The High Street / Leverington Avenue Bridge Approach Retaining Wall consist of cut stone and mortar with a concrete cap/overhang. The north wall was inspected via High Street. The cut stone wall is in good condition with no significant separation of the mortar joints or displacement of the wall. The reinforced concrete caps/overhangs are heavily spalled along the top outside edge, especially at the hand railing connections. The interior edges of the caps are in good condition and appear to be candidates for connection areas of the proposed hand railing or fence. This will require further investigation. The south wall was observed from above at track level due to heavy vegetation along the bottom of the wall. The cut stone walls and reinforced concrete counterforts are also in good condition with no significant mortar joint separation or spalling and cracking. Leverington Avenue Bridge Structural Evaluation - The concrete arches on either side and spanning over Leverington Avenue have light to moderate cracking, efflorescence and spalling throughout the barrels of the arches. The north fascia sides of the arches exhibit significantly more spalling and efflorescence than on the south side. Cars currently park under the structure in the two arch spans east of Leverington Avenue. The concrete arch spans are in good condition with no structural concerns, however, in the interest of public safety and aesthetics it may be desirable to patch or otherwise repair the concrete in the areas that exhibit excessive spalling and delamination. The top exterior edge of the curb on the north side is heavily deteriorated, especially at the handrail post attachments. Handrail post repairs have been performed in the past due to this deterioration. The interior edge of the north curb and the entirety of the south curb are in good condition. The interior edges of the existing curbs may be used to support new hand railing or fence posts. To maintain a consistent design vocabulary, it may be desirable to use the same hand railing or fence configuration as is currently under design for the Manayunk Bridge. Soil Contaminants - Based on preliminary testing associated with the Manayunk Bridge Trail project it is anticipated that similar contaminates may be present within the existing ballast. Further evaluation of the soils should be performed during final design to classify the soils according to EPA regulations and PADEP regulations as required and dependent on the source of the construction funding.

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Trail Segments Proposed Conditions

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

Design concepts were developed during design of the MBT for proposed canopy and sculpture representative of the station platform; however, due to budget restrictions, the element was removed from the bridge project and should be included in the Ivy Ridge Trail project to provide a sense of place, incorporate public art into the landscape, compliment the history of the railroad and highlight transportation alternatives.

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Trail Segments

The transition from the MBT to the Ivy Ridge Trail will need to be seamless to maintain a visual connection to the Manayunk Bridge as well as to provide a safe transition of the trail surfaces if required. A continuation of design elements and pavement types will allow for this smooth transition. Due to this section being elevated, protective fencing will be required the entire length of this segment. Proposed fencing should consist of similar materials and design parameters as being proposed for the MBT. The fencing as well as all metal objects shall be bonded and grounded to meet the overhead utility requirements. Drainage along the trail will be required to adequately drain the trail, as well as properly drain the existing structure. Proposed trench drains as well as scuppers shall be added if required. An eight- to ten-foot width along the elevated approach section provides an opportunity for green space which may possibly be used to capture runoff from the paved trail. This method of collecting drainage may significantly reduce costs by eliminating the need for engineered trench drains. Landscape areas will need to incorporate native plants in a low maintenance setting that does not require watering.

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Trail Segments

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

Opportunities: Landscape and pedestrian amenities The Ivy Ridge Trail will be used by cyclists and pedestrians and will offer amenities to serve those users. The trail features excellent views across the Schuylkill River, and benches and places to rest should be provided, as well as waste receptacles to help maintain cleanliness. Continuation of separated trails On parts of the MBT, cyclists and pedestrians will travel on separate, parallel trails. At some point, this would have to transition to a shared trail. The structural drainage requirements discussed previously may require a fully paved section and full separation of pedestrians and bicyclists may continue to Canton Street.

Challenges: High cost The Leverington Avenue bridge section of the Ivy Ridge Trail will be the most expensive to implement. The potential need for environmental cleanup, the need for additional safety features such as protective fence, and potential drainage and structural repairs contribute to a higher cost. Protective fencing Considering that all of the Leverington Avenue bridge section is elevated and that the existing handrails are in an advanced state of disrepair, new railings and fencing will be required. New fencing was similarly required on the MBT, and the new fencing on the Ivy Ridge Trail should correspond to the type of fencing that will be installed there. Structural modifications and drainage The SEPTA owned Leverington Avenue bridge currently drains by means of surface runoff through the open ballast of the structure. Applying a paved surface to the structure will require extensive drainage modifications and potential waterproofing applications similar to what was required on the SEPTA owned Manayunk Bridge structures. Although the structure has been determined to be structurally sound, installation of protective fencing may require significant structural repair to portions of the existing parapets. Environmental remediation Based on information obtained from the Manayunk Bridge Trail project it is anticipated that the existing ballast will contain similar contaminants requiring removal and disposal of the contaminated soils. Existing railroad ties will also need to be removed and disposed of in accordance with EPA and PADEP regulations.

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IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY Canton Street Area The Canton Street area extends approximately 0.15 mile from Leverington Avenue to Wright Street. Existing conditions: The trail runs diagonally from the end of the Leverington Avenue bridge across the SEPTA property between Canton Street and a private parking lot behind the buildings facing Umbria Street. Since SEPTA removed the rails the property has been used by the community as a parking area, often filled to capacity with numerous cars randomly scattered throughout the parcel. The asphalt pavement along Canton Street is in disrepair and full depth pavement reconstruction should be considered. Proposed conditions:

Trail Segments

Precautions should also be taken to ensure the safety of trail users as they cross Wright Street. Options could include a raised crossing and/or bollards to prevent drivers from using the trail. Trail users may also cross Canton Street at the top of the hill that leads down to Leverington Avenue to connect to the Towpath. This crossing is particularly challenging due to poor visibility. Potential pavement markings, lighting, and/or raised crossings should be considered during final design. This area provides special opportunities for landscaping at the potential trailhead near the end of the Leverington Avenue bridge. The formalized parking area could be lined with trees not just to beautify the area, but to help delineate the parking and prevent vehicles from encroaching on the trail. This area may have similar soil contamination issues to the Leverington Avenue bridge section, so soil may need to be remediated. A variety of plans were presented to the residents of Canton Street to determine how to address parking. Currently, approximately 80 cars use the SEPTA owned property for parking. A major concern of the residents was what would happen to this parking when the trail is developed. After a series of discussions, the residents preferred an option that would include parallel parking on the residential side of Canton Street, with paved and striped 90-degree parking on the trail side. This would allow for approximately 70 formalized parking spaces. Further study will be needed to determine if permit parking for residents would be an option to alleviate parking concerns for the adjacent residents. Because the parking is not strictly a part of the trail project, alternative funding sources may need to be utilized for construction related to the parking. April 2014 25

Trail Segments

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

Proposed formalized parking and landscape along Canton Street

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IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY Opportunities:

Trail Segments

Landscape and pedestrian amenities The Canton Street area will serve as an access point for the Ivy Ridge Trail as well as the Manayunk Bridge Trail. As such, there is an opportunity to provide trail head site amenities including signage, landscape, seating, and sculpture. The area currently has no landscaping, so street trees could provide much needed beautification as well as a benefit to the environment. Parking Parking may be considered an opportunity as well as a challenge. The proposed plans include formalizing existing parking along Canton Street with the potential to provide dedicated residential sticker parking for the residents along Canton Street.

Challenges: Relatively high cost Potential improvements to the parking and Canton Street may include curbing, full depth pavement and striping. Environmental remediation Further soil testing is required in this area to determine the presence of contaminants.

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Trail Segments

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Fountain Street Area The Fountain Street area extends approximately 0.2 mile from Wright Street across the Fountain Street steps to the Ivy Ridge Station parking lot. Existing conditions: The Fountain Street area is the most secluded area of the alignment as well as the widest section of the corridor. The area is bound by SEPTAs Norristown line and a strip of undeveloped, steeply-sloped wooded land to the west and mixed use residential properties to the east. The railroad ties and steel rails have been removed and the ballast remains in place. Catenary poles remain and will provide the outer limits for the trail. The Fountain Street steps are City owned and provide pedestrian access from Umbria Street to the canal. Stone drainage channels and storm sewer infrastructure exist on both side of the steps. The community has adopted the maintenance of the area and has constructed a native plant garden in the areas adjacent to the steps.

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IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY Structural Evaluation Fountain Street bridge - The single-span reinforced concrete slab bridge spans a pedestrian walkway that connects Umbria Street to the Schuylkill River Trail/Towpath. Although the walkway below consists primarily of concrete steps, it is also being used by bicyclists, as has been witnessed during site visits. The bridge is in satisfactory condition with no structural concerns. Approximately 5% of the deck underside exhibits scaling or spalling with exposed reinforcement bars. It is recommended to patch these areas in order to eliminate hazards to public safety associated with continued deterioration of the deck underside and falling concrete. The curbs of the bridge are in good condition with negligible deterioration. It may be possible to mount the proposed hand railing or fence directly to the existing curbs. It may be necessary to extend the proposed hand railing at the southwest and southeast quadrants adjacent to the bridge to eliminate safety concerns associated with steep embankments in these areas.

Trail Segments

There has been some discussion as to whether or not an access ramp leading from Umbria Street to track level of the Fountain Street bridge should be built. This ramp would require the construction of a retaining wall as well as significant utility coordination, or possible relocation due to the presence of a sanitary sewer and overhead utility wires that parallel the walkway.

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Trail Segments Proposed conditions

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Trail Alignment Two alternative trail alignments were initially evaluated for the Fountain Street area. The first was a 16 foot wide single paved surface with pavement markings separating pedestrians and bicycles. The second alternative included a landscaped buffer and a total paved surface width of 20 feet. A final preferred alternative was developed to include a 16 foot wide shared use trail with a soft surface buffer for joggers. Due to the wide flat area there is an opportunity to meander the trail through this segment for visual interest and creation of areas for site amenities and landscaping.

Landscaping The existing landscape character of this section includes dense trees on the southwest side of the trail and lighter, screening landscaping along the back yards of houses on the northeast side. Additional screening should be coordinated with the adjacent property owners. The Fountain Street steps are landscaped and maintained by the community. Improvements to the bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure should be installed with the preservation of these community resources in mind. Further discussions of proposed improvements for the Fountain Street steps can be found in the connection alternatives section of this document. 30 April 2014

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Trail Segments

Opportunities: Low cost Excluding the potential Fountain Street step connections, the Fountain Street segment will be relatively low cost to provide a simple paved shared use trail extending from Canton Street to the Ivy Ridge Station. Connections to the Schuylkill River Trail / Towpath See connection alternatives section of this document.

Challenges: Right-of-way encroachments Several of the adjacent property owners have fence lines and other items that encroach into the SEPTA right of way. Further coordination with property owners may be required. Prohibiting vehicular access Bollards or other devices should be included to deter vehicles from accessing the trail. Coordination with emergency services should occur during final design to ensure access is maintained. Environmental remediation Further soil testing is required in this area to determine the presence of contaminants.

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Trail Segments

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

Ivy Ridge Station Area The Ivy Ridge Station area extends from the southern end of the Ivy Ridge Station parking lot to Parker Street and includes connections to the Umbria Street bike lanes, which extend to the northwest. Existing Conditions The Ivy Ridge Station area consists of a two-tiered parking lot providing free parking for SEPTA riders. The lot is heavily used and available parking is limited during rail service hours. The high level platform structure shown in the adjacent image was demolished in 2012. The existing catenary towers are still in place, carrying active utilities through the parking area. A steep set of stairs extends to the current Ivy Ridge Station. Further to the west, a residential development, Umbria Village, is currently under construction and is accessed via Parker Avenue. There are three vehicular entrances to the parking lot from Umbria Street. Parker Avenue is an unsignalized intersection located at a low point of Umbria Street with poor sight distances to the northwest. High-visibility pedestrian striping exists; however, safety is a concern for pedestrians due to the poor visibility and absence traffic control for Umbria Street vehicles. A mid-block entrance is located between Parker Avenue and Lemonte Street, and the Lemonte Street intersection has all-way stop control with a pedestrian crossing. Proposed Conditions Trail alignment - Several alignments for the trail were explored with the goal to provide safe access to the Umbria Street bike lanes. A path was considered that would connect to Umbria Street at Parker Avenue, which could allow for future expansion of the trail using the bridge over Parker Avenue and continue along the remainder of the rail corridor to the north. However, current lease agreements with SEPTA and safety concerns at Parker Avenue led to deferring this option to a later phase. The preferred option extends from the Fountain Street segment and skirts the northern edge of the lower parking lot at Ivy Ridge Station before ascending a small hill to the upper parking lot. This section of the trail is proposed to be a 12-16 foot wide shared use trail which will be sufficient for the anticipated use of this area and have the least impacts to the existing parking lot and adjacent slope. This area is often utilized for overflow parking as shown in the adjacent photo. 32 April 2014

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Trail Segments

To meet ADA requirements for the transition from the lower lot to the upper lot, low retaining walls and railings may be required. Minor adjustments to the upper parking lot will be required to provide a safe pedestrian crossing through the parking lot. Potential safety improvements could include a raised crosswalk to improve motorist awareness of the trail. As a de facto trailhead, this section provides an opportunity to include user amenities such as bike parking, benches, garbage cans, and public art. Umbria Street Crossing - Safety measures must be taken to ensure the safety of trail users when interacting with vehicles. Where the trail crosses the upper lot, a raised crossing could be included. Tactile safety features will be employed at the crosswalk ramps on Umbria Street, and a highly visible crosswalk, potentially with a unique pattern designating the trail, will help users cross Umbria Street safely. Some concerns were expressed about the safety features at Umbria Street. Suggestions included flashers for stop signs or a traffic signal. Further traffic study, outside the scope of this project, will be needed to determine whether additional traffic controls are needed and, if so, who will maintain them. Opportunities: Future trail connections to points north and Shawmont Connections to Umbria Street bike lanes Connection to Ivy Ridge Station provides multi-modal enhancements

Challenges: Minimize impacts to existing parking Minimize pedestrian/vehicular conflicts within the parking lot Moderate cost of retaining walls and ramp

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Connection Alternatives

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

SCHUYLKILL RIVER TRAIL / CANAL TOWPATH CONNECTION ALTERNATIVES


Canton Street/Leverington Avenue/High Street connections - The area where the Leverington Avenue bridge ends at Canton Street provides an opportunity to connect to the Towpath. Several options were considered for this connection. The first would include bike lanes on either side, which would connect to shared lane markings for bicyclists (Sharrows) on Canton Street and High Street. This would allow people to ride off the Ivy Ridge Trail at Canton Street, down a bike lane on the northwest side of Leverington Avenue, to a shared-use path on Main Street that would connect to the Towpath; or to ride off the Towpath at Main Street, up the southeast side of Leverington Avenue, and up High Street to the trail access at Dupont Street. This could be an interim phase before building a more permanent and expensive connection.

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Connection Alternatives

As a later option, a two-way, shared-use path could be constructed from Main Street along either side of Leverington Avenue connecting to Canton Street or High Street. The Canton Street connection on the northwest side would allow for a safer crossing of Main Street and a shorter overall connection, but would include a steep grade on Canton Street (approximately 15%). An off-road connection parallel to Canton Street would require a new retaining wall and fill on the north side of Leverington Park, as well as potential land acquisition from neighboring properties which could be very expensive, so it was determined Canton Street should be marked or signed as a shared street. The High Street connection would be less expensive and have a more manageable slope, but would have a less desirable connection across Main Street and a longer path overall. The Canton Street connection emerged as the preferred alternative.

Opportunities: The Canton Street/High Street connection is critical to linking the Ivy Ridge Trail to the Schuylkill River Trail and downtown Manayunk Interim striping option could be implemented independently, is cost effective, and would provide access to the Manayunk Bridge Trail via high street prior to construction of the Ivy Ridge Trail Challenges: Traffic/safety conflicts along Leverington Avenue, Canton Street, High Street and Main Street Limited available right of way for implementation of off-road facilities Steep grades on Canton Street and Leverington Avenue Increased costs to implement off-road improvements

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Connection Alternatives

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

Fountain Street Connector the Fountain Street steps, though not designed for cyclists, provide a pedestrian connection between Umbria Street and the Towpath. Several alternatives were evaluated to connect the Ivy Ridge Trail to the Schuylkill River Trail/ Towpath via the Fountain Street steps. One option would be to include a stairwell at the bridge passing over the Fountain Street steps. This would impact the least amount of space and could potentially have the lowest cost. However, it would require riders to dismount and would not provide an ADA-accessible route. A bike trough could be included that would allow cyclists to walk their bikes down the steps. If this becomes the preferred option, further coordination with the community during final design is required to determine the location of the steps that least impacts the landscape. Another option would be a path that would connect from the Ivy Ridge Trail near the southern end of the Ivy Ridge Station parking lot. This path would traverse the wooded slope and be made up of segments of moderate slope (8.33%) with regularly spaced landings and would include a switchback adjacent to the lower section of the Fountain Street steps. The construction of this structure would require significant grading for the retaining walls, as well as railings for ADA compliance. Terraced gardens could be incorporated into the design to mitigate impacts to the Fountain Street landscape. Opportunities: Direct off-road accessible connection to Schuylkill River Trail/Towpath Challenges: Meeting ADA grade requirements Costs associated with grading, switchback retaining walls Minimizing disturbance to Fountain Street steps/gardens An additional connection to the towpath was evaluated via Parker Street and the Umbria Village apartment development currently under construction. Initial discussions with the developer included providing an ADA accessible trail through the property connecting directly to the towpath. However, as of the date of this report, construction only included a set of steps with a bike trough requiring bicyclists to dismount.

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Connection Alternatives

Proposed switchback and terraced gardens adjacent to the Fountain Street steps

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Amenities, Materials, and Landscape

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

AMENITIES, MATERIALS, AND LANDSCAPE


Site Amenities In addition to providing a key transportation link in the Citys regional trail network, the Ivy Ridge Trail has the potential to become a premier destination in this part of Philadelphia. As an extension of the Manayunk Bridge Trail, the Ivy Ridge Trail should include design elements that are similar and complement the historic nature of the rail corridor and the community while ensuring accessibility, including ADA compliance, for a wide range of users. Seating Seating should be added at trailhead locations and resting areas along the trail. The Leverington Avenue bridge segment provides opportunities for resting areas and outward views. Benches should be pre-approved by Philadelphia Parks and Recreation or the entity that is determined to be responsible for long term maintenance of the trail.

Lighting Future funding for lighting should be considered for safety. Conduits for future lighting are being proposed for the Manayunk Bridge Trail and once funds are available for lighting the bridge, continuing that lighting along the Ivy Ridge Trail should be considered for safety and security. 38 April 2014

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Amenities, Materials, and Landscape

Public Art/Sculpture The incorporation of public art can play an important role along the Ivy Ridge Trail to provide aesthetics, a sense of place, and a connection to the community. Public art has also proven to provide an economic benefit to the community through attracting visitors as well as deterring vandalism and graffiti in some instances. Although the purpose of this planning study is to provide a safe trail for transportation and recreation purposes, it is recommended that further discussions be held with the Association for Public Art and other local art organizations to evaluate opportunities for incorporating art into the trail and its surroundings.

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Amenities, Materials, and Landscape

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

Pavement materials The trail surface must meet the loading requirements of maintenance vehicles for overhead utilities as well as emergency vehicles. Transition from the concrete separated trails of the Manayunk Bridge should occur seamlessly and safely. It is anticipated that the Ivy Ridge Trail will transfer from a concrete trail surface to an asphalt trail surface once off structure. One opportunity to continue the use of concrete is to incorporate a concrete band at the trail edge as shown in the adjacent photo. This treatment provides an aesthetic linear visual element as well as a clean edge making it easier to maintain the trail surface over time. Exposed aggregate treatment similar to what is proposed for the pedestrian side of the Manayunk Bridge Trail could be incorporated where the transition occurs. Fencing Protective fencing will be required along the entire length of the elevated Leverington Avenue bridge segment as well as a short portion on the Fountain Street bridge. A similar treatment as proposed for the Manayunk Bridge should be incorporated for aesthetics and safety. Materials include; Galvanized steel angle posts with a handrail and welded wire mesh infill panels. The height of the fence should be 4-8 over its entire length. Other Materials Railroad ties and rails can be incorporated into the design to provide aesthetic edge treatments and reflect the history of railroad use through the corridor.

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IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY Landscape pallette Landscaping shall be designed to meet the following requirements: Low maintenance - Plantings should be selected from the Philadelphia Parks and Recreation native plant list for their ability to thrive in urban conditions. Seasonal interest Low maintenance does not mean plant material cannot be colorful. Careful selection of species that provide seasonal interest should be incorporated into the design. Water quality Stormwater treatment may not be a requirement for the trail, however plant beds should be designed to collect surface runoff from the trail to minimize the need for irrigation and to treat runoff. Safe environment for users Proposed vegetation should be carefully placed and existing vegetation carefully managed to not interfere with the safety of the trail. A narrow strip of low plantings capable of handling occasional foot traffic should be placed adjacent to the trail and larger plantings should be set back far enough to keep a clear line of sight for trail users.

Amenities, Materials, and Landscape

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Safety, Maintenance, and Operations

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

SAFETY, MAINTENANCE, AND OPERATIONS


Like the adjacent Manayunk Bridge Trail, the final design of the Ivy Ridge Trail must account for maintenance and operations concerns. These may include: General operations - A number of public agencies have participated in the development of this feasibility study. This study recommends that the agencies develop a memorandum of agreement regarding ownership, operations, and maintenance as early as possible to ensure that its provisions will be in place prior to completion of the trail. The participating agencies will undoubtedly also look for partnership opportunities, such as a friends group and/or corporate sponsorship, to provide ongoing maintenance. Operational responsibilities to be identified at this stage include trail and landscape maintenance, emergency vehicle access, policing responsibilities, graffiti removal, snow removal, and ADA compliance. The final design of the trail will need to address these issues to minimize ongoing operational costs. Lighting and security - The need for lighting and security elements such as cameras, call boxes, and policing will be dependent on the practices of the agency that operates and maintains the trail. At the present time, use of the Manayunk Bridge Trail will be limited to daylight hours, so lighting is not provided and the bridge will be gated at night. Access to the Ivy Ridge Trail cannot be as easily Photo source: Ivy Ridge Green secured, so lighting and security will be especially important. The final trail design should incorporate elements of Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED), such as good sight lines, clear delineation of public and private areas, and ease of maintenance. Amount of use and visibility are both important factors. Photo source: Ivy Ridge Green

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Final Design Requirements

FINAL DESIGN REQUIREMENTS


The following tasks are anticipated during final design: Permitting Chapter 102 (25 Pa. Code) is the Pennsylvania state regulation for erosion and sediment control and stormwater management. Projects disturbing one or more acres must obtain authorization through a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit for Stormwater Discharges Associated with Construction Activities before beginning any earth disturbance activity. It is anticipated that the Ivy Ridge Trail project will result in greater than one acre of ground disturbance associated with the construction of the trail and associated access features, including parking lots and trailhead access areas. Due to the potential for soil contamination, it is also anticipated that an Individual NPDES permit will be required. It is recommended that a pre-proposal meeting be conducted with the Southeast Region of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection and the Philadelphia Water Department (PWD) to initiate the project file with these agencies. Soil testing/hazardous waste treatment Due to the nature of the project along an inactive railroad, soil contamination is anticipated. A Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) using the ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) Standard 1527-05 as guidance for the proposed project will be required. The Phase I ESA will include a review of all existing records and databases for the properties scheduled for acquisition and any adjacent properties of concern. If any evidence of contamination is found, Federal, State, and local environmental health regulatory agencies should be contacted to obtain information on permits and enforcement actions. A potential contaminant inventory of known hazardous waste sites or areas of contamination will be included. The Phase I ESA will determine whether additional field work, soil and groundwater testing, or laboratory analysis will be required. Based on experience from the Manayunk Bridge Trail project, it is anticipated that a Phase II Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) will be required due to the potential for soil contamination. Historically, railroad beds have exhibited contamination associated with the operation of railroad trains. Contaminants can include volatile organic compounds (VOCs), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs), metals, herbicides, asbestos, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Soil sampling should be considered to ensure or limit exposure pathways of potential contaminants to future recreational users of the proposed trail. The investigation should include the submission and approval of a sampling plan to SEPTA, the sample collection and delivery to laboratory, and preparation of a Phase II ESA Report. Soil borings for structures Soil borings should be performed along the corridor where proposed structures are anticipated requiring soil analysis for footing design. Structural elements may include overhead lighting, retaining walls, ramps, steps, significant art or sculpture, fencing subject to wind loads, and others as required.

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Final Design Requirements Utility coordination

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

A Pennsylvania One Call is required during final design to identify all existing utilities and potential conflicts within the corridor. Depending on the funding source, coordination may also need to occur with the Pennsylvania Public Utilities Commission (PUC) throughout the design process. The existing catenary towers carry high voltage PECO and Amtrak lines as well as SEPTA signal wire. Design information and coordination for the requirements of these utilities occurred during the Manayunk Bridge Trail project and should apply to the Ivy Ridge Trail. Other utility clearances may be required depending on the final design and construction funding sources. Traffic studies The completion of the trail itself does not require any additional traffic analysis. However, additional traffic studies may be required for trail connection alternatives at Canton Street, Leverington Avenue, Main Street, High Street, and the Umbria Street crossing. Environmental clearance Preliminary design approval for the Ivy Ridge Trail will require resolution of several environmental issues, notably review by DCNRs Wild and Scenic Rivers program, and Section 4(f) review. The project lies within the Schuylkill River Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Corridor System. This requires that the project design be reviewed to be consistent with the protection of river values, including its aesthetic and recreational values. Section 4(f) permits the use of publicly-owned parks, recreational areas, wildlife or waterfowl refuges, or any significant historic sites for transportation use only when it has been determined that there is no feasible and prudent alternative to such use, and the project includes all possible planning to minimize harm to the property resulting from such use. If there are no feasible and prudent alternatives to avoid the use of Section 4(f) resources, mitigation measures will be developed. There are two potential Section 4(f) resources present within the project study area, including the Manayunk Historic District and the Schuylkill River Trail (SRT). If the proposed trail will result in the use of the Section 4(f) properties, a Section 4(f) Evaluation would be warranted. However, it is anticipated that the project will have no adverse effect on any historic resources and that the project will have a de minimis use on the SRT. Therefore, it is anticipated that the PennDOT Section 4(f) de minimis or No Use checklists will be sufficient to clear any Section 4(f) use. Stormwater/erosion and sediment control For all earth disturbance activities exceeding 5,000 square feet, an adequate erosion and sediment control (E&SC) plan must be properly designed and implemented. The plan must show how the land is to be protected against accelerated erosion through the use of E&SC Best Management Practices (BMPs). Examples of E&SC BMPs include: silt fence, mulch, diversion ditches, sediment traps and basins, and the planting of grasses or similar vegetation. The plan must show the site, location of the BMPs, and timing and sequence of their installation for maximum erosion control.

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Final Design Requirements

In addition to an E&SC Plan, a Post-Construction Stormwater Management (PCSWM) Plan is required for all construction activities requiring an NPDES Permit. The PCSWM Plan will need to include PCSWM BMPs designed to maximize infiltration technologies, minimize point source discharges to surface waters, preserve the integrity of stream channels and protect the physical, biological and chemical qualities of the receiving waters. As part of the Individual NPDES permit, an approved E&SC and PCSWM plan will be provided to the PADEP and PWD for review and approval. In addition, all projects that generate an earth disturbance of 5,000 square feet or more must submit an Existing Resources and Site Analysis (ERSA) worksheet and attachments to PWD through the PWD Plan Review website. Construction plans, specifications, and estimates Final construction plans and specifications should be prepared in accordance with the anticipated funding source for design and construction. For the purpose of this report, it is assumed final design will follow PennDOT standards and design approvals. Design submissions and approvals may include: Safety Review ADA Compliance Review Right-of-Way Clearance Utility Clearance Traffic Review Lighting Review (If lighting is proposed) Construction Review PS&E Review (Contract Management)

In addition to PennDOT reviews the project will need to be reviewed concurrently with Philadelphia Parks and Recreation, Philadelphia Streets Department (specifically the Departments Bridge Unit), and SEPTA.

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Costs and Implementation

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

COSTS AND IMPLEMENTATION


Potential funding sources Although no funding has been secured for the final design or construction of the Ivy Ridge Trail, the project has been listed as a medium priority project in the 2013 Philadelphia Trail Master Plan due to the availability of right-of-way, current planning studies, and relatively low cost of implementation. Based on this ranking, City funding for this project is in the 5-10 year stage. However, the Manayunk Bridge Trail is scheduled for construction in 2014, and upon completion of this trail momentum will build as trail users will want to continue along the corridor to the northwest. Potential public funding sources include: Future Federal Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grants Discretionary grant programs, such as the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC) and William Penn Foundation Regional Trail Program PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources (DCNR) grants PA Department of Environmental Protection Coastal Zone Management grants City of Philadelphia capital funds through Philadelphia Parks and Recreation and the Department of Commerce

Potential private funding Private funding for trails is typically easier to obtain when there are large corporations or developers that will benefit from trail use through increased property values or alternative modes of transportation for potential employees. Although there are none of these large corporations directly within the area of the trail, private funding should be further investigated as a potential funding source. Project costs The following page contains a summary of anticipated costs to design and build the Ivy Ridge Trail as described within this report. Costs were developed from recent bid unit prices from PennDOTs Engineering and Construction Management System (ECMS). Estimated prices are based on 2014 costs and inflation should be considered accordingly. The following additional project costs have been accounted for in the project costs below: Construction engineering - 18% of the design item costs Mobilization - 5% of the design item costs Contingency - 20% of the design item costs

This report does not include construction costs for connecting the Ivy Ridge Trail to the Schuylkill River Trail. Further planning and design, including survey and property ownership verification, is needed to develop accurate construction costs for these trail connections.

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Costs and Implementation

Final design is estimated to be 10-15% of the total design item construction price excluding construction engineering. Design costs include the following anticipated services and fees: Development bid ready plans, specifications, and estimates SEPTA right-of entry agreement and railroad protective liability insurance Soil samples @ $1000 per sample Soil borings @ $1500 per sample Environmental permitting fees Construction administration services Total design fee Construction Overall project construction items anticipated to be required for the overall trail project Inspectors field office/equipment package Maintenance and protection of traffic Railroad right of entry fees and insurance $100,000 $450,000

Construction costs per trail segment: Leverington Avenue bridge area Canton Street area Canton Street parking improvements Fountain Street area Ivy Ridge Station area Planning-level cost estimate for designing and constructing the Ivy Ridge Trail $2,500,000 $650,000 $100,000 $700,000 $200,000 $4,700,000

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AppendixSummaryofPublicComments

IVYRIDGETRAILFEASIBILITYSTUDY

APPENDIX SUMMARY OF PUBLIC COMMENTS


PUBLICMEETINGNO.1 November19,2012 ManayunkBrewingCompany POSTCARDSFROMTHEFUTURE:11RESPONSES HIMOM,IMONTHEIVYRIDGETRAIL!ICOMEHEREEVERYDAYBECAUSEITHAS Flowersandnicepeople.Nograffitiandbikededicatedlanes Araisedbumperalongitslengthasitcrossestheivyridgeparkinglot,tohelpdelineateitspathfromautotraffic,whilenotprecludingautos fromcrossingitsrightofway SuchgreatconnectionstoLM,theriver,thetowpathandtheSchuylkillRivertrail.CantwaituntilthenextsectioniscompletesoIcanstay offUmbriaStreet! TheabilitytoconnectmetothetowpathorrunouttheSchuylkilltrail.Ilovethegreenpaththroughtheparkinglotatthestation.Itisvery environmentallysoundwithlotsofstormwatercontrolsithascollaborationwithpwdandnativeplantings.ConnectiontoGermanyhull! Anamenitytheconnectiontothetrainstation,widetrailpath,andaplaygroundforkidsandadults Activitiesthatdrawpeople.ConnectsdirectlytoSchuylkilltrail.Restrooms.Aconcessionstand/foodtruck Asanavidcyclist,theIRTwillmakeasafercommute.Accessfromfountainstreetstepstoboththetrailandtowpathandimproved/safe crossingsatFountainStreet.GreenspaceandtrailaroundCantonStreetwithtreesandonlyonerowofparallelparking.Gatheringspaces, playspaces,plantingsandlighting. ItwillmakemybicyclecommutesafersoIwilldriveless.Afountainstreetconnectorisimportant,iffountainandUmbriaintersectionwas includedallofUmbriawouldbemorewalkable Asafegrassyareatowalkmydog.Parkinghastobereplacedforanythatislost.Manyresidentsareforcedtoparkupthereduringthe schoolyearandonweekends Asafegrassyareatowalkmydog.IliveatthebottomoftheLeveringtonAve.Bridgeandusethatareaeverysingledaytowalkmydog.The bridgehasbecomeanunofficialdogparkandisveryimportanttoourcommunity.Itwouldbeveryupsettingtoloseittobikers.However,it wouldbelovelyifitcouldbeacleaner,saferspacetosharew/doglovers/outdoorenthusiasts,orevencommuterswhowererespectfulof othersusingthepath. Ithasanicewidesmoothsurfaceanditconnectsinmultipleplacestotheneighborhoodstreets.ImridingtoConshohockenormaybe Reading.Itiswellusedbecausepeoplefeelsaferidingonthetrail.WhenIwanttoavoidthenarrowsectionofUmbriaStreet,Icantakethe pathorifIwanttogofasterIllswitchtothebikelanesonUmbria.

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY COMMENTS FROM MARKED UP PLANS Canton Street Section Provide lighting Increase visibility at Wright St./ Canton St. Cut through traffic south on Wright St. Need safe crossing (at Wright St. & Trail). Make Canton St. one way. Convert all parking to parallel parking only. Add street trees. Need green space, public art, playground at Canton St. Add community garden with ROW. Canton St. Provide good access to tow path via Leverington Avenue. Mark the entrance to tow path better. High St. & Leverington Ave. intersection is a death trap. Leverington Bridge Section Provide access ramp to Canton St. Utilize space of old station. Provide a dog park. Do not take away parking at SEPTA lot. Why do we need two sets of stairs? Why do we need a ramp? Emergency vehicles can cross at Canton St. Connect direct to green lane via old railroad steps. Fountain Street Section

Appendix Summary of Public Comments

Provide traffic signal at trail access point from Umbria Street (at station parking). Should be more than a stop sign. Provide traffic calming devices, safer pedestrian and cycle crossing and more visible crosswalk at Fountain and Umbria Streets intersection. Ramp connecting Fountain Street to the Ivy Ridge Trail at grade with Umbria Street. Provide traffic calming at Fountain Street. More lights please! Thanks for the cleanup! Provide ramp through undeveloped property between Gates and Fountain Streets to access tow path through Fountain Street underpass of Norristown Lane. Access tow path via Gate Street ROW.

Appendix Summary of Public Comments

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

Ivy Ridge Station Lot Section Sell this as the High Line South! Traffic calming for bike at trail entrance to parking lot (coming off of Ivy Ridge Trail). Use old rail ROW within travel lane? Cars currently park along travel lane. Cut into hill and provide new trail outside of parking limits. Cars travel too fast through parking lot. Add bike here? (not sure) Convert area where old station was removed to Transit Caf. Add bike parking at old station location. Provide ramp down to Parker Avenue adjacent to rail corridor. Add 4-way stop at Parker Avenue. This intersection is unsafe! The existing bike lanes on Umbria Street will get more use and maybe more dangerous. Parker Avenue will need light or new development on river. Can children use the trail to get to school? Lamonte Street is unsafe for pedestrians. Umbria Street backup in the morning hours approaching Leverington. Would like to see the path follow the old ROW through the parking lot. Connect to tow path via Parker Avenue.

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY PUBLIC MEETING NO. 2 April 22, 2013 Manayunk North Light Community Center

Appendix Summary of Public Comments

I like: Fountain Street connection to the towpath. Because: Fountain Street connection from Fountain Street to the Ivy Ridge Trail. Fountain Street is a key connecting street into the neighborhood and need to connect to the trail. I like: Landscaping on Canton Street. Because: Bank is seriously eroding and paving will increase the runoff problem. I would rather see: Parallel/head-in Canton Street Parking (70-75 spaces) Because: As a Canton St. resident, Im painfully aware of the scarcity of on-street parking and any path plan needs to offer the most possible spaces. Im also looking forward to the City raking up the leaves from all the new trees. I like: The entire concept. Because: It connects the area with trails. The wider concept for the trail because the trail traffic will grow and the room will be needed. More people are biking trails. I would rather see: A shorter connection where possible. Because: People will always take what appears to be a shorter route even though it may be steeper.

I would rather see: Option C/D. Because: Safety!! A buffer between walkers and cyclists will go a long way for safety. (On the Leverington Ave. Bridge Area board.) I like: A connection to Fountain Street steps and the towpath. Because: It will provide another access point to the towpath in addition to just either end (@ Main & @ Shawmont) I like: Buffer strip between bike and ped paths. Because: It will largely prevent conflicts. Example: On the boardwalk in Ocean City, NJ, pedestrians ignore the painted bike symbols and risk collisions. I like: Purple connector from Fountain Street to towpath. Because: It provides safe bicycle and handicap access. I like: Buffer in middle (C) Leverington Ave. Bridge onward. Because: Safety reasons. Sometimes cyclists and pedestrians dont mix. Also, connection @ Fountain St. steps a good idea to gain access to towpath. I would rather see: 1. Connection at Ivy Ridge Station to the canal path. 2. Traffic calming on Umbria Street including the Shawmont/Umbria intersection. Because: Public access and public safety.

Appendix Summary of Public Comments

IVY RIDGE TRAIL FEASIBILITY STUDY

I like: Improved organization of Ivy Ridge Station (?) I would rather see: Bikes directed to Lemont Street, Same as vehicles. Pedestrians given access to Umbria.

Sent by email: To help alleviate weekend parking concerns, promote free weekend parking at the Ivy Ridge SEPTA stop. I did not see it listed as a permit parking lot. http://www.septa.org/parking/permit.html Consider adding bike parking facilities at Ivy Ridge. The new trail will be dumping even more cyclists on to the already dangerous bike lanes on Umbria Street. Traffic calming is needed it is all too common for motor vehicles to exceed 50 mph on Umbria. All-way stop signs are needed at the intersections with Domino Lane, Autumn River Run (at The Glen at Shawmont apartments), and the extremely dangerous Shawmont Avenue intersection. The entrance to the Umbria Golf Center, 7200 Umbria, endangers west-bound cyclists as motor vehicles use the bike lane to get around vehicles turning left into the golf center. Several SeeClickFix links are listed below that illustrate the Umbria Street bike lane problems. Also, I would think that the residents of the Glen would appreciate a three-way stop at their intersection with Umbria as left-hand turns onto Umbria are risky due to speeding eastbound traffic. (From Wikipedia - SeeClickFix is a web tool that allows citizens to report non-emergency neighborhood issues, which are communicated to local government, as a form of community activism. It has an associated free mobile phone application). To help separate cyclists from pedestrians and runners, consider a wider trail with multiple surfaces that help to define user lanes, especially at the Ivy Ridge station. For example, in front of Boathouse Row, the trail is asphalt in the center, with brick pavers on the outer sides. Peds and runners tend to stay to the outer edge lanes, using the brick pavers, while cyclists stay on the center asphalt. Also, hardpack surfaces on the outside of the paved trail would be preferred by runners, also helping to relieve contention between trail users. Access to the Manayunk Canal Path from Umbria Street/Parker Avenue: In attempting to secure public access through the underconstruction Station at Manayunk, emphasize the need for police and emergency access, as well as handicap access, to this somewhat remote section of the canal path. Consider the use of QRs (matrix barcodes) on trail signage for info on the trail, nearby history, and local info (parking, food, hotels, hostels, etc. even possibly a source of revenue from advertisers). Increased signage and publicity to make the public aware of the trail I spend a lot of time on the Schuylkill River Trail talking to trail users and am always disappointed to find that so many have only recently become aware of this treasure. There has been an effort for increased signage such as on Ridge Avenue, but more needs to be done. For example, when coming into Manayunk from Lower Merion on the Green Lane bridge, new signage to the SRT, the canal path, and the Manayunk Bridge would greatly increase awareness.

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