INSIDE

:
nAnnual Spring
Home & Garden
special section!
nLook inside!
Special sales
events from ...
Chief, Menards,
Rural King,
State Issue 1
Around
Paulding
County
Lunch at the
courthouse
PAULDING – Everyone
is welcome to have lunch
from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.
Wednesday, April 30, in the
basement of the Paulding
County Courthouse.
The menu will be hot
chicken sandwiches, potato
salad, chips, pickles, bottled
water and homemade cook-
ies. The cost is a free will
donation with all proceeds
going to a local Paulding
County resident to assist
with medical needs for a
disabled child that insurance
will not cover.
Carry out will be avail-
able. Call 419-786-9427
with any questions.
Transportation
planning meet
set in Paulding
PAULDING – Maumee
Valley Planning Organi -
zation (MVPO) will hold a
public meeting on the devel-
opment of a Rural Long
Range Regional Transporta -
tion Plan for the five coun-
ties of Defiance, Fulton,
Henry, Paulding and Will -
iams. The public meeting
for Paulding County will be
held on Tuesday, April 29 at
the Paulding Carnegie
Library in Paulding. Doors
will open at 6 p.m. with a
presentation at 6:30 p.m.
followed by a question and
answer period.
The public is encouraged
to attend this public meeting
to learn more and provide
input into the Rural Trans -
por tation Plan, Moving
Together 2040. Topics to be
discussed include existing
traffic volumes, crashes,
bridge conditions, rail cross-
ings and train characteris-
tics, environmental issues,
recreational trails, popula-
tion areas including age and
environmental justice areas
and other areas pertaining to
transportation and planning
for the region.
The public is also encour-
aged to visit the MVPO
website, www.mvpo.org, for
updated information to the
plan and to provide com-
ments during the planning
process, or provide written
comments to Maumee
Valley Planning Organi -
zation, 1300 E. Second St.,
Defiance OH 43512.
Thanks to you ...
We’d like to thank Mary
Hinschlager of Celina for
subscribing to the Progress!
P
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AULDING
AULDING
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OUNTY
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VOL. 139 NO. 35 PAULDING, OHIO 419-399-4015 www.progressnewspaper.org WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23, 2014 ONE DOLLAR USPS 423620
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P
P
ROGRESS
ROGRESS
By JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
This year, National Book -
mobile Day was celebrated on
Wednesday, April 16.
Recently, I decided to make a
couple of stops along one of
their routes and quickly dis-
covered it was a happening
place for all ages. Actually,
those who take advantage of
the Paulding County Carnegie
Library’s Bookmobile when it
comes to their community
range in age from preschool to
just over 100 years old.
My first stop was in Latty.
On any given Tuesday, there
will be 10-15 patrons who will
show up. The Latty folks who
come out are consistent, ac-
cording to Bookmobile man-
ager Kathy Heffley.
“Some of our regulars that
we can count on seeing each
week are in Latty,” said
Heffley.
After sharing that little sta-
tistic it wasn’t but a couple of
minutes when Darl Stoller
drove up and made his way in-
side. Stoller is one of the regu-
lars.
“This is great for a small
town like Latty. I come in just
about every Tuesday to pick up
some videos, and my wife
likes to read, so she is always
looking for book to read,” said
Darl.
Darl’s wife, Iva, wasn’t
with him, but he was instruct-
ed to pick up a couple of
books for her.
“She likes inspirational
books and I like the movie se-
lection they have here.”
On the warm Tuesday after-
noon, Kathy Habern had just
left the library on wheels when
I showed up. Habern was plac-
ing her 6-month-old grand-
daughter, Aylah, in her stroller
and was anticipating a stroll
back home.
“She (Aylah) loves her
books. Having the Book -
County
confers
with state
officials
about EMA
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
PAULDING – Paulding
County commissioners met
Monday with Richard Lauffer,
Northwest Ohio Emergency
Management director, and
Andrew Elder, Preparedness
Grants branch chief, to discuss
filling the position of former
EMA director Randy Shaffer.
Shaffer was fired by com-
missioners last week follow-
ing an ongoing dispute over
reports involving grant financ-
ing and various other organi-
zational disagreements.
Monday, the commissioners
discussed various options,
both temporary and perma-
nent, in filling the EMA posi-
tion.
“We want you to help guide
us through this whole process
of filling this position in a way
that will benefit the entire
county,” said Commissioner
Tony Zartman. “Our end goal
is to put the right person on the
job.”
Elder told commissioners
that they have 90 days to fill
the position, with a one-time
option of an extra 30 days.
“The key is that you don’t
lose any funding,” said
Lauffer. “Randy did get in all
of the fourth and fifth quarters
and a lot of the sixth quarter.
When I look things over, nor-
mally there are a few clarifica-
tions that are needed.
“I don’t have enough paper-
work. I need some documen-
tation,” continued Lauffer.
“Grants have gotten a lot more
cumbersome. They look for
bills and proof of purchase in
everything.”
Zartman raised the question
of possibly sharing a director
with another county. Lauffer
responded that one of the diffi-
culties of such an arrangement
is the need for the EMA direc-
tor to build local relationships
with all of the agencies en-
gaged.
“If they aren’t from this
area, they may not know this
area as well,” said Lauffer.
Zartman asked if there were
any examples of such an
arrangement in the state and
Elder replied that Mont -
gomery (Dayton) and Greene
(Xenia) had disbanded their
Until the cows
come home
Denise Gebers/Paulding County Progress
There was a bit of a rodeo in
Paulding Township on Monday after
part of a herd of cattle escaped their
enclosure, possibly during an unload-
ing procedure. This group of 14
bovines was kept off Ohio 500 by
passersby until the owners could col-
lect them. Additionally, a handful of
steers could be seen from afar, gath-
ered outside nearby woods. At left, an
unidentified man who helped keep the
animals off the roadway made friends
with one of the more curious animals.
‰WHAT: Antwerp vs.
Wayne Trace in the
Parkview Sports Medicine
Baseball Series
‰WHEN: 4:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 8
‰WHERE: Parkview
Field, downtown Fort
Wayne
‰ADMISSION: Tickets
$5; teams keep $4 from
the sale of each ticket
See EMA, page 2A
See BOOKMOBILE, page 2A

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See BASEBALL, page 2A
Bookmobile inspires both young and old
By JOE SHOUSE
Progress Sportswriter
FORT WAYNE – The first-ever
Parkview Sports Medicine Baseball
Series showcasing 28 area high school
baseball teams begins this week and will
continue over the next three weeks.
Fourteen games will be played at
Parkview Field, home of the Fort Wayne
TinCaps, with the May 8 double-header
featuring the Antwerp Archers playing
Wayne Trace Raiders. The 4:30 p.m. start
time for the Paulding County match-up
will be followed by the Leo and Woodlan
game.
The Archers and Raiders are the only
two Ohio teams playing in the inaugural
event.
The game will be a fundraising oppor-
tunity for the high schools playing.
Tickets are $5 and, according to Antwerp
athletic director Drew Altimus, Antwerp
tickets can be purchased at the high
school at this time with other ticket out-
lets being available soon.
“This is an exciting time for our base-
ball program. Tickets are $5 and we get to
keep $4 from the sale of each ticket. We
plan to filter the money back into the
baseball program for various improve-
ments,” said Altimus.
The price of the ticket is good for both
games that are played that evening.
The baseball series, the first of what
will be an annual event, gives area teams
and players a unique opportunity to play
in a top-rated minor league ball park. The
sponsorship by Parkview Sports
Medicine makes it possible for each team
to participate without any ball park rental
costs and allows each team to sell tickets
to the game as a fund raiser for their indi-
vidual school.
Teams will experience much of the
same as the TinCaps. They will have use
of the batting cage and on the field warm
ups, and even their names announced and
headshots on the Parkview Field video
board as they step up to the plate for their
at bats.
Wayne Trace has been selling tickets
for the last month and students can con-
Archers, Raiders to play at Parkview Field
Joe Shouse/Paulding County Progress
One young reader finds a place to rest while propping her book up on her left foot. Readers
of all ages look forward to the bookmobile when it comes to their community.
tinue to purchase tickets from
Coach Zach Boyer in Room
206 at WTHS.
The general public can pur-
chase tickets by contacting a
player or coach before May 6.
Athletic director Jim Linder
reminds all Raider fans that
tickets will also be available
this Saturday, April 26 during
the tri-way baseball game
with North Central and
Antwerp.
“The baseball team will be
using the money from the
Parkview game to pay for the
two new pitching mounds that
were purchased in the winter.
“These new mounds will
2A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 23, 2014
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
PAULDING – A renewal of a tax
levy covering current operating ex-
penses for Paulding County Carnegie
Library will be appearing on the May
6 Primary Election.
The operating expenses rate is not
to exceed 2.17 mills for each one dol-
lar of valuation, which amounts to
$0.217 for each one hundred dollars
of valuation for five years, com-
mencing in 2014 and first due in cal-
endar year 2015.
Library director Susan Pieper said
recently that the State of Ohio Public
Library Fund for 2014 is projected to
include another cut of over $25,000
for Paulding’s library system.
“State funding has steadily de-
clined over 25 percent in the last
decade,” said Pieper. “Paulding
County citizens approved an operat-
ing levy in 2009 for the library. This
levy is a renewal levy of the 2009
levy for a five-year-period.
“This levy means no new taxes
and no increase in taxes,” continued
Pieper. “The amount a property
owner is paying for the library now is
what they will continue to pay, even
if their property values rise.”
The total items borrowed in 2013
was 162,235, including 27,027 from
Antwerp Branch Library, 14,976
from Bookmobile, 23,535 from
Oakwood Branch Library, 76,528
from Main Carnegie Library in
Paulding and 20,169 from Payne
Branch Library.
Pieper said that library materials
and services include access to an up-
dated collection of fiction and non
fiction; large print; romance, mys-
tery, Westerns, science fiction and in-
spirational titles; popular movies and
television programs in DVD format;
e-books; high-speed internet access
on public computers; Wi-Fi hotspot;
books recorded on CD; books
recorded on Playaway and movies in
the Playaway View format.
Also, award-winning children’s
programs, historically important and
inspirational guest speakers and au-
thors, summer reading programs for
all ages, test proctoring, genealogy
and local history collections, access
to thousands of authoritative online
databases, and participation in
Library for the Blind and Physically
Handicapped.
“Books remain the number one
item loaned at the public library,”
said Pieper. “And, over 5,000 e-
books were borrowed from the li-
brary’s collection in 2013.
“For many years, the State of Ohio
provided the funds for Ohio’s public
libraries,” continued Pieper.
“However, with the 2004 decision to
cut the state income tax by 21 per-
cent, the downturn in the economy
and the recent decision to cut the in-
come tax another 10 percent, it is
clear that the message from the state
is to turn more of the responsibility of
maintaining our public libraries back
to the local level.
“Ohio’s public library community
is again working hard to prevent an-
other decrease in state funding,”
added Pieper.
Pieper noted that in addition to the
funding received through the Public
Library Fund from the state, over 50
percent of the library’s funding
comes from a property tax levy ap-
proved by voters in 2009 and from
miscellaneous revenue such as fines,
fees, copies, book sales and other
small item funds.
“The library receives zero dollars
from the county budget,” said Pieper.
“The library is considered a ‘free
county library’ and is governed by a
seven-member board of trustees ap-
pointed by the judge of the Common
Pleas Court. The board is a political
subdivision unto itself.”
n BASEBALL
Continued from Page 1A
choices on books for 1-year-
old Kendyl and 8-year-old
Kyla, Shawn selected a DVD
he knew he and his wife would
enjoy together.
“Having this Bookmobile
come to Haviland is a big deal
for our little community. I am
certainly in favor of anything
that will benefit the kids and
this certainly does,” Hurd said.
While one Hurd family was
ready for their three-block
journey home, another Hurd
relative slipped inside the
Bookmobile with her daugh-
ter, Emma.
“Emma loves the Book -
mobile and although she is
only 3, she enjoys getting her
favorite books and videos.
This week, the Chipmunk
movie is her favorite. And for
me, I love the convenience of
having the Bookmobile com-
ing to our community,”
Tiffany said.
Young or elderly, it doesn’t
seem to matter; there is some-
thing for everyone at the
Bookmobile. And each time it
stops in one of Paulding
County’s quaint little commu-
nities, both Heffley and her as-
sistant and Bookmobile driver
Tawnya English are always
excited to greet you.
For many, the Bookmobile
has become more than a place
to check out books or get the
latest movie releases. It’s a
place to get better acquainted
with your neighbors and to
take a short walk with your
family. It’s an outlet where you
can watch excited faces light
up when they have opportuni-
ty to latch on to a book that
will enable them to grow and
develop a deeper understand-
ing about the world around
them. A world that quite possi-
bly was introduced to them by
the Bookmobile.
books and you don’t have to
rent them or buy them,” he
said.
Bailey Adams, a 10-year-
old fourth grader, and his 12-
year-old sister, Madison, were
enjoying the Bookmobile as it
made its stop in Haviland. The
family duo obviously had dif-
ferent interests. Bailey likes
the book series titled I
Survived by author Jake
Maddox while his older sib-
ling was holding on to a book
to check out that was about the
musical band One Direction.
“I like to read and it’s excit-
ing to have the Bookmobile
come here so we can have a
chance to pick out what we
want to read,” said Madison.
Often times, parents will ac-
company their children in
order to help them select
books while at the same time
looking for a recently released
DVD to watch. That was the
case when Shawn Hurd, a sev-
enth grade social studies
teacher, brought two of his
daughters to the Bookmobile.
Shawn and his wife live three
blocks from where the rolling
library parks each week.
“To be able to get out and
walk with your kids is great.
This is the only time we get to
the library,” said Hurd. “With
three kids and after working
all day, it’s hard sometimes to
load the family up in the car
and go to the library in
Paulding. I know its only eight
or so miles, but this works out
well for our family.”
After making a couple of
mobile here in Latty is great
for the kids. They have a
chance to get books and
DVDs and it will only help
them in the long run,” said
Habern.
Jose Aguilar, a sixth grader,
looks forward to the Book -
mobile coming to his neigh-
borhood. He was filling up his
green plastic library tote with
books and movies.
“I like the action-type
movies and today I found a
World War II movie. I usually
pick out two or three books. I
keep my eye out for new
books. It’s great getting these
Stykemain
Chevrolet
to host
open house
PAULDING – Stykemain
Chevrolet will be holding a
grand opening event from 11
a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, April 26
at the new dealership located
at 1255 N. Williams St.
During the grand opening
event there will be a car show,
door prizes every half hour, fa-
cility tours, food, drinks, disc
jockey, a bounce house for
kids and carnival games.
In addition, at 6 p.m. there
will be a grand prize give-
away, which will either be a
2014 Chevrolet Spark or
$10,000 cash. To be eligible to
register for the grand prize, en-
trants must be at least 18 years
of age. Need not be present to
win.
There will also be a car
show during the celebration.
Registration for the car show
is at 11 a.m., judging will be at
1 p.m. and prizes will be
awarded at 3 p.m.
The judging categories for
the car show include: best in
show, first runner up, second
runner up, longest drive, most
radical, and outstanding in the
following: accessories,
Chevrolet, engine, Ford, inte-
rior, modified, paint, stock and
outstanding workmanship.
United Way will also be on
site and accepting donations.
For more information, see
the Stykemain advertisement
on page 14A of today’s
Progress.
individual directors and
merged several years ago.
“The administrative respon-
sibilities of such an arrange-
ment are almost impossible,”
added Elder. “It’s not a viable
option.
“Where do you locate the di-
rector in such an arrangement,”
continued Elder. “If he is not
located in the local county, will
the constituents be satisfied?”
“We want the best person for
the job,” said Com mis sioner
Roy Klopfenstein. “Ideally we
would like to have that person
from Paulding County. We
don’t know at this time.”
Elder said that there is no re-
quirement that the director has
to live in the county that he
serves, or even the state, in ref-
erence to the possibility of hir-
ing someone from Allen
County, Ind.
“We provide all of the re-
quired training,” Elder said. “It
takes about three years to get
somebody comfortable and up
to speed. There is a code that
requires certain training.”
Lauffer said that there are
several sections in require-
ments that the EMA director is
responsible for. He noted that
in order to share the best train-
ing, his office will send spe-
cialized trainers for each sec-
tion.
According to Lauffer, it is
important that, due to financial
limitations in most situations,
the EMA director development
a network of county support
including jobs and family serv-
ices, county engineer, health
department, law enforcement,
first responders and other spe-
cialized agencies.
“The matter of a team player
is absolutely essential,” said
Lauffer. “He must have good
communication and the ability
to quickly rally all entities
needed in the case of an emer-
gency.”
“The key is getting the right
person,” said Commissioner
Fred Pieper.
“You have to have an idea of
what you want your program
to look like,” noted Elder. “You
are the visionaries for the
county, for what you want your
program to be.”
Elder added that depending
on the market of available per-
sonnel and what the commis-
sioners are looking for, secur-
ing an EMA director can take
from a few weeks up to sever-
al months. He noted that the
120-day period allowable for
securing a director begins with
the termination of the previous
director, so several days of
search time have already been
lost.
Zartman said that commis-
sioners are aware that there are
certain investments that need
to go into the department, in-
cluding the purchase of a dif-
ferent vehicle.
Sheriff Jason Landers, who
was also present at the meet-
ing, said that it is his opinion
that commissioners should hire
someone that can step into the
office and get going from day
one.
The sheriff added that his
department is prepared to re-
spond to certain emergencies
until the EMA director position
has been filled.
replace the wooded (2x4’s and
plywood) mounds that have
been in use for over 20 years.
Any additional money will go
towards the purchase of an
outdoor batting cage to be
placed by the baseball field in
the future,” said Linder.
Parkview Field and
Parkview Sports Medicine is
excited about hosting this
year’s event and the 28 teams
that will be participating.
“This area is filled with tal-
ented high school baseball
players and teams who de-
serve a shot to showcase their
skills in a big league environ-
ment,” said Julie Fleck, COO.
copyright © 2014 Published weekly by
The Paulding County Progress, Inc. P.O.
Box 180, 113 S. Williams St., Paulding,
Ohio 45879 Phone 419-399-4015
Fax: 419-399-4030;
website: www.progressnewspaper.org
Doug Nutter . . . . . . . . . . . . . Publisher
Advertising - dnutter@progressnewspaper.org
Melinda Krick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor
News - progress@progressnewspaper.org
Ruth Snodgrass . . . . . . . . . . . . . Circulation
subscription@progressnewspaper.org
USPS 423620
Entered at the Post Office in Paulding,
Ohio, as 2nd class matter. Subscription
rates: $38 per year for mailing addresses
in Defiance, Van Wert Putnam and Paulding
counties. $46 per year outside these coun-
ties; local rate for Military
personnel and students.
Deadline for display adver-
tising 3 p.m. Monday.
News deadline 3 p.m.
Thursday.
Paulding County Progress
n EMA
Continued from Page 1A
n BOOKMOBILE
Continued from Page 1A


Introducing Mercy General Surgeons
Surgical Services
• Hernia repair
• Appendectomy
• Gallbladder disease
• Hemorrhoids
• Laparoscopic surgery
• Breast biopsies
• Mastectomies
• Bowel surgery
• Colonoscopies
• EGD

Paulding Surgery and
Office Appointment
Schedule
Surgeries and office
appointments at Paulding
County Hospital are
scheduled on Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday.
To Make Office
Appointments in
Paulding
Call Mercy Defiance Clinic
toll-free at 1-800-925-4642
or dial 419-784-1414 and
press 1 for scheduling.
Now Providing Services at
Paulding County Hospital
Board-Certified General Surgeons
• Souheil Al-Jadda, M.D.
• Jeffrey A. Pruitt, M.D.
• John W. Shaw, M.D.

Dr.Pruitt Dr. Al-Jadda Dr. Shaw
Tax levy renewal for library to appear on May 6 ballot
Now Hauling Diesel Exhaust Fluid
419-399-3677
270 Dooley Drive
Paulding
Gas • Diesel Fuel • Motor Oils
Joe Shouse/Paulding County Progress
Nearly 30 patrons stopped at the Bookmobile in Haviland on a recent Tuesday. Looking over
their selections were a trio of readers including Madison Adams, Kyla Hurd and Bailey Adams.
Joe Shouse/Paulding County Progress
Darl Stoller, one of the reg-
ulars who stops by the book-
mobile most every week,
looks over the latest selection
of DVDs.
VICKI LONG
1944-2014
OAKWOOD – Vicky Rae
Long, 69, of Oakwood, died
at 3:45 p.m. Saturday, April
19 at her residence.
She was born Sept. 6, 1944
in Paulding to the late Dorris
and Myrtle (Wilcox) Steele.
She married Leonard Jack
Feeney, who preceded her in
death. On July 5, 1975, she
then married Fred W. Long,
who survives in Oakwood.
Vicky was an EMT for the
Oakwood EMS. She was a
member of Mount Zion
United Methodist Church,
Oakwood Village Council,
and a volunteer for the Pauld-
ing Senior Center. She was
active in the Wayne Trace
Wrestling Club.
Survivors also include her
children, Jeff (Loretta)
Feeney of Defiance, Rick
Long of Jackson, Mich., and
Jerry (Kelly) Feeney, Rob
(Karisa) Long and Chad
(Holly) Long, all of Oak-
wood; 10 grandchildren,
Leonard Jack Feeney III, Jeff
Feeney Jr., Shauna (Sean)
Marsee, Nichole Hornish,
Robert Long, Taylor Long,
Hunter Long, Jacob Long,
Chad Long, and Maddie
Egnor; four great-grandchil-
dren, Kaiden Feeney, Kale
Marsee, O’Koner Feeney,
Kaine Marsee, and one on the
way; two sisters, Grace Mar-
shall of Dayton and LeAnn
Boyd of Van Wert; a brother,
Dennis Steele of Defiance;
and three dear friends, Diane
Clemens, Sue Barron and
Sherri Friend.
She was preceded in death
by a son, Leonard Jack
Feeney Jr.; a sister, Kate
Flint; and a brother, Ray
Steele.
Funeral service will begin
at 11 a.m. Thursday, April 24
at Heitmeyer Funeral Home,
Oakwood, with Pastor Dave
Prior officiating. Burial will
follow in Riverside Ceme-
tery, Defiance.
Visitation will be from 2-8
p.m. today, April 23 and one
hour prior to the service
Thursday at the funeral home.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the family.
Condolences may be ex-
pressed at www.heitmeyerfu-
neralhome.com.
DAVID ZIEGLER
1960-2014
PAULDING – David
Wayne Ziegler, age 53, died
Tuesday, April 15 at the
Paulding County Hospital.
He was
born Dec.
6, 1960 in
H e n r y
Co u n t y,
the son of
Kent and
Al b e r t a
( F o u t s )
Ziegler. On Feb. 14, 1995, he
married Wanda M. Miller,
who survives. He was em-
ployed by Custom Assembly,
Haviland, and was a member
of Paulding Eagles #2405. He
enjoyed canoeing, bird
watching and nature.
He is survived by his wife,
Wanda Ziegler, Paulding;
children, Jamie (Greg) Lam-
mers, Paulding, Lindsey Las-
siter, Cincinnati, and Hannah
Tunis, Paulding; grandchil-
dren, Taylor, Greg Jr., Olivia
and Calvin; mother, Alberta
“Bert” Smith, Defiance; and
siblings, Debbie (Walter)
Kauser, Paulding, Keith
(Sharon) Ziegler, Texas and
Tammy (Shane) Wilson, De-
fiance.
He was preceded in death
by his father, Kent Ziegler, a
brother, Kenny Ziegler; ma-
ternal grandparents Albert
and Esther Fouts, and pater-
nal grandparents Kenneth and
Charlotte Ziegler.
Funeral services were Sat-
urday, April 19 at Den Herder
Funeral Home, Paulding.
Donations may be made to
American Cancer Society.
Online condolences may be
sent to www.denherderfh.com.
VICTORIA GRAY
1984-2014
HAVILAND – Victoria
Sue Gray, age 29, died
Wednesday, April 16.
She was born Sept. 5, 1984
in Defiance, the daughter of
Michael E. and Brenda L.
(Hill) Sprow.
She is survived by her father,
Mi c h a e l
( Vi c k i )
S p r o w ,
Paulding;
her mother,
B r e n d a
( J e r r y )
S m i t h ,
Paulding;
two children, Zander and Bra-
lynn; maternal grandfather,
Paul Hill, Paulding; and sib-
lings, Lisa (Rodney) Stevens,
Temperance, Mich., Annie
Sprow, Paulding, Shane (April)
Litzenberg, Charie (Brad) Pe-
ters and Alli (Joe) Beregzazi,
all of Antwerp, Angie Doel,
Massachusetts, Sara (Jason)
Bullinger, Convoy, and Sam
(Ashley) Smith, Paulding.
She was preceded in death
by her maternal grandmother,
Margie Hill, and paternal
grandparents, Elmer and Kate
Sprow.
Funeral services were
Tuesday, April 22 at Den
Herder Funeral Home, Pauld-
ing, with the Rev. Ben Lowell
officiating. Burial was in Live
Oak Cemetery, Paulding.
In lieu of flowers, the fam-
ily requests donations made
to a charity of the donor’s
choice.
Online condolences may be
left at www.denherderfh.com.
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 3A
Obituaries
Updated weekdays at www.progressnewspaper.org
Obituaries are
posted daily
The Paulding County
Progress posts obituaries
daily as we receive them.
Check our Web site at
www.progressnewspaper.org
and click on “For the
Record.”
BAINBRIDGE RASEY
1936-2014
ANTWERP – Bainbridge
“Bing” Rasey, 77, of
Antwerp, passed away
Wednesday, April 16 at Hick-
ory Creek Nursing Home,
Hicksville.
LEONA TAYLOR
1917-2014
ANTWERP – Leona Irene
Taylor, 96, of Antwerp, died
Thursday, April 17 at her res-
idence.
LESTER
HART
1928-2014
ANTWERP – Lester Hart,
85, of Antwerp, passed away
Saturday, April 19 at The
Gardens of Paulding.
Lester was born in Pauld-
ing County on Dec. 23, 1928,
a son of the late Opal (Dot-
terer) and Charles Hart.
Lester served in the U.S.
Army and was the owner of
Hart’s Auto Parts, Cecil. On
May 7, 1971, he married
Ruth Fetters. He thoroughly
enjoyed traveling and flying
his own plane.
He will be missed by his
wife, Ruth; children, Randy
(Cali) Getrost of Decatur,
Ind., Kathy (Kelly) Whitney
of Antwerp, Ronnie Getrost
of Gaffney, S.C. and Barbara
(Aaron) Butzin of Antwerp;
10 grandchildren; and 10 great-
grandchildren.
He was preceded in death by
two sisters and one brother.
His funeral service will be
at 11 a.m. today, April 23 at
Antwerp United Methodist
Church with visitation one
hour prior. He will be laid to
rest at Pleasant Grove Ceme-
tery. Dooley Funeral Home is
in charge of arrangements.
Memorials are to the church.
Condolences and fond mem-
ories may be shared at
www.dooleyfuneralhome.com.
The Amish Cook
By: Lovina Eicher
evening to grill.
The children are taking the
ponies to exercise now that it is
warmer. Lovina and Kevin like
to drive Minnie the miniature
pony. They can put her harness
on and hitch her to the pony
wagon. It’s nice that they learn
with a smaller pony and get
used to it.
Daughter Elizabeth went to
her friend Timothy’s house for
supper last night. His parents,
his brother and wife and his
sister and family took supper in
for Timothy. One of Timothy’s
horses kicked back at one of
his seven month old foals last
Saturday. It was hit in the head
and died almost instantly. The
mare that kicked is due to have
a foal soon. It happened so fast
and she must’ve hit just in the
wrong place. It was disappoint-
ing to Timothy as at seven
month old it was a nice size al-
ready.
Little Prancer, our miniature
pony, turned a year old yester-
day, April 9. Daughter Lovina
said she thinks she should go
tell Prancer it’s his birthday.
The boys said they should give
him extra feed. It made me
laugh. In another year he will
be ready to train to drive the
pony wagon.
Jacob and Emma’s oldest
daughter Elizabeth, 17, will
have surgery done on her ear
tomorrow. She had the surgery
done on the other ear with good
It’s already Thursday, the
deadline for me to get this col-
umn out in the mail. This week
our five children are home on
spring break. The boys have
been cleaning out the barn and
hauling manure. The girls have
been helping with the spring
cleaning and also cleaning up
the yard. We’ve had a few nice
days this week now. It gives
you the eagerness to want to
plant the garden. Our garden
hasn’t dried up enough yet but
with these nice sunny days
maybe it will soon. I am also
hoping to see the dandelion
greens pop up. I always look
forward to those fixed into a
salad with diced hard boiled
eggs and a homemade sour
cream dressing. We like the
dandelion greens over steamed
potatoes. I haven’t been out to
check if any rhubarb is peeping
through yet.
A friend of daughter Verena
is here today. She came last
night and stayed the night. She
used to be in the same school
and grade as Verena but they
moved to another school dis-
trict. They still keep in contact
and she has come to visit be-
fore. They always enjoy each
other’s company.
My husband Joe grilled
chicken last night for supper
and along with that we had
spaghetti, macaroni and
cheese, jello cake, and angel
food cake. It was a nice
results. We wish her a complete
and speedy recovery.
I took daughter Susan, 18, to
the doctor this week. She has
been so miserable breaking out
all over with an itchy and
painful rash. Her hands are all
blistered and peeling skin. It
started after she started her new
job at the RV factory. She
caulks the outside of the RVs
and has to use a strong cleaner
to clean off the excess caulk.
The doctors said she is allergic
to the strong chemicals in the
cleaner. We hope they will con-
sider moving her to a new po-
sition. It’s just not worth the
money to have to be miserable
like this. The doctor gave her
antibiotics and cream to try to
clear it up.
CHOCOLATE CHIP
COOKIES
9 eggs
2 cups butter or margarine
2 cups shortening
4-1/2 cups brown sugar
2-1/4 cups white sugar
1 tablespoon vanilla
Mix together well and then
add the following:
12 cups bread flour
1-1/2 tablespoons baking
soda
1 tablespoon salt
4-1/2 cups chocolate chips
Mix well and drop by tea-
spoon (or use an ice cream
scoop) onto greased cookie
sheet. Bake at 350° for 15-20
minutes depending on size.
The Church Corner
HEITMEYER
FUNERAL HOME
610 Walnut Street
Oakwood, Ohio
419-594-3660
Full Service Funeral Home
Pre-Arrangement Specialists
35c1
Would you like to work with
funeral directors who understand
how valuable it is for you and your
family to have a truly meaningful
funeral experience?
When the time comes to honor a
loved one’s memory in a personal
way, give us a call.
Dooley
FUNERAL HOME
Antwerp
419-258-5684
35c1
Payne
419-263-0000
For a Life Worth Celebrating
SM
www.dooleyfuneralhome.com
LEGAL NOTICE
The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio has scheduled local hearings in Case No. 13-2385-EL-
SSO, In the Matter of the Application of Ohio Power Company for Authority to Establish a
Standard Service Offer Pursuant to R.C. 4928.143, in the Form of an Electric Security Plan,
and Case No. 13-2386-EL-AAM, In the Matter of the Application of Ohio Power Company for
Approval of Certain Accounting Authority. In the application, Ohio Power Company d/b/a AEP
Ohio seeks Commission approval of an electric security plan filed on December 20, 2013, and
matters related to the company’s procurement of power for the period of June 1, 2015 through
May 31, 2018. According to the application, for all customer classes, customers are expected
to experience average annual rate changes ranging from -27 percent to 6 percent during the
electric security plan period. The application proposes the recovery of other costs through riders
during the term of the electric security plan, although the costs and subsequent rate impacts are
unknown at this time. In addition, the application contains provisions addressing distribution ser-
vice, economic development, alternative energy resource requirements, and energy efficiency
requirements. The local hearings are scheduled for the purpose of providing an opportunity for
interested members of the public to testify in this proceeding. The local hearings will be held as
follows:
(a) Tuesday, April 29, 2014, at 6:00 p.m., at Wolfe Park Shelter House, 105 Park D r i v e ,
Columbus, Ohio 43209.
(b) Wednesday, April 30, 2014, 6:00 p.m., at Lima Municipal Center, City Council Chambers,
50 Town Square, 1st Floor, Lima, Ohio 45801.
(c) Tuesday, May 6, 2014, at 12:30 p.m., at the offices of the Commission, 180 East Broad
Street, Hearing Room 11-C, Columbus, Ohio 43215.
(d) Wednesday, May 14, 2014, at 6:00 p.m., at Canton City Hall, Council Chambers, 218
Cleveland Avenue SW, 1st Floor, Canton, Ohio 44702.
(e) Tuesday, May 20, 2014, at 6:00 p.m., at Washington State Community College, Arts &
Science Building, Harvey Graham Auditorium, 710 Colegate Drive, Marietta, Ohio 45750.
The evidentiary hearing will commence on June 3, 2014, at 10:00 a.m., at the offices of the Com-
mission, Hearing Room 11-A, 180 East Broad Street, Columbus, Ohio 43215. Further information
may be obtained by contacting the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio, 180 East Broad Street,
Columbus, Ohio 43215-3793, viewing the Commission’s web page at http://www.puco.ohio.gov,
or contacting the Commission’s hotline at 1-800-686-7826.
35c1
Call us at 419-399-3887
Toll Free
1-800-784-5321
To soften the sorrow,
To comfort the living,
Flowers say it
best!
April 26
Food giveaway
GROVER HILL – The Mt. Zion United
Methodist Church will be having a food and
miscellaneous giveaway from 9-11 a.m. Sat-
urday, April 26, at the church fellowship hall.
The church is located on Road 151, outside of
Grover Hill. Everyone is welcome.
April 27-30
Revival services
OAKWOOD – Steve and Martha Williams
will be holding spring revival services at the
Auglaize Chapel Church of God from April
27-30.
Rev. Williams is the pastor of the First
Church of God in Bowen, Ky. He has served
in the ministry for over 30 years as a pastor,
evangelist and chaplain.
Sunday services will be held at 9 a.m. and 6
p.m. and Monday-Wednesday services at 7
p.m.
The church is located at 22652 CR 60, Oak-
wood.
May 1
National Day of Prayer
observance
OAKWOOD – Oakwood area churches will
be observing National Day of Prayer at noon on
May 1, at the town hall in Oakwood. This year’s
theme is “One Voice United in Prayer.”
Pastors who will be taking part are Pastor Stan
Hamon from Auglaize Chapel Church of God,
Pastor Eric Dailey, Twin Oaks UMC, Pastor
Justin Sterrett, Mandale Chruch of Christ in
Christian Union, Pastor Joe Fifer of Junction
Bible Christian, Pastor Rick Noggle of North
Creek UMC, Pastor Eileen Kochensparger from
Melrose UMC, Mayor Bud Henke of Oakwood,,
Gary Frederick of Oakwood, Amber Brown,
Oakwood, State Representative Tony Burkley,
Paulding, and Oakwood Elementary second
grade students.
Prayers will be given for agriculture, schools,
state and national leaders, military, freedom, first
responders, local and community leaders, home
and families, churches, and the medical field.
Please bring a chair for your convenience dur-
ing the service. For any further information call
419-399-5818.
“Church Corner” listings are free. If your
church is having any special services or pro-
grams, please call the Paulding County Progress
at 419-399-4015 or email us your information
at progress@progressnewspaper.org.
Museum to celebrate
the arts and artists
of Paulding County
PAULDING – The John Paulding Historical Society has
many works-of-art created by past and present artists from
Paulding County.
An exhibit, “Celebrating the Arts and Artists of Paulding
County,” featuring oil, acrylic and watercolor paintings, will
be held from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, May 17.
The show is open to all Paulding County artists. Artists are
invited to enter one of their paintings by May 6 to the John
Paulding Historical Society museum located at 600 Fairground
Drive.
A relative or friend of a deceased Paulding County artist may
also enter a painting.
Paintings may be brought to the museum on Tuesdays, 10
a.m.-4 p.m. with a brief biography of the artist. Tuesday, May
6, is the deadline to submit paintings.
For more information call 4199-399-8218, 419-594-3659 or
e-mail JPHS45879@yahoo.com.
4A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 23, 2014
Property
Transfers
Common Pleas
FORUM Reader’s Opinion
Express your opinion
The Paulding County Progress provides
a public forum through “FORUM Reader
Opinion” Letters to the Editor for area res-
idents to express their opinions and ex-
change ideas on any topic of public
interest.
All letters submitted are subject to the
Publisher’s approval, and MUST include an
original signature and daytime telephone
number for verification. We won’t print un-
signed letters.
Letters should be brief and concise.
Letters must also conform to libel law and
be in good taste. Please limit letters to no
more than 500 words. We reserve the right
to edit and to correct grammatical errors.
We also reserve the right to verify state-
ments or facts presented in the letters.
The opinions stated are those of the
writer, and do not necessarily reflect that
of the newspaper.
Where to write: Letters to the Editor,
Paulding County Progress, P.O. Box 180,
Paulding OH 45879; or drop them off at
the office, 113 S. Williams St. The deadline
is noon Thursday the week prior to publi-
cation.
Kudos to
hospital
volunteers
Dear Editor,
Paulding County has a
hospital that we can be very
proud of. It takes commit-
ment, by not only the em-
ployees, but the volunteers
who help to keep the hospi-
tal a vibrant part of our com-
munity.
One of those volunteer
groups is the hospital auxil-
iary. At the beginning of the
year we donated $6,000 in
support of the Stroke Care
Now program that is a life
saving procedure to anyone
Weather report weekly summary as recorded at Paulding Village’s water treatment plant
Observations recorded for the 24 hours ending at 7:30 a.m. on the morning of:
PRECIPITATION
24-HOUR AMOUNTS Snow/Ice on
DATE HIGH LOW Rain-Melted snow Snow-Ice the ground
April 15 65 28 0.24” 1.8” 2”
April 16 35 23 -0- -0- -0-
April 17 47 25 -0- -0- -0-
April 18 68 30 -0- -0- -0-
April 19 69 37 -0- -0- -0-
April 20 60 36 -0- -0- -0-
April 21 75 36 -0- -0- -0-
County Court
who is having a stroke and
can get help within a mini-
mum amount of time.
We have seen this to be a
successful venture for resi-
dents of Paulding County,
since its inception into the
hospital program.
We can make this dona-
tion, because of your support
to the auxiliary programs
and fund raisers. We have a
lovely gift shop where you
can buy some beautiful gifts.
Hours are 9 a.m.- 4 p.m.
Monday -Friday and is oper-
ated by auxiliary volunteers.
Throughout the year we
have a variety of vendors
come in. We thank you for
your support.
We are now taking orders
for geraniums and hanging
baskets. This is our third
year and the flowers have al-
ways been beautiful. Stop in
at the gift shop or ask any
member for an order blank,
You won’t be disappointed.
Geraniums are $3 for a 4-
inch pot and hanging bas-
kets, including Boston ferns,
are $15 each. Orders can be
taken until April 27 with de-
livery on May 8 at the hospi-
tal parking area.
A special thank you goes
to the hospital employees for
the faithfulness of their sup-
port of our vendors.
Along with the auxiliary,
we are complimented by the
Bargain Bin, located on
West Perry. Hours are Friday
9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturday 9
a.m.-noon. If you want a
bargain and some very nice
clothes, bedding or miscella-
neous, stop in an see what
we have to offer at a small
cost.
We have beautiful wed-
ding dresses that have been
donated to us. Save your
money on a dress and put it
towards a fabulous honey-
moon or down payment on a
house.
Bargain Bin proceeds ben-
efit the physical therapy de-
partment at the hospital. If
you have had rehab, you
have used something that we
have helped to purchase. I
can attest to using the equip-
ment. We are so blessed to
have this as an added benefit
to our hospital.
Behind the scenes are the
sewing ladies who help in a
variety of ways with the
linens and gowns.
And, we can’t forget those
who fill in at the greeters
desk on a daily basis.
All of these members are
volunteers. We enjoy what
we do and are blessed.
New members are always
welcome. Rhonda Smalley
is the president of the Bar-
gain Bin and I am president
of the auxiliary.
Give us a call if you
would like to help in any
way. Membership to both is
$3 year each. We hope you
will join us.
Eileen Kochensparger
Paulding
Letters about election issues,
candidates due by April 24
Letters to the Editor about issues and candidates on the May
6 Primary Election ballot must arrive at the Paulding County
Progress by Thursday, April 24, to be considered for publica-
tion.
Letters and other news items about ballot issues will follow
the same guidelines that are applied to other letters:
• Be brief as possible; please limit to no more than 500
words.
• Include your name, address and a daytime phone number.
• Original signatures are required; anonymous letters won’t
be published.
• We reserve the right to edit and to correct grammatical er-
rors. We also reserve the right to verify statements or facts pre-
sented in the letters.
Items will be published until our April 30 edition.
For more information, contact the Progress news department
at 419-399-4015.
The term “et al.” refers to and oth-
ers; “et vir.,” and husband; “et ux.,”
and wife.
Blue Creek Township
William A. Carpenter, et al.
to Autumn Ridge Farms LLC;
Sec. 31, 0.77 acre. Sheriff’s
deed.
Brown Township
Evalena M. Fitzwater Life
Estate to Evalena M. Fitzwater
Life Estate et al.; Lots 3 and 4,
Rickner’s Second Subdivision,
0.56 acres and Sec. 26, 2.2
acres. Warranty deed.
Allison Elliot et al. to J. Kirk
Roughton and Teresa M.
Roughton; Sec. 20, 1.59 acres.
Warranty deed.
Cooper Farms Inc. to
Heather D. Cooper; Sec. 15,
5.677 acres. Warranty deed.
Crane Township
Wayne L. Zielke Life Estate
et al. to Jerry Lynn Zielke et al.;
Sec. 7, 1.548 acres. Affidavit.
Wayne L. Zielke, dec. to
Mary Jane Zielke; Sec. 7, 3.01
acres. Affidavit.
Antwerp Village
Gretchen L. and Tracey Re-
liford to Kandise Englen; Lot
17, Block C, 0.152 acres. War-
ranty deed.
Grover Hill Village
Virgil C. and Toni L. Rogers
by Sheriff to B.C. Ross
Rentals; Lot 4 and Outlot 47,
0.312 acre. Sheriff’s deed.
Melrose Village
Johnnie A. and Robin L. Ad-
kins to London E. Landers;
Lots 212 and 213, Original
Plat, 0.34 acre. Warranty deed.
Paulding Village
Homestead Acres Inc. to
Todd Dangler and Linda
Eakins; Lot 90, Country Side
Estates Phase II, 0.234 acre.
Warranty deed.
Poll results
Results from last week’s poll question on our web site
www.progressnewspaper.org: “Should the county emergency
management agency office duties be a separate office?”
• 57.9% – Independent office governed by a board
• 23.7% – Under county commissioners’ office
• 10.5% – Under sheriff’s office
• 7.9% – Don’t know
Visit our web site and cast your vote in this week’s poll ques-
tion.
Civil Docket:
Atlantic Credit and Financial Inc.,
Roanoke, Va. vs. Joseph P. Kirkham, Cecil.
Money only, satisfied.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance vs.
Angel M. Slawson, Payne and Jeremy J.
Slawson, Payne. Money only, satisfied.
The Farmers and Merchants State Bank,
Archbold vs. Bradley Proxmire, Cecil and
Bobette Proxmire, Cecil. Money only, sat-
isfied.
William S. Bricker DDS Inc., Antwerp
vs. Mary Echols, Paulding. Small claims,
dismissed.
Sarah J. Mowery DDS Inc., Antwerp vs.
James Hill, Scott and Leann L. Hill, Scott.
Other action, satisfied.
Sarah J. Mowery DDS Inc., Antwerp vs.
Melissa Boger, Antwerp. Small claims, sat-
isfied.
William S. Bricker DDS Inc., Antwerp
vs. Carl McStoots, Oakwood. Small claims,
judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of
$772.
Midland Funding LLC, San Diego vs.
Regina M. Reno, Melrose. Other action,
judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of
$2,558.77.
William S. Bricker DDS Inc., Antwerp
vs. Vicki Long, Payne. Small claims, dis-
missed.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance vs. Re-
becca M. Hermiller, Paulding and Earl R.
Hermiller, Grover Hill. Small claims, satis-
fied.
Larry Jackson, Paulding vs. Angela Jack-
son, Defiance. Evictions, dismissed.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance vs.
Alyse Bidlack, Paulding. Small claims,
judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of
$1,803.60.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance vs.
Terry E. Hasch, Paulding. Small claims,
judgment for the plaintiff in the sum of
$2,574.32.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance vs Ann
M. Shrader, Oakwood. Small claims, judg-
ment for the plaintiff in the sum of $712.02.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance vs.
Christina G. Bok, Oakwood. Small claims,
dismissed.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance vs.
Brandon J. Adkins, Oakwood. Small
claims, judgment for the plaintiff in the sum
of $523.34.
Credit Adjustments Inc., Defiance vs.
James D. Hemenway, Grover Hill. Small
claims, judgment for the plaintiff in the sum
of $1,263.82.
Mark Marenberg, Paulding vs. Rob
Major, Paulding. Evictions, dismissed.
Mark Marenberg, Paulding vs. Rob
Major, dba MMA Gym, Paulding and
MMA Gym, Paulding. Evictions, dis-
missed.
Integrity Ford, Paulding vs. Tracy
Bringer, Payne. Small claims, dismissed.
Garbani LLC, Defiance vs. Jeremy Har-
ris, Defiance. Evictions, dismissed.
Criminal Docket:
Scott A. Turner, Payne, disorderly con-
duct; $250 fine, $211 costs, 40 hours com-
munity service, no unlawful contact with
victim, complete online anger management
course, May 14 jury trial vacated.
Kandi M. Snyder, Oakwood, domestic
violence; $100 fine, $145 costs, one day jail
with 179 suspended; probation ordered, no
unlawful contact with victims, 20 hours
community service, submit to mental health
evaluation and complete counseling.
Kandi M. Snyder, Oakwood, domestic
violence; dismissed per State.
Holly L. Starbuck, New Bavaria, confine
dog; $100 fine suspended provided restitu-
tion of $49 is paid, $126.73 costs, pay all by
July 25 or turned in for collection.
Holly L. Starbuck, New Bavaria, confine
dog; $100 fine suspended if restitution is
paid.
Holly L. Starbuck, New Bavaria, failure
to register dog; dismissed per State.
Jayson Dangler, Paulding, confinement
of dog; $25 fine, $77 costs.
Douglas J. Bauer, Payne, confine dog;
dismissed per state without prejudice, costs
waived.
Douglas J. Bauer, Payne, failure to regis-
ter dog; dismissed per State without preju-
dice, costs waived.
Douglas J. Bauer, Payne, confine dog;
$25 fine, $98 costs.
Douglas J. Bauer, Payne, two counts fail-
ure to register dog; $25 fine suspended for
each because defendant showed proof of
registration.
Brandon L. Berridge, Oakwood, ob-
structing official business; $100 fine, $173
costs, two days jail with 88 suspended; pay
for stay in jail, probation ordered, 20 hours
community service, complete Ridge Proj-
ect, have no contact with victim or resi-
dence, work with APA.
Brandon L. Berridge, Oakwood, criminal
damage; dismissed per State.
Nicole M. Fisher, Oakwood, complicity;
dismissed.
Nicole M. Fisher, Oakwood, obstructing
official business; $100 fine, $221 costs, two
days jail with 88 suspended; pay for stay in
jail, repay court appointed counsel, com-
plete Ridge Project, 20 hours community
service, no contact with victim, probation
ordered.
Zacharie J. Ball, Melrose, burglary; de-
fendant indicted, matter bound over to
Common Pleas Court.
Traffic Docket:
Domanic J. Herge, Continental, stop sign;
$53 fine, $77 costs, pay all by April 25 or
sent for collection.
Joshua W. Hart, Bryan, 88/65 speed; $75
fine, $87 costs, pay all by April 25 or sent
for collection.
Sonny J. Windhorst, Plymouth, Ind., fail-
ure to control; $68 fine, $85 costs.
Alan Dale Spencer, Williston, N.D.,
79/65 speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Cody Smith, Hamilton, Ont., 77/65
speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Jason E. Streicher, Fishers, Ind., 82/65
speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Paul T. Groat, Toledo, 78/65 speed; $33
fine, $80 costs.
Quamia L. Carter, Fort Wayne, 100/65
speed; $93 fine, $77 costs.
Christopher I. Trojniak, White Lake,
Mich., 82/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Ali A. Atwi, Dearborn, Mich., 92/65
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Fei Huang, Indianapolis, 84/65 speed;
$43 fine, $80 costs.
Jason N. Holifield, Defiance, 85/65
speed; $63 fine, $80 costs.
Arun Gupta, Monroe, Mich., 84/65
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Jason Wayne Lee, Antwerp, stop sign;
$53 fine, $82 costs.
George E. Riley, Peoria, Ill., failure to
control; $68 fine, $85 costs.
Aoreal G. Payton, Fort Wayne, driving
without license; dismissed at State’s request.
Aoreal G. Payton, Fort Wayne, 84/65
speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Andrew G. Dismore, Fishers, Ind., 78/65
speed; $33 fine, $82 costs.
Stanley G. Brenneman, Elida, 67/55
speed; $50 fine, $121.48 costs, pay all
within 30 days.
Michael P. Piggins, Douglas, Mich.,
78/65 speed; $33 fine, $85 costs.
Bradley J. Weidenhamer, Oakwood, loud
exhaust; found not guilty.
Jeff C. Hutton, Willoughby Hills, 80/65
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Arumugam Thirunavukkarasu, Missis-
sauga, Ont., seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs.
Moises D. Merida, Houston, 80/65 speed;
$43 fine, $77 costs.
David R. Simmons, Scarbough, Ont.,
highway use tax; $68 fine, $77 costs.
Sean M. Tucker, Toledo, 77/65 speed;
$33 fine, $77 costs.
Gligorevic Dalibor, Milwaukee, seat belt;
$30 fine, $50 costs.
Gloria Ornelas Garcia, Anderson, Ind.,
81/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Robert A. Coker, Payne, seat belt; $30
fine, $50 costs.
Vlademar B. Dearaujo, Harrow, Ont.,
highway use tax; $68 fine, $80 costs.
Dominique M. Blake, Indianapolis, 77/65
speed; $33 fine, $85 costs.
Justis Richard Mendez, Brooklyn, Ohio,
76/65 speed; $33 fine, $85 costs.
James Caleb Good, Port Clinton, 77/65
speed; $33 fine, $85 costs.
Heidi M. Schlatter, Defiance, 65/55
speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Pamela S. Feasby, Antwerp, failure to
control; $68 fine, $77 costs.
Lisa L. Clark, Portland, Ind., 75/65 speed;
$33 fine, $80 costs.
Douglas G. Duke, Toledo, 78/65 speed;
$33 fine, $80 costs.
Christian Y. Mora, Cincinnati, 92/65
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Debra A. Ecenbarger, E. Stroudsburg,
Pa., 82/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Johnathan J. Font, Payne, seat belt; $30
fine, $47 costs.
Cory J. Zalesak, Rossford, 79/65 speed;
$33 fine, $80 costs.
Emily Thielbar, Grover Hill, failure to
control; $68 fine, $77 costs.
Kevin B. Homier, Continental, 65/55
speed; $48 fine, $77 costs.
Matthew A. Straley, Paulding, 79/65
speed; $33 fine, $82 costs.
Braxton Lewis Smith, Columbia City,
Ind., seat belt; $30 fine, $52 costs.
Timothy A. Dersch, Blacklick, highway
use tax; $68 fine, $85 costs.
Daniel J. Gordon, Convoy, 64/55 speed;
$120 fine, $95 costs.
Rogelio P. Maldonado, Grandview, Mo.,
seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs.
Dakota J. Talbott, Paulding, 77/55 speed;
$43 fine, $82 costs.
Robert A. Shapiro, West Bloomfield,
Mich., 84/65 speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Juris Pagrabs, Novi, Mich., 79/65 speed;
$63 fine, $80 costs.
Debra L. Howell, Paulding, 85/65 speed;
$250 fine, $87 costs, pay $75 monthly, pay
all by Aug. 29 or sent for collection.
Mallory B. Anderson, Maricopa, Ariz.,
seat belt; $30 fine, $47 costs.
Kelly Lee Reigle, Ohio City, 68/55 speed;
$48 fine, $80 costs.
Ariana D. Scoggins, New York, N.Y.,
88/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
John R. Roddy, Payne, seat belt; $30 fine,
$50 costs.
Kirk Lee Forbis, Vandalia, Ill., 75/65
speed; $33 fine, $80 costs.
Matthew L. Salinas, Paulding, seat belt;
$30 fine, $47 costs.
Damien R. Cross, Fort Wayne, 86/65
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Sarah A. Haidar-Ahmad, Dearborn
Heights, Mich., following close; $53 fine,
$80 costs.
Ryan C. Lockett, Ypsilanti, Mich., 82/65
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Devon A. Richardson, Defiance, 83/65
speed; $63 fine, $80 costs.
Stephen D. Shrader, Aston, Pa., 82/65
speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Civil Docket
The term “et al.” refers to and others; “et vir.,” and husband; “et ux.,” and
wife.
Dennis D. Stark, Defiance vs. Jerry Howard, Oakwood and
Darlene Howard, Oakwood and Pontus Investment III, LLC,
Dover, Del. and Bank of New York, Plano, Texas and Paulding
County Treasurer, Paulding. Foreclosures.
Kyle Tromblay, Paulding vs. Rachelle Tromblay, Oakwood.
Divorce.
Capital One Bank (USA) N.A., Richmond, Va. vs. Mary A.
Tadsen, aka Moore, aka Lamb, Antwerp. Money only.
In the matter of: Travis B. Young, Grover Hill and Kati L.
Young, Defiance. Dissolution of marriage.
In the matter of: Patrick H. Mossburg, Stryker and Crystal A.
Mossburg, Bryan. Dissolution of marriage.
The Antwerp Exchange Bank Company, Antwerp vs. Mark
A. Marenberg, Antwerp and Village Square Inc., dba Village
Apothecary, Antwerp and Chun Marenberg, Antwerp and Ying
Ma, Liao Ning Province, China and Michael K. Renno,
Antwerp and Belinda J. Renno, Antwerp and Invacare Corpo-
ration, Elyria and Paulding County Treasurer, Paulding. Fore-
closures.
Marriage Licenses
Kelly Lynn Craig, 46, of Antwerp, truck driver and Lisa Ann
Blankenship, 45, Antwerp, dispatcher. Parents are Donald
Craig and Sharon Scott; and William Kolb and Marsha Shirley.
Criminal Docket
Abagail L. Baumle, 22, of Paulding, had a bench trial to the
Court on April 10. The Court found her guilty of theft (F5) be-
yond a reasonable doubt and scheduled her sentencing for June
2.
Matthew H. Scott, 42, of Defiance, was scheduled for a sta-
tus conference April 14 regarding his indictment alleging theft
(F5). He was then scheduled for a pretrial conference on May
5.
Nichole V. Shugars, 25, of Antwerp, was in Court for a
change of plea recently. She entered a guilty plea to an
amended charge of attempted complicity to unlawful sexual
conduct with a minor (F5). She will be sentenced May 19.
Eradio Arreola Ayala, 23, of Paulding had charges of aggra-
vated vehicular assault (F3) and failing to stop after an accident
(F5) dismissed without prejudice upon a motion of the State.
Costs were waived. The Ohio State Highway Patrol learned a
second individual was in the vehicle at the time of the offense.
That subject could not be located and their involvement is un-
known.
Jonathan L. Wells, 40, Hicksville, has been scheduled for a
hearing on a motion to suppress evidence in his case involving
illegal manufacture of drugs (F2) and possession of chemicals
for the manufacture of drugs (F3). It will be May 1.
Amber Clevinger, 26, of Antwerp, had a pretrial conference
set for her illegal manufacture of drugs (F2) case. It will be
May 5.
Johnathan Coyne, 26, of Van Wert, was arraigned for two
counts nonsupport of dependents (F5) recently. At that time not
guilty pleas were entered. He waived extradition and was re-
leased on an own recognizance bond on the conditions that he
have no arrests, make support payment and report immediately
to Paulding County Child Support Enforcement Agency and
that he maintain his address in Van Wert with a parent.
Jason A. Brown, 35, of Oakwood, had a warrant on indict-
ment issued April 15 when deputies were unable to serve him
a summons on indictment. He was recently indicted for theft
(F5).
United Way
trustees to meet
PAULDING – The United
Way of Paulding County
trustees will hold its annual
meeting at 5:30 p.m. Mon-
day, April 28, at 101 E.
Perry St. in Paulding. The
regular monthly meeting
will follow.
For the Record
It is the policy of the
Paulding County Progress to
publish public records as they
are reported or released by
various agencies. Names ap-
pearing in “For the Record”
are published without excep-
tion, to preserve the fairness
and impartiality of the
Progress and as a news serv-
ice to our readers.
In good times business peo-
ple want to advertise. In bad
times they have to. Learn how
your community newspaper can
help you – call the Progress
today at 419-399-4015.
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 5A
Commissioners’ Journal
Sheriff’s Report
Police Report
n COMMON PLEAS
Continued from Page 4A
INCIDENT REPORTS
Thursday, April 10
12:51 a.m. A North Williams Street busi-
ness caught a man going through their
dumpster with a rake looking for canned
goods. The subject was warned.
Friday, April 11
3 p.m. Possible theft of village utilities is
under investigation on Emerald Road.
Saturday, April 12
12:05 a.m. Suspicious subject was seen
leaving Bryan’s Alley.
12:40 a.m. Missing juvenile was reported
from East Baldwin Avenue. He was located
the next day and returned to a parent.
1:10 a.m. Noise complaint was lodged
from Bryan’s Alley. The topic was ad-
dressed with a business owner.
8 a.m. A caller reported seeing a person
walking behind houses along West Harrison
after parking a bike.
8:14 a.m. Report of someone using an-
other’s dumpster was investigated and the
subject was warned.
9 a.m. Tire was slashed on South Grant
Street. Case is under investigation.
10:42 a.m. A business was broken into on
Elm Street. Investigation revealed entry was
gained through a window. Matter remains
under investigation.
5:27 p.m. Officers looked into a 911
hangup from Partridge Place. It was deemed
unfounded.
10:18 p.m. Threats by phone were re-
ported from North Main Street.
11:20 p.m. Officers assisted sheriff’s
deputies with a vehicle search on Copeland
Street.
Sunday, April 13
4 a.m. Officers assisted Ohio State High-
way Patrol Post 81 as a witness.
7:10 a.m. A female on Main Street admit-
ted to keying a truck. She agreed to pay the
damages.
9:15 a.m. Police were called to West Car-
oline Street where an unwanted subject was
trespassing in a home. He injured himself
while fleeing and officers were later called
to Paulding County Hospital ER regarding
the subject.
5:02 p.m. Hit-skip accident in the lot of a
North Williams Street business was docu-
mented.
10:35 p.m. Report of suspicious activity
on West Wall Street ended up being a family
argument.
10:52 p.m. Officers were called to North
Cherry Street where subjects were seen in
masks hiding in bushes and behind vehicles.
Two males were located. A report was sent
to the prosecutor’s office.
Monday, April 14
1 a.m. A man was arrested on West Bald-
win Avenue for criminal damaging.
2:40 a.m. Officers were called to North
Williams Street for neighbor problems.
4 a.m. The same male was arrested on
West Baldwin Street for domestic violence.
He was taken to Paulding County Jail and
released to the corrections officer.
4:38 a.m. Theft of a riding mower valued
between $1,500 and $2,000 was investi-
gated on West Jackson Street.
9:41 a.m. An alarm sounded at a West
Perry Street business. All was found secure.
5:50 p.m. Officers served paperwork on
East Perry Street from the Probate Court.
8:48 p.m. A 911 hangup on North Dix
Street was handled and deemed unfounded.
8:56 p.m. A North Williams Street busi-
ness alarm sounded. The building was
found secure.
Tuesday, April 15
2:30 p.m. A rural Paulding man told offi-
cers he had been assaulted by a female in
the village the previous evening at Caroline
and Dix streets.
3:03 p.m. Officers were called to West
Baldwin Street for an unwanted person
complaint. The subject was gone when they
arrived.
3:10 p.m. Police were called to a West
Perry Street business to handle an unwanted
person complaint. The man was gone when
they arrived, but he was located nearby and
warned.
4 p.m. Missing adult was the call from
North Walnut Street. An out-of-town family
member called later to say the man was fine.
5:10 p.m. Violation of a police order to
stay off property was handled at a West
Perry Street business. A man was told to
leave or be arrested. He complied.
6:44 p.m. Violation of a no contact order
was noted on West Caroline Street. A report
was sent to the prosecutor’s office.
Wednesday, April 16
3:52 p.m. Damage to a car was investi-
gated on South Summit Street. Scratches that
seemed of a deliberate nature were noted.
Thursday, April 17
1:25 a.m. Police arrested a man on West
Caroline Street for domestic violence and
burglary. He was taken to Paulding County
Jail and released to the corrections officer.
2:38 p.m. Unwanted person complaint
came in from East Perry Street.
3:15 p.m. Juvenile matters were handled
on West Perry Street.
7:38 p.m. Harassment by calls and text
were reported by a North Cherry Street res-
ident.
Friday, April 18
3:41 a.m. Gun shots were heard to the
north of a North Dix Street location. Officers
found nothing amiss.
Robert A. Storms II, West Lafayette, Ind., seat belt; $30 fine, $50
costs.
Cody M. Grudowski, Paulding, driving under FRA suspension;
$50 fine, $87 costs, provide proof of financial responsibility, pay
all by June 27 or sent for collection.
Chase A. McNall, Topeka, Ind., 81/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Ariel Alyssa Chandler, Continental, left of center; $53 fine, $77
costs.
Scott A. Strahley, Paulding, failure to yield right of way; $53 fine,
$77 costs.
Scott M. Williams, Defiance, 72/55 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Helen Noonan Bauer, Defiance, 66/55 speed; $33 fine, $77 costs.
Michael A. Rio, Brent wood, N.Y., driving under suspension;
$100 with $50 suspended, $87 costs, both taken from bond; proof
of financial responsibility provided, license card returned to defen-
dant in open court.
Michael A. Rio, Brent wood, N.Y., 87/65 speed; $43 fine, taken
from bond.
Ruth K. Eschbach, Payne, failure to yield right of way; $53 fine,
$77 costs.
Gregory G. Pappas, Homer Glen, Ill., 83/65 speed; $43 fine, $85
costs.
Hiroki Felipe Saotome, Ann Arbor, Mich., 78/65 speed; $33 fine,
$77 costs.
Joshua M. Fields, Westland, Mich., no brake lights, $68 fine, $77
costs.
Juan Jose Fabregas, Miami, Fla., 80/65 speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Kaushik Shankar, Las Vegas, 87/65 speed; $43 fine, $77 costs.
Hytiki F. Rodgers, Louisville, 82/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Robin P. Medeiros, Hamilton, Ont., 87/65 speed; $43 fine, $77
costs.
Tyler C. Schultz, Whitehouse, 84/65 speed; $43 fine, $80 costs.
Courtney J. Gianas, Fairview Park, 79/65 speed; $33 fine, $80
costs.
ACCIDENTS:
Thursday, April 10
9:51 a.m. Ruth K. Eschbach, 62, of
Payne, was cited for failure to yield at
an intersection following a two-vehicle
crash at Oak and Main streets in Payne.
She was traveling east on Oak in a
2012 Chevy Cruz when reports say she
failed to yield right of way at Main and
struck a northbound 2008 Mercury
Sable driven by Arlen G. Burk, 82, of
Payne. Minor damage was inflicted on
each vehicle. Neither driver was hurt.
INCIDENTS:
Thursday, April 10
8:05 a.m. Deputies assisted Paulding
Police on Road 162.
8:47 a.m. An unwanted person
pounding on a door along Ohio 49 in
Harrison Township was investigated.
9:37 a.m. Dog bite in Oakwood was
handled.
10:19 a.m. K-9 unit was deployed at
an undisclosed location.
10:21 a.m. K-9 unit was deployed at
a second undisclosed location.
12:58 p.m. K-9 unit deployed at Fort
Jennings High School.
2:48 p.m. Telephone harassment
was looked into on Road 178 in
Auglaize Township.
3:23 p.m. Deputies made a transfer
with Defiance County deputies at Ohio
49 at Road 8 in Carryall Township.
3:59 p.m. Littering complaint was
lodged from Road 151 at Ohio 613 in
Melrose.
6:32 p.m. Suspicious vehicle was
seen at the ball park in Melrose.
8:54 p.m. Deputies were called to
Haviland for neighbor problems in-
volving loud music.
10:11 p.m. A 91l hang-up investiga-
tion was completed in Paulding.
Friday, April 11
5:44 a.m. Deputies documented a
car/deer collision on Road 73 in Crane
Township.
7:56 a.m. Theft of gas from a garage
on Road 104 in Brown Township was
investigated.
2:02 p.m. A car/deer crash on Road
165 in Washington Township earlier in
the day was reported.
2:42 p.m. Telephone harassment
was looked into on Ohio 111 in
Auglaize Township.
2:43 p.m. Dog complaint was han-
dled on Rita Street in Paulding.
6:21 p.m. Suspicious person was
seen along Road 1021 in Auglaize
Township.
9:28 p.m. Neighbor problems on
Road 122 in Brown Township were in-
vestigated.
Saturday, April 12
8:21 a.m. Menacing was investi-
gated on Road 55 in Benton Township.
8:38 a.m. Dog complaint was han-
dled on Road 123 in Emerald Town-
ship.
9:25 a.m. A dog complaint was
looked into at US 24 and Ohio 49 in
Carryall Township.
10:26 a.m. A Carryall Township res-
ident of Road 23 called in a dog com-
plaint.
10:35 a.m. Kids throwing rocks at
cars along Road 204 in Carryall Town-
ship was addressed.
10:35 a.m. Dog complaint was han-
dled on Road 10 in Auglaize Town-
ship.
12:03 p.m. A three-wheeler and a
mini bike were on the roads at Road
1021 in Auglaize Township.
2:03 p.m. Telephone harassment
was investigated on Road 171 in
Auglaize Township.
2:22 p.m. Deputies delivered a mes-
sage for Defiance County Sheriff’s of-
fice on Road 31 in Carryall Township.
2:39 p.m. Two Auglaize fire units
and the Oakwood EMS were on the
scene of a brush fire on Road 153 in
Auglaize Township for less than 10
minutes.
3:15 p.m. A Benton Township resi-
dent of Ohio 500 reported hearing
about 30 gunshots in the area.
3:36 p.m. Dog complaint was han-
dled on Road 171 in Auglaize Town-
ship.
8:20 p.m. Deputies responded to an
alarm at a business on Ohio 114 in
Latty Township. While on the way,
they were told to disregard.
9:27 p.m. Deputies assisted P.O.
Gonzales on East Caroline Street in
Paulding.
11:19 p.m. A deputy advised of
drugs in Paulding Village.
Sunday, April 13
9:23 a.m. Deputies assisted another
department on West Baldwin Avenue
in Paulding.
10:20 a.m. A subject inflicting dam-
age to a truck was reported in Grover
Hill.
11:14 a.m. Vandalism to the Oak-
wood ball field was investigated.
1:03 p.m. Trespassing complaint
came in from Cecil.
1:09 p.m. Two Antwerp fire units
and the EMS responded to a grass fire
near the intersection of Roads 2 and
230 in Carryall Township. They were
on the scene less than 10 minutes.
5:25 p.m. A Cecil resident com-
plained of trespassing.
6:34 p.m. Loud music was the com-
plaint on East Merrin Street in Payne.
7:02 p.m. Neighbor problems in-
volving threats were reported from
South Laura Street in Payne.
8:02 p.m. Dog complaint was
lodged from Road 138 in Brown
Township.
9:22 p.m. Deputies arrested a subject
on US 24 in Crane Township.
10:52 p.m. Deputies assisted the
Paulding police on North Cherry Street
with a complaint of two males in white
masks.
10:56 p.m. Juvenile matter was han-
dled on Ohio 637 in Auglaize Town-
ship.
Monday, April 14
4:07 a.m. Deputies assisted Paulding
police on West Baldwin Street where a
subject threatened another before flee-
ing on foot.
7:09 a.m. Dog complaint was han-
dled on Road 107 in Paulding Town-
ship.
7:14 a.m. A Paulding Township res-
ident of Road 162 lodged a dog com-
plaint.
7:35 a.m. Report of a dog killing
chickens on Road 31 in Carryall Town-
ship was investigated.
1:08 p.m. Breaking and entering of
an unoccupied house on Road 263 in
Brown Township was looked into.
5:47 p.m. Deputies delivered a mes-
sage for Hicksville Police Department
on Road 230 in Crane Township.
5:46 p.m. A Crane Township resi-
dent of Road 192 told deputies their
bank card information had been stolen.
Tuesday, April 15
3:30 p.m. K-9 deployment occurred
on US 127 in Blue Creek Township.
4:03 p.m. Juvenile problem in Mel-
rose was handled.
6:43 p.m. Consent search was con-
ducted on Road 12 in Blue Creek
Township.
Wednesday, April 16
1:03 a.m. A car/deer crash on Ohio
49 north of Road 220 in Carryall
Township was documented.
3:30 a.m. Report of an unresponsive
female came in from Road 72 in Blue
Creek Township.
6:36 a.m. A dog complaint was
made from Road 162 in Paulding
Township.
8:25 a.m. Suspicious male was seen
walking on Ohio 613 in Benton Town-
ship.
11:06 a.m. Telephone harassment
complaint was lodged from Road 163
in Auglaize Township.
11:19 a.m. A Grover Hill resident
told deputies about a telephone scam
claiming a grandchild in New York
was in jail and needed money. The
grandchild was in the room when the
call came in.
11:44 a.m. Harassment by text was
reported from US 127 in Crane Town-
ship.
3:18 p.m. Dog complaint was
handled on South Laura Street in
Payne.
7:09 p.m. K-9 unit was deployed
on Road 153 south of Road 218 in
Auglaize Township.
9:45 p.m. Suspicious vehicle was
seen in a lot on Road 138 in Jackson
Township.
11:32 p.m. Windows were broken
out of the back of a house on Road
122 in Brown Township.
Thursday, April 17
1:25 a.m. A male came through a
window on West Caroline Street
then allegedly assaulted a female
before fleeing through the window.
Commissioners’ Journal March 31,
2014
This 31st day of March, 2014, the
Board of County Commissioners met in
regular session with the following mem-
bers present: Tony Zartman, Fred Pieper
and Nola Ginter, Clerk. Absent: Roy
Klopfenstein
MEETING NOTES OF APPOINT-
MENTS
Claudia Fickel, County Auditor, re-
ported she had attended a meeting re-
cently where HB 337 was discussed.
HB 337 addresses the possibility of cre-
ating a 5% reserve for County’s General
Funds. Ms. Fickel will gather more in-
formation and report on her findings at
a later date.
Brenda Crawford, Board of Elec-
tions, announced that absentee voting
hours begin on April 1. The Ohio Sec-
retary of State has mandated that all
Boards of Elections have uniform ab-
sentee voting hours from 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Lunch breaks will need to be alternated
to allow for one Republican and one
Democrat to be in the office at all times
to assist voters if necessary. Ms. Craw-
ford noted there will be two additional
hours each day the office will need to be
staffed. The Secretary of State has also
directed the Boards of Elections be open
the Saturday prior to election day. Ms.
Crawford indicated the scheduling of
workers will be challenging, especially
the last three weeks in April.
She also reported she is working on
the security plan directives from the
Secretary of State.
During a discussion about testing the
voting units, Ms. Crawford commented
it is best if the units can be tested at the
same time.
In other business, Ms. Crawford
(representing the Garden Club) indi-
cated she would be happy to assist with
a landscaping project on the courthouse
square.
Jerry Zielke, Paulding County Eco-
nomic Development, presented Revolv-
ing Loan Fund (RLF) paperwork for
signatures. The Economic Development
office will generate a letter to request the
issuance of a check.
Randy Shaffer, EMA director, met
with the Commissioners at their request.
Commissioner Zartman informed Mr.
Shaffer that he had communicated with
the other Commissioners regarding last
week’s meeting. He told Mr. Shaffer he
would have recommended, at the very
least, an administrative leave of absence.
Mr. Zartman added that he was very
upset with Mr. Shaffer verbalizing his
disagreement with the Commissioners’
decision to investigate an alternative
radio system and to apply for a change
in the frequency with the FCC.
Commissioner Zartman then pre-
sented Mr. Shaffer with completed dis-
ciplinary action paperwork for Mr.
Shaffer’s review and signature.
Mr. Zartman then explained his stand
on the current radio system, comparing
it to the MARCS information provided
by the Motorola representative. Mr.
Shaffer voiced his concerns about the
expense of the radios, the user fee, and
the dollars the county already has in-
vested in the current system. Mr. Zart-
man assured Mr. Shaffer that there
would be no “forcing” county emer-
gency entities to switch over to the
MARCS system. The EMA tower can
still be utilized for those who chose not
to use the MARCS system.
Commissioner Zartman told Mr.
Shaffer the Sheriff’s Office is not satis-
fied with the current radio system, due
to dead spots and busy signals. The ul-
timate goal is to ensure the safety of the
Sheriff’s deputies and also the first re-
sponders.
Mr. Shaffer stated he would like to
be present at any emergency radio com-
munications meetings. Commissioner
Zartman related there are various de-
partment heads who refuse to attend
meetings if Mr. Shaffer is present, stat-
ing there is never any progress toward
solving the issues.
Mr. Shaffer agreed he needs to con-
centrate on trainings and meeting dead-
lines for paperwork and grant work. He
added the current radio system was
meant to communicate countywide and
is an interoperable system, designed for
complete interaction. Mr. Shaffer also
noted there are changes that could be
made to the current system to expand its
use. Mr. Shaffer agreed no changes
should be made if the Commissioners
are leaning towards the MARCS system
for the Sheriff’s Office.
Returning to the subject of the appli-
cation to the FCC to change frequency,
Commissioner Zartman commented it
was his understanding that WD Miller
of Lima Radio had made a telephone
call to the FCC, stating he was repre-
senting the Paulding County EMA. His
intent was to put a halt to the frequency
application process. Mr. Zartman once
again questioned Mr. Shaffer, asking if
he had suggested that Mr. Miller make
the phone call. Mr. Shaffer said he had
spoken to Mr. Miller, but denied asking
Mr. Miller to intervene in the Commis-
sioners’ application efforts.
Mr. Zartman then discussed the Jan-
uary 2012 journal pages on which Mr.
Shaffer was to secure signatures. There
is still a signature missing and Mr. Shaf-
fer stated he had tried to locate the offi-
cial for his signature, but was unable to
track him down.
Commissioner Zartman then ques-
tioned Mr. Shaffer about the request for
state reimbursement for the EMA, stat-
ing the last payment received was in Au-
gust of 2013. Mr. Shaffer claimed he has
been completing the paperwork on a
quarterly basis. Mr. Zartman requested
documentation of the requests for the
third and fourth quarters of 2013. The
Commissioners strongly suggested
monthly requests to keep the EMA fund
balance strong.
Commissioner Zartman asked Mr.
Shaffer the status of the FY 2011 SHSP
(State Homeland Security Program)
grant. Mr. Shaffer presented the grant
agreement and explained this grant is for
$20,820 and must be used by April 30,
2014. Mr. Shaffer would like to pur-
chase gas meters for fire departments
and EMA and presented an estimate
from IE Monitoring Instruments for the
purchase of nine meters.
Commissioner Zartman asked Mr.
Shaffer about the LEPC exercise which
is to be held at the Mercer Landmark fa-
cility in Payne. May 18 is the tentative
date. Mr. Shaffer reported he has been
trying to contact Ben Snyder (corporate
representative) to secure the date.
The final issue brought to Mr. Shaf-
fer’s attention was concerning a missing
gas receipt from Marathon. Mr. Shaffer
indicated he is trying to get a duplicate
receipt. Commissioner Zartman empha-
sized prioritization on Mr. Shaffer’s part.
He also strongly encouraged Mr. Shaf-
fer to follow through and keep closer
tabs on time lines for grants and train-
ing.
IN THE MATTER OF THE
BOARD OF COUNTY COMMIS-
SIONERS OF PAULDING
COUNTY, OHIO, SUPPORTING
STATE ISSUE 1, THE RENEWAL
OF THE STATE CAPITAL IM-
PROVEMENTS PROGRAM
Mr. Fred Pieper moved to adopt the
following resolution;
WHEREAS, Ohio local communi-
ties are in continuing need of support for
vital road, bridge, sewer, water and other
infrastructure projects; and
WHEREAS, Ohio has in place a
state program of support for local com-
munities which not only helps to fund
infrastructure projects, but also creates
large numbers of construction and allied
jobs; and
WHEREAS, the Ohio State Capital
Improvements Program has success-
fully provided support for more than
11,500 such projects and resulting job
creation since its inception in 1987; and
WHEREAS, Paulding County has
been able to complete 132 projects (total
assistance of $17,837,464) to the benefit
of Paulding County residents and its
economic climate; and
WHEREAS, Issue 1 on the May 6,
2014, statewide ballot provides Ohio
voters with the opportunity to renew the
program by authorizing issuance of
$1.875 billion in capital improvement
bonds; and
WHEREAS, no new taxes are re-
quired to fund repayment of the bonds;
now, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of
County Commissioners of Paulding
County, Ohio:
THAT, this Board of County Com-
missioners declares its support for State
Issue 1, and urges Ohio voters to cast
their votes in support of continuing the
infrastructure improvement and job cre-
ation Issue 1 will foster; and
THAT, this Board of County Com-
missioners hereby finds and determines
that all formal actions relative to the
adoption of this resolution were taken in
an open meeting of this Board; and that
all deliberations of this Board which re-
sulted in this formal action were taken in
meetings open to the public in full com-
pliance with applicable legal require-
ments, including ORC 121.22.
Commissioners’Journal April 2, 2014
This 2nd day of April, 2014, the
Board of County Commissioners met in
regular session with the following mem-
bers present: Tony Zartman, Fred Pieper
and Nola Ginter, Clerk. Absent: Roy
Klopfenstein.
MEETING NOTES OF APPOINT-
MENTS
Judge John DeMuth, Probate/Juve-
nile Court, met briefly with the Commis-
sioners to discuss improvements to the
clerical area of his office. Plans were re-
viewed and approved. Judge DeMuth
may check the feasibility of setting up a
special fund to allow for the funding of
future improvement projects. He re-
ported his current court costs are com-
parable with other area courts; however,
lower than most on juvenile cases and
probate filings.
Jeff Hollis, All-Trades Historical
Restoration, met with the Commission-
ers for a walk-through update on the
Courthouse interior painting project.
Claudia Fickel, County Auditor – The
Commissioners and Ms. Fickel met to
schedule a Board of Revisions meeting
to review the appeals that have been
filed. Ms. Fickel also updated the Com-
missioners on plans to replace the car-
peting in her vault and closet areas.
Commissioner Zartman shared con-
cerns he had received from a county res-
ident, referring to the appraiser not
having proper identification when she is
out and about. Ms. Fickel stated, to her
knowledge, the appraiser always has
identification with her, but said she
would address the issue with the ap-
praiser.
Corey Walker, Defiance-Paulding
County Combined JFS, announced that
April is Child Abuse Prevention Month.
He asked for permission to display a
banner on the Courthouse lawn. He also
would like to have luminaries placed on
the sidewalks.
Mr. Walker updated the Commis-
sioners on the status of the Dooley Drive
office. There are a few more items left to
complete. Mr. Walker anticipates the of-
fice will be able to relocate within the
next 2-3 weeks. He also reported there
are three children at the Jacob Eaton
Children’s Home.
Judge Suzanne Rister, County Court,
was excited to announce County Court
is hosting a free Bureau of Motor Vehi-
cles program to review traffic laws and
other updates. She reported there will be
two sessions and there are 25 people
signed up for each session.
Ms. Rister noted her new employee
is working out well. She works 35 hours
a week and is considered full-time for
benefit purposes. Judge Rister continues
to work on a full time judgeship for
County Court. She reported her Court
and Probation office are both very busy.
Ms. Rister praised the new K-9 officer,
saying the dog is doing a great job.
Marsha Yeutter, Senior Center, re-
ported having an ice dam in the valley of
the metal roof of the Senior Center. She
noted there were some wet spots on the
ceiling. The Commissioners agreed that
she should apply a sealant to the ceiling
and watch to see if the spots recur before
painting the ceiling. Ms. Yeutter reported
her agency keeps busy doing medical
runs, preparing and delivering meals,
and other activities at the Senior Center.
IN THE MATTER OF CREATING
A NEW FUND AND CREATING
LINE ITEMS AND AMENDING
THE 2014 ANNUAL APPROPRIA-
TION IN THE SHSP FY11 FUND
(FUND 225)
Mr. Fred Pieper moved to adopt the
following resolution:
WHEREAS, it is necessary to track
revenue and expenses for auditing pur-
poses for an FY 2011 State Homeland
Security Program (SHSP) Grant from
the Ohio Emergency Management
Agency; now, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board
of County Commissioners does hereby
direct the County Auditor to create Fund
225, SHSP FY11 Fund; and also to cre-
ate the following line items in the SHSP
FY11 Fund (Fund 225); and be it
FURTHER RESOLVED, that the
Board of County Commissioners does
hereby amend the 2014 Annual Appro-
priation and hereby directs the County
Auditor to appropriate unappropriated
funds in Fund 225, to-wit;
Revenue Line Item: 225-001-10000;
Line Description: Grant Proceeds; Ap-
propriation: $20,819.70.
Expense Line Item: 225-001-00001;
Line Description: Other Expenses; Ap-
propriation: $20,819.70.
IN THE MATTER OF TRANSFER-
RING UNCLAIMED WARRANT
AMOUNTS TO THE UNCLAIMED
MONIES FUND (FUND 021)
Mr. Fred Pieper moved to adopt the
following resolution:
WHEREAS, the County Auditor has
presented a list of 33 unclaimed warrants
from various Funds totaling $4,672.07;
now, therefore
BE IT RESOLVED, that the Board
of County Commissioners does hereby
authorize and direct the County Auditor
to transfer the following amounts, repre-
senting unclaimed warrants, to-wit:
FROM: TO: AMOUNT:
Fund 001/General Fund to 021/Un-
claimed Monies $582.60
Fund 003/Health Fund to 021/Un-
claimed Monies $80
Fund 007/Public Assistance Fund to
021/Unclaimed Monies $200
Fund 008/Real Estate Assess Fund to
021/Unclaimed Monies $25
Fund 014/PCBDD Fund to 021/Un-
claimed Monies $39.28
Fund 028/General Tax Fund to 021/Un-
claimed Monies $3,493.41
Fund 029/Trailer Tax Fund to 021/Un-
claimed Monies $25.85
Fund 032/Certificate of Title Fund to
021/Unclaimed Monies $83.38
Fund 065/Child Support Fund to
021/Unclaimed Monies $39.99
Fund 079/Paulding County EMA Fund
to 021/Unclaimed Monies $7.57
Fund 158/Area 7 WIA Fund to 021/Un-
claimed Monies $94.99
EXECUTIVE SESSION
A motion was made by Mr. Fred
Pieper to go into executive session at
8:04 a.m. with the Paulding County
Prosecutor to discuss legal matters. The
motion was seconded by Mr. Tony Zart-
man. All members voting yea. At 8:26
a.m. all members present agreed to ad-
journ the executive session and go into
regular session.
6A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 23, 2014
Birthdays
Anniversaries
April 26 – Kenneth and Catherine Snellenberger.
April 28 – Kenneth and Mary Musselman.
April 29 – Mr. and Mrs. Greg Troyer.
May 1 – Rich and Amanda Jasso, Dr. and Mrs. Daniel Manz.
May 2 – Dave and Kris Stallkamp, Kevin and Holly Vance.
(The Paulding Progress maintains
a file of birthdays and anniversaries. To
make any changes, please call our of-
fice at 419-399-4015 during business
hours, email to progress@progress -
newspaper.org, or drop us a note to
P.O. Box 180, Paulding.)
April 26 – Samuel Good-
win, Joyce Huseby, Alma
Mosier, Sierra Short.
April 27 – Velma Dinger,
Kris Kniceley, Elouise Lind-
Divine Mercy Payne Preschool
Located at Divine Mercy School
120 Arturus St., Payne
For more information call
419-263-2841
419-263-2114
Open House
& Registration
Divine Mercy
Payne Preschool
Wed., May 7, 6:30 - 8:30 pm
Classes are now available for
3, 4 and 5 year olds for the
2014-2015 school year.
35c1
LAND FOR SALE – SEALED BID
The undersigned will offer for private sale, by sealed bid, the following:
39.42 acres, more or less, in Section 1, Washington Twp.,
Van Wert County. (#24-046016.0000); and 10.28 acres,
more or less, in Section 6, Jennings Twp., Putnam County.
(#14-008080.0000)
Offers must be made in the form of a sealed bid and contain the
total amount offered for the land. An envelope containing the offer
(sealed bid) shall bear a notation on the outside of the envelope
“BLOCKBERGER SEALED BID.” Offers must be mailed or delivered to
Troth Law Office, LLC, (Blockberger Offer), 125 N. Water Street, P.O. Box
84, Paulding, OH 45879, on or before 5:00 P.M. Friday, April 25, 2014.
The offers (sealed bids) will be opened at 10:00 A.M. on Tuesday,
April 29, 2014. All persons making an offer are invited to attend and
will be given an opportunity to make additional offers until an accept-
able offer is received by the Land Owners. Additional instructions will
be given when the offers are opened.
TERMS OF SALE: Down payment of $1,000 to be paid upon execu-
tion of written purchase contract, to be signed on or before May 9, 2014;
with the balance to be paid at closing on or before May 23, 2014. The
usual and customary Paudling County terms of sale shall apply.
The undersigned reserve the right to refuse any offers.
Glenn H. Troth & Stephen Snavely, as Attorneys for
LAND OWNERS 33c3
34c1
Delivery May 8, at the hospital in the morning
4”Geraniums red, pink or white - $3
10”Hanging Baskets - $15
Ivy Geraniums, Mixed Baskets, Double Impatiens,
Bostern Fern, Supertunia, Surfinnia, Begonias
Place order by April 30 to Eileen Kochensparger
15261 SR 613, Paulding, OH • 419-399-5818
or drop off at the hospital gift shop Monday - Friday
Make checks out to PCH Auxiliary.
Pay at time of ordering.
PCH Auxiliary 3rd Annual
FLOWER SALE
Uncle Fudd’s
Diner
Melrose, OH
419-594-3319
Brian Holbrooks
and the
Poor Grass Boys
Fri., April 25
6-8 pm
35c1
RSVP
if possible
Opening May 1st
Austinworld
ANTIQUES & BOOKS
127 S. across the Bridge
Paulding
Comics Books
Toys - Coins - Stamps
Small Antiques
419-399-3353
35p3
Anniversary
MR. and MRS.
ROBERT BAUMLE
PAYNE – Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Baumle of Payne celebrated their
50th wedding anniversary.
Bob Baumle and Fran Cole-
man-Miller were married April
18, 1964, at St. John the Baptist
Catholic Church, in Payne, by Fa-
ther Frances Miller.
The couple have five children,
Patrick (Wendy) Baumle, Havi-
land, Jack (Annette) Baumle, Paul
(Kathy) Miller, Rossford, Pete
(Connie) Miller, Upper Sandusky,
and Patsy (Todd) Wiedemann,
Harlan, Ind. They have 14 grand-
children, three great-grandchil-
dren, and one deceased grandson.
They celebrated their special
occasion with a private family
dinner.
sey, Ashley McMichael,
Dorothy Moreno.
April 28 – David Manz.
April 29 – Donna Gray,
Lou Hummell, Clare Lanz,
Sarah Moreno, Bryant Troyer.
April 30 – Dave Gilbert,
Brittany Mawer, Addyson Hor-
mann, Mitch Rothenbuhler,
Edgar Spears.
May 1 – Leona Aldred, Kara
Baumle, Julia Grant, Frieda
Hammons, Stephanie
Mumma, Alyssa Nardone, Tat-
rina Neer, Ashlynn Rice,
Courtney Roughton.
May 2 – Lauren Brown,
Victoria Geib, Jared Grace,
Kathi Gross, Jordan Lotz,
Deb Mericle, Audrey Smiley.
Lafarge U.S. plants recognized
for innovation with awards from
the Portland Cement Association
PAULDING – Lafarge North America has
even more reason to be proud of its U.S. op-
erations, thanks to two recent Innovation
awards from the Portland Cement Association
(PCA). The Paulding Cement Plant, in Pauld-
ing, won PCA’s 2014 Cement Industry Energy
& Environment Award for Innovation, while
the Cave in Rock Quarry, located in Cave in
Rock, Ill., won PCA’s 2014 Safety Innovation
Award.
“A hearty congratulations to the Paulding
Plant and the Cave in Rock Quarry on their re-
spective PCA awards,” said Lafarge U.S. pres-
ident and CEO John Stull. “These
achievements are especially gratifying be-
cause they reflect the innovative thinking that
drives Lafarge, from our product research and
development teams to the employees who
work hard to produce our building materials
every day.”
The Paulding Plant pioneered a briquetting
process to optimize the recycling of cement
kiln dust (CKD) back into the cement making
process. “We had been returning CKD in its
native powder form to the kilns for many
years,” said Paulding senior environmental
manager Tim Weible. “But it was common for
the dust to float around inside the kiln as op-
posed to staying in the kiln feed bed.”
To resolve this problem, the Paulding lead-
ership team came up with the innovative idea
of creating CKD briquettes, after the fashion
of charcoal briquettes used for grilling. After
an initial and successful trial period, the plant
invested approximately $600,000 to install a
large briquetting machine and feed system.
“Today Paulding has the potential to return
about 16,000 tons of CKD to the hood of the
kilns as raw material, increasing our clinker
production and improving kiln performance,”
said Weible. “We’ve also decreased our spe-
cific heat consumption and use of chlorinated
grinding aid accelerator, as well as reduced the
amount of CKD we send to the landfill, and
associated haul truck hours and fuel use.”
With a yearly savings of $1 million, Pauld-
ing’s CKD briquetting project payback period
was less than eight months. The project sup-
ports Lafarge’s corporate-wide goal to recycle
or reuse all of its CKD, and its ongoing com-
mitment to sustainability.
To the west of Paulding, in Cave in Rock,
Ill., employees came up with a safer way to
service the jaw crusher hopper. Used for
crushing quarried rocks, the crusher hopper re-
quires periodic maintenance and repairs.
Climbing in and out of the hopper on exten-
sion ladders while carrying the necessary tools
presents both a physical challenge and a po-
tential safety risk. By repurposing equipment
and materials found on site, Cave in Rock em-
ployees built a movable staircase, complete
with handrails, to facilitate access to and
egress from the hopper.
“This seems like a simple solution, but it
hasn’t been done here at Cave in Rock be-
fore,” said health and safety coordinator for
Lafarge U.S. West Cement Trent Hes-
selschwardt. “And this is just one example of
how the group here thinks outside the box to
find ways to improve processes and make
things safer.”
The staircase solution is safer in more ways
than one, since in addition to providing a
handhold, it also creates a clear visual that
alerts others working in the area that someone
is in the hopper, and to steer clear.
“The PCA award is well deserved recogni-
tion for the group at Cave in Rock Quarry,”
adds Hessel schwardt. “This is a great example
of innovative thinking, where form and func-
tion create an opportunity to do our jobs more
safely. And the opportunity to share this idea
with others is equally satisfying.”
AUTHOR TO SPEAK – The Paulding County Carnegie Library will present a special visit from
local author, Alice Gerber All the Mommies Would Go Painting Together: The Art of Art in Paulding
County, Ohio at 6 p.m. Thursday, April 24 at the main historic Carnegie library in Paulding. Come
reminisce and listen to the stories about how mothers of the Baby Boom generation gathered to-
gether to share inspiration and vision through art in Paulding County. Space is limited, so call
ahead to save your spot. Call 419-399-2032 to register.
Election board announces
May 6 election information
The Board of Elections of
Paulding County, Ohio,
wishes to inform voters that
the PRIMARY ELECTION
will be held on Tuesday, May
6 to nominate and vote on the
following Democratic, Re-
publican, Green or Libertar-
ian candidates at the
following locations:
• AUGLAIZE TWP - Fire
House at Ohio 637 & RD 169
• BLUE CREEK TWP –
Haviland Community Center,
201 Vine St.
• BROWN EAST &
OAKWOOD and BROWN
WEST & MELROSE – Oak-
wood Fire & EMS Station,
201 N. Sixth St.
• ANTWERP VILLAGE
and CARRYALL TWP –
Antwerp Catholic Church
Hall, 303 W. Daggett St.
• CRANE TWP & CECIL
- Cecil Fire House, 301 Third
St.
• EMERALD TWP -
Township House at RD 133
& RD 218
• BENTON TWP and
PAYNE VILLAGE and
HARRISON TWP and
PAYNE VILLAGE – Payne
Legion Hall, 229 N. Main St.
• JACKSON TWP &
BROUGHTON – Township
House at RD 126 & RD 131
• PAULDING VILLAGE
1, 2 and 3 – County Exten-
sion Bldg. at Fairgrounds
• LATTY TWP &
GROVER HILL – Township
House, 204 E. Jackson St.
• PAULDING TWP &
LATTY VILLAGE - Town-
ship House at Ohio 500 &
RD 87
• WASHINGTON TWP –
Township House, SR 114 &
RD 177
for the purpose of choosing
the following offices:
• Governor and Lieutenant
Governor
• Attorney General
• Auditor of State
• Secretary of State
• Treasurer of State
• Representative to Con-
gress (5th District)
• State Representative
(82nd District)
• State Senator (1st Dis-
trict)
• Justice of the Supreme
Court and Justice of the
Supreme Court (one com-
mencing 1/1/15 and one com-
mencing 1/2/15)
• Judge of the Court of
Appeals 3rd District (com-
mencing 2/9/15)
• Member of State Central
Committee Man & Woman
(1st Senate District – Demo-
cratic & Republican)
• 2 Members of State Cen-
tral Committee (5th Congres-
sional District – Libertarian
Party)
• County Commissioner
• County Auditor
and determining the fol-
lowing questions or issues:
• State Issue 1
• Paulding County Library
- renewal.
The polls for the election
will open at 6:30 a.m. and re-
main open until 7:30 p.m. on
Tuesday, May 6.
Please VOTE and help
make Paulding the county
with the best voter turnout in
Ohio.
Contact the Paulding
County Board of Elections
with any questions at 105 E.
Perry St., Paulding, 419-399-
8230.
The office email address is
paulding@ohiosecretaryofs-
tate.gov. The office website
may be located at www.elec-
tionsonthe.net.
Current office hours are
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5
p.m. through Friday, May 2;
Saturday; May 3 from 8 a.m.-
noon.
Regular office hours begin
on Monday, May 5, 8 a.m.-
noon and 1-4 p.m.
Book signing at
Antwerp Library
ANTWERP – Robin Theis
will be having a book signing
at the Antwerp Branch Li-
brary on April 26 from noon-
1 p.m.
Her book titled Surren-
dered Identity was released in
January 2014. Surrendered
Identity is about rejection,
forgiveness, healing, trust,
identity, broken heart and sui-
cide.
Lions Club meets
PAULDING – Members of
the Paulding Lions Club meet
the second and fourth Thurs-
days of each month, exclud-
ing holidays, at the Paulding
Eagles. Meeting time is 7
p.m. The public is welcome
to attend.
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 7A
HOPPIN’ DOWN THE BUNNY
TRAIL
Kids look for the Easter
Bunny almost as much as
they do for Santa Claus. The
thrill of hiding an Easter bas-
ket filled with goodies never
gets old.
Easter is the second most
important candy-eating occa-
sion of the year for Ameri-
cans who consume 7 billion
pounds of candy a year, ac-
cording to the National Con-
fectioner’s Association.
Now there are some par-
ents who are concerned that
their children might eat too
much Easter candy. Recently
while shopping, I saw a dis-
play of Easter toys. One of
those toys really enthralled
me and I really wanted to buy
it.
Now, I am a person who
likes anything that talks,
sings, dances or lights up.
This was a toy wooden gun
and when you pulled the trig-
ger, it made different noises.
There were gross noises such
as burping and then you can
flip a button and it made good
nice noises such as laughing.
It was a little pricey, so I
thought to myself, “You don’t
need to spend money on that.
Perhaps if I wait they will
mark it half price after
Easter.”
The Easter holiday cele-
brates the resurrection of
Christ, but is also associated
with chocolate rabbits, Easter
bunnies and baskets of eggs.
I did not know there was a
proper way to eat a chocolate
bunny, but a poll was taken
and 70 percent said that
chocolate bunnies should be
eaten ears first. Five percent
of the poll takers said bunnies
should be eaten feet first and
4 percent ate the tail first.
Another popular Easter
treat is jelly beans. Today there
are many different brands and
flavors. I have never cared for
A Penny For
Your Thoughts....
By: Nancy Whitaker
jelly beans, but I found a cer-
tain brand which carries many
different flavors and this brand
was also a favorite of one of
our U.S. presidents.
Did you know that Ameri-
cans consume 16 billion jelly
beans at Easter, many of them
hidden in baskets. If all the
Easter jellybeans were lined
end to end, they would circle
the globe nearly three times.
However, it is not the Easter
bunny or candy we celebrate, it
is the resurrection of Jesus
Christ.
I don’t know about anyone
else, but I still like Easter toys,
Easter baskets and Easter
candy. I just hope that Easter
bunny brings me that toy gun
that makes noises plus some
chocolate. I will let you know
if he did.
Do you like chocolate bun-
nies and jelly beans? How do
you eat your chocolate rabbit?
Let me know and I’ll give you
a Penny for Your Thoughts.
Paulding County Hospital
Family Health “Week”
www.pauldingcountyhospital.com
Available Blood Testing

Comprehensive Health Panel . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $30

Thyroid Screen (TSH) . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . $20

Hemoglobin A1C :. . .. . . Price Increase This Year. . . . . . $15

PSA (Prostatic Specific Antigen) .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $20

Vitamin D ………..New Test Offered This Year………... $20
Due to Patient
Request, now
expanded to
a full WEEK!
Monday through Saturday,
May 12 thru May 17, 2014
Mon - Fri: 7-9 am
Sat: 7-10 am
Where: PCH Medical Office Building
(attached to the hospital at its northwest corner)
Pre-registration forms available
at the following locations
Paulding County Hospital Information Desk; Doctors Halachanova, Spangler & Gilreath’s of-
fices in PCH Medical Office Building; Dr. Ahmed’s office, Paulding; Dr. Gray’s office, Ant-
werp; Dr. Kuhn’s office, Payne; Dr. Hogan’s office, Oakwood; or: visit our website
(www.pauldingcountyhospital.com) to download pre-registration forms (downloaded pre-
registration forms - need to be returned to PCH with payment and self-addressed legal enve-
lope (size 10).
Completed forms must be returned by May 7th to any of the above locations.
For questions, contact Brenda Wieland
419-399-1138 or 800-741-1743, ext 138
CORRECTION
The Hemoglobin price on the
ad for Paulding County
Hospital Family Health Week
should be $15 not $10 as
shown in last week’s ads.
The Paulding Progress
apologizes for making this mistake.
Easy ways to get green outside
By Mark Holtsberry
Education specialist
Paulding SWCD
As springtime approaches, here are some re-
cycling tips for your lawn and garden and out-
side leisure.
Out in nature:
• Trash: When you are out hiking, pick up
trash along the way.
• Organize: A work group to clean up a local
stream, highway, park, beach, etc.
• Tree planting: Form a tree planting group
with family and or friends. Commit to planting
and maintaining an agreed upon number of
trees over your life times. Plan regular gather-
ings for tree planting and watering.
• Balloons: Never release balloons outdoors.
They frequently find their way to open water
and can harm or kill turtles, birds, or fish.
Your home:
• Create a nontoxic safe home for your fam-
ily and pets. Gather up all products in your
house or garage that contain unsafe chemicals
and drop off at your local hazardous waste fa-
cility. Switch to alternatives containing non-
toxic and biodegradable ingredients. Some
products labeled “green” aren’t actually safe.
Look for green certification labels.
• Hazardous waste – Dispose of the follow-
ing products at a hazardous waste facility or
pick up drive at a local community. Building
materials – paint, varnish, paint thinner, sol-
vents, rust remover, wood preservatives, and
driveway sealer. Household cleaners, pesti-
cides, miscellaneous photographic chemicals,
acids, and corrosive chemicals, pool chemi-
cals, compact fluorescent light bulbs.
Create a backyard wildlife habitat:
As people take over more and more of the
land, we need to provide food, water and shel-
ter to the animals that are now relying on us
for their survival.
Basic elements include fresh water, such as
a bird bath, plants and feeders that provide
nourishment for birds, insects, etc. – rocks,
trees, bushes and or bird houses for shelter and
nesting. Purchase plants that are native to your
area. The National Wildlife Federation has an
excellent program called the Backyard
Wildlife Habitat Program, which provides
some helpful detailed examples:
• Attracting animals – Learn how to attract
hummingbirds, butterflies, and birds.
• Protecting birds – The greatest danger to
birds in your yard is window collisions.
Audubon provides tips for minimizing colli-
sions.
• Rain garden – Create a rain garden on your
property to reduce runoff into storm drains.
• Composting – Composting provides im-
portant nutrients for your organic garden.
• Mulching – Mulching mowers are avail-
able which will convert cut grass into a natural
fertilizer.
State agencies recommend
streamlined ag manure program
Proposal would create ‘one-stop-shop’ for
agricultural nutrient oversight of Ohio farmers
COLUMBUS – In a move
designed to reduce regulatory
redundancies between their
agencies, the directors of the
Ohio Departments of Agri-
culture (ODA) and Natural
Resources (ODNR) have an-
nounced a proposal to stream-
line the management of
manure in the state to bring
all oversight of farmers ap-
plying agricultural nutrients
under a single agency.
Current law gives oversight
of agricultural pollution and
manure management respon-
sibility for smaller livestock
farms to ODNR while ODA
regulates the large livestock
farms. Under this proposal,
ODNR’s authority over ma-
nure management on small-
scale farms would be
transferred to the state agri-
culture department, which al-
ready runs a robust manure
management program and
has authority over other agri-
cultural nutrients.
While the proposal does
not amend existing manure
use regulations, it would cre-
ate uniformity in how those
regulations are enforced by
bringing small-scale farmers
under the same department as
large-scale producers and
farmers applying commercial
fertilizer.
“Finding ways that state
government can streamline
our efforts and streamline
services has been a priority of
Governor Kasich since he
first took office,” said Ohio
Agriculture director David
Daniels. “This proposal will
improve efficiencies by re-
ducing the redundancies that
currently exist between our
agencies regarding the man-
agement of manure. More im-
portantly, it also allows us to
ensure the management of all
agricultural nutrients is fully
coordinated within one cabi-
net agency.”
As part of this transition,
ODNR would continue to ad-
minister the existing manure
handling, storage and appli-
cation requirements within
the Grand Lake St. Marys
watershed as long as it is still
designated a watershed in dis-
tress.
ODNR would also con-
tinue to maintain authority for
providing technical programs
and services relative to soil
health, soil erosion and
drainage management and
would maintain authority for
silvicutlure and other soil and
water conservation programs
which have historically been
administered by ODNR
through the Division of Soil
and Water Resources.
“Having one agency over-
see livestock farming opera-
tions makes sense and
eliminates duplicated serv-
ices,” said ODNR director
James Zehringer. “There will
be no change to the critical
role that Ohio’s soil and water
conservation districts fulfill
in addressing manure-related
issues, nor will there be any
change to our commitment to
partner with SWCDs in con-
serving our natural re-
sources.”
The proposal, originally in-
troduced as part of the Gov-
ernor’s mid-biennium review,
is now included as a part of
House Bill 490 and is being
considered by the House
Agriculture and Natural Re-
sources Committee.
BABY CHICKS MEET THEIR NEW OWNERS – On April 15, more than 500 baby chicks were de-
livered to the OSU Extension Office as part of the bulk order for the 2014 Paulding County Fair.
Exhibitors receive the chicks when they are only a day or so old and they will raise them up to
exhibit at the fair. This day is always filled with a lot of chirping and smiles as exhibitors meet
their chicks for the first time. Here, Sydney, Madison and Therin Coyne of Blue Ribbon Workers
4-H Club greet their baby chicks. These birds will be exhibited at the Paulding County Fair starting
June 9.
8A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 23, 2014
The Paulding County Progress -
Your source for exclusive
Paulding County news!
David A. & Harvey D.
Hyman and Families
Compliments of
Baughman
Tile Company
Ohio Gas
Company
1-800-331-7396
The Antwerp
Exchange
Bank Company
Stabler Steam Carpet
Cleaning Service
Payne 419-263-2211
Den Herder Funeral
Home
1-800-399-3522
(419) 399-2866
Red Angel Pizza
740 Emerald Rd, Paulding,
OH • 419-399-2295
Scott Variety Shop
Variety is our middlename
419-622-3014
If you would be interested
in helping to sponsor our
church directory, please
call us at the
Paulding County Progress
at 419-399-4015. This
directory is made possible
by our advertisers!
Mara Mart
Paulding
Member FDIC
The Church Directory Is Proudly Sponsored By The Following Businesses:
Paulding County Church Directory
Paulding United Methodist Church, 321 North Williams Street,
Paulding, church telephone number is 399-3591, Rev. Ben Lowell,
Worship service at 9:45 a.m.; Sunday School, 11:15 a.m.; Wed. worship
at 6 pm. Church office is located at 308 N. Main St.
Pentecostal Church of God, 601 W. Caroline St., Paulding, Elder
George Robinson, Sunday school at 10 a.m., worship service at noon,
prayer services Monday at 6 p.m. and Thursday at noon, Bible study
at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Pioneer Christian Ministries, County Road 108 and Ohio 637, Paulding,
Rev. Chuck Oliver, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30
a.m., and Wednesday evening at 7 p.m. including a youth service on at
least three Wednesday evenings.
Rose Hill Church of God, corner of SR 637 and Charloe Trail, Paulding,
399-3113, Pastor Ron Hofacker, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday service from 7-8 p.m. with children’s hour.
St. John Lutheran Church–ELCA, 7611 Road 87, Briceton, Pastor
Karen Stetins, church telephone number is 419-399-4962 or 419-399-
2320. Sunday worship at 8:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
St. Paul Evangelical Lutheran Church, 601 Flat Rock Drive (P.O. Box
156), Paulding, Pastor Karen Stetins, church telephone number is 399-
2320, Sunday Worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:15 a.m.
PAYNE AND OUTLYING AREAS
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 203 W. Townline, Payne, 399-2576, Pas-
tor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 4 p.m.
Edgerton Wesleyan Church, 1717 Bertha St., Woodburn, (Edgerton)
Ind. 46797, Pastor Dave Dignal, church telephone number is 260-632-
4008, Sunday school at 9 a.m., children’s church at 10 a.m., worship at
10 a.m., home groups at 6 p.m., Wednesday evening services at 6:30
p.m..
Living Water Ministries, Contemporary worship service Sunday nights
at 10 a.m. & 6:30 p.m., The “Well” church for kids, Sunday mornings from
10-11:30 a.m. The church is currently in the process of relocating. For lo-
cation information, contact Pastor Rich Phelan, 419-263-2728.
Payne Church of Christ, 220 West Merrin Street, Payne, Pastor Mikeal
George. Sunday worship at 9:30 am. 419-263-2092; 419-574-2150 (cell).
Payne Church of the Nazarene, 509 E. Orchard St. (Ohio 500) Payne,
Pastor Mike Harper, 263-2422, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday wor-
ship at 10:30 a.m. Sunday night service at 6:30 p.m., Wednesday prayer
meeting at 7:30 p.m.
St. Jacob United Church of Christ, southwest corner of Oak and
Hyman streets, Payne, Rev. Jim Langham, 263-2763. Sunday School 9
a.m, Church service-10 a.m.
St. James Lutheran Church– NALC, West Townline Street (P.O. Box
42), Payne, 263-2129, Pastor Fred Meuter, 260-492-2581. Sunday School
at 9 a.m., Sunday worship at 10 a.m.
St. Paul United Methodist Church, (P.O. Box 154) 312 South Main
Street, Payne, Rev. David Rohrer, church telephone number is 263-2418,
parsonage telephone number is 263-2017, Sunday school at 9 a.m., Sun-
day worship at 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
Editor’s Note: If your church doesn’t have service times listed, please
contact the Paulding County Progress office to notify of Sunday service
times.
worship at 6 p.m., Wednesday Bible study at 7 p.m.
PAULDING AND OUTLYING
Bethel United Methodist, Forders Bridge, Cecil, Pastor Kevin Doseck
(419) 899-4153, worship service at 10:30 a.m., Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.
Bethlehem Temple Pentecostal, 818 West Jackson Street, Paulding,
399-3770, Rev. Burpo, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 12
p.m.
Calvary Bible Church, Ohio 111 West across from Paulding County
Hospital, 399-4919, elders John Mohr, 260-632-4356, Bob Fessel 419-399-
3398, Don Baer 419-399-5805. Sunday school at 9 a.m., morning worship
at 10:15 a.m.
Cecil Community Church, 203 S. Main St., Cecil. Pastor Ted Ramey.
Sun. school 10:00 am, Worship service 11 am, Sun. eve. 6 pm, Wed.
eve. 6 pm.
Cecil First Presbyterian Church, Main Street, Cecil, Sunday worship
at 8 a.m., Sunday school at 9 a.m.
Christian Fellowship Church, Paulding High School Auditeria, 10
a.m. Sunday. Pastor Greg Cramer.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 417 N. Main, Paulding, 399-2576,
Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Saturday at 6 p.m.; Sunday
at 10:30 a.m.
Emmanuel Baptist Church, 1275 Emerald Road, Paulding, 419-399-
5061, Sunday School at 9:30 a.m., worship services at 10:45 a.m. and
6 p.m. Sunday and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday. Pastor Drew Gardner.
First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), 1233 Emerald Road,
Paulding, 419-399-4576, Sunday school 9 a.m., Worship service 10
a.m. Interim pastor is Rev. Dr. Paul Biery.
First Presbyterian Church, 114 West Caroline Street, Paulding, 399-
2438, Rev. David Meriwether, 9:00am Sunday school (youth and adult),
10:15 a.m. praise singing, 10:30 a.m. Sunday worship. Communion
1st Sunday each month.
House of Love Ministries, 220 N. Williams St., Paulding. Pastor
Predest (Dwayne) Richardson or Sister Brenda Richardson, 419-399-
9205 or 419-796-8718, Sunday worship at 3 p.m. Jail Ministry, Food
Ministry, Outreach Ministry. Overcomer Outreach - a Christian 12-steap
meeting, Sundays at 5 p.m.
New Beginnings Church (Church of God), Cecil, Pastor Roy Burk,
399-5041, Sunday worship at 11 a.m.
Paulding Church of Christ, East Perry Street, Paulding, Minister
Christopher Reno, 419-399-4761. Bible school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday
worship at 10:30 a.m.
Paulding Church of the Nazarene, 210 Dooley Dr., Paulding, 399-
3932, Pastor Jeremy Thompson, Sunday school at 9:15 a.m., Sunday
worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening at 6 p.m.: Kids’ Summer Jam
(ages 4-4th grade), Preteen class (5th-6th grade), Teen group (7th-
12th grade), and adult service. Wednesday at 7 p.m.: Teen group (7th-
12th grade), adult bible study and prayer. Nursery available for all
services.
Paulding Family Worship Center, 501 West Perry Street, Paulding,
399-3525, Rev. Monte Moore, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Pastor Jonathan L. Hoagland, 587-3376, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m.,
Morning worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday evening gospel hour at 6 p.m.,
Wednesday evening service at 7 p.m.
Grover Hill Zion United Methodist Church, corner of First and Harrison,
587-3941; Pastor Mike Waldron, 419-238-1493 or 419-233-2241 (cell).
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:20 a.m., nursery avail-
able during all services.
Mandale Church of Christ in Christian Union, Ohio 66, Pastor Justin
Sterrett, 419-786-9878, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., Wednesday prayer meeting at 7 p.m.
Middle Creek United Methodist Church, County Road 24, Grover Hill,
Pastor William Sherry, Sunday worship at 9 a.m., Sunday school at 10:15
a.m., Sunday evening Bible study at 6 p.m.
Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Grover Hill, County Road 151, Sun-
day school at 9:30 a.m., Pastor David Prior, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.,
Wednesday evening prayer meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Roselms Christian Church, Ohio 114, Pastor Gary Church, 594-2445,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
HAVILAND/LATTY/SCOTT
Apostolic Christian Church, 12867 Road 82, Haviland, 399-5220, wor-
ship service at 10:30 a.m.
Country Chapel United Methodist Church, Haviland, 419-622-5746,
Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:15 a.m.
Latty Zion Baptist Church, Latty, Pastor Levi Collins Jr., 399-2748, Sun-
day school at 10 a.m., worship service at 11:15 a.m.
Harvest Field Pentecostal Church of God, 13625 Road 12, Scott, Pastor
Terry Martin, 419-622-2026, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday morning
worship at 10:30 a.m., Sunday Evening worship at 6 pm, Wednesday
evening worship at 7:00 pm, Wednesday Youth Group at 7 pm.
Friends United Methodist Church, Latty, Pastor Ron Johnson. Sunday
worship at 9 a.m., Wednesday Bible Study at 7 p.m.
OAKWOOD/MELROSE AREAS
Auglaize Chapel Church of God, rural Oakwood, 3 miles south and half
mile west on County Road 60, Pastor Stan Harmon, 594-2248, Sunday
worship at 9:00 a.m. Sunday school at 10:30 a.m., Wednesday services
for children, youth and adults at 7:00 p.m.
Melrose United Methodist Church, Melrose, 594-2076, Pastor Eileen
Kochensparger 399-5818; Sunday school 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at
10:30 a.m., Wednesday Bible study and prayer at 7 p.m.
Twin Oaks United Methodist Church, corner of Harmon and Second
streets, Oakwood, Pastor Eric Dailey. 419-594-2992. Sunday worship at
9:30 a.m., Sunday school at 10:45 a.m., Bible Study Wednesdays at 10
a.m.
Prairie Chapel Bible Church, one mile east and a half-mile north of Oak-
wood on the corner of Roads 104 and 209, Pastor Earl Chapman, 594-
2057, Sunday school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m., evening
ANTWERP AND SURROUNDING
Antwerp Community Church, 704 S. Erie St., SR 49, Antwerp; Pastor
Ricky L. Grimes 419-258-2069. Bible Study Fellowship 9:30 am; Contem-
porary Worship 10:30 am, Wednesday Discipleship Study, 7:00 pm
Antwerp United Methodist Church, East River Street, Rev. Pastor Mike
Schneider, church telephone number is 258-4901, Comtemporaty service
Sunday 8:30a.m., Sunday school 9:30a.m., Traditional Service 10:30a.m.
Divine Mercy Catholic Parish, 303 S. Monroe, Antwerp. Office: 417 N.
Main, Paulding, 399-2576, Pastor Very Rev. G. Allan Fillman, Masses: Sun-
day at 8:30am.
First Baptist Church, 5482 CR 424, Pastor Todd Murray, 258-2056,
Sunday school at 9 a.m., Sunday worship 10 a.m.; evening service 6 p.m.,
Wednesday Bible Study 6:30 p.m.
First Presbyterian Church, 126 W. River St., Pastor Mike Pennington,
258-2864, Sunday school at 11:15 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:00 a.m.
Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses, 2937 US 24, 258-2290. Public
talk 10 a.m. Sunday, Congregation Bible Study, Theocratic Ministry School
& Service Meeting, Theocratic school 7:30 p.m. Thursday.
Mt. Calvary Lutheran Church, Pastor Robert Becker. Sunday school at
9 a.m., Sunday worship at 10 a.m.
Riverside Christian Church, 15413 St. Rt. 49, (corner Ohio 49 and
Road 192), Antwerp. 258-3895, Pastor Regan Clem.
ARTHUR/FIVE SPAN AREA
Apostolic Christian Church, 13562 Road 147, Defiance (Junction), 399-
3121, William Schlatter, Elder, Sunday services at 10:15 a.m. and 12:30
p.m., Sunday school at 1 p.m., Wednesday services at 8 p.m.
Bethel Christian Church, Ohio 66, Defiance (Arthur), Pastor Christopher
Baker, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m.
Church of Christ, corner of County Roads 166 and 191, Evangelist Lon-
nie Lambert, 399-5022, Sunday worship at 10:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m., Bible
study at 9:30 a.m. Sunday.
Junction Bible Christian Church, County Road 111, Defiance (Junction),
393-2671 or JunctionBible@copper.net, Rev. C. Joseph Fifer, Sunday
school at 9:30 a.m., Sunday worship follows at 10:30 a.m & Bible Study on
Wed. at 7pm.
Pleasantview Missionary Baptist Church, County Road 180, Defiance
(Junction), Rev. Alan Ray Newsome, Sunday worship at 11 a.m., evening
service at 6 p.m.; Wednesday evening services at 7 p.m.
Rock Church, SR 637, Five Span-Arthur area, Pastor Bobby Branham
393-2924, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 10:45 a.m., Sun-
day evening worship at 7 p.m., Wednesday evening worship at 7 p.m.,
Youth Service Wednesday at 7 p.m.
GROVER HILL AND OUTLYING
Bible Baptist Church, corner of Cleveland and Perry streets, Grover
Hill, Pastor Pat Holt, 587-4021, Sunday school at 10 a.m., Sunday worship
at 11 a.m., Sunday evening worship at 6 p.m.; Wednesday prayer meeting
at 7 p.m.
Grover Hill Church of the Nazarene, Maple and East Jackson streets,
C &Y Oil
Company
Payne
The Paulding Progress &
Weekly Reminder
www.progressnewspaper.org
866-636-7260
‘Winning the Battle for a Generation’
By Rick Jones
Defiance Area Youth for
Christ executive director
Are you longing for peace of mind and
heart?
We live in a world in search of peace, polit-
ically, socially and perhaps most poignantly,
spiritually, that is peace with God and the
peace of God.
Regarding the subject of peace, author and
Pastor David Jeremiah writes in his Turning
Point Daily Devotional for April 3, 2014: “We
know the bus we need to catch is always on
time. A friend who has promised to help us on
Saturday is one who always keeps his word.
The pension check we need by the end of the
month never has been late. Certainty – or as
close as we can get to it in human terms –
brings peace of mind.
“The truth is, nothing is absolutely certain
in life. Things happen that never have hap-
pened before. So if we achieve a degree of
peace by trusting in things that are less than
certain, how much more peace could we enjoy
by trusting in Someone who never has failed.
The psalmist wrote, ‘Your testimonies,
which You have commanded, are righteous
and very faithful’ (very certain; Ps. 119:138).
The apostle Paul said that when we commit
our uncertainties to God in prayer, ‘the peace
of God, which surpasses all understanding,
will guard your hearts and minds through Christ
Jesus’ (Phil 4:7). We have peace because we be-
lieve in God’s absolute trustworthiness.
Are you longing for peace of mind and heart?
“If peace seems elusive in your life today, com-
mit yourself to God, commit your concerns to
Him in prayer, and then rest peacefully as you
trust in Him.”
For more information about the work of Youth
for Christ, you may contact Youth for Christ at
419-782-0656, P.O. Box 111, 210 Clinton Street,
Defiance, Ohio 43512, or email to defyfc@em-
barqmail.com.
By Jim Daly
QUESTION: We’re consid-
ering taking my elderly
mother into our home,
rather than placing her in a
nursing facility. This deci-
sion is especially difficult,
because we still have three
children living with us.
Would this new arrange-
ment impact family dynam-
ics?
JIM: In a big way and you
should be prepared for bless-
ings, as well as challenges.
On the plus side, you’ll have
the emotional and practical
support of your family as you
take on the weighty task of
meeting your mother’s needs.
There’s also the potential of
realizing a strong sense of fam-
ily unity and cohesiveness as
you share in the caregiving re-
sponsibilities.
Then there are the potential
benefits for your kids as they
experience firsthand the impor-
tance of sacrifice and service in
the interest of others. This can
become a vital part of their
character growth. There’s also
the opportunity for them to de-
velop a special relationship
with their grandparent.
On the other side, the stabil-
ity of your family will likely be
affected. With these changes,
your children’s social lives will
probably be disrupted and their
personal freedom may be re-
stricted in some ways. And you
and your spouse will at times
be caught in between the com-
peting needs of your kids and
your mother, while your own
needs frequently take a back-
seat. This is what people have
in mind when they talk about
the “sandwich generation.”
There’s obviously a lot here
to pray about as you consider
the equally legitimate ques-
tions of your responsibility to
your mom and your family’s
well-being. In short, there are
no simple solutions to the chal-
lenges you’ll face if you take
her in. It will involve a delicate
balancing act and place you in
a position where you will have
no choice except to rely on the
grace and wisdom of the Lord
from one moment to the next.
And that’s a good place to be.
QUESTION: My teenagers
often go to films that have
racy content. My heart tells
me that it’s probably not a
good thing, but I have noth-
ing more to go on than that.
Can you help?
BOB WALISZEWSKI, di-
rector, Plugged In: I recently
received an email from a
young man who explained
how his struggle with lust
was linked to his television
and movie choices and not
surfing inappropriate Internet
sites. He’s not alone. Holly-
wood has become a super-
teacher to an untold large
number of young people. As
Tinseltown instills its own
brand of sexual “values” via
motion pictures, young peo-
ple are embracing what
they’re being taught.
This isn’t simply my opin-
ion; mounting research is say-
ing the same thing. For
instance, two RAND Corpora-
tion studies found that teens
exposed to sexualized televi-
sion and music were more
likely to become sexually ac-
tive compared to their peers
who had limited exposure. Re-
searchers at Dartmouth Col-
lege had similar findings
regarding the power of sexual-
ized motion pictures.
I believe that your teenagers
already have a tough fight in
guarding their hearts and minds
without consuming risqué
media. Once, after a speaking
engagement, a young man
came up to me to argue for a
film that I had labeled as inap-
propriate. His view was that the
“art” trumped content. My re-
sponse was to completely ig-
nore the acting and special
effects. Instead, I asked him if
a certain sex scene and another
involving nudity had ever
caused him to struggle with his
thought life. To this day, I’ve
never had an answer. The man
lowered his head and walked
away.
Armed with the research,
which is easy to find online, I’d
suggest you have a heart-to-
heart talk with your teens. It’s
never too late to lay down safe
boundaries.
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By
Kylee Baumle
In The
Garden
Spring surprises in the woods
sp.) has distinctive mottled
foliage, which is how it got its
common name, although it
also goes by another - Dog-
tooth Violet - because its
roots do somewhat resemble
a dog’s canine tooth (but it
isn’t a lily). These will only
bloom, in either white or yel-
low (depending on species),
when they are mature enough
to have two leaves, which can
take up to seven years when
grown from seed.
Finally, look for Mayapple
(Podophyllum peltatum), if not
for its shy blooms, but for its
distinctive umbrella-like fo-
liage, usually growing in good-
sized patches when you find it.
If the plants are mature enough,
peek under the umbrellas to
find the white single flowers
that have a beauty all their
own. Small fruits appear later
and the foliage, though cer-
tainly ephemeral, lasts longer
than that of most other spring
wildflower plants.
These are just a few of the
beautiful wildflowers we’re
fortunate to have here. The tim-
ing can vary according to
weather, and you likely won’t
find all of these in one woods,
blooming all at the same time,
but it’s worth a hike or two in
spring to seek them out. I hate
exercise more than just about
anybody, but take me to the
woods and I’ll walk all after-
noon.
A good reference book is
Wildflowers of Ohio, Second
Edition, by Robert L. Henn.
The Paulding County Library
system has two copies of the
First Edition, which is an ade-
quate guide as well.
Read Kylee’s blog, Our Little
Acre, at www.ourlittleacre.com
and on Facebook at OurLit-
tleAcre. Contact her at Pauld-
ingProgressGardener@gmail.
com.
Spring Beauty (Claytonia
virginica) is a small white
flower with lavender veining
that can be seen in abundance
on the woods floor and is usu-
ally in bloom at the same time
as Dutchman’s Breeches (Di-
centra cucullaria), whose
bluish-green lacy foliage per-
fectly complements the puffy
ivory blooms which really do
look like little pantaloons
hanging from a clothesline.
Hepatica is sometimes
called Liverwort, because it
was used to treat liver ail-
ments in the 1800s, although
its effectiveness has never
been proven. This is one of
my very favorite spring wild-
flowers and I feel fortunate
when I come across its grace-
ful white, pink, or lavender
blooms, which appear before
its beautiful tri-leaved fo-
liage, most often in clumps at
the bases of trees.
Bloodroot (Sanguinaria
canadensis) is another of my
favorites, with its unique
characteristics. The flower
bud is encased by a scalloped
leaf as it emerges from the
ground. The leaf unfurls, then
the pristine white daisy-like
bloom follows, staying open
for only one day. Its roots will
ooze a red juicy sap when cut,
giving it its common name.
Trout Lily (Erythronium
Since spring and winter de-
cided to call a truce, it’s the
perfect time to take a break
from your garden chores and
enjoy the show that may be
going on right now in a
woods near you. If you’ve
never taken a stroll through
the woods at this time of year,
you’re really missing out.
Ohio has an abundance of
native wildflowers and
Mother Nature can be a real
show-off. Don’t wait too long
to get out there though, be-
cause just like the crocus and
daffodils and other spring
bulbs in your garden, the
spring wildflowers won’t last
forever.
Though they come up
every year, we don’t really
call them perennials (though
they are). They’re collec-
tively known as spring
ephemerals, which means
they make an appearance in
the spring, they bloom, the
flowers wilt and die, with the
foliage following suit a short
time later. By the time sum-
mer heats up, they’re only a
memory.
These spring wildflowers
grow in the woods where the
ground is organically rich
from decomposed leaves and
trees, usually coming up be-
fore the leaves provide a
canopy of shade. If you were
to venture out now, what
might you see?
At least two different trilli-
ums grow in Paulding
County: Trillium sessile,
which is commonly known as
Toadshade Trillium, with
spotted three-leaved foliage
and burgundy blooms, and
Trillium grandiflorum, other-
wise known as Giant White
Trillium. The latter is our
state wildflower and is really
glorious when seen in large
patches.
Paulding water treatment plant
hosts water association meeting
By BILL SHERRY
Correspondent
PAULDING – Paulding Village Council
met in regular session on April 21 for a very
short council meeting.
Mayor Greg White extended thanks to
water treatment superintendent Mike Winners
for an extraordinary presentation of the new
water treatment plant to the American Water
Works Association (AWWA). Winners and the
treatment plant crew hosted about 120 people
at the AWWA meeting last week.
The day included technical sessions and
plant tours.
Mayor White commented that everyone he
talked to was very pleased to see what Pauld-
ing had implemented in the new water treat-
ment plant.
Village administrator Harry Wiebe provided
council members with the ODOT plans and
drawings for the “Safe Routes to School” proj-
ect being funded and implemented by the
Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT)
through two ODOT grants.
Councilwoman Barb Rife asked, “Is there
any cost to the village?” Wiebe replied, “The
way I understand it, there is no cost to the vil-
lage.”
Council President Roger Sierer commented
that construction is to start about May 1, 2015
and be completed before school starts in the
fall, except for some items overlooked or in
need of change.
Wiebe commented that the bids for the Safe
Routes project would probably go out mid-
February 2015 and the project would be com-
pleted by early November.
The village will be working with the county
to develop a paved parking lot located across
the alley north of the Paulding Municipal
Building. Council unanimously approved the
administrator’s agenda, which confirmed pro-
ceeding with the village’s participation in de-
veloping and paving a 20-foot strip of property
and the alley portion adjacent to the county’s
proposed parking lot.
The estimate for developing and paving the
20-foot wide, 137-foot long strip of village prop-
erty is $8,040.16; the estimate for the 12-foot
wide and 137-foot long alley is $6,431.65. The
estimated useful life of this paving is 10 years.
A utility committee meeting was scheduled for
5:30 p.m. on April 23 in the village council
chambers.
The next scheduled council meeting will be at
6:30 p.m. Monday, May 5.
Paulding’s ‘Safe Routes to
School’ project progressing
By BILL SHERRY
Correspondent
PAULDING – The Village
of Paulding Planning Com-
mission met Wednesday,
April 16 to answer a letter
from the Ohio Department of
Transportation (ODOT) re-
garding the proposed “Safe
Routes to School” project for
Paulding.
Present for the meeting
were Ronnie Breedlove, Ron
Schmidt, Krista Gonzales,
James Caris, Mayor Greg
White and village administra-
tor Harry Wiebe.
There was a concern from
ODOT regarding a small por-
tion of the Safe Routes proj-
ect being in a flood zone. This
flood zone area in question
concerned a small section of
the sidewalk along Emerald
Road near Opossum Run.
The preliminary plan and
final plan of the development
area shall be approved by the
planning commission, so
ODOT requested a letter from
the planning commission stat-
ing that this small area would
not be a problem for the proj-
ect.
It was discussed that the
sidewalk construction would
follow the general contour of
the land it was being built on,
so the project would have lit-
tle to no change or effect on
the flood plain. The commis-
sion voted unanimously to
draft a letter to ODOT with
approval to continue with the
Safe Routes to School proj-
ect.
Mayor White commented
that one of the nice things
about this project is that
ODOT is not only providing
the money but they are man-
aging the project from start to
finish.
The Safe Routes to School
project is still in the design
phase, with DLZ Ohio Inc. of
Columbus providing ODOT,
village and school with over
50 pages of plans regarding
sidewalk construction/repair,
intersection details, drainage
profiles, maintenance of traf-
fic, bike rack details, pave-
ment markings and signs.
The project construction is
scheduled to begin in the
spring of 2015 and be com-
pleted before school starts in
the fall of 2015. This project
is designed to provide for the
safety of the children getting
dropped off at school and
those walking or riding a bi-
cycle to school.
The Safe Routes to School
project started several years
ago when, on Oct. 18, 2010,
Councilman Randy Daeger
reported that the street com-
mittee had met and addressed
the wish list of items and their
estimated cost for the upcom-
ing Safe Routes project.
Paulding Schools representa-
tives Pat Ross and Deb
Paputsakis were in attendance
to help with discussion and
explanations of this project.
Then, on April 4, 2011,
Wiebe told council that
ODOT had approved the
grant for the Paulding’s Safe
Routes project. The total
grant money available for
Phase 1 is $510,294.
A year later, on May 21,
2012, Wiebe announced that
Phase 2 of the Safe Routes
project for the total of
$499,000 had been approved
by ODOT.
‘Changing School Culture’ is event theme
for transitioning students with disabilities
VAN WERT – The Paulding/Van Wert
Transition Council, The Parent Mentor Pro-
gram of Paulding County, and the State Sup-
port Team Region 1 are pleased to sponsor
“Changing School Culture,” a free inspira-
tional evening presentation with nationally
recognized spoken word poet, playwright,
motivational speaker, entrepreneur and ad-
vocate, LeDerick R. Horne.
This special evening presentation takes
place from 7-8 p.m. Wednesday, April 30 at
the Niswonger Performing Arts Center in
Van Wert.
The evening event is for students with dis-
abilities who are in the process of transition,
and their parents, and for the teachers who
serve them.
The presentation will focus on best prac-
tices to guide the successful creation of
school and community environments that
optimize student potential. Emphasis will be
placed on disability self-awareness, self-ad-
vocacy and the interrelationship of these to
the needs of transition-aged youth with dis-
abilities.
There is no charge to attend. Light re-
freshments will be served. Certificate of at-
tendance will be available.
Pre-registration is preferred by contacting
Cathy Ruiz, Parent Mentor, Western Buck-
eye Educational Service Center, Paulding
County, at 419-263-2512 (select opt #4 for
Payne Building), or 419-203-7364. Or,
email Ruiz at cruiz@wb.noacsc.org.
For more information about Horne, visit
www.lederick.com/index.php.
Delivery problems?
Are you having trouble
with your mail delivery of the
Progress? Changes by the
U.S. Postal Service may be
causing delays. Contact
USPS customer service at 1-
800-ASK-USPS (275-8777).
Take us on vacation
Are you headed to some
exotic foreign destination, an-
other state or even Ohio for a
vacation? Take the Progress
with you, along with your
camera, and send us a photo
and information. Email
progress@progressnewspa-
per.org
Board looking to upgrade transportation fleet
BY JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
ANTWERP – The Antwerp Local
School Board met in regular session
on Thursday, April 17 with all mem-
bers present. The passing of a reso-
lution allowing bids for a new bus
and Micro Bird van, principal re-
ports, and year-end activities and
dates were presented.
The board passed a resolution for
the treasurer, Kristine Stuart, to ac-
cept bids for a Micro Bird van and
a 72-passenger bus.
Superintendent Pat Ross reported
that $10,281 left over from the
Straight A grant is available and
could be used towards the purchase
of a vehicle for the school’s trans-
portation fleet. The Micro Bird van
would seat nine plus the driver and
would cost approximately $39,900.
The new vehicle would allow the
school to rid themselves of one of
their less-efficient vans that has
nearly 120,000 miles on it.
Middle school/high school princi-
pal Michael Bute congratulated
Amy Sorrell and the yearbook staff
for their excellent showing at their
yearbook conference at Kent State
University. The staff was recognized
in seven areas for their work on the
yearbook that is self-published.
Tiffany Romero, who attends
Vantage, was recognized for com-
peting at the nationals in computer
modeling.
Bute reported that in a recent Red
Cross blood drive sponsored by the
National Honor Society, 35 pints of
blood were donated. The spring arts
festival will be held on Saturday,
April 26 from 4-9:30 p.m. Prom is
scheduled for May 3 with afterprom
being held at The Plex in Fort
Wayne.
The academic awards night is
scheduled for Wednesday, May 14
with the senior breakfast slated for
May 22.
Tim Manz, elementary principal,
reported that a year-end online pilot
program testing fourth and fifth
graders in social studies and science
will be take place on May 3 and
May 5.
Kerry Kazaam “The Safety Man”
will hold two assemblies on April
29 dealing with various safety is-
sues that elementary-aged students
deal with from time to time. On
May 15, the second and third grade
classes will have their spring con-
cert.
The following consent items were
approved:
• one-year teaching contracts for
2014-15 for Shelly Billman, Tina
Kennedy, Krista Runk, Zacory
Feasby, Alexandria Gillis, Travis
Hammer, Harla Long, Andrea
Newell, Jassmine Reyes and Rick
Weirich.
• two-year teaching contracts for
2014-16 for Brittni Engel and Renee
Staas.
• three-year teaching contracts for
2014-17 for Crystal Brooks, Betty
Smazenko, Mary Jo Smith, Lisa
Girlie Jordan, Phil Rangel, Diana
Rogge.
• accepted the resignations of
Paige Zuber and Carol Grindstaff
for the purpose of retirement effec-
tive at the end of the 2013-14 con-
tract year, and of Marsha Oberlin
effective at the end of the 2013-14
contract year.
• approved two-year noncertified
contracts for Karleen Grimes as
cook and Mike Knight as bus driver.
• approved a one-year noncerti-
fied contract for Lynn Bute for as
outside maintenance.
• approved a one-year administra-
tive contract for Cathy Barnett as
part-time technology coordinator.
• approved student workers and
wages as follows: Shawn Dooley
$8, Jacob O’Donnell $8, Aaron O’-
Donnell $7.95, Jarrison Steiner $7,
Matthew Dooley $7, Emily Butzin
$7, and Derek Reeb $7.
Stuart reported that for the month
of March, receipts totaled
$401,924.12 with expenses being
$603,534.55.
Also attending the meeting was
county commissioner candidate Bob
Burkley, who introduced himself
and asked for their support in the
upcoming primary.
The next board meeting is sched-
uled for May 15 at 6 p.m.
The Progress ...
is Paulding County’s
newspaper of record.
10A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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Celebrate creation and
the earth around us
Some of my earliest mem-
ories are the sounds of doves,
cardinals and chirping birds
singing their morning chorus
when I accompanied my
mother and grandmother to
the garden early to avoid the
heat of the summer sun.
I recall getting off the
school bus in late April or
early May and the aroma of
blossoming cherry trees,
crabapple tree, lilacs and the
spring flowers from our na-
ture-cultured yard surround-
ing the 100-year old country
home where I was raised.
As I grew older, it was a
way of life for our family to
go for walks along the
Wabash River and take pic-
tures of flowering trees,
walking to the covered bridge
in the cool of the evening to
watch sunsets across the
clover-laden Indiana mead-
ows and harvesting the sweet
fruits that the earth was giv-
ing back to us.
In my elementary years,
Meredith Sprunger, the
neighbor down the street who
was to become my lifelong
“David and Jonathan” friend,
and I would take a Boy Scout
guide to go hiking, a pad of
paper, and we would sketch
out nature walks through the
Rainbow Bottom, recording
every tree, brook, grassy
meadow, marsh and bend in
the riverside trail.
As I got older, and my par-
ents began to age, genera-
tional blending began to bring
earth memories. My grandma
passed, my folks aged; my
dad couldn’t walk very well,
but loved golf and my mother
walked with me as long as
she could.
Joyce had come on the
scene and loved hiking as
much as I did, from the Mid-
west to the Mountain Parks of
New Jersey that she recalled
from her childhood.
When the children came on
the scene, country walks, vis-
its to zoos and other nature-
oriented emphasis became a
way of life for us.
These days, my life has be-
come immersed in walking,
taking pictures of nature and
writing thoughts and medita-
tions based on the lessons
from earth. I admire the com-
mitment of geese in lifetime
marriage, the song of the car-
dinal, most soothing to my
soul and the way life survives
harsh winters to bring forth
beautiful wild flowers in their
season.
I learn how seeds sown can
be bloom at just the right
time, in our lives and the lives
of our children, how storms
can so quickly give way to
brilliant sunshine, like the
hope through the storms of
life and how the warmth of
light regenerates everything
around us.
I am most mindful of God’s
command to mankind to re-
produce and take care of the
earth He created for us. I am
impressed with how after
each creation, He would say,
“and God saw that it was
good.”
Yes, I am concerned about
abuse of this earth, waste of
natural products and ignoring
of indications that some parts
of creation are struggling.
My parents constantly were
playing devout music around
our house.
I remember looking at the
forsythias, tulips, daffodils,
irises and peonies in my
mother’s gardens and listening
to, “This is my Father’s world,
and to my listening ear, all na-
ture sings and round me rings
the music of the sphere.”
HOMESPUN
By
JIM LANGHAM
Antwerp to place levy for
new fire truck on fall ballot
By JOE SHOUSE
Correspondent
ANTWERP – A new proposed tax levy to
purchase a pumper truck for the fire depart-
ment, clean-up day, and the completion of the
comprehensive plan for the village were all
part of the regular scheduled meeting of the
Antwerp Village Council meeting Monday
night.
Councilman and chairman of the finance
committee Larry Ryan and Fire Chief Ray
Friend reported to the council the desire to
place on the November ballot a 2.63-mill levy
that would generate nearly $250,000 over five
years. The funds would be used to purchase
the pumper. The motion to pursue the neces-
sary paperwork in order to place the millage
on the ballot unanimously passed.
Antwerp’s annual clean-up day is scheduled
for Saturday, May 24 at the water plant. Hours
will be from 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
The village’s cost for the one-day clean up
will be $2,750. A flyer will be distributed list-
ing all items and bulky waste that can be
dropped off at the water plant.
A draft of the comprehensive plan for the
village has been completed by Poggemeyer
Design Group and will be reviewed by the
planning commission and the council in May.
Those wanting to view the plan can see it at
the library, town hall, administrator’s office,
or online at the village’s Facebook page.
Meetings will be scheduled and corrections
will be made before the final plan is approved
and adopted by council.
Administrator Sara Keeran reminded the
council of the importance of State Issue 1. The
issue, which will be on the ballot May 6, is a
renewal for state capital improvements in
Ohio towns and villages like Antwerp.
“This issue has been a vital part of develop-
ing bridge, sewer, water and other infrastruc-
ture projects since 1987. It is a renewal and
will require no new taxes,” said Keeran.
Due to the importance of State Issue 1, the
council unanimously passed a resolution sup-
porting the Issue while urging voters to cast
their vote supporting the continuation of Issue
1 that will foster improvements and job cre-
ation throughout the state of Ohio.
The third reading was unanimously passed
for a resolution requesting the county auditor
to certify the total current tax valuation and
the dollar amount of revenue that would be
generated by a 1-mill renewal levy for current
expenses.
A resolution allows the village to enter into
the revised agreement to purchase the real es-
tate located on Road 43. The revised agree-
ment to purchase the real estate requires the
need for a survey and to continue the closing
date in order to allow a survey to be obtained.
The motion to accept the resolution unani-
mously passed as an emergency reading fol-
lowed by approval to accept the resolution.
The Antwerp Police Department reported
that 104 calls for service were made in March
and seven citations were turned over to
Mayor’s Court.
During the month, Mayor’s Court took in
$685.
A motion was unanimously passed to do-
nate $100 to the Antwerp after-prom commit-
tee for the purpose of purchasing gift cards
from local businesses as a way of supporting
the after-prom and the young people of the
community.
In other business, Keeran reported:
• an application has been submitted to
Maumee Valley Planning organization for the
waterline replacement project on West Wood-
cox. The request for funding will be presented
to the county commissioners along with other
block grant projects from township and vil-
lages in the next few weeks. The commission-
ers will decide in May what projects will
receive funding. If funding is awarded for the
Woodcox project, work will take place in
2015. The cost of the waterline replacement is
$171,313. The projected grant would pay for
the entire cost minus $26,250 for engineering
fees.
• repair of potholes and repaving estimates
will be received in the next couple of weeks.
Once estimates are calculated repairs will
begin shortly thereafter.
• the berm located next to the river on Shaf-
fer Road has been deteriorating for years. The
county engineer has been contacted and once
he makes a suggestion on how to shore up the
berm the repairs will be made. After the re-
pairs are completed, the street repairs to the
sunken roadway will be completed.
• hydrants are being flushed throughout the
village. Hydrants north of River Street will be
flushed first followed by those located on the
south side. Residents are asked to watch for
cloudy or rusty water and to run their faucets
prior to washing clothes.
• VFW Post 5087 donated all new military
service flags, the Ohio state flag and American
flag for the veterans’ memorial.
4-H CLUB PACKS SOUP – The Leaders of Tomorrow 4-H Club packed soup April 10 for its
community service project. They packaged 1,200 bags of soup which will make 12,000 meals.
The soup will be shipped to Haiti and the Philippines.
Master Gardener plant sale set
VAN WERT – The annual
Ohio State University Exten-
sion (OSUE) Van Wert
County Master Gardener Vol-
unteer Plant Sale will be held
at 8 a.m. Saturday, April 26 in
the Junior Fair Building on
the fairgrounds.
The proceeds through the
sale of plants will benefit the
OSUE Van Wert County
Master Gardener Volunteer’s
projects, such as the Garden
for the Senses, Children’s
Garden, and their continuing
educational activities.
The plant sale will feature
potted herbs, both culinary and
aromatic, plus a variety of col-
orful perennials have been se-
lected for the sale. Gardening
items are also available.
Lose your ash tree? Ask an
expert about tree replacement
and tree planting preparation:
10-minute demonstrations will
be held at 8:30 a.m., 9 a.m.,
9:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. pre-
sented by Curtis Young, OSU
Extension educator.
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 11A
Vancrest and St. John
Lutheran Church of Payne
hosted an Easter egg hunt on
Saturday, April 12 in Payne.
More than 100 members of the
community showed up to
share in the hunt. In excess of
1,000 eggs hidden around the
grounds of Vancrest and
search areas were sectioned
off by age group. There was
also a photo op with the
Easter Bunny. Pictured with
the bunny are event volun-
teers, front from left– Rita
Gross, Mathew Adams
(bunny), Chris Kipker; back –
Deb Baumert, Paul Ludwig,
Kathy Flaugh, Vicky Laukhuf
and Jennifer Ramsier.
Vantage board meets
VAN WERT – School board members and administrators from
the 13 associate schools that attend Vantage enjoyed a delicious din-
ner prepared by culinary arts students at the 37th annual Vantage all
boards dinner on Thursday night, April 3. Speaking about the Vantage
STEM Equity project was MaryJo Wilhelm, Vantage community re-
lations coordinator.
The Vantage Board of Education held their April board meeting
in the district conference room prior to the dinner. The minutes from
the March 6 regular board meeting were approved along with finan-
cial statements for the month of February. Fiscal year 2014 revenues
and appropriations were amended.
Superintendent Staci Kaufman updated the board on education and
community items which included recent interest by Wright State Uni-
versity Lake Campus on building college pathways and Fort Worth
Towers, Hicksville, interest in a welding apprenticeship or internship
program.
A brief discussion updated the board on remaining punch list items
in the recent Vantage construction project.
Adult education director Pete Prichard reported on accreditation
status and program enrollment and retention.
High school director Ben Winans recognized nine BPA students
who will compete in the national contest and commended the out-
standing team effort that was required to host the FCCLA regional
contests. He also presented information on preliminary enrollment
numbers for the 2014-15 school year, program updates, and special
activities.
In new business, the board:
• Employed the following list, as needed as scheduled: Leigh
Carey, two year, Health Technologies; Paula VanTilburg, continuing,
Medical Office Management; Michelle Knippen, two year, special
education; Larry Regedanz, two year, Network Systems; Robin Burns,
continuing, Culinary Arts; Jeff Duncan, four year, Auto Technology;
Rachael Harpel, four year, science; Rose Krietemeyer, continuing,
Paulding FCS; Darrell Miller, one year, attendance/discipline; Robert
Schnippel, one year, Paulding Ag; Jerry Robinson, four year, Carpen-
try; Sarah Wurth, one year, Social Studies.
• Approved supplemental contracts for Robert Schnippel and
Mike Miller, Summer Ag Student Projects.
• Non-renewed the position of building and grounds educational
aide, Brenda Wurst, effective at the end of the 2013-14 school year.
(Position determined annually by program enrollment).
• Employed adult education instructors, as needed, as scheduled
– Donald Swander and Kent Taylor, adult ed instructors; Pam Knodel,
adult ed learning resource professional.
• Approved overnight travel to Haiti for Student Interact Club
business from April 20-28.
• Approved overnight travel to Indianapolis for National BPA
Leadership from April 30-May 4.
• Approved interdistrict open enrollment checklist for fiscal year
2014-15.
• Acknowledgee that the proposed school district maintenance
plan required by state law and the project agreement with the Ohio
School Facilities Commission has been created.
• Approved the City of Van Wert Community Reinvestment Area
Agreement between Glen and Connie Grunden of Van Wert and Van-
tage Career Center.
• Accepted the donation of a 2001 Ford Mustang, with the value
of $3,717 from Alan Lautzenheiser for the Auto Technology program.
• Accepted the donation of two three-phase electric motors with
the value of $800 from Al Brown for the Electricity program.
• Accepted a donation of $2,500 from Van Wert Rotary Founda-
tion for the Vantage Interact Club.
• Accepted a donation of $258 from the Resource and Opportu-
nity Center, St. Marys, to assist students in the GED program at Van-
tage Career Center.
• Acknowledged the services donated from Statewide Ford and
Straightline Body & Paint to the Vantage Auto Technology class.
• Accepted the 2014-15 student handbook.
After two separate executive sessions to discuss personnel items,
with no action taken, the board adjourned.
The next regular board meeting will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday,
May 1 in the district conference room.
Mercy Defiance Clinic neurologist earns certification
DEFIANCE – Prasad N. Policherla, M.D.,
a neurologist at Mercy Defiance Clinic, has
earned certification and become a diplomate
of the American Board of Psychiatry and Neu-
rology (ABPN) Inc., a member board of the
American Board of Medical Specialties.
To become an ABPN diplomate, a physician
must successfully complete the certification
examination. The certification process is de-
signed to assure patients that a physician has
the knowledge and skills to diagnose and treat
specific problems and to provide medical
management for a range of problems, includ-
ing emergencies and long-term care of chronic
neurological disorders.
Dr. Policherla has completed one-year fel-
lowships at Wayne State University, Detroit,
in neurotrauma/neuro critical care/emergency
neurology and clinical neurophysiology. He
has also earned certification in healthcare
quality management by the American Board
of Quality Assurance and Utilization Review
Physicians (ABQAURP), urgent care medi-
cine by the American Board of Urgent Care
Medicine, and pain management by the Amer-
ican Academy of Pain Management.
PRASAD POLICHERLA
Visit us online at
www.progressnewspaper.org
12A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 23, 2014
HOUSE OF LOVE MINISTRIES
33ctf
We send our love to the men at Chillicothe charm school.
Also, we would like to thank those who have been obedient to the Lord
and have continued to sow seed into the House of Love Ministries. Keep
us covered in prayer and we will do the same for you.
Peace and love, Pastor Dwayne
D
u
s
t
y
B
ib
leslead
to
d
i
r
t
y
l
i
v
e
s We the believers of the House of Love ministries
witnessed God's healing mercy again in our presence.
Tuesday night, Tammy Bauer was rushed to Parkview hospital
with two pulmonary emboli (PE). Te Holy Spirit instructed
Pastor Dwayne to pray boldly over Tammy on Wednesday that the
emboli would be dissolved or disappear. We prayed through
the power of the Holy Spirit and the following day when more MRIs
were taken they could no longer fnd any signs of the emboli.
Tammy appeared healthy in church on Sunday. To God be the glory.
Past -Time Cafe
Anniversary
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419-399-2720
107 West Perry • Paulding
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2014 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT Lt.
Tan, Loaded, 14K.
2013 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT 4 Dr.,
White, 10K, Astro Roof, 3.6 V-6.
2013 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT 4 Dr.,
Red, 7K, Sunroof, Spoiler, 3.6 V-6.
2013 CHEVROLET SONIC SEDAN 4
Dr., LTZ-2, Red, 16K.
2013 CHEVROLET TAHOE LTZ White,
Every Option Built, 4K.
2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN 4
Dr., Black, Base Model
2013 GMC ACADIA SLT 4 Dr., AWD,
Blue, Leather.
2013 GMC ACADIA DENALI SUV
AWD, Red Met., Cocoa Leather, Bg Roof,
11K.
2013 GMC TERRAIN SLT V-6, Leather,
Roof, Chromes, D-Gray.
2012 DODGE AVENGER RT 3.6, Inferno
Red, Graphite Cloth, 22K.
2011 BUICK LUCERNE CXL
PREMIUM Frost Beige Met., 34K.
2011 BUICK REGAL Dk. Blue/Tan
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2011 BUICK REGAL CXL-T 4 Dr., Bk.
Met., Astro Roof, 28K.
2011 CHEVY CAMARO RS Black, V-6,
Loaded, 25K.
2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE LT 4 Dr.,
White, 30K, 1.4 Turbo, Tan Leather.
2011 CTS AWD Red Pearl, Dbl. Sunroof,
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2011 CTS AWD White, Loaded, 30K.
2010 BUICK LUCERNE CX 4 Dr., Red
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2010 DODGE JOURNEY V-6, FWD,
Silver, Graphite Cloth, Loaded, Only 21K.
2008 CADILLAC DTS Titanium Met.,
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2008 CHEVY HHR LT Burgundy, 83K.
2007 PONTIAC G6 4 Dr., Gold, Glass
Top, V-6, Loaded, Lady Owned, 70K Miles.
2003 CADILLAC DEVILLE Di. White, Dk.
Blue Leather, 100K.
2003 MERCEDES-BENZ C-CLASS 230
COUPE Supercharged, Compressor, Burnt
Orange, Loaded, Lady Owned, 90K.
2002 CADILLAC DEVILLE Lt. Bronze,
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2001 CADILLAC DEVILLE 4 Dr., Di.
White/Tan Top, Chromes, 74K, Excellent
Condition.
1998 DODGE DAKOTA SLT White, Ext.
Cab, 3.18 V-8, Extra Clean, Topper, 141K.
Jim Langham/Paulding County Progress
Members of this year’s “Battle of the Books” winning team from Divine Mercy Catholic School
includes, front from left – Cameron Cox, Catie Strable, Kaden Sutton; back – Carson Rupp, Jacob
Graham, Allison Dyson and Treyton Banks.
Divine Mercy is ‘Battle of
the Books’ county champ
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
PAULDING – It came
down to the final question be-
tween Divine Mercy and
Grover Hill in this year’s
“Battle of the Books” county
championship last week at the
Paulding County Fairgrounds
Youth Leadership Building.
With the score tied at 12-12
in a nail biting match, Catie
Strable, spokesperson for the
Divine Mercy team, an-
swered correctly to give the
school this year’s trophy.
There was a brief hesi-
tancy, then suddenly, team
members erupted with the re-
alization that they had just
correctly answered the ques-
tion that had awarded them
the championship.
“That question was the
same as last year,” said Stra-
ble, whose squad lost to the
same Grover Hill squad in
2013. “Allie (Dyson) and I
were shocked.”
“I was happy, surprised and
all excited,” observed Dyson.
“I couldn’t believe that it was
the same question that was
the final question last year.
This year we got it right.”
Dyson said that she loves
the “Battle of the Books”
concept because it enables
her to concentrate more in her
reading.
“I like this. It’s the first
year I’ve done it,” said team
member Treyton Banks.
Library director Susan
Pieper explained that the
“Battle of the Books” pro-
gram is literary competition
involving Paulding County
schools and home-schooled
children that is sponsored by
the Paulding County
Carnegie Library system.
“This is the 23rd year that
we have done this,” said
Pieper following the event.
“We want to encourage the
children to read quality liter-
ature and find it exciting.
“We want to make reading
really fun,” continued Pieper.
“There are a lot of good old
books out there. Some of
them are 100 years old.
Paulding County is very
unique these days. There are
still a lot of very young read-
ers. We want to encourage
them to become lifetime read-
ers.”
“I like this because it keeps
kids encouraged,” com-
mented team member Jacob
Graham. “It’s amazing what
we learn about the books.”
“I like it because it makes
us all work together,” com-
mented Kaden Sutton. “Not
one person does all the work.
You have to do it as a team.
You can’t rely on one per-
son.”
In the opening round of
competition, Antwerp de-
feated Paulding, 15-9; then,
Divine Mercy defeated
Payne, 20-15; Grover Hill
bested Oakwood, 22-16 and
Divine Mercy defeated
Antwerp, 22-9, to set up the
championship match.
“This is a lot of fun,” ob-
served Carson Rupp, of the
winning team. “It teaches us
how to read and know what
we read.”
“I was nervous when they
asked the last question,” com-
mented Cameron Cox.
“I like the whole idea. This is
the best day of my life. I’m
the happiest I’ve ever been.”
Fifty books are chosen by
the staff of the library for
each year’s battle. Staff of the
library read the books and
compile the questions. All of
the schools receive the books
at the same time each fall.
Home schooled children use
the collections at the main
and branch libraries.
The slate for the final com-
petition is determined by
competition at each local
school, with the winning
team advancing to the finals.
Each year, 25 titles are kept
on the list, and 25 new titles
are added. Occasionally, all
50 titles are replaced.
Jim Langham/Paulding County Progress
The judges for last week’s Battle of the Books were Sara Molitor, Kirk Baker (announcer) and
Teresa Reel.
Bill Sherry/Paulding County Progress
PARK CLEANUP IN OAKWOOD – Recent flooding of the Auglaize River left huge piles of debris in the Oakwood Community
Park. On Friday, April 18, a group of about 40 local residents that included Gleaners, Scouts, 4-Hers and children home from
school spent most of the day loading the trash in a truck and hauling it to the village compost site. Here, workers cut up the bigger
pieces before hauling them away.
UWPC Community Impact
Grant applications available
PAULDING – The United Way of Paulding County
(UWPC) invites nonprofit agencies serving residents in Pauld-
ing County to apply for funding.
Funding guidelines for applicants include:
• Must be 501c3 agencies serving residents in Paulding
County.
• Programs must meet an identified need in the areas of ed-
ucation, income, health, or essential services.
• Agencies are encouraged to develop partnerships.
• Programs must have measurable outcomes.
• Agencies may submit more than one application.
Application materials are available at the UWPC office lo-
cated at 101 E. Perry St. in Paulding (use the South Williams
entrance) or they may be sent electronically.
Application requests should be sent to:
pcuwdirector@gmail.com.
Completed applications must be received in the office by
noon, Friday, May 23 and may be submitted electronically. Or-
ganizations are required to present their programs to the Citi-
zen’s Review Panel in June (TBA).
Please contact executive director Sonya Herber at pcuwdi-
rector@gmail.com or 419-399-8240 with any questions you
have about the application, the funding process, or questions
about potential programs.
Relay For Life
5-K Fundraiser
BRYAN – With hope, any-
thing is possible. At 8:30 a.m.
on Saturday, May 3, The
Bryan Times is holding a
“Hope” Relay for Life 5K
run/walk to continue the fight
against cancer.
The 3.1-mile course, which
is flat and fast, begins and
ends at the Williams County
YMCA. Men and women
will be divided into the fol-
lowing age groups: 12 and
under, 13-15, 16-19, 20-29,
30-39, 40-49, and 50 and
over.
Cost on the day of the race
will be $18 for those who
want a T-shirt and $10 for
those who don’t. Registration
begins at 7:30 a.m. the day of
the race.
Questions about this
fundraiser for Relay for Life
may be directed to Cheryl
Andres by emailing relayfor-
life@bryantimes.com or call-
ing 419-212-2547.
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 13A
KAUSER TRUCKING
SERVICE INC.
850 W. Harrison St.
Paulding, OH 45879
419-399-4856
• Driveway Stone
• Decorative Gravel
• Concrete/Play Sand
• Mason/Pool Sand
• BULK Top Soil/Peat
• Mulch: Bulk & Bag
• Flagstone
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• Land/Brush Cleaning
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Sunday, April 27th
10 am to 4 pm
Knights of Columbus Hall
111 Elliot Rd., Defance
• Free Admission
• Public Invited
• Largest Coin Show
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Tables 70 - Dealers 42
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For information on tables
contact Charles Bakle at
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United Way of Paulding County Luau raises $4,000
The Paulding Eagles presented United Way of Paulding County with a donation at their April 5 luau. Pictured are Dennis Price
(Eagles), Doug Miller (Eagles), Megan Clark (United Way), Marsha Bennett (Eagles), Cathy Wirts (Eagles), Pam Miller (United Way),
Sonya Herber (United Way director), Karen Baldwin (Eagles).
PAULDING – Nearly 200
enjoyed the fourth annual
United Way of Paulding
County luau fund-raiser on
April 5 at Paulding Eagles.
“Thank you to the Eagles for
their tremendous support. We
couldn’t do this without them,”
stated Sarah Sajuan, UWPC
special events leader. “We
would also like to thank every-
one for attending and the con-
tributions we received.
“Many wonderful and fun
raffle items were donated by
businesses and individuals in
the county as well as board
members,” Sajuan continued.
“We cannot thank you enough
for these very important contri-
butions to the luau.”
Executive director Sonya
Herber commented, “It was
wonderful to see how individ-
uals came together to support
the UWPC and our mission to
mobilize the caring power of
the community to improve
lives.”
Raffle prize donors included
Ace Hardware, Anna Lee
Adams, Alex Products,
Antwerp Exchange Bank,
Antwerp Pharmacy, Auglaize
Canoe & Kayaking, Erin
Baumle, Carla’s Cut and Curl,
Charloe Store, Megan Clark,
Cooper Farms, Country
Times Market, Creamy
Dreamy Soap, First Financial
Bank, Friends of Antwerp,
Sonya Herber, Holly Wood &
Vine, Hyman & Hyman,
Kircher’s Flowers, Tony and
Kay Langham,
Marilyn’s Petals & Vines,
Morning Star Convenience
Store, Oakwood Development
Company, Oasis Bar & Grill,
Oakwood Rhees’ Market, Nick
and Janice Miller, Papa Oley’s,
Paulding County Area Founda-
tion & Marshall Memorial
Supporting Foundation,
Stykemain Chevrolet grand
opening event, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
in Paulding.
• Saturday, May 17, Armed
Forces Day event 11 a.m.-1
p.m. at two different locations,
the American Legion in Oak-
wood and River Street Market
in Antwerp.
United Way of Paulding
County also will be participat-
ing in John Paulding Days in
June, Paulding County Fair,
and Flat Rock Creek Fall Fes-
tival Sept. 19-21, and a Hal-
loween Party and
fingerprinting ID kits for kids
with Sheriff Jason Landers at
the Eagles in October.
United Way has received
100 percent of its fund-raising
goal of $60,000. Remember, it
is not about meeting a goal, it’s
about meeting needs. 99.9 per-
cent remains in the county to
provide programs that make a
positive impact in our commu-
nities by improving people’s
lives.
To volunteer with the
United Way of Paulding
County, contact the office
419-399-8240 or by email
pcuwdirector@gmail.com.
Paulding Chamber of Com-
merce, Paulding County Eco-
nomic Development, Paulding
County Senior Center, Pauld-
ing-Putnam Electric, Phil’s
Diner in Oakwood, R&B Fab-
rication, Sanderson Meats,
Stan and Barb Searing,
S&P Miller Excavating
LLC., Rose Shepard, State
Bank & Trust, Stiebeling
Farms, Subway in Antwerp
and Paulding, Susie’s Family
Bakery, Tastefully Simple,
Thirty-One and Jamberry
Nails.
Winner of the 50/50 was An-
nette Glick. Winner of an iPad
mini was June Crosser.
Other special thanks go to
the GRG 3 band for playing
their fabulous music for the
event.
“It certainly was an exciting
evening, with everyone dressed
in their tropical attire. The dec-
orations were fantastic,” said
Megan Clark, trustee of
UWPC. “We had an excellent
grilled chicken breast and steak
dinner by the Eagles.”
Board members and officers
are president George Carter,
vice-president Pam Miller,
treasurer Bill Shugars, secre-
tary Erika Willitzer and trustees
Anna Lee Adams, Megan
Clark, David Fisher, Harvey
Hyman and Pam Miller.
Serving as high school rep-
resentatives are Jake Gerber,
Wayne Trace; Kyle Recker,
Antwerp; and Michael Mott,
Paulding.
The organization special
events committee is comprised
of Sarah and Sal Sajuan,
Damien Morales, Linda
Bostelman, Megan Clark,
Anna Lee Adams, Rose Shep-
ard, Sonya Herber, Cindy Clel-
lan, Brian and Jamie Wisda,
Kim Boatright, Lynn Chest,
Lauren and Dakota Knieper,
Brenda Crawford, Aniyah
Sajuan, Bill and Leslie
Shugars, Megan Meeks,
Cheryl Eddy, Jeremy and
Angel Townsend, Barb and
LeRoy Gillett, Sherry Miller
and Pam Miller.
Upcoming special events in-
clude:
• Saturday, April 26,
Progress posting
news items daily
Check the Progress web
site at www.progressnewspa-
per.org and read “Today’s
News Briefs.” We are posting
selected short news items
each weekday before they are
published in the next
Progress.
Current Progress sub-
scribers are entitled to a free
online subscription; call 419-
399-4015 or email subscrip-
tion@progressnewspaper.org
to obtain your user name and
password.
14A - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 23, 2014
GRAND
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A district legislative conference was held April 7 at the Barn Restaurant in Archbold. Among
those attending were, from left – State Senator Cliff Hite, Defiance County Farm Bureau board
member Bruce Krill, State Representative for District #82 Tony Burkley, and Farm Bureau state
trustee Mike Poling.
Kauser Trucking and Excavating were at work last week in the parking lot owned jointly by the county and Paulding Village located
on the southwest corner of the intersection of Perry and Main streets. They completed a two-day project installing catch basins and an
outlet that will be tied into the new storm water system. After Kauser completes grading in the area, there are plans to pave and stripe
the lot. It is anticipated the project will be completed this summer. Costs of the project will be split by the village and the county.
Visit us online at
www.progressnewspaper.org
Varsity Track
Sports
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 1B
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PAULDING COUNTY
PROGRESS
INSIDE:
IThe 2014
Area Guide
—special section
IFinancial
& Tax Guide
IBridal section
ILook inside!
Special sales
events from ...
Chief, Menards,
Rural King,
Ruler Foods
Around
Paulding
County
Mini Relay at
PEVS in talks
PAULDING – The Relay
For Life Mini Relay protest
that was set for the morning
of Jan. 29 at Paulding
School is canceled. The
Progress received an report
that the school had decided
to bring back Mini Relay at
the school; however, in a
phone conversation late this
morning, superintendent
Bill Han k indi ated that






































P PAULDING
AULDING C COUNTY OUNTY































































VOL. 139 NO. 23 PAULDING, OHIO 419-399-4015 www.progressnewspaper.org WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 2014 ONE DOLLAR USPS 423620
facebook.com/pauldingpaper
twitter.com/pauldingpaper
www.progressnewspaper.org P PROGRESS
ROGRESS
superintendents and some of
the transportation employees
drive the roads at 5 a.m. and
some even earlier to check
road and weather conditions.
This is a job that is taken very
seriously by those involved as
each one makes sure that roads
and conditions are safe for the
buses and students.
Frigid temperatures, snow
and the wind have been a
problem this year. It has been a
long time since temperatures
have dipped to below zero and
remain so low for such a long
time.
So, when is too cold, too
cold?
A lot of it depends on where
one lives and what one is used
to. In Florida, 40° is consid-
By NANCY WHITAKER
Progress Staff Writer
It has never been necessary
to enact a “cold weather poli-
cy” in Paulding County. That
is until this month of January.
There’s been an onslaught of
below-zero temperatures, high
winds and an accumulation of
snow.
It appears that there is not
much relief coming this week,
as temperatures are to dip
down to below zero once
again.
When the road conditions
are bad, residents usually get
fair warning from the news
media, EMA and weather
services informing of ap-
proaching bad weather.
Information is also available
on all of the school delays and
closings. Sometimes, the de-
lays and closings are an-
nounced the night before.
What nobody realizes is the
process involved in making
the decision whether to cancel
school or just delay it.
All of the Paulding County











See COLD, page 2A





Jim Langham/Paulding County Progress
A road drifting shut at Jacob’s Pointe in Payne. The county was under a Level 3 snow emergency during a portion of Monday.































































HAVILAND – The Ohio
State Highway Patrol’s Van
Wert Post is investigating
an injury crash involving a
Wayne Trace Elementary
school bus that occurred at
2 U S








Payne, was northbound
coming from Wayne Trace
High School.
Troopers said Dingus was
distracted in the vehicle and
drifted left of center. Etzler
i i d





Bus-car crash
injures one
Too cool for school? Districts may set policies
DID YOU KNOW?
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FREE!
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Paulding Progress
Paulding Progress
E-Edition
Online Content
on Phone & Tablets
Basketball Marathon raises $9,000
By JIM LANGHAM
Feature Writer
PAYNE – At least $9,000 will be placed in the
Paulding County Society for Crippled Children
and Adults as a result of money raised at the 36th
annual Basketball Marathon held this past week-
end, April 18-19 at the Payne Elementary
School.
Chad Benschneider, who once again spear-
headed the event, said that 118 teams partici-
pated in this event.
“That was the third highest number of teams
we’ve had to participate,” said Benschneider.
“We’re in good shape. We continue to appreciate
all of the support we get from businesses and in-
dividuals around the area. It’s not just Paulding
County, there are supporting efforts that come
from surrounding counties and Indiana.”
Last year’s event sported the highest number
of teams on record, with 126 entries.
This year’s final tally was minus a donation
from Thrivent, which usually donates on an
every-other-year basis, said Benschneider. How-
ever, Oakwood Gleaner Arbor gave $200 and the
Paulding chapter gave $750, which nearly sup-
plemented the total amount given by Thrivent.
“It’s amazing how things always work out,”
said Benschneider. “This always comes together
and we are happy with the way that it came
through this year.”
Benschneider noted that there were seven di-
visions of teams playing for 29.5 hours during
Easter weekend.
Top awards were captured by the following
teams in each division:
• Mini-Tots – 1. Divine Mercy School, 2. Lee
Kinstle GM; Sportsmanship, Payne Super Valu
• Tots – 1. Hailey’s Team, 2. Antwerp Ex-
change Bank; Sportsmanship, Grace Home Im-
provement
• Mini-Youth – 1. MAC Tigers, 2. Parkview
Physician’s Group; Sportsmanship, 469 Cycle
Club
• Youth – 1. Benschneider Auto, 2. Paulding
First Christian; Sportsmanship, Payne Venturing
Crew
• Co-ed – 1. Manchester Spirit, 2. Midwest
Community Federal Credit Union; Sportsman-
ship, Innovative Assembly Service
• Women – 1. Foltz Insurance, 2. Laukhuf
Farms
• Men – 1. The Linder Clan, 2. Wauseon Ma-
chine’ Sportsmanship, Reinhart Chevy.
This year’s Traveling Plaque was awarded to
the Edgerton Wesleyan Church for the multiple
teams they entered the last several years and their
help in cleaning the gym after the Marathon was
over.
The countywide volunteer board of the Crip-
pled Children Society screens each application
to ensure that there is a need and that the need is
not fulfilled by other means. Applications are
available from any board member.
Money from the Marathon, fall mailing and
individual donations throughout the year are
used for county residents on such things as med-
ications, assistance with medications, physical
and occupational therapy, speech therapy, hand-
icap programs, appliances such as wheel chairs,
braces and more.
Jim Langham/Paulding County Progress
The sound of the basketball bouncing on the Payne Elementary Gym floor signified 118 teams
that played in this year’s basketball marathon on Friday and Saturday. The event drew the third
highest number of teams ever.
Jim Langham/Paulding County Progress
Bleachers were crowded on Friday evening as the county’s supporters turned out to watch
their children and friends play in the 36th Paulding Marathon.
Raider boys take Wayne
Trace Invitational title
By KEVIN
WANNEMACHER
Sportswriter
HAVILAND – Wayne
Trace’s boys and the Tinora
girls each captured team
championships at the 38th an-
nual Wayne Trace track invi-
tational held Thursday
evening at the home of the
Raiders.
The Raider boys took first
with 78 points to nip second
place Fairview’s 72 while
Hicksville took third at 64.
Lincolnview (59), Ayersville
(56), Tinora (52) and Pet-
tisville (51) rounded out the
top seven squads. Antwerp
finished 11th with 18 points
on the night.
Wayne Trace’s Arlen
Stoller won the 800 meter run
in 2:07.12 with Hank Sinn
taking first in the discus with
a toss of 141-9.
Antwerp’s Sam
Williamson won the 3200
meter run with a time of
10:00.05 while also finishing
second in the 1600 run.
Other placers for the red,
white and blue included Seth
Saylor (fifth, 110 hurdles and
300 hurdles), Stoller (fourth,
1600 run and fifth, 3200 run),
Kenny Ganter (fifth, 400
dash), Cole Shepherd (fourth,
800 run and long jump),
Jacob Dingus (sixth, 200
dash), Brock Worden (fifth,
discus and fourth, shot put),
David Sinn (sixth, high
jump), Jake Gerber (second,
pole vault) and Sinn (third,
shot put).
The Raiders’ 3200 relay
team of Stoller, Saylor, Bran-
don Zartman and Shepherd
took third as did the 800 relay
team of Dingus, Ganter, Wes
Goings and Connor Arend.
Shepherd, Saylor, Goings and
Ganter combined to place
fourth in the 1600 relay as
well.
Fairview’s 800 relay team
of Brandon Bostater, Jacob
Eisel, Zach Thomas and
Kaleb Eisel set a new meet
record of 1:34.27. Lincol-
nview’s Hunter Blankemeyer
also entered the record books
after winning the 110 hurdles
in 15.34.
Tinora took the girls’ team
title with 94 points, easily
outdistancing second place
Holgate’s 59.5. Edgerton
(44), Pettisville (42), Wayne
Trace (40), Fairview (36) and
Antwerp (34) completed the
top seven schools.
Antwerp’s Audrie Lon-
gardner broke the meet record
in the 400 meter dash, posting
a winning time of 1:00.78.
The Lady Archer 1600 relay
team of Annie Miesle, Bailee
Sigman, Jamie Ryan and
Longardner also was victori-
ous, completing the race in
4:27.69.
Tori Abdul of Tinora set
new meet records in the 100
dash (12.52) and 200 dash
(26.05).
Abdul, Kenzie Hall, Ash-
ton Otte and Chelsey Seifert
also combined to set new
meet records in the 800 relay
(1:48.28) and 400 relay
(50.99). Edon’s Hannah
Brehm-Gutting posted a toss
of 128-5 in the discus to set a
new meet record.
Other individuals placing
for the red, white and blue in-
cluded Monique Goings
(fourth, 100 dash and long
jump), Shayna Temple (sec-
ond, 300 hurdles and fifth,
high jump), Erin Mohr (tied
for third, high jump) and
Brooke Wilcox (sixth, 200
dash).
The Raider quartet of Car-
rigan Critten, Stacy Flint, Go-
ings and Wilcox placed
second in the 800 relay and
finished third in the 400 relay.
Temple, Abbie Shepherd,
Wilcox and Flint also took
fifth in the 1600 relay.
Also scoring points for the
blue and white were Miesle
(fifth, 110 hurdles), Sigman
(third, 800 run) and Longard-
ner (fourth, 200 dash). Lon-
gardner, Ryan, Sigman and
Mackenzie Hart combined to
finish fifth in the 3200 relay.
Team results:
Boys - Wayne Trace 78,
Fairview 72, Hicksville 64,
Lincolnview 59, Ayersville
56, Tinora 52, Pettisville 51,
Continental 24, Edon 23,
Edgerton 19, Antwerp 18,
Holgate 10
Girls - Tinora 94, Holgate
59.5, Edgerton 44, Pettisville
42, Wayne Trace 40, Fairview
36, Antwerp 34, Toledo Notre
Dame 33.5, Stryker 33, Ay-
ersville 29, Continental 27,
Lincolnview 25, Edon 17,
Hicksville 10, Lima Temple
Christian 3
COLUMBUS GROVE INVITE
Paulding’s boys and girls track
teams took part in the Columbus
Grove Invitational last Thursday
with the boys finishing tied for
fourth and the girls taking 11th.
Anna won the boys’ portion
with 137 points to get past the
host Bulldogs, who finished with
110. Delphos St. John’s posted a
third place finish with 47 while
Arlington and Paulding each to-
taled 44.
Ryan Schindler won the shot
put to lead the Panthers with a
toss of 46-11-3/4 while also fin-
ishing third in the discus after a
toss of 131-9.
Preston Ingol placed sixth in
the 100 dash with a time of 12.40
and Ron Mercer was fifth in the
200 dash in 24.50. Andrew Lay-
man took sixth in the 3200 run,
posting a time of 11:02.50.
Kaleb Hernandez jumped 5-8 in
the high jump to finish fourth
and teammate Sean Bentley
leaped 5-10 to post second.
Dylan Carnahan finished fifth in
the pole vault at 11-0 with Lucas
Arend grabbing sixth in the long
jump after a jump of 17-8.
Paulding’s 400 relay team of
Hernandez, Mercer, Zach Buch-
man and Ingol combined to
place fourth in 47.30 Cody Jar-
rell, Buchman, Mercer and Ingol
posting a fourth place finish in
1:39.80 in the 800 relay. The
Panther 3200 relay quartet of
Travis Jones, Simeon Shepherd,
Layman and Arend was sixth in
9:20.50.
On the girls side, the Lady
Bulldogs recorded 91-1/3 points
to win the championship fol-
lowed by Botkins (83) and Ar-
lington (62). Paulding picked up
13 points in the meet.
Malayna Van Cleve was
fourth in the 300 hurdles with a
time of 50.70.
The Lady Panther 400 relay
team of Van Cleve, JoEllyn
Salinas, Sidney Salinas and
Meagan Weller finished sixth
in 54.50.
Van Cleve, Sidney Salinas,
Weller and Taylor March com-
bining to take fourth in the 800
relay with a time of 1:53.90
and also finished fourth in the
1600 relay in 4:28.40.
www.progressnewspaper.org
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see more
photos of
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favorite
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2B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 23, 2014
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Birthdate__________________________________
Parents____________________________________
_____________________________________________
Grandparents______________________________
_____________________________________________
***NOTE: These are a reduced version of what your picture will actually look like.
--Graduate--
Graduate’s Name
Name of School
Date of Birth
Parents Name
Grandparents
Deadline is May 9th, 2014
Enclose Check
for
$
20.
00
and mail to Baby to
Graduate Review
Paulding Progress
PO Box 180
Paulding, OH 45879 or email
to advertising@
progressnewspaper.org
with payment information
Published Wednesday
May 21, 2014
“Baby To Graduate Review”
Now’s the time to reserve your space for graduates, from the Paulding County area,
a spot in this “special edition” just for them. Just bring in or mail with coupon below
your graduates’ favorite baby picture along with their senior picture to be published side by
side on May 15. What a special way to show off that graduate that you’re so proud of.
We will also include- College, Jr. High and Kindergarten Graduates
33k5 Due to limited space, parents and grandparents only.
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Varsity
Games
of the
Week
Softball
Minster................18
Antwerp.................1
Paulding at Crestview
.........................ppd
Wayne Trace ........12
Heritage ................0
Wayne Trace...........4
Antwerp.................0
Ottawa-Glandorf 3,
Wayne Trace 0
Wayne Trace 5, Ottawa-
Glandorf 1
Baseball
Paulding at Crestview
.........................ppd
Ottawa-Glandorf ..14
Wayne Trace...........1
Hicksville 12, Antwerp 4
Paulding 18, Antwerp 3
Paulding 12, Hicksville 0
Track
WAYNE TRACE INV.
Boys’ meet -
Wayne Trace 1st ..78
Fairview 2nd .......72
Antwerp 11th ......18
Girls’ meet -
Tinora 1st............94
W. Trace 5th.........40
Antwerp...............34
GROVE INVIT.
Boys’ meet -
Paulding 4th .......44
Girls’ meet -
Paulding 11th .....13
Sports
schedule
THURSDAY, APRIL 24 –
Softball: Antwerp at Edgerton;
Paulding hosts Lincolnview;
Wayne Trace hosts Hicksville
Baseball: Antwerp at Edgerton;
Paulding hosts Lincolnview;
Wayne Trace hosts Hicksville
FRIDAY, APRIL 25 –
Softball: Antwerp hosts
Fayette; Paulding at Parkway
Baseball: Antwerp at Montpe-
lier; Paulding hosts Wayne Trace
SATURDAY, APRIL 26 –
Baseball: Paulding at Edger-
ton; Wayne Trace hosts North
Central and Antwerp
Track & Field: Antwerp at
Hicksville Invitational; Paulding
and Wayne Trace at Ayersville
Diller Invitational
MONDAY, APRIL 28 –
Softball: Paulding hosts Ada;
Wayne Trace hosts Woodlan
Baseball: Antwerp at Tinora;
Paulding hosts Ada
TUESDAY, APRIL 29 –
Softball: Antwerp hosts
Hicksville; Paulding hosts
Stryker; Wayne Trace at Ay-
ersville
Baseball: Antwerp hosts
Hicksville; Paulding at Arch-
bold; Wayne Trace at Ayersville
Track & Field: Antwerp and
Fayette at Edon
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30 –
Baseball: Wayne Trace hosts
Ottoville
DODGEBALL FUNDRAISER – The Paulding After Prom parents appreciate everyone who
played, watched and helped with their recent dodgeball fundraiser. The division winner teams
won $50 and pizza donated by Marco’s Pizza in Paulding. The Paulding After Prom Dodge Ball
Tournament winners in the high school division (above) were Kyle Kauser, Dylan Carnahan, Javi
Gonzales, Quentin Vance and Justin Adams. Middle school division winners (below) were Lupe
Martinez, Blake Dobbelaere, Jaret Miller, James Stultz and Carson Shull.
Varsity Softball
Varsity Baseball
O-G 3, WAYNE TRACE 0; WAYNE TRACE 5, O-G 1
Wayne Trace and Ottawa Glandorf split a doubleheader in
varsity softball action Saturday at the home of the Raiders.
The Lady Titans won the opener 3-0 as Haley Kitchen scat-
tered seven hits while striking out nine to shut down the Raider
offense.
Emily Annesser had two singles to lead the Titan offense
with Tasha Cass, Michelle Sdao, Stephanie Hempfling and
Kate Kaufman all posting a single each.
Ottawa Glandorf scored one run in the fourth to take the lead
and added two more in the fifth to round out the scoring in the
contest.
Addison Baumle allowed six hits and a walk in seven in-
nings of work, suffering the loss for Wayne Trace. Baumle
fanned 10 Titan hitters on the day.
Emilie Linder paced the Raider offense with three singles
and Brenda Feasby added a pair of hits. Carley Wright and Bai-
ley Bergman picked up the other Wayne Trace hits in the con-
test.
In the second game, the red, white and blue scored one run
each in the first, third and fourth innings and added two more
in the sixth to seal a 5-1 victory over Ottawa Glandorf.
The Titans picked up their lone run in the fifth inning.
Molly Crosby recorded the win for Wayne Trace, allowing
the Titans only six hits and a walk to go along with three strike-
outs.
Libby Stabler ripped a single and a double to pace the red,
white and blue offense and Emilie Linder added two singles.
Wright (double), Baumle (single), Feasby (single) and
Mackenzie Swary (single) also had hits for Wayne Trace.
Stephanie Hempfling suffered the loss for Ottawa Glandorf,
giving up eight hits and fanning four in six innings of work.
Sdao topped the Titans with two singles with Kitchen adding
a double. Hempfling, Erin Basinger and Lindsey Prichard also
had singles for the blue and gold.
WAYNE TRACE 4, ANTWERP 0
Wayne Trace scored single runs in the first and second in-
nings and added two more in the fourth en route to a 4-0 Green
Meadows Conference victory over county rival Antwerp.
The Raiders posted eight hits compared to Antwerp’s two in
recording the win.
Sydney Critten had two hits and two runs batted in to lead
the Wayne Trace offense with Addison Baumle also driving in
a pair of runs.
Molly Crosby picked up the win on the hill for the lady
Raiders, striking out eight Antwerp hitters in the complete
game effort.
Peyton Short and Autumn Hughes had the only two Archer
hits.
HICKSVILLE 12, ANTWERP 4
Hicksville scored three
runs in each of the first three
innings as the Aces cruised to
a 12-4 win over Antwerp Fri-
day night.
Nine different Hicksville
batters picked up one hit each
and the Aces also benefited
from six Archer fielding er-
rors.
Kaden Brumett had two
hits to lead Antwerp while
Trenton Copsey, Jeff Cole-
man and Justin Langham
added one hit each.
Brumett took the loss on
the hill, tossing three innings
while allowing four earned
runs, six hits and a walk.
Brumett also fanned a trio of
Hicksville hitters.
PAULDING 18, ANTWERP 3
Paulding rolled to an 18-3
win over the Archers as the
Panthers plated six in the first
and eight in the second.
Jeff Coleman had two hits
for the Antwerp offense with
Justice Clark getting the other
hit.
Kyle Kauser got the win
for the Panthers, giving up
three hits, one earned run and
two walks while fanning
seven in five innings of work.
Kauser, Corbin Edwards
and Treston Gonzales each
posted three hits and Quentin
Vance added two more.
Cameron Doster, Javier Gon-
zales, Aaron Mock, Damon
Egnor and Justin Adams all
had a hit for the maroon and
white.
O-G 14, WAYNE TRACE 1
Ottawa Glandorf rolled to a
14-1 win over Wayne Trace
in non-league baseball action
last Monday afternoon.
The Raiders managed only
two hits in the contest, getting
singles from Noah Stoller and
Grant Gillett.
Denver Burkley suffered
the loss for the red, white and
blue, allowing 11 hits and
five walks but only two
earned runs as the Raider de-
fense amassed 15 errors in the
contest.
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County
Progress -
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exclusive
Paulding County
news.
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Paulding County Progress -3B
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• Consultation
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Call to make an appointment at:
419-506-9010
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410 East River Street, Antwerp
Located east side of town on old 24
Includes:
1st Visit for $27
SIGN LETTERS OF INTENT – Guy and Gerod Harder, students at Paulding High School, have
signed to further their education and play basketball at Mount Vernon Nazarene University. Front
row from left are Brian Harder, Gerod Harder, Guy Harder and Melissa Harder; back row – athletic
director Chris Etzler, Grant Harder and coach Shawn Brewer.
STATE SCIENCE DAY QUALIFIERS – Several Paulding Middle School and High School students
have qualified for the State Science Day, which will be held on Saturday, May 10 at Ohio State
University. From left are Ava Moats, Bridgett Moore, Kacie Karlstadt, Brooke Weidenhamer, Pre-
ston Johanns, Jordan Shull and Cade McGarvey. The students are under the supervision of
LeeAnn Favorito.
The Paulding High School National Honor Society inducted 25 new members. Currently there are 35 seniors already inducted
from the previous year. The requirements are to have a 3.5 or higher GPA and to fill out an application to be accepted. Members
are required to have six community service hours as a junior and 10 as seniors. The inductees included: seniors, Olivia Cramer,
Emily Farr, Michael Mott, Chelsea Rose, Jenifer Switzer and Jade VanCleve; juniors, Taylor Ankney, Katie Carnahan, Kathryn
Clapsaddle, Kayla Deitrick, Hannah English, Claudia Foltz, Ben Heilshorn, Alexis Howell, Karolina Zakuczun, Erin Johanns, Amanda
Lacastro, Ellie Miller, Isaac Nice, Morgan Riley, Shayla Shepherd, William (Bill) Smith, Ashlyn Strahley, Malayna VanCleve and
Laurel Wehrkamp. The advisers are Mrs. Melissa Harder and Mrs. Malinda Schmidt.
READ MORE, KNOW MORE – Paulding High School FCCLA members and the Paulding High School Child Development classes
have been reading to the Paulding Elementary preschoolers. Family and Consumer Science members Kacie Karlstadt and Jordan
Shull organized a “Focus on Children” project titled “Read More, Know More.” They collected gently used children’s books that
were read to preschoolers. The preschoolers were able to choose a book to keep. Bookmarks were distributed that reminded par-
ents of the importance of reading to their children.
School Lunch Menus
Menus are subject to change
ANTWERP LOCAL SCHOOLS
Week of April 28
MONDAY – Lunch: Beef and
onion on bun, corn, pears, milk.
Plus: Salad bar.
TUESDAY – Lunch: Chicken fa-
jita, tossed salad, mixed fruit, milk.
Plus: Salad bar.
WEDNESDAY – Lunch: Hot dog
on bun, carrots with dip, pineapple,
milk. Plus: Salad bar.
THURSDAY AND FRIDAY
Not available
PAULDING HIGH SCHOOL
Week of April 28
MONDAY – Breakfast: Breakfast
pizza, sausage, bacon, fruit, juice,
milk. Lunch: Popcorn chicken bowl,
dinner roll or salad bar, breadstick,
fruit, milk.
TUESDAY – Breakfast: Egg and
sausage burrito, juice, fruit, milk.
Lunch: Chicken chunk salad, ched-
dar biscuit, or sandwich on bun,
oven fries, milk.
WEDNESDAY – Breakfast:
Sausage, egg and cheese bagel,
fruit, milk. Lunch: Pizza sticks, mari-
nara sauce, or top-your-own-potato,
pretzel breadstick, milk.
THURSDAY – Breakfast: Waffles,
sausage links, juice, fruit, milk.
Lunch: General Tso’s chicken bowl,
egg roll, or Big Daddy pizza, lettuce
salad, fruit, milk.
FRIDAY – Breakfast: Sausage
gravy and biscuit, juice, fruit, milk.
Lunch: Cheeseburger on bun, pick-
les, oven potatoes, or salad bar and
breadstick, fruit, milk.
OAKWOOD ELEMENTARY
Week of April 28
Packed lunch: Peanut butter
and jelly, Gogurt, crackers, milk.
MONDAY – Breakfast: Yogurt,
Goldfish grahams, fruit, milk. Lunch:
Chicken on whole grain bun, broc-
coli, lettuce salad, fruit, milk.
TUESDAY – Breakfast: Pan-
cakes, fruit, milk. Lunch: Vegetable
beef soup, grilled cheese, celery
sticks, fruit, milk.
WEDNESDAY – Breakfast:
Breakfast pizza, fruit, milk. Lunch:
Pepperoni bread stick, marinara
sauce, green beans, fruit, milk.
THURSDAY – Breakfast: Egg and
cheese omelet, fruit, milk. Lunch:
Chicken fajita, lettuce, corn, fruit,
milk.
FRIDAY – Breakfast: Cereal or
cereal bar, fruit, milk. Lunch: Cheese
pizza, corn, bean salad, fruit, milk.
PAULDING ELEMENTARY
Week of April 28
MONDAY – Breakfast: Yogurt,
Goldfish grahams, fruit, juice, milk.
Lunch: Chicken on whole grain bun,
carrots, fresh vegetable choice, or
bologna on bun, fruit, milk.
TUESDAY – Breakfast: Pan-
cakes, fruit, juice, milk. Lunch: Veg-
etable beef soup with crackers or
bread, fresh vegetable choice, or
bologna on whole grain bun milk.
WEDNESDAY – Breakfast: Bur-
rito, fruit, juice, milk. Lunch: Pan-
cakes, sausage, oven potatoes,
tomato juice or peanut butter and
jelly, Gogurt, crackers, fruit, milk.
THURSDAY – Breakfast: Muffin,
string cheese, fruit, juice, milk.
Lunch: Barbecue on whole grain
bun, oven potatoes, corn, or peanut
butter and jelly, Gogurt, crackers,
fruit, milk.
FRIDAY – Breakfast: Cereal or
cereal bar, fruit, juice, milk. Lunch:
Mozzarella sticks with marinara
sauce, spaghetti rings, or peanut
butter and jelly, Gogurt, crackers,
milk.
WAYNE TRACE SCHOOLS
Week of April 28
MONDAY – Breakfast: Sausage
pizza, fruit, juice, milk. Lunch:
Chicken and noodles, mashed pota-
toes, green beans, dinner roll, fruit,
milk. Also offered to HS: Chef salad,
pizza sub or grilled chicken on bun
with salad bar.
TUESDAY – Breakfast: Egg,
cheese muffin. Lunch: Cook’s
Choice. Also offered to HS: Chef
salad, pizza sub or chicken sand-
wich with salad bar.
WEDNESDAY – Breakfast: Mini
pancakes, sausage, fruit, milk.
Lunch: Breaded chicken sandwich,
baked beans, fruit, milk. Also offered
to HS: Chef salad, pizza sub or pret-
zel with cheese, salad bar.
THURSDAY – Breakfast: Cheese
omelet, toast, fruit, milk. Lunch: Bar-
becue pork sandwich, sweet potato
fries, fruit, milk. Also at Jr/Sr. High
School – Chef salad, pizza sub or
chicken sandwich on bun with salad
bar.
FRIDAY – Breakfast: Fruit
turnover, fruit, milk. Lunch: Fiestada,
romaine lettuce salad, fruit, milk.
Also at Jr/Sr. High School – Chef
salad, pizza sub or pretzel with
cheese, with salad bar.
DIVINE MERCY SCHOOL
Week of April 28
Same menu as Wayne Trace; no
breakfast served.
1015 N. Williams St. • Paulding • 419-399-5092
4B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 23, 2014
School Zone
1883 – 2013
130 Continuous Years
8516, Rd. 137, Paulding
(419) 399-3160
On Friday, February 14th, students at Antwerp Elementary celebrated the 100th day of school. Pictured here are the first graders
with their teachers, who dressed up like they were 100 years old. For 100 Day, the first graders made a poster with "100 Reasons Why
We Love Our School."
Paulding Maramart
Payne Maramart
127 Maramart
Proud Sponsor of
Paulding County’s School Zone
The Following Businesses are proud to
present the Paulding County School Zone
Congratulations to Vantage Blue Chippers for the second quarter –
front - Quintin Mengerink (Van Wert), Adam Jurczyk (Van Wert), Jarett
Bute (Antwerp); back - Dustin Carter (Van Wert), Emily Pastor (Paulding),
Andrea Shepherd (Lincolnview), Shana Brincefield (Lincolnview), and
Gene Gillespie (Crestview). Blue Chippers have perfect attendance and a
4.0 gpa for a nine-week period.
Lifetime
FREE car
washes w/ any
New or Used
purchased
1255 N. Williams St.
Paulding
1-800-399-2071
www.stykemainchevy.com
DAIRY QUEEN
of Paulding
Monday - Saturday 10:30-9:00
Sunday 11:00-9:00
Wayne Trace JH recently took 75 students to Olympic Lanes in Van Wert as a
Reward Day. In order to be eligible for this reward, a student could not have late
homework, a discipline referral, a failing grade, or a tardy to class during the sec-
ond grading period. Great Job Raiders; keep up the good work!!!
Paulding Elementary fourth graders are learning about poetry and
creating poetry journals of their own in their Language Arts class.
Jahnessa LaFountain and Jeremiah Smith are shown working on
their poetry journals.
Oakwood Elementary third graders were privileged to have Tucker
Shisler visit them recently. He shared a lot of stories about his many years
of working as an auctioneer. Shown with Mr. Shisler are Mason Schlatter,
Caydence Rue, and Joseph Estle.
Wayne Trace Grover Hill January Students of the Month front row - Cameron
Sinn, Whitney Boroff, Corbin Kimmel, Addison Stoller & Devin Nichols;
standing - Tatum Tigner, Jacob Howell, Julie Sinn, Jacob Hull & Andrew Sinn;
back - Tucker Antoine and Ryley Baker. Absent are Hayden Manson and Macy
Doster.
Our students at WT Grover Hill AR TREE-MENDOUS READ-
ERS!!!! Students read books from the Accelerated Reader list
and take quizzes. Passing scores on these quizzes give the stu-
dents points. When a student has accumulated 100 points they
earn an apple with their picture on it. Our top two students have
400 points each. Parents keep encouraging your students to
read daily.
The fifth and sixth graders at Divine Mercy recently experimented with dry ice. The experiment, along with other
demonstrations, helped students understand the different states of matter and how phase changes occur.
Students in Mrs. Stouffer's 5th grade social studies class
at Payne Elementary recently completed a unit on climates
of the world. For their assessment, students chose a loca-
tion anywhere in the world and using the information they
learned created travel brochures for their location. After the
brochure was completed, students then presented them to
the class.
Approximately 80 community members and families from the
PARC Lane's Early Intervention program enjoyed "Breakfast
with the Easter Bunny" on Saturday, April 12. The community
event included breakfast, crafts, a picture with the Easter
Bunny, and a coloring contest for Easter baskets.
The Wayne Trace High Spanish Club cel-
ebrated Easter by making traditional
Mexican cascarones. The Easter eggs were
stuffed with confetti and glitter, then broken
in jest over the heads of their friends. WTHS
Spanish teacher Jacqueline Davis reports,
“It’s always fun, and always messy.” Here,
Brooke Ludwig, Brooke Lelonek, Kacey
Reinhart and Danae Myers all busily cut
their confetti.
M.L. Zehr Construction
The quality of our work speaks for itself
and will remain long after.
Metal Frame Buildings
Pole Barns
Commercial & Residential
25720 Notestine Rd., Woodburn, IN 46797
(260) 433-5628 Mon. - Fri. 6:30 am - 5:00 pm
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FARM SALE
A total of approximately 80 acres of farmland in Ben-
ton Township in Paulding County, Ohio is being offered
for private, sealed–bid sale:
A FARM CONSISTING OF APPROXIMATELY 80
ACRES OF LAND, MORE OR LESS,
Situated in Sections 3 and 32 of Benton Township,
Paulding County, Ohio.
1. Property will be sold as two separate tracts; consist-
ing of approximately 40 and 41 acres respectively.
2. The sale will be held by sealed bid, and bid pack-
ages are available at the Law Offices of Schroeder,
Blankemeyer and Schroeder, LLP, 315 East Main
Street in Ottawa, Ohio 45875 or may be downloaded
from www.sbslawoffice.com.
3. All bids must be physically received at the Law Of-
fices of Schroeder, Blankemeyer and Schroeder, LLP
before 5:00 p.m. on Friday, April 25, 2014.
4. Only those who have submitted bids by the April 25
deadline will be permitted to participate when BIDS
ARE OPENED at The Ohio State Extension Office,
Youth Leadership Building at 503 Fairgrounds Drive
in Paulding, Ohio 45879 on the evening of Wednes-
day, April 30, 2014.
5. Further terms and requirements of sale noted in the
bid package.
6. Offers made outside this process will not be ac-
cepted.
Owners: Sue Miller, Mary Hess, and
Garnett Beagle, Trustees
Agent/Attorneys for Owners:
Law Firm of Schroeder,
Blankemeyer and Schroeder, LLP
(419) 523-5658
00090594
The Village of Paulding's Utility Department Is
currently accepting applications for part-time
SUMMER help. Must be 18 years of age and
have a valid Ohio driver's license. First pref-
erence will be given to qualified Village resi-
dents. Applications will be accepted until
April 30, 2014 Applications may be picked
up at the Village Office 116 S. Main St.
EOE
32c3
HELP WANTED



















IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
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1st and 2nd shift! Pay starting at
$11.00 / hour. Motorcycle knowledge
preferred. Apply online at
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419-956-0337 for more information!
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100 East Jackson St., Paulding, OH 45879
419-399-4444
STRALEY REAL ESTATE
“PRI CE REDUCED TO
$79, 900: Located on the
"MAUMEE RIVER" west
of Antwerp near the state
line. This 3 bedroom 1.5
bath Cape Cod Home has
a full basement, and
many improvements that
include new lighting, new
or remodeled baths, new
exterior doors, fresh paint
and more. Outside on
1.88 acres shaded by
mature trees a circular
drive leads to the 3 car
garage that has new roof
shingles and lots of over-
head storage. Planting of
shrubbery, adding shut-
ters and some exterior
paint will truly add to the
appeal. Please call our
office for more info and to
view this home. #356
BUI LDI NG SI TES -
Located in and near
Paulding. Various sizes
and prices. Please call for
information.
3 BEDROOM one story
home with attached
garage. Newer siding, win-
dows, kitchen tops, and
most floor covering.
Located in Paulding. #330
A NEW PRICE REDUC-
TION: $49,900 for this clean
& neat home on a corner lot
in Paulding with hardwood
and carpet flooring, recent
updates. Outside there is a
large one car garage and a
fenced in rear yard. #357
LOOK AND MAKE YOUR
OFFER: for this Brick 3 bed-
room home. The home has
a large living & dining area,
attached garage and corner
lot located in the NE part of
Paulding. #355
For photos & more information please visit
www.straleyrealestateinc.com, or call
Matt Straley at 419-785-5161
Carolyn Straley at 419-769-1352 or 419-399-3721
Rudy Straley at 419-769-8996 or 419-399-3721
or email straleyrealestate@windstream.net
FOLTZ REALTY
Donald K. Foltz, II - Broker: 106 N. Williams St. Paulding
www.foltzrealty.com • 419-399-2347
REALTORS: Tim Boss 419-769-0823, Maurie Wannemacher 419-769-9090
#2819 401 W. Canal St. Antwerp:
Nice 3 Br, 2 Ba, brick & vinyl sided
home with 2 car attached garage
on a corner lot in Antwerp. City
water and sanitary sewer on a
crawl space. Call Don $79,900
#2851 NEW LISTING607 N. Laura
St. Payne: Attractive 3 BR, 1 BA,
home with J/tub and shower
combo, 2 car detached garage and
all appliances remain. $46,900 Call
Maurie
#2852 NEW LISTING5014 Rd 33
Payne: Nice 2 BR country home
W/attached garage. Laminate
flooring, updated kitchen & bath W/
tub and shower combo.Vinyl siding
& large backyard. $46,000 Call
Maurie
#2847 907 Countryview Dr. Pauld-
ing: Open to Offer. Beautiful, "well
kept" home in a nice, established
neighborhood. 3 BR., 2BA., w/
family room, living room, covered
front porch, fenced patio area in
back and 16' x 20' pole building.
Many more amenities. $125,000
Call Maurie
CHECK OUR WEBSITE @ foltzrealty.com
CAMPBELL SOUP JOB FAIR- ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
Date: Saturday April 26th
Time: 8 am to 11 am
Place: Four County Career Center Cafeteria
Address: 22900 Ohio 34, Archbold, OH 43502
The Campbell Soup Company, the world’s leading maker and marketer of soup, seeks quality and
safety conscious individuals to join our Napoleon operations team for the current season. Ideal
candidates will have manufacturing work experience, be willing to work any shift and must be able
to work overtime as needed. Forklift experience is a plus. Most positions require the ability to
lift/carry 50 lbs. repeatedly.
Applications for this season’s general labor and distribution center/forklift positions will be accepted
on Saturday April 26th at Four County Career Center, in the cafeteria, from 8-11 a.m. No interviews
will be done at this time. If an applicant has completed a WorkKeys assessment prior to the job
fair, they should bring a copy of their scores when they apply. Those applicants who have not taken
a WorkKeys assessment will be able to schedule their assessment at the job fair.
Seasonal positions start at $14.00/hour. Season may run from June through February. Employees
will be required to satisfactorily complete a background check, physical and drug screen. Applicants
who have already applied for the 2014 season through Job and Family Services do not need to at-
tend. Veterans are strongly encouraged to apply.
If you are interested in joining the world’s most extraordinary food company, please join us at this
Job Fair to complete an employment application. Equal Opportunity Employer.
35c1
Large Auction
Sat., May 3 - 10:00A.M.
LOCATION: Gorrell Bros. Auction Facility –
1201 N. Williams St., Paulding, OH
Antiques - Collectables
Masonry, Shop & Hand Tools
Clean Furniture & Household
Antiques & Collectables & Related including
Long oak wash stand ……… Oak bed head & foot
boards …… Victorian style parlor Set w/ love seat
& 3 side chairs …… Small wardrobe ……. Kitchen
clock …… Many old jars & bottles incl dairy, soft
drink, etc ….. Old tins ….. 20+ Crocks, crock
bowls, jugs, etc. ……. Pink depression glass &
other glassware items …… Sets of china including
Carlsbad Austria, Homer Laughlin & nice set of
England china ….. Decorator & Collector plates &
related …… Martha Stewart Xmas decorations …
… Horse hames ……. Old records & paper items
including JD 70 operator manuals & large old
Paulding Co Auditor’s Ledger …… Copper, granite
& other coffee & tea pots ……. Old wood trunk …
.. Spice grinder ……. 3 burner kerosene stove …..
Sad irons ….. 7 Carpet beaters …… Scales ……
Old pictures & frames ……. Old manual typewriter
….. Many other old small items including kitchen
utensils, primitives, etc. - partial listing / still un-
boxing …………Shop & Hand Tools & Related
including 9 sets of scaffolding incl cross members
& planks ………bolt & parts bins ….. Wagon full
of small tools incl Socket sets, extension cords,
trowels, shovels, saws, hoes, hose, levels, etc., etc.
etc. …. Shop vac …… 8 ton hyd jack …….. Air
nailer …. Sledge hammer …. Jig saw ….. Hand cart
… ….. Hand grinder ….. Kerosene shop heater …
…. Portable air compressor ….. 10” Table saw ….
6 ft. fiberglass step ladder ….. and more Plus Lawn
& Garden inc Scott lawn seeder, gas cans, park
bench, hand sprayer, lawn trailer, wheel barrel, etc.
…… Nice Furniture & Household including
Solid wood 4 pc bedroom suite …… White wicker
3 pc bedroom suite …… 6 pc double bedroom suite
….. Dresser …… Chest of drawers ….. Dining
room suite with table and china cabinet ….. Lighted
curio cabinet …….. 2 large round folding tables …
.. Oval maple kitchen table & chairs ….. Square
wood kitchen table & chairs ….. Lazy Boy recliner
& other living room chairs ……. Sleeper sofa …..
2 Small & 2 larger entertainment centers …….
Several end, coffee & other stands & tables …….
Sweepers ….. Buffet …… Blanket chest …… Sev-
eral lamps …….. Wall mirrors …… Telephone seat
….. Vanity stool …… Ottoman …… Nice Straight
back wooden chair with upholstered seat & other
side and wood chairs …. Older gas dryer & older
Gibson chest deep freeze …. Pots, pans, knic knacs,
decorator items …… Sheets, towels, etc. …… 3 tel-
evisions …… DVD / VCR player ..……... 2 auction
rings …… Very Partial Listing - visit our web site
or Auction Zip for photos ….. Inspection: Fri., May
2 from 2:00 P.M. to 5 P.M. and beginning at 8:30
A.M. on the day of the auction …. Terms: Cash, ap-
proved check, VISA, Master Card or Discover Card
….. Sellers: John Herzig Estate, Paulding Co.,
OH Probate Case 2014 ES 5 …… and …. Mary
Lou Kemerer/Peter Trust …… and …… Lucille
Den Herder family …….. Dorothy Balser Estate,
Pldg Co. Probate Crt Case 20131087 ….. and …
… Deborah Stevenson ………and other con-
signors …….. Gorrell Bros. Auctioneers - Don
Gorrell, Larry Gorrell, Matthew Bowers, Aaron
Timm, Sandra Mickelson, Nolan Shisler
S & S SANITATION
Serving Northwest Ohio
Roll-off containers available, Commercial
and Residential Clean-up
1-888-596-3805
33c8
SNYDER
C H E V R O L E T
524NPERRYST,NAPOLEON,OH
800.811.9414
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM
0%APR* FORWELL-QUALIFIED
BUYERSON:
CHEVROLETCRUZE, EQUINOX,
SELECT2014IMPALAS, MALIBU,
SILVERADO(INCLUDINGHD), AND
TRAVERSE; BUICKENCLAVE,
LACROSSE, ANDREGAL; GMC
ACADIA, SIERRA(INCLUDINGHD)
ANDTERRAIN;
800-451-2709
|
SchraderAuction.com
A DETAILED BROCHURE IS AVAILABLE OR ACCESS INFORMATION ONLINE
DEKALB COUNTY, IN
• 5 Farms - Tracts Ranging from 6± to 99± Acres
• 355± Tillable Acres with Prime Soils
• Great Woods & Recreation -
Potential Building Sites
• Country Home with 2 Pole Barns
AUCTION
LAND M
a
j
o
r
OFFERED IN 11 TRACTS
489
±





ACRES
THURS., MAY 1 • 6PM
Held at Fraternal Order of Eagles - 541 W Main St, Butler, IN 46721
ONLINE BIDDING AVAILABLE
INSPECTION DATES:
Thursday, April 10 • 3-5pm • Monday, April 21 • 3-5pm
Meet a Schrader representative at the FOE (Eagles) Building for additional info
OWNER: Westrick, LLC.
AUCTION MANAGERS: Roger Diehm and Kevin Jordan 800.451.2709
#AC63001504; AU1060023; AU11200038
FARM A: 91± ACRES IN 3 TRACTS
FARM B: 40± ACRES
FARM C: 136± ACRES IN 2 TRACTS
FARM D: 142± ACRES IN 2 TRACTS
FARM E: 80± ACRES IN 3 TRACTS
BUTLER, SPENCER &
WILMINGTON TOWNSHIPS
IT TECHNICIAN
Paulding-Putnam Electric Cooperative, Inc. is seeking a full-time Information
Technology Technician. Paulding-Putnam offers a comprehensive benefit
package which includes medical, dental, vision, prescription drug, group term
life insurance, long and short term disability, 401k, vacation and paid holidays.
This position manages the Cooperative’s information technology,
telecommunication systems and networks. Also, participates in IT strat-
egy and budget planning, IT best practices and must possess strong
project management skills.
Facilitate hardware moves and installation, troubleshooting, repair, and
preventative maintenance support for PC desktop systems, servers,
and mobile phones.
Maintains and operates Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) system,
Supervisor Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) system, security
concepts and systems, antivirus, spam blockers, and other IT matters.
Understanding of LAN/WAN and TCP/IP concepts, specifically within a
Microsoft Networking infrastructure.
VMware familiarity, Server 2008-2012, Microsoft Certification: MCSA,
MCITP, and Cisco Certifications: CCNA or CCNP.
Please do not apply in person. Send cover letter, salary requirements
and resume postmarked by May 3, 2014 to:
Paulding-Putnam Electric Cooperative
Attn: Human Resources
401 McDonald Pike
Paulding, OH 45879
Requirements include a Bachelor Degree in Computer Science or
equivalent or demonstrated experience.
Equal Opportunity Employer, Minorities/Females/Disabilities/Veterans
x
x
x
x
34c1
MAY 5TH XTRA LARGE AUCTION
4:00 START - GUNS & COINS SELL
FIRST, COMIC BOOKS, ROY ROGERS
JEWELRY, SILVER AND LOTS OF
FURNITURE FOLLOWS.
PLACE: AMES WHOLESALE/AUCTION CITY
9017 St. Rt. 66, Oakwood, OH 45873
419-594-3364
PICTURE ON WEBSITE:
WWW.ORIGINALAUCTIONCITY.COM
Wednesday, April 23, 2014 Paulding County Progress - 5B
PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD
QUICKLY...EASILY...
JUST PHONE 419-399-4015
THE 3 STOOGES, John
Wayne, and Marshall Matt Dil-
lon Collector plates. $10 each.
419-399-2188. 35k1
PRINT COUCH & glider
loveseat. $250. 2 end table $5
each. Free full size mattress.
419-399-2646. 35p1
CHIHUAHUA PUPPIES. 1 fe-
male, 1 male. In time for
Easter! 419-263-8304. 33p3
NEW ONLINE AUCTION
(DROPnSHOP.net) Antwerp,
OH 574-298-6199 34p2
$150 QUEEN PILLOWTOP
MATTRESS SET. New in
plastic, can deliver 260-493-
0805. 33p4
YEARS AGO ANTIQUE
MALL, 108 W. Main Street,
Van Wert (419) 238-3362,
30+ Dealers. Closed Tues-
days. Buy & Sell. 27ctf
HOUSE FOR RENT IN
PAYNE, Ohio: 2 bdrm., 1
bath attached 1 car garage.
Country setting. Rent
$400/month. $400 deposit.
Responsible for all own utili-
ties. Contact Jenniffer for
more information 419-786-
0467. 35c2
3 BDRM. HOUSE in Havi-
land. $400 lease and de-
posit. No pets. Apply by
calling 419-622-4611. 35c4
ROOMMATE WANTED to
share expenes, separate
bathrooms, in-ground pool.
419-263-2780. 35ctf
NICE 1 BDRM. APT. - all
electric, no pets, $400 a
month plus $400 deposit re-
quired. 620 Lincoln St.,
Paulding. 419-670-2206. 35ctf
NICE, CLEAN 2 BEDROOM
TRI-PLEX. Excellent location,
off street parking, appliances
and air conditioner. 419-769-
0505 or 419-658-8644 34c2
RECEPTION HALL RENTAL
available at Payne American
Legion. Call Bob Burkley at
419-263-3001. 33c3
TWO, NICE 1 BDRM APTS.
on ground level. 1 mile West of
Antwerp, quiet country setting.
Laundry facility on site - in-
cluded in rent. 260-385-8799
14ctf
2 BDRM. APARTMENTS
FOR RENT in Paulding and
Defiance. Please call Al at 419-
399-2419 for more details. 43ctf
IN PAULDING - Whispering
Pines - 2 bdrm. Call 419-670-
4655 or 419-399-2419 47ctf
NOW LEASING: ONE & TWO
BEDROOM APARTMENTS.
in Paulding. Please call Straley
Real Estate at 419-399-4444
or 419-399-3721 for more in-
formation 25ctf
PAULDING STORAGE CEN-
TER: Now renting storage
units. Different sizes available.
Call 419-399-2419 for info. 18ctf
PAULDING MINI STORAGE
UNITS. For more information
please call Straley Real Estate
at 419-399-4444 or 419-399-
3721 25ctf
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
FOR FULL AND PART TIME
TRUCK DRIVERS. The per-
sons applying must have a
Class A CDL with a clean
driving record. We offer 40
cents per mile loaded or
empty, drop and pickup pay,
home nightly. Apply in person
at Haviland Drainage Prod-
ucts, 100 West Main St.,
Haviland, OH 45851 35c2
SOIL & WATER CONSERVA-
TION TECHNICIAN - Full Time
Position, Salary Based on Ex-
perience. Required: Valid Dri-
ver’s License; Basic computer
skills including Word, Excel and
Internet; Experience with basic
surveying and instruments; Ex-
cellent oral and written commu-
nication skills; Organized and
detail oriented; Be able to read
and understand a plat book.
Preferred: Associate Degree or
Equivalent experience in engi-
neering, natural resources or
agriculture related field; Techni-
cian Development Programs
(TDP) Certified/Completed;
Experience with conservation
practices in the agricultural
area; Experience with Auto
CAD or similar programs;
Knowledge of Paulding
County area and as it relates
to a plat book. Advanced
training can be provided.
Please visit our office to com-
plete an application and sub-
mit a resume: Paulding
SWCD 503 Fairground Dr.,
Paulding, OH 45879 Visit
www.pauldingswcd.org for a
more detailed job description
and responsibilities. Applica-
tion Deadline: Close of busi-
ness May 14, 2014. Please
no phone calls. Paulding
SWCD is an Equal Opportu-
nity Employer 35c2
HORSE BARN NEEDS
EXTRA HELP caring for
horses and general grounds
upkeep. Must be able to
clean 16 stalls daily, horse
experience is preferred. Mail
resume to: RRR, 10457
Road 230, Cecil, OH 45821.
NO PHONE CALLS! 35c2
TRUCK DRIVER/YARD
WORKER for recycling cen-
ter. Send resume to P.O. Box
180P, Paulding, OH 45879
34c3
INDEPENDENT CONTRAC-
TORS, HIGHEST PAY IN-
CREASE EVER! USA Truck
is proud to announce the
highest pay increase EVER
for Independent Contractors,
making them one of the high-
est "real" pay packages of-
fered today. For more
Information or to apply, call
866-545-2014 35k1
"PARTNERS IN EXCEL-
LENCE" OTR Drivers. APU
Equipped Pre-Pass EZ-pass
passenger policy. 2012 &
Newer equipment. 100% NO
touch. Butler Transport 1-
800-528-7825 www.butler-
transport.com 35k1
DAILY EXPRESS NEEDS
CONTRACTORS for
Stepdeck & Lowboy hauls!
FREE TRAILERS! "New"
Daily Expedited Fleet! Also
Heavy Haul and Specialized
Division Available. www.dai-
lyrecruiting.com or 800-669-
6414 35k1
AVERITT EXPRESS New
Pay Increase For Regional
Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel
Bonus! Also, Post-Training
Pay Increase for Students!
(Depending on Domicile) Get
Home EVERY Week + Ex-
cellent Benefits. CDL - A req.
888-362-8608 Apply @
AverittCareers.com Equal
Opportunity Employer - Fe-
males, minorities, protected
veterans and individuals with
disabilities are encouraged to
apply. 35k1
2 STORY COUNTRY HOME
WITH 2 car garage and 2
outbuildings. Perfect for the
DIY type. Needs TLC. 1528
sq. ft. on 1.5 acres. 4 bdrms.,
1 bath, 7856 SR 111. Pauld-
ing. Asking $50,000. Moti-
vated seller. Call
419-399-2727. 31ktf
TENNESSEE LOG HOME
SALE! New, ready to finish log
cabin on 5+ acres with FREE
Boat Slip on 160,000 acre
recreational lake. Only $89,900.
Excellent financing. Call now
877-888-0267, x103 35k1
NEW LISTING - BEAUTI-
FUL 3 BDRM, 1 1 /2 BATH
RANCH HOME. Great loca-
tion, 735 Tom Tim Dr., near
school & park. Lg. backyard
overlooking pond & forest.
Home includes lg. eat-in
kitchen, lg. family room, living
room & den. $130,000. Call
419-576-7758 to tour. 51ktf
COINS, ANTIQUES, OLD
KNIVES, postcards, OLD
toys, jewelry, watches,
stamps, collections. Austin
White 419-399-3353 14p7
REACH 2 MILLION NEWS-
PAPER READERS with one
ad placement. ONLY $295.00.
Ohio's best community news-
papers. Call Mitch at AdOhio
Statewide Classified Network,
614-486-6677, or E-MAIL at:
mcolton@adohio.net or check
out our website at: www.ado-
hio.net. 35k1
REACH OVER 1 MILLION
OHIO ADULTS with one ad
placement. Only $995.00. Ask
your local newspaper about our
2X2 Display Network and our
2X4 Display Network $1860 or
Call Mitch at 614-486-6677/E-
mail mcolton@adohio.net. or
check out our website:
www.adohio.net. 35k1
AL GRIFFITHS CON-
STRUCTION: Windows, light
electrical, drywall, siding,
doors and more. Call Al for
your repair or construction
needs. 419-506-2102 51ctf
ERIC’S PAINTWORKS &
Pressure Washing. Interior
and Exterior Painting. Com-
mercial/Residential. Bonded &
Insured. Office # 419-594-
3674; Cell # 1-704-557-6723.
33p12
SUNDAY MAY 4TH, Auto
Parts Swap-Meet, 8am-4pm.
Fairgrounds, Wapakoneta,
Ohio. Info. 419-394-
6484. 35p2
SIGN UP FOR SUMMER
DAYCARE for ages 2 1/2
(must be potty trained)
through age 13 at Ann’s Bright
Beginnings. Located at 211
Emerald Road in Paulding -
Monday, May 5 from 6:00 to
7:30 PM – call 419-399-KIDS
(5437) for more information.
Licensed center, planned ac-
tivities, trained staff! 33c4
SIGN UP FOR THE
2014/2015 school year at
Ann’s Bright Beginnings Pre-
school on Monday, May 5 from
6:00 to 7:30 PM. Located at
211 Emerald Road in Paulding.
3, 4 and 5 year olds accepted.
Call 419-399-KIDS (5437) for
more information. 33c4
WERNER NEEDS DRIVER
TRAINEES! Drivers are IN DE-
MAND. We need YOU! No
CDL? No Problem! 16-Day CDL
training available! Opportunity
Awaits. CALL TODAY! 866-203-
8445 35k1
Huge 5 Family Garage Sale. FRI.
& SAT. APRIL 25TH & 26TH, 8-
4. Girls 14 to XL juniors, mens &
womens clothes household, bed-
ding, lots of misc. scrapbooking,
something for everyone. Ham-
mans, 3405 Rd. 144, Antwerp. 1
1/2 miles west of 49, look for
signs.
GRAIN FARM, TRACTOR ex-
perience. Class A CDL, non-
smoker 419-346-7129 or
419-203-1852. 35c1
OUR SPORTSMAN will pay top
dollar to hunt your land. Call for a
free Base Camp Leasing Info
Packet & Quote. 866-309-1507
www.BaseCampleasing.com
VACATION CABINS FOR RENT
IN CANADA. Fish for walleyes,
perch, northerns. Boats, motors,
gasoline included. Call Hugh 1-
800-426-2550 for free brochure.
Website www.bestfishing.com
SAWMILLS from only $4897.00-
MAKE & SAVE MONEY with
your own bandmill- Cut lumber
any dimension. In stock, ready to
ship. Free Info/DVD: www.Nor-
woodSawmills.com 1-800-578-
1363 Ext. 300N
AIRLINE JOBS begin here-Get
Trained as FAA certified Aviation
Technician. Housing/Financial
aid for qualified students. Job
Placement assistance. Aviation
Institute of Maintenance. 1-877-
676-3836
ADOPTION - A LOVING AL-
TERNATIVE to unplanned preg-
nancy. You choose the family for
your child. Receive pictures/info
of waiting/approved couples. Liv-
ing expense assistance. 1-866-
236-7638
FOR SALE
ANTIQUES
FOR RENT
WANTED TO BUY
SERVICES
HELP WANTED
PAINTING
SWAP MEET
WORK WANTED
HOME FOR SALE
SUMMER DAYCARE
PRESCHOOL REGISRATION
SCHOOL/INSTRUCT.
GARAGE SALE
MISC.
ADOPTION
We need you...
If you are reliable, patient and have a
desire to enrich the lives of seniors,
this maybe the place for you.
We are currently seeking
self-motivated applicants for
Full-Time & Part-Time Cook
Apply in person at
HEARTH AND HOME OF VAN WERT
1118 Westwood Drive
Van Wert, Ohio 45891
35c2
SNYDER
C H E V R O L E T
524NPERRYST,NAPOLEON,OH
800.811.9414
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM



Down Pmt.
Security
Deposit
First Pmt.
JUST SIGN AND DRIVE
On New 2014
Chevy Cruze,
Malibu and
all Cadillacs
Now thru 4-30-2014
0
$
.
.
.
Paulding County Hospital
1035 W. Wayne Street
Paulding, OH 45879
Email: pchhr@saa.net
JOB OPPORTUNITIES
Physician Office Assistant - The current posi-
tion is Part Time working every Thursday and Fri-
day from 8:00am – 5:00pm. The Physician
Office Assistant greets patients at the Physician
Office and performs various clerical and recep-
tionist duties. An office assistant helps the physi-
cian and staff by performing a variety of
administrative, clerical, and technical tasks.
Some tasks include maintaining patient charts,
copying files, answering the phone, making ap-
pointments, entering accurate insurance informa-
tion, entering codes, and other duties as assigned.
The position requires either a Medical Assistant
Certification or Equivalent work experience.
Prior computer experience, coding experience,
and knowledge of health insurance products is
preferred.
To apply, please send resume to: Pchhr@saa.net,
or online at www.pauldingcountyhospital.com, or
by mail to Paulding County Hospital, 1035 W.
Wayne Street, Paulding, OH 45879.
Physician Office LPN – Full Time and Part Time
positions. Works under the direction of a licensed
physician and under the supervision of the Physi-
cian Services Director. The Physician Office
LPN performs various job responsibilities which
include technical skills (drawing blood, vaccina-
tions, IVs, etc.) and clerical tasks to include
proper patient charting/documentation. Any other
duties as assigned. Must have a current State of
Ohio LPN license. Prior work experience in a
physician office or Outpatient Specialty Clinic is
preferred. Knowledge of CPT Coding preferred.
To apply, please send resume to: Pchhr@saa.net,
or online at www.pauldingcountyhospital.com, or
by mail to Paulding County Hospital, 1035 W.
Wayne Street, Paulding, OH 45879. 35c1
CLASSIFIEDS
CLASSIFIEDS
Baughman Tile Co. is now hiring for
multiple full-time positions.
• Day-Trip Truck Driver
- CDL Class B and clean driving
record are required
• Coiler/Laborer
- Must be dependable, team
oriented and able to lift up to 70 lbs.
Competitive wages and complete benefits
package. Please apply within.
Baughman Tile Company,
8516 Twp. Rd. 137, Paulding, OH. Located
4 miles east of US 127 on SR 613.
35c2
Hornish Bros. Inc. is currently
accepting applications for city
work/shuttle driver for work in the
Defiance area. This is an hourly
position w/ benefits. If being
home daily is important to you &
you have a Class A CDL w/ at
least 2 years tractor-trailer experi-
ence, please fill out an application
at 2060 E. Second St. Defiance,
OH (west side of office building).
www.hornishgroup.com. E.O.E.
35c1
DRIVERS WANTED
SNYDER
C H E V R O L E T
524NPERRYST,NAPOLEON,OH
800.811.9414
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM
0%APR* FORWELL-QUALIFIED
BUYERSON:
CHEVROLETCRUZE, EQUINOX,
SELECT2014IMPALAS, MALIBU,
SILVERADO(INCLUDINGHD), AND
TRAVERSE; BUICKENCLAVE,
LACROSSE, ANDREGAL; GMC
ACADIA, SIERRA(INCLUDINGHD)
ANDTERRAIN;
SNYDER
C H E V R O L E T
524NPERRYST,NAPOLEON,OH
800.811.9414
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM


Down Pmt.
Security
Deposit
First Pmt.
JUST SIGN AND DRIVE
On New 2014
Chevy Cruze,
Malibu and
all Cadillacs
Now thru 4-30-2014
0
$
.
.
.
SNYDER
GMC•BUICK•CADILLAC
1421NSCOTTST,NAPOLEON,OH
800.716.6506
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM
SNYDER
GMC•BUICK•CADILLAC
1421NSCOTTST,NAPOLEON,OH
800.716.6506
SNYDERAUTOGROUP.COM
0%APR* FORWELL-QUALIFIED
BUYERSON:
CHEVROLETCRUZE, EQUINOX,
SELECT2014IMPALAS, MALIBU,
SILVERADO(INCLUDINGHD), AND
TRAVERSE; BUICKENCLAVE,
LACROSSE, ANDREGAL; GMC
ACADIA, SIERRA(INCLUDINGHD)
ANDTERRAIN;
ROMANS 12:13 is where this morning’s bible reading lead me. I
was exploring my pondering to Jesus’ walk through the palm leaves;
knowing He was approaching an underserved death. As a result of
Romans 12:13, I am offering shelter and water and electricity to a
maximum of 2 bedrooms out of my home. If in need, reply to PO
Box 78, Grover Hill, OH 45849. 35c1
NOTICE
www.progressnewspaper.org and click the
Facebook or Twitter link
Follow The Progress
on Facebook and Twitter!
Search for
“Paulding County Progress
Newspaper”
Then become a fan by
clicking “LIKE”
Search for “pauldingpaper”
or go to our website at
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
IN THE COMMON
PLEAS COURT OF
PAULDING
COUNTY, OHIO
Paulding County
Clerk of Courts
115 N.Williams St.
Paulding, OH 45879
United States of
America, acting
through the Rural
Development, United
States Department of
Agriculture vs.
Thais R. Stallbaum,
Deceased, et al
Case No.CI 13 211
Surviving Spouse, if
any, of Thais R. Stall-
baum, Deceased "name
unknown", Diane Carr,
Trevor Tracy, Jane Doe,
unknown spouse of
Trevor Tracy "name un-
known", Troy Tracy,
Wendy Tracy, Unknown
Spouse, if any, of Troy
Tracy "name un-
known", Paul Stall-
baum, Jane Doe,
unknown spouse of Paul
Stallbaum "name un-
known", Bradon Last
"Name Unknown",
Darion Last "Name Un-
known", Carson Last
"Name Unknown",
Ashlynn Last "name un-
known", The unknown
heirs, legatees, devisees,
executors, executrixes,
administrators, adminis-
tratrixes and assignees
of Kenneth L. Stall-
baum, deceased
"name(s) unknown",
The unknown Spouses
of the known and/or un-
known heirs, legatees,
devisees, executors, ex-
ecutrixes, administra-
tors, administratrixes
and assignees of Ken-
neth L. Stallbaum, de-
ceased "name(s)
unknown", Unknown
Surviving Spouse, if
any, of Kenneth L. Stall-
baum, deceased "name
unknown", The un-
known heirs, legatees,
devisees, executors, ex-
ecutrixes, administra-
tors, administratrixes
and assignees of Sandra
Suu Welch, deceased
"name(s) unknown",
The unknown Spouses
of the unknown heirs,
legatees, devisees, ex-
ecutors, executrixes, ad-
m i n i s t r a t o r s ,
administratrixes and as-
signees of Sandra Suu
Welch, deceased
"name(s) unknown",
Unknown Surviving
Spouse, if any, of San-
dra Suu Welch, de-
ceased "name
unknown", The un-
known heirs, legatees,
devisees, executors, ex-
ecutrixes, administra-
tors, administratrixes
and assignees of Thais
R. Stallbaum, Deceased
"name(s) unknown",
and The unknown
Spouses of the unknown
heirs, legatees, devisees,
executors, executrixes,
administrators, adminis-
tratrixes and assignees
of Thais R. Stallbaum,
Deceased whose ad-
dresses are unknown,
will hereby take notice
that on March 20, 2014,
United States of Amer-
ica, acting through the
Rural Development,
United States Depart-
ment of Agriculture,
filed its Amended Com-
plaint in Foreclosure
and Marshalling of
Liens in the Common
Pleas Court of Paulding
County, Ohio, 115 N.
Williams St., Paulding
OH 45879 being Case
No. CI 13 211 against
Thais R. Stallbaum, De-
ceased, et al praying for
judgment in the amount
of $21,474.69 with in-
terest thereon according
to the terms of the note
from September 3, 2013
until paid and for fore-
closure of said Mort-
gage Deed on the
following described real
estate, of which said
Defendants, are the
owners of:
Real estate located at
114 W. Wayne St.,
Paulding, OH 45879
as further described in
Plaintiff’s mortgage
recorded on December
28, 2004 in OR Book
505 pg 1883 of the
Mortgage Records of
Paulding County, Ohio
and that Defendants,
Surviving Spouse, if
any, of Thais R. Stall-
baum, Deceased "name
unknown", Diane Carr,
Trevor Tracy, Jane Doe,
unknown spouse of
Trevor Tracy "name un-
known", Troy Tracy,
Wendy Tracy, Unknown
Spouse, if any, of Troy
Tracy "name un-
known", Paul Stall-
baum, Jane Doe,
unknown spouse of Paul
Stallbaum "name un-
known", Bradon Last
"Name Unknown",
Darion Last "Name Un-
known", Carson Last
"Name Unknown",
Ashlynn Last "name un-
known", The unknown
heirs, legatees, devisees,
executors, executrixes,
administrators, adminis-
tratrixes and assignees
of Kenneth L. Stall-
baum, deceased
"name(s) unknown",
The unknown Spouses
of the known and/or un-
known heirs, legatees,
devisees, executors, ex-
ecutrixes, administra-
tors, administratrixes
and assignees of Ken-
neth L. Stallbaum, de-
ceased "name(s)
unknown", Unknown
Surviving Spouse, if
any, of Kenneth L. Stall-
baum, deceased "name
unknown", The un-
known heirs, legatees,
devisees, executors, ex-
ecutrixes, administra-
tors, administratrixes
and assignees of Sandra
Suu Welch, deceased
"name(s) unknown",
The unknown Spouses
of the unknown heirs,
legatees, devisees, ex-
ecutors, executrixes, ad-
m i n i s t r a t o r s ,
administratrixes and as-
signees of Sandra Suu
Welch, deceased
"name(s) unknown",
Unknown Surviving
Spouse, if any, of San-
dra Suu Welch, de-
ceased "name
unknown", The un-
known heirs, legatees,
devisees, executors, ex-
ecutrixes, administra-
tors, administratrixes
and assignees of Thais
R. Stallbaum, Deceased
"name(s) unknown",
and The unknown
Spouses of the unknown
heirs, legatees, devisees,
executors, executrixes,
administrators, adminis-
tratrixes and assignees
of Thais R. Stallbaum,
Deceased be required to
set up any interest they
may have in said prem-
ises or be forever
barred, that upon failure
of said Defendants to
pay or to cause to be
paid said judgment
within three days from
its rendition that an
Order of Sale be issued
to the Sheriff of Pauld-
ing County, Ohio, to ap-
praise, advertise in the
Paulding Progress and
sell said real estate, that
the premises be sold
free and clear of all
claims, liens and interest
of any of the parties
herein, that the proceeds
from the sale of said
premises be applied to
the Plaintiff s judgment
and for such other relief
to which United States
of America, acting
through the Rural De-
velopment, United
States Department of
Agriculture is entitled.
Said Defendants are di-
rected to the Complaint
wherein notice under
the fair debt collection
practice act is given.
Said Defendants are re-
quired to answer within
twenty-eight days after
the publication said De-
fendants will take notice
that you are required to
answer said Complaint
on or before the 11th
day of June 2014 or
judgment will be ren-
dered accordingly.
United States of Amer-
ica
Plaintiff,
Stephen D. Miles
Vincent A. Lewis
Attorneys for Plaintiff
18 W. Monument Av-
enue 33c6
Dayton, Ohio 45402
PROBATE COURT
NOTICE
The Village of Latty is
accepting bids for Lot
31 in the Wrexham
South addition of the
Village of Latty, Ohio.
The lot has a half (1/2)
interest in a dug well
on the West line of the
lot and a connection to
the Village sewer sys-
tem. The lot is 66' x
132'. The Village has
placed a bid minimum
on this lot of $2,500
(two thousand five
hundred dollars). This
lot does not meet the
minimum square
footage requirement
for the village's trailer
permit.
Bids will be accepted
BY MAIL ONLY to
the Village of Latty,
P.O. Box 86, Latty,
Ohio 45855 with the
envelope clearly
marked on the outside
"SEALED BID." All
bids must be received
by mail by 3:30 P.M.
on Monday, May 19,
2014. Bid opening will
take place on Monday
evening, May 19, at
the Latty Village Hall,
650 Alexander St.,
Latty, Ohio, at 6 p.m.
Questions regarding
this lot, taxes and
monthly sewer
charges, etc. may be
directed to Kay Miller,
Clerk-Treasurer by
calling (419) 399-2644
or (419) 399-5315. 34c5
NOTICE OF ELEC-
TION ON TAX
LEVY IN EXCESS
OF THE TEN MILL
LIMITATION
R.C. 3501.11(G),
5705.19, 5705.25
Notice is hereby given
that in pursuance of a
Resolution of the
Board of County Com-
missioners of the
County of Paulding,
Ohio, passed on the 5th
day of February, 2014,
there will be submitted
to a vote of the people
at the PRIMARY Elec-
tion to be held at the
regular places of vot-
ing on Tuesday, the 6th
day of May, 2014, the
question of levying a
tax, in excess of the ten
mill limitation, for the
benefit of Paulding
County for the purpose
of current operating
expenses for the Pauld-
ing County Carnegie
Library.
Tax being a renewal of
an existing tax of 2.17
mills at a rate not ex-
ceeding 2.17 mills for
each one dollar of val-
uation, which amounts
to $0.217 for each one
hundred dollars of val-
uation, for five years,
commencing in 2014,
first due in calendar
year 2015.
The polls for the elec-
tion will open at 6:30
a.m. and remain open
until 7:30 p.m. on elec-
tion day.
By order of the Board
of Elections, of
Paulding County, Ohio
David H Cline,
Chair
Brenda J. Crawford,
Director 35c2
Dated April 16, 2014
LEGAL NOTICE
Keri A. McMillan,
whose last place of resi-
dence is known as 1085
Grant Street, Scott,
OH 45886 but whose
present place of resi-
dence is unknown and
John Doe, Unknown
Spouse, if any, of Keri
A. McMillan, whose
last place of residence is
known as 1085 Grant
Street, Scott, OH 45886
but whose present place
of residence is unknown,
will take notice that on
February 3, 2014,
FIFTH THIRD
MORTGAGE COM-
LEGALS
LEGALS
PANY, filed its Com-
plaint in Foreclosure in
Case No. CI 14 017 in
the Court of Common
Pleas Paulding County,
Ohio alleging that the
Defendants, Keri A.
McMillan and John
Doe, Unknown Spouse,
if any, of Keri A.
McMillan, have or
claim to have an interest
in the real estate located
at 1085 Grant Street,
Scott, OH 45886, PPN
#07-02S-053-00. A
complete legal descrip-
tion may be obtained
with the Paulding
County Auditor's Office
located at 115 North
Williams Street, Suite
101, Paulding, OH
45879.
The Petitioner further al-
leges that by reason of
default of the Defen-
dant(s) in the payment of
a promissory note, ac-
cording to its tenor, the
conditions of a concur-
rent mortgage deed
given to secure the pay-
ment of said note and
conveying the premises
described, have been
broken, and the same has
become absolute.
The Petitioner prays that
the Defendant(s) named
above be required to an-
swer and set up their in-
terest in said real estate
or be forever barred from
asserting the same, for
foreclosure of said mort-
gage, the marshalling of
any liens, and the sale of
said real estate, and the
proceeds of said sale ap-
plied to the payment of
Petitioner's claim in the
property order of its pri-
ority, and for such other
and further relief as is
just and equitable.
THE DEFENDANT(S)
NAMED ABOVE ARE
REQUIRED TO AN-
SWER ON OR
BEFORE THE 4TH
DAY OF JUNE, 2014.
BY: THE LAW OF-
FICES OF JOHN D.
CLUNK CO., LPA
Charles V. Gasior
#0075946
Attorneys for Plaintiff-
Petitioner
4500 Courthouse Blvd.
Suite 400 N
Stow, OH 44224
(330) 436-0300 - tele-
phone
(330) 436-0301 - fac-
simile
requests@johndclunk.co
m 35c2
6B - Paulding County Progress Wednesday, April 23, 2014

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