Philippine Folk Dance

The definition of Philippine folk dance is a Philippine traditional dance. This traditional dance is said to have originated among the common people. Music played at a Philippine folk dance is traditional folk music. Examples are: Tinikling Maglalatik Singkil

Cariñosa (Spanish pronunciation: [kaɾiˈ ɲosa], meaning the loving or affectionate one) is a Philippine dance of Hispanic origin from the Maria Clara suite of Philippine folk dances, where the fan or handkerchief plays an instrumental role as it places the couple in romance scenario. Pandanggo is a Philippine folk dance which has become popular in the rural areas of the Philippines. The dance evolved from Fandango, a Spanish folk dance, which arrived in the Philippines during the Hispanic period. This dance, together with the Jota, became popular among the illustrados or the upper class and later adapted among the local communities. In the early 18th century, any dance that is considered jovial and lively was called Pandanggo. Tinikling dance is one of the most popular and well-known of traditional Philippine dances.The tinikling is a preSpanish dance from the Philippines that involves two people beating, tapping, and sliding bamboo poles on the ground and against each other in coordination with one or more dancers who step over and in between the poles in a dance. The name is a reference to birds locally known as tikling, which can be any of a number of rail species; the term tinikling literally means "tikling-like." The dance originated in Leyte among the Visayan islands in the central Philippines as an imitation of the tikling bird dodging bamboo traps set by rice farmers. The dance imitates the movement of the tikling birds as they walk between grass stems, run over tree branches, or dodge bamboo traps set by rice farmers. Dancers imitate the tikling bird's legendary grace and speed by skillfully maneuvering between large bamboo poles. Maglalatik is an indigenous dance from the Philippines in which coconut shell halves that are secured onto the dancers' hands and on vests upon which are hung four or six more coconut shell halves. The dancers - all male perform the dance by hitting one coconut shell with the other - sometimes the ones on the hands, sometimes, the ones on the body, and sometimes the shells worn by another performer, all in time to a fast drumbeat. Like many native Filipino dances, it is intended to impress the viewer with the great skill of the dancer, and in some Filipino Martial Arts (FMA) circles, it has been noted that the manlalatik "consists of a trapping and boxing method hidden in a dance."

danced the Singkíl. particularly royalty. Originally only women. It is a popular dance performed during celebrations and other festive entertainment. which serves as either a conscious or unconscious advertisement to potential suitors. the Ramayana. the Maranao interpretation of the ancient Indian epic. Cariñosa Pandanggo . It is derived from a story in the Darangen.Singkíl originated from the Maranao people who inhabit the shores of Lake Lanao. The name of the dance itself means "to entangle the feet with disturbing objects such as vines or anything in your path".