Thursday, April 24, 2014 • Vol. 132, No. 38 • Stoughton, WI • ConnectStoughton.

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Hitting Home
Photos by Seth Jovaag
Leslie and Jeff Newman are still grieving over the May 2012 death of their son, Chase, who died in his
Stoughton apartment from a heroin overdose.
Rising abuse of opiates touches Stoughton, too
Addiction in Dane County
Resources
Parent Addiction Network
parentaddictionnetwork.org
Safe Communities of Madison-
Dane County
safercommunity.net
SETH JOVAAG
Hub correspondent
As a reminder to stay
sober, Chase Newman in
his early 20s tattooed three
sets of initials on his left
forearm, one each for three
friends who’d died of hero-
in overdoses.
It didn’t work.
Despite years of recovery
programs and even being
a mentor at times for oth-
ers struggling with addic-
tion, Newman relapsed and
died from a heroin overdose
May 2, 2012, in his Stough-
ton apartment. He was 26.
Hi s parent s, Jeff and
Leslie Newman of Cottage
Grove, were on a dream
vacation in Italy when they
got the call in the middle of
the night about their son’s
death. Before that, Chase
had been clean for five
months.
“I still ask myself, ‘Why
did he start again?’” Jeff
Newman said during an
interview at the couple’s
kitchen table. “The only
thing I can see is that her-
oin addiction, it can be five
months, it can be a year,
three years later. There’s
some trigger that makes
him want to go do it again.”
Newman’s deat h was
another statistic in a trend
of rising opiate abuse that
has alarmed area health and
law enforcement officials
for years.
In 2006, there were 123
hospitalizations in Dane
County from heroin or pre-
scription opiate overdoses,
according to data from the
department of Public Health
for Madi son and Dane
Count y ( PHMDC) . By
2012, there were 300, a 144
percent increase. In 2003,
19 people died from over-
doses. That figure peaked
at 61 in 2011 before fall-
ing to 49 in 2012. Similar
trends exist statewide, with
overdoses tripling between
2002 and 2012, from 824 to
2,457.
And those stats might just
be the “tip of the iceberg,”
said Lisa Bullard Caw-
thorne, a health educator
Stoughton Area School District
Board OKs
slight staff cuts
Kegonsa position
restored based on
class sizes
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
The recently passed $20
million referendum might
have saved the Stoughton
Area School District from
drastic cuts, but with enroll-
ment declining, board mem-
bers continued their plan to
keep whittling down staff
numbers.
Two weeks ago, dis-
trict superintendent Tim
Onsager recommended
a combination of adding
$253,250 to next year’s
budget for the equivalent of
4.05 positions and cutting
$399,000 from the equiva-
lent of 6.6 full-time posi-
tions. The board scaled the
cuts back slightly Monday
night, voting unanimously
to leave intact a first-grade
position at Kegonsa Elemen-
tary, due in part to concerns
about large class sizes there.
The changes leaves the
net staff salary decrease for
the 2014-15 school year at
$80,750, including leaving
vacant a full-time Kegonsa
kindergarten position and
0.6 FTE business education
Yahara Lakes
Beach closures show
lack of progress
Clean-up gains international attention
KATE GOLDEN
Wisconsin Center for Investigative
Journalism
After one of Madison’s
longest, coldest winters
ever, swimming season is
almost here – along with
toxic algal blooms, bac-
teria, invasive milfoil and
other pestilences of the
lakes.
The Yahar a l akes –
Mendota, Monona, Wing-
ra, Waubesa and Keg-
onsa – are no clearer than
they were 30 years ago,
despite intensive efforts
to improve them. During
that time, lake scientists
said, the increased heavy
rainfalls that are part of
climate change most like-
ly offset gains from bet-
ter land use practices by
washing giant volumes of
pollution into the lakes.
“They are flatlining,”
said Steve Carpenter, a
University of Wisconsin-
Madison professor who
has studied the Yahara
Turn to Heroin/Page 12
Turn to Cuts/Page 2
Murky Waters
A four-part series produced by The Capital Times and
Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism.
This week: Beach closures persist despite cleanup
efforts
Next week: Manure digesters could help, but reliability,
cost, politics are in the way
May 9: The effect of urbanization and the role of devel-
opers
May 15: Hard realities of biology, particularly at Lake
Kegonsa, threatens viability of cleanup efforts.
Turn to Lakes/Page 8
2
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
No Kidding
Eugster Farm Market goat gives birth to quintuplets
KIMBERLY WETHAL
Hub Correspondent
If two’s company and
three’s a crowd, a litter of
five baby goats is probably
quite the handful.
Eugster’s Farm Market
experienced this phenom-
enon earlier this month, as
one of their goats gave birth
to five kids. Carol Eugster,
owner of the farm, said that
the large litter was unex-
pected due to goats only
having one or two at a time.
“It was a surprise,” she
sai d. “We t hought she
was going to have twins
for sure, but she kept get-
ting bigger and bigger. We
eventually thought it was
going to be triplets. They
were all born within 35
minutes, and they just kept
coming.”
Eugster said that two
of t he goat s were born
healthy, but three of them
were in jeopardy and were
unable to stand as a result
of being weak from birth,
whi ch caused Eugst er ,
her husband Joe and their
daughter Kat to bottle feed
them every three hours until
they became stable.
The goats were originally
given Norwegian names to
represent Stoughton’s heri-
tage, but they were changed
to the main characters of
the Disney movie “Frozen”
on the day that the Hub
visited the farm after real-
izing that two of the Nor-
wegian names matched up
with the characters.’
The goats will be able
to be seen when the farm
opens on Memorial Day
weekend.
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position at SHS, as well as
cuts to a full-time district
educational assistant, full-
time SHS special ed teacher,
full-time eighth-grade Eng-
lish teacher, half-time SHS
English teacher and half-time
SHS social studies teacher.
Onsager said there are 71
Kegonsa first- and second-
grade students divided among
three classes. At an average
of 23.33 students per class,
that’s just below board policy
of 24, which he said grants a
bit of leeway.
“(It) says when all three
classes get two above the 24,
we would add, but it’s right
on the borderline of 24,” he
said.
With the board voting to
keep the position, Onsager
said he’d like to sit down with
Kegonsa first- and second-
grade staff to “brainstorm”
how to best use the full-time
teacher.
“They’re in the trenches
… they would have the best
idea on how to utilize this
(teacher),” he said. “It could
be we put (the teacher) at first
grade, realizing second grade
will still be a little high, or we
could do a split – multi-age
or what-not – which would
reduce all the grade levels.
And we could be … where
the staff member is teaching
first- and second-grade read-
ing and first- and second-
grade math, so we’re splitting
that up into four sections for
those core subjects areas.”
Board president Liz Men-
zer said Kegonsa Elementary
has some “fragile learners,”
and class sizes need to be tak-
en into consideration.
“It’s the transient popula-
tion that makes this a par-
ticularly compelling situation
– when kids are coming in
and out of classrooms, it just
requires additional supports
and tactics,” she said. “The
educators at Kegonsa are just
doing a terrific job, (but) hav-
ing smaller class sizes, to me,
will enable us to serve those
kids. It’s an investment in
those kids.”
Board member Donna Tar-
pinian said she has a prob-
lem with the district’s policy
where classes must be two
students each above the level
to force a staffing change.
Onsager suggested looking at
it, noting recent changes that
have been made involving
allowable high school class
sizes.
“It would be a policy,
among other ones, worth
reviewing,” he said.
Fees raised
Following up on an issue
discussed two weeks ago,
board members unanimously
passed several modest fee
increases.
Among those was raising
student lunch by 10 cents,
breakfast by 5 cents and adult
lunch by 50 cents. The board
also approved establishing a
pool timing system fee ($50
flat fee for residents; $100
for non-residents), increased
prices to hold birthday par-
ties at the pool by $40 for
residents and $50 for non-
residents and increased swim-
ming lesson fees 25 cents.
All changes are effective
July 1.
Photos by Kimberly Wethal
A litter of five baby goats earned
the names Olaf, Kristoff, Hans,
Anna and Elsa after characters
in Disney’s film “Frozen.” The
five were born at Eugster’s Farm
Market in early April.
Kat Eugster, right, holds the
siblings shortly after they were
born.
Cuts: District adjusts staffing to meet enrollment trends
Continued from page 1
Police investigate threatening
letter sent to Stoughton family
Stoughton Police have
enlisted the help of state
and national agencies to
determine the source of a
racially charged letter sent
to a family in Stoughton
last week.
According a report from
WISC TV-3, the family
received a letter April 16
with a picture of a lynch-
ing.
The letter was addressed
to their oldest son, whose
photo was depicted in the
lynching.
Stoughton police said in
a news release that details
of the investigation would
not be released, as it is an
ongoing case. Lt. Pat Con-
lin told the Hub that no
updates in the case were
available as of Monday
night.
“Detectives have taken
the letter and contents to
the Wisconsin State Crime
Laboratory for process-
ing,” police said. “Detec-
tives are continuing their
investigation and have
been in contact with the
Federal Bureau of Investi-
gation and the U.S. Postal
Service.”
Mayor Donna Olson and
police chief Greg Leck
said “this type of behavior
will not be tolerated and
the person(s) responsible
will be prosecuted to the
full extent of the law.”
Conlin said one possible
charge could be a felony
– threatening to injure
someone.
Anyone with informa-
tion related to this inci-
dent is encouraged to con-
tact the Stoughton Police
Department at 873-3374.
– Mark Ignatowski
Norse Star earns journalism awards
The St ought on Hi gh
School newspaper, Norse
Star, took home 15 jour-
nal i sm awar ds at t he
Northeastern Wisconsin
Scholastic Press Associa-
tion Conference at UW-
Oshkosh on April 9.
In the writing division,
Payton Gross took first
place in Feature Story –
Personality Profile, sec-
ond place in Feature Story
– Sports, third place in
Column – Humorous, and
third place in Column –
Sports; Erica Keenan took
second place in Column –
Serious and third place in
Reviews; Jessie Valenza
took second place in Fea-
ture Story – Entertain-
ing; Tanner Novotny took
second place in In-Depth
Report i ng I; Ki mberl y
Wethal, Ryan Skotzke,
and Jack Greenwood took
second place in In-Depth
Reporting II; and Wethal
took third place in Feature
Story – Entertaining.
In the design division,
Novotny took first place
and Gross took second
place in Photo Illustra-
tion; Alexus Crockett took
second place in Hand-
Rendered Illustration; and
Gross took third place in
Page Design/Layout.
The staff also received
Red Ribbon Honors for
medium-sized schools for
its publication produced
through a journalism class.
Jon Netzler serves as
advisor for the newspaper.
Get Connected
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April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
3
Town of Rutland
Radio tower debate
returns to spotlight
SETH JOVAAG
Hub correspondent
The years-long battle to
build a radio tower in the
Town of Rutland is about to
go public again.
Opponents of the proposed
486-foot tower – which
could someday service an
FM radio station in Stough-
ton – are expected to air
concerns Tuesday at a public
hearing of the Dane County
Zoning and Land Regulation
Committee. And on May 5
and 6, Rutland’s plan com-
mission and town board,
respectively, are expected to
review the proposal, too.
Tomah-based Magnum
Communications has tried
for years to build the tower in
a farm field between Oregon
and Stoughton. But its plans
were denied in 2011 by the
town board, which agreed
with opponents who said the
tower’s size and lights would
mar the rural landscape and
harm nearby property val-
ues. The Dane County Board
later backed the town’s deci-
sion.
Magnum appealed, but a
Dane County judge upheld
the town’s decision last Sep-
tember.
However, the company
reapplied with Rutland in
February, citing a new pro-
vision tucked into last year’s
state budget that said Wis-
consin municipalities can’t
deny broadcast towers unless
they can prove the structures
would harm public health or
safety.
Rutland chair Dale Beske
on Monday declined to spec-
ulate whether the new state
law means Magnum will get
its way. He said the town’s
attorney is still “reviewing
the statutes,” and he hadn’t
determined if the plan com-
mission or town board would
act on Magnum’s new appli-
cation at their upcoming
meetings.
The county’s ZLR com-
mittee won’t vote on Mag-
num’s proposal until after the
town does so, said commit-
tee member Patrick Miles,
the Dist. 34 county board
supervisor. But he expects
opponents will speak out at
the April 29 public hearing.
Asked if the change in
state law trumps the county’s
ability to deny rezones or
conditional use permits for
towers like the one proposed
by Magnum, Miles also
deferred comment.
“I am guessing that will
be part of our discussion”
at next week’s meeting, he
said.
Among opponents of
Magnum’s plans are mem-
bers of Preserve Our Rural
Landscape, a Stoughton-
based non-profit group led
by president Jim Danky. In
an email to group members
earlier this month, he encour-
aged them to attend all three
meetings.
The saga over the tower
prompted a story last month
by the Wisconsin Center for
Investigative Journalism,
which found that state Rep.
John Klenke, R-Green Bay,
was listed in drafting records
for the new state provision
governing communica-
tion towers. Klenke did not
respond to requests for com-
ment from the Center or the
Hub.
The tower would service
FM channel 95.9 WBKY,
currently in Portage. Propo-
nents of the tower – includ-
ing many municipal and
school officials in Stoughton
and Oregon – have said a
radio station could improve
communication during emer-
gencies and air local broad-
casts of local sporting events.
The site near Old Stage
Road was chosen because it
fits inside a small segment of
land that wouldn’t interfere
with other area FM radio fre-
quencies, company president
Dave Magnum has said.
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If you go
What: Public hearing
of the Dane County ZLR
committee
Topic: The application
to build a 486-foot radio
tower in the Town of
Rutland
When: 7 p.m. Tuesday,
April 29
Where: Room 351,
City-County Building, 210
Martin Luther King Jr.
Blvd., Madison
Kettle Park West
Economic analysis due in June
Council selects
Minnesota firm for
$16K, 3-month study
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
A report on how the pro-
posed Kettle Park West
development could affect
the city and local business-
es is expected to be ready
to present by the end of
June.
The Common Coun-
ci l on Apr i l 8 unani -
mously selected Maxfield
Research Inc. to conduct
what it calls an Economic
and Fiscal Analysis on the
project. The Minneapolis-
based real estate research
company conducts market
research feasibility stud-
ies.
Maxf i el d was one of
t hr e e c ompa ni e s t ha t
responded t o t he ci t y’s
request for proposals to do
the analysis. Each respond-
ed after the city relaxed an
initially tight timeline that
requested a report within
about a month.
Maxfield offered to do
the work for not more than
$16, 525, about $1, 000
less than Vierbicher and
Associates of Madison. A
third company, the Mich-
i gan-based Gi bbs Pl an-
ning Group, submitted a
proposal of not more than
$26, 000 t o conduct t he
study and submit a report.
Kettle Park West is a
proposed 35-acre devel-
opment on the city’s west
side, at the intersection of
U.S. Hwy. 51 and State
Hwy. 138. The commer-
ci al devel opment phase
includes a 153,000-square-
foot Wal-Mart Supercenter
and three other commer-
cial/retail businesses.
Included in the develop-
ment agreement signed by
the city and Kettle Park
West LLC and Forward
Devel opment Gr oup i s
$5.1 million in taxpayer
financing. That has been a
source of controversy, as
has the announcement that
Wal -Mart woul d be t he
anchor retailer. The Hub’s
opi ni on page has been
flooded with letters both
for and against, an oppo-
sition group has formed
to stop or stall the devel-
opment, and decisions on
KPW were at least partial-
ly responsible for inspiring
four write-in candidates in
the last election, though all
were unsuccessful.
The economic analysis is
a requirement of the city’s
so-called big box zoning
ordinance. The ordinance
requires that the analy-
sis estimate the types of
jobs created through the
development and the num-
ber of full- and part-time
jobs created. It also calls
for estimating the amount
of local labor to be used
in the construction of the
proj ect and i n empl oy-
ment.
In February, the council
voted to put all permit-
ting approvals for KPW on
hold until the analysis has
been completed.
Council debate
One aspect of estimating
the impact of the develop-
ment that remains contro-
versial is the identity of the
proposed tenants. While
Wal-Mart allowed itself to
be identified in January,
just two weeks before the
city signed a developer’s
agreement, other potential
tenants remain a mystery.
During the April 8 dis-
cussion over which firm
to hire, city attorney Matt
Dregne told the commit-
tee that both Vierbicher’s
and Maxfield’s cover let-
ters indicated they would
study the entire build out
of the commercial phase of
development at KPW, as
opposed to only the effect
that the Wal-Mart Super-
center might have.
“That begs the question,
in order to do the study,
don’t they need to know
the identity of the other
retailers?” asked Ald. Tim
Swadley (D-1).
Swadl ey i s among a
handful of alders – includ-
ing David Kneebone (D-1)
and Michael Engelberger
(D-2) – who have repeat-
edly pressed city staff and
t he devel oper t o reveal
the names of the devel-
opment’s proposed ten-
ant s. Ot hers, i ncl udi ng
Al d. Tom Sel sor (D-4)
and Mayor Donna Olson,
think the important ques-
tion should be what type
of businesses, not specifi-
cally who.
Dr egne sai d i n Max-
field’s proposal, the con-
sul t ant asked f or “t he
abi l i t y t o request what
information they need” to
gather the data.
As the Hub reported last
week, Scheel told the com-
mittee of the whole that
in addition to Wal-Mart,
the city expects a finan-
cial institution and a con-
venience store to open in
the development. A fourth
retailer is unknown, but
Scheel said, “some of the
buildings are going to be
multi-tenant buildings.”
He sai d t he names of
t hose t enant s have not
been divulged.
Three-month process
In their proposals, Max-
field and Vierbicher both
indicated they could con-
duct the work and submit
the analysis within about
three months, while Gibbs
di d not i ncl ude a t i me-
frame for completing the
study.
Scheel sai d Maxfi el d
estimated it would take
between 60 and 75 days to
complete the draft report.
The consultant will then
present its findings to the
council, which means it
coul d t ake about t hree
months to complete the
process.
In i t s proposal t o t he
ci t y, Maxfi el d sai d t he
anal ysi s “wi l l focus on
identifying employment,
infrastructure, economic
and tax impacts resulting
from the development and
operation of the proposed
project.”
It added that the analy-
sis will identify positive
and negative impacts of
the development and “will
pr ovi de r e c omme nda-
tions to mitigate negative
impacts that may result
f r om t he devel opment .
Quantitative analysis will
identify the net economic
i mpact from bot h posi -
tive and negative impacts
to the community and the
resulting potential reve-
nues to the City from taxes
to be paid.”
The city initially did not
get any responses when it
sought proposals for the
study.
City planning director
Rodney Scheel di st ri b-
uted the initial RFPs to 13
potential consultants On
Feb. 12, but received no
responses “even though we
anticipated a few respons-
es based on conversations
prior to the due date,” he
told the Hub.
Scheel said five of the
13 companies indicated
the KPW fiscal analysis
was not “a good fit” with
the services they provide.
Other companies felt the
ci t y’s t i mel i ne was t oo
tight. Scheel had requested
that companies return pro-
posals no later than March
4 and submit a final report
by April 8.
At the council’s April 8
meeting, Scheel reported
that the city had removed
its original time require-
ment for submissions and
received three proposals
for the project.
As part of the approv-
al, the council accepted
fi nance di rect or Lauri e
Sullivan’s recommenda-
tion that the city require a
$50,000 deposit from the
developer.
Economic and Fiscal Impact
Analysis requirements
1. Estimate the types of jobs created, including
the number of full- and part-time jobs created.
2. Estimate the amount of local labor to be used in
the construction of the project and in employment.
3. Include an analysis indicating the market
proposed for the project and the area from which
patrons will be attracted.
4. Compare and evaluate the projected costs
and benefits to the community resulting from the
project including:
a. Projected costs arising from increased demand
for and required improvements to public services
and infrastructure.
b. Value of improvements to public services and
infrastructure to be provided by the project.
c. Projected tax revenues to the city to be
generated by the project in the first five years.
4
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Courier Hub
Thursday, April 24, 2014 • Vol. 132, No. 38
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Letters to the editor
Letters to the editor
Seniors and low-income families
need Super Wal-Mart development
When working as a Wal-Mart
cashier, I see what seems like an
endless stream of seniors on fixed
income and low income individuals
and families using EBT cards (elec-
tronic version of food stamps).
They often express how difficult
it is for them to stretch their dollars
in this still very challenging econo-
my.
I refuse to believe that anyone in
the Stoughton area would refuse to
help these people if they were able
to.
A full-sized grocery store in
a larger Wal-Mart would help
all shoppers in the area (not just
Stoughton) stretch their food bud-
get further. It would also provide an
affordable option for all the every-
day needs everyone has; things like
laundry detergent, paper towels
and toilet tissue, light bulbs, under-
wear and socks at an affordable
price. Those in the lower and fixed
income groups would benefit the
most.
As it stands, there is no other tru-
ly affordable full service option in
Stoughton or the surrounding area.
Madison shopping is not an option
for most seniors as they are just too
frightened of what they feel is very
intense traffic.
As I have personally experienced
we are already serving the needs
of the surrounding area and not
just Stoughton; places like Oregon,
McFarland and Evansville. By
increasing our ability to help all
shoppers in the area, the positive
economic impact would be greater
than most people realize.
To deny the shoppers of Stough-
ton and the surrounding communi-
ties this opportunity, we would be
hurting the needs of those who need
our help the most.
Vincent Blegen
Wal-Mart associate
The Courier Hub encourages citizens to engage in discussion through letters to the editor. We take sub-
missions online, on email and by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and phone
numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
The editorial staff reserves the right not to print any letter, including those with libelous or obscene con-
tent. We can accept multiple submissions from local authors.
Submit a letter
When is an ordinance not an
ordinance? When is a policy not
a policy? Answer: when city offi-
cials say so. Just what kind of
la-la land is city hall creating to
protect their investment in Kettle
Park West?
If you read the Courier Hub’s
April 17 comprehensive article
on Stoughton’s TIF policy, you
know that Mayor Olson and
finance director Sullivan are
now claiming that Resolution
No. R-18-05, “City of Stoughton
Resolution Establishing Policies
for the Use of Tax Incremental
Financing (TIF)” only created
“guidelines” and really didn’t
have to be followed. Really? It
doesn’t read very “advisory.”
Let’s do a fact check on city hall
claims.
First, it has been known for
over 15 months that some sort of
public assistance like TIF could
be needed for Kettle Park West.
R-18-05 makes very clear that
the city council is the ultimate
TIF “decider” and has the right to
oversee all aspects of the project
on behalf of Stoughton residents.
Not one discussion on the 2005
policy was held by the city coun-
cil over the past 15 months. Isn’t
that curious? I believe, like many
others, that this was deliberate
to keep residents and the council
from knowing about Wal-Mart’s
future occupancy plans too early.
Moreover, even if you bought
city hall’s line that the policy is
really not a policy and was only
meant to provide casual guide-
lines that city staff could imple-
ment, R-18-05 contains clear lan-
guage allowing the city council to
waive guidelines, but not a single
vote to waive guidelines came
before the finance committee
or city council over the past 15
months! City staff decided what
they would waive or amend with-
out input by alders. There can be
no doubt who was in charge of
this project.
So, here we are at the 11th
hour and we now know that
Stoughton adopted a sound TIF
policy in 2005 that should have
been used from the start to pro-
tect taxpayers from undue expo-
sure, but it wasn’t. And we also
know, thanks to an open records
request, that the developer knew
more about this policy than our
own city council as they were
prepared to follow the policy last
summer.
Just who is guarding the pub-
lic interest in the project? Will
the council ever get the cour-
age to stand up before city hall?
It will all come down to a set of
TIF hearings later this spring
and I am convinced that taxpay-
ers will find many reasons to be
concerned about TIF payback
that should have been discovered
sooner if council had been doing
its job!
Roger Springman
City of Stoughton
City hall makes mockery of TIF ordinance and policy
City is masking real costs of Kettle Park West TIF
Using public money to subsi-
dize a private investment ought
to require high financial transpar-
ency.
Sadly, city hall has not done
its homework on the financial
aspects of Kettle West. From the
start, they have played fast and
loose with the facts and costs to
taxpayers. Here is what you need
to know:
• real financing costs for Ket-
tle West will exceed $7 million
when you add the interest costs
of the two TIF bonds (which they
always forget to mention) plus
the obligated costs of site grading
work.
• TIF bond interest rate charg-
es could well exceed 3.4 percent
because the city deliberately mis-
led the public on the negative
financial condition of TIFs 4 and
5 in the downtown area. They are
currently behind assessed value
by $3.5 million. City hall knew
this but they used 2012 figures
instead.
• It is unclear who will be
paying for utility infrastructure
costs for sewer mains, electric
service, water lines, and natu-
ral gas lines to the Kettle West
boundary. These costs could
exceed $800,000.
Add t o t he above t he fact
that the Wisconsin Department
of Transportation had already
planned to upgrade Hwy. 51 with
public highway funds in a few
years, but now, because of Kettle
West, Stoughton taxpayers will
be left subsidizing this construc-
tion for a private retail develop-
ment.
Then there is Kettle West itself.
The prospects of Kettle West ever
paying off are slim. Why? Many
box store chains are in trouble
and around 50 percent of all retail
stores fail within five years. There
is zero chance that all stores that
start with Kettle West will finish
with it in 17 years! Zero. And,
every time a store goes out of
business, assessed evaluations
and taxes will likely go down.
It is time for an open, honest
and complete account of all Ket-
tle West public expenses. We
deserve better.
Roger Thompson
City of Stoughton
Editor’s note: City finance
director Laurie Sullivan
explained that her presentation
used audited figures for 2012,
rather than the still-unaudited
numbers of 2013. Those unau-
dited numbers do show a drop
of $800,000 in TIF 4 and $2.7
million in the new TIF 5 district,
both of which are redevelopment
districts.
Redevelopment districts typi-
cally do not grow quickly and
can even lose value in a down
economy. Those types of districts
are often are supported by indus-
trial TIF districts, such as TIF
3 and the proposed new district,
which Sullivan explained would
have its costs assured by guar-
anteed value in the developer’s
agreement.
Corrections
A story about the annual Yahara River clean-up day had the incor-
rect date. The event will be held April 26. See page 5 for more details.
• • •
A photo caption about the vintage hat show at Cheeser’s misidenti-
fied owner Peggy Schuett.
The Hub regrets these errors.
See something wrong?
The Courier Hub does not sweep errors under the rug. If you see
something you know or even think is in error, please contact editor Jim
Ferolie at 845-9559 or at stoughtoneditor@wcinet.com so we can get
it right.
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
5
St. Ann’s spring gift and
plant fair set for May 3
St . Ann’ s Ca t hol i c
Church will hold a Spring
Fever Gift and Plant Fair to
help pay for a summer mis-
sion trip.
The fair will be held from
9 a.m. until 2 p.m. Satur-
day, May 3, at 324 North
Harrison St.
Proceeds will help defray
expenses for parish youth
who are making a mission
trip to Marvell, Ark., this
summer.
Vendors include local
artists with African straw
baskets, garden decorations
of recycled glass, yard dec-
orations, gift baskets with
food mixes, many different
hand-crafted jewelry prod-
ucts, fleece blankets, quilt-
ed, knit/crochet and fabric
items, homemade pet treats
and pet product s, hand
embroidered girls dresses
from Chile, etc.
Also present will be ven-
dors from The Pampered
Chef, Wildtree, Watkins,
Scent s y, Tupper war e,
Ori gami Owl , Usborne
Books & More, Thirty-One
Gifts, Norwex, Gold Can-
yon, Jamberry Nails, Lia
Sophia and many more.
Baskets of flowers will
be available for purchase,
as well as many different
varieties of annual plants.
The students will also be
selling refreshments during
the fair.
Quest i ons shoul d be
directed to Cathie Truehl
at 873-7633 or email her at
Cathie.Truehl@Stoughton.
k12.wi.us.
THANK YOU!
Thank you to all who came to my retirement
celebration and for the many gifts I received. It
was a special day for me and one I will always
remember.
Special thanks to the fire department and all who
worked to make this possible.
“RED”
UN347554
85TH BIRTHDAY PARTY
for
A. Lorraine Ellis
Saturday, April 26
1 p.m.-4 p.m.
American Legion Post 59
803 N. Page St., Stoughton
Come Help Us Celebrate!
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Friends of the Stoughton Public Library
Book Sale
April 23-26, 2014
Wed., April 23 • Friends Preview Sale 6-7 p.m.
Friends of the Library members only
(Memberships available at the door)
Thur., April 24, 9:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
Fri., April 25, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Sat., April 26, 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
304 S. Fourth St., Stoughton WI 53589
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7
5
3
9
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7
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THANK YOU
In memory of Wayne Sutton his family would like to
thank Mike Miller and family and all others for their acts
of kindness and support.
With 40 years of being part of the Stoughton community,
the adopted families and valuable friends are a treasure
we hold close to our hearts.
With Love,
Vicki Sutton
Kayla & Tim Krauss
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VFW Badger Post 328 Inc.
200 Veterans Rd., Stoughton
Friday Night
All-You-Can-Eat Fish Fry
Dine-in only. Regular menu also available
Also serving Cat Fish Dinner Special
Come in and check out new updated dining area and lunch special.
Purchase 8 daily Lunch Specials get the 9th free.
Month of May Free dessert with meal
Big Johnson Karaoke
Up Coming
Sunday, May 4 • Blue Grass Jam • 12 p.m.
Tuesday, May 6 • Bartenders Dinner • 5 p.m.
Every Friday Night Meat Raffe starts at 5 p.m.
Every Thursday night Bingo starting at 7:00 p.m.
Serving Lunch Tuesday-Friday 11:00 a.m.-1:30 p.m.
Open to the Public
www.stoughtonvfw.org Like us on Facebook
U
N
3
4
6
4
9
4
Prom ‘under
the big top’
Stoughton High School stu-
dents will celebrate prom this
weekend.
This year’s theme is “Under the
Big Top.” The event will take
place at the Overture Center in
Madison.
The 2013-14 SHS Prom
court is, from left, back row:
Timothy Johnson, Alexander
Zacharias, Zach Hasselberger,
Jacob Fitzsimmons, Skylar
Gunderson, Colin Davis, Joshua
Hole. From left, front: Jessica
Wendt, Kenisha Baker, Reghan
Anderson, Julie Garvin, Lindsay
Bach, Kristen Nett, Madeline
Jensen.
Photo by Kimberly Wethal
If you go
What: St. Ann craft fair
and plant sale
When: 9 a.m. until 2
p.m. Saturday, May 3
Where: 324 North
Harrison St.
Info: 873-7633
Kiwanis to
hold disc golf
tournament
Stoughton Area Key Club
and Kiwanis Club of Stough-
ton will host their Kiwanis
Disc Golf Rally on Saturday,
May 3.
Registration begins at 8:30
a.m. followed by 9 a.m. open
tee off. Beginners tee off
starts at 10 a.m. Players of
similar ability and age play
for prizes, so all are encour-
aged to join in the fun.
Entry fee is $5 per indi-
vidual, although this year all
adults accompanying their
children will play free. The
first 20 students registered
will receive a free tourna-
ment quality disc and there
will be a variety of door priz-
es offered.
“This is always a fun event
for families and students,”
said Glenn McNaughton,
club president.
Kiwanis is well-known for
its child and youth-oriented
programs to strengthen fami-
lies, improve educational
opportunities, foster a sense
of community service, and
provide leadership develop-
ment.
For more information
on the Disc Golf Rally or
Kiwanis, go to stoughtonki-
wanis.org or call McNaugh-
ton at 877-1055.
Pitching in for the Yahara
Annual river
cleanup is Saturday
SCOTT DE LARUELLE
Unified Newspaper Group
Th a n k s t o a n n u a l
cl eanup ef f or t s goi ng
back t wo decades, t he
Yahara River and sur-
rounding walking trails
are one of the area’s sce-
nic jewels.
People can help keep
it that way this Saturday
during this year’s River
and Trai l s Task Force
cleanup, set to begin at
9 a.m. at the pedestrian
bridge at Division Park.
Ri ver and Trai l s Task
Force chairman Jon Lew-
is said in recent years,
as volunteers have had
to pull less debris from
the river, they have more
time to expand efforts to
neighboring parks and
trails.
“The first time we did
this, it was tractor tires
and everything,” he said.
“We’ve found shopping
carts, big tires, and lots
of Styrofoam bait con-
t ai ner s, whi ch r eal l y
angers me, because fish-
ermen are supposed to be
environmentally aware.”
Lewi s cr edi t ed ci t y
efforts to reduce harm-
ful run-off into the river
as helping keep it clean
from chemicals, as well.
“ For a l ong t i me ,
t hey’ve t ri ed t o make
sure peopl e don’t put
l eaves and f er t i l i zer s
i n t he s t or m s ewer s ,
because that drains into
t he ri ver, ” he sai d. “I
think that’s gotten bet-
ter.”
Tom Lynch, the direc-
t or of t he St ought on
Parks Department, said
parks crews regul arl y
clean the river area and
trails during the warmer
months, but the annual
cleanup is a good way
t o get a head st art on
the debris that has accu-
mulated during the long
winter.
“Depending how many
people we get, we may
send peopl e t o gr een
ways and cert ai n park
areas that need help,” he
said.
Lync h s a i d pe opl e
should dress appropri-
ately for the weather and
wear gloves. Bags will
be provided, as well as
maps t o cl eanup l oca-
tions. He said while the
cleanup doesn’t have an
official end time, most
groups are usually done
around 11 a.m.
“By noon, we’re get-
ting everything, pretty
much,” Lynch said.
If you go
What: Yahara River
Cleanup
When: 9 a.m.
Saturday, April 26
Where: Pedestrian
bridge over Yahara River
Your opinion is something
we always want to hear.
Call 873-6671 or at
connectstoughton.com
WE’RE
ALL
EARS
Questions?
Comments?
Story Ideas?
Let us know how
we’re doing.
6
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
Skaalen Retirement
Services
400 N. Morris, Stoughton
(608) 873-5651
AFFILIATED WITH THE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH OF AMERICA
Doctors Park
Dental Office
Dr. Richard Albright
Dr. Phillip Oinonen
Dr. Thor Anderson
Dr. Thane Anderson
1520 Vernon St.
Stoughton, WI
A Life
Celebration Center
873-4590
1358 Hwy 51, Stoughton
Mike Smits • Dale Holzhuter • Jodi Corbit
Laurie Dybevik, Pre-Need Specialist • Paul Selbo, Office Manager
Place your ad
here weekly!
Call 873-6671
to advertise in the
Courier Hub Church Page.
Place your ad
here weekly!
Call 873-6671
to advertise in the
Courier Hub Church Page.
221 Kings Lynn Rd.
Stoughton, WI 53589
(608) 873-8888
www.anewins.com
Thought for the week
Baha’i Faith
For information: Alfred Skerpan, 877-0911
or Gail and Greg Gagnon, 873-9225
us.bahai.org Stoughton study classes.
Bible Baptist Church
2095 Hwy. W, Utica
• 873-7077 • 423-3033
Sunday: 10 a.m. - Worship; 6 p.m. - Worship
Christ Lutheran Church
700 Cty Tk B, Stoughton
• 873-9353
• e-mail: office@clcstoughton.org
Sunday: 8 and 10:30 a.m. – Traditional Worship
9:10 a.m. – Family Express and Sunday School
Christ the King Community Church
401 W. Main St., Stoughton 877-0303
christthekingcc.org - Sunday: 10 a.m. - Worship
Christian Assembly Church
1844 Williams Drive, Stoughton
873-9106
Saturday, 6 p.m. worship; Sunday, 10 a.m. worship
The Church of Jesus Christ
of Latter-Day Saints
825 S. Van Buren, Stoughton
877-0439
Missionaries 877-0696
Sunday: 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Sunday school and Primary
Cooksville Lutheran Church
Office: 882-4408 - Sunday: 9:30 a.m. - Worship
and Sunday School
Covenant Lutheran Church
1525 N. Van Buren St., Stoughton • 873-7494
covluth@chorus.net • covluth.org
Saturday: 5:30 p.m. Come As You Are Worship
Sunday: 9 & 10:30 a.m. Worship Sunday School:
9:30 a.m.
Ezra Church
ezrachurch.com
129 E Main St, Stoughton | 834-9050 - Sunday: 9
and 10:30 a.m.
First Lutheran Church
310 E. Washington, Stoughton • 873-7761
flcstoughton.com - Sunday: 8:30 & 10 a.m. worship
Fulton Church
9209 Fulton St., Edgerton
884-8512
Worship services 8, 10:30 a.m. -
coffee hour 9 a.m. - Sunday School 9:30 a.m. -
Varsity 12:07 p.m. - AWANA 3 p.m.
www.fultonchurch.org
Good Shepherd By The Lake
Lutheran Church
1860 Hwy. 51 at Lake Kegonsa, Stoughton
873-5924
Sunday Worship: 8:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Education Hour for all ages: 9:15 a.m.
LakeView Church
2200 Lincoln Ave., Stoughton
873-9838
lakevc.org
Sunday: 9, 10:45 a.m. - Worship
Seventh Day Baptist
Church Of Albion
616 Albion Rd., Edgerton
Worship Saturday 11- Sabbath School 10
Fellowship Meal follows service on first Sabbath
Phone: 561-7450 or email: albionsdb@gmail.com
forministry.com/USWISDBGCASD1
Stoughton Baptist Church
Corner of Williams Dr. & Cty. B, Stoughton
873-6517 Sunday: 10:30 a.m. - Worship;
6 p.m. - Evening Service
St. Ann Catholic Church
323 N. Van Buren St., Stoughton
Weekday Mass: At Nazareth House and
St. Ann’s Church - call 873-6448 or 873-7633.
Weekend Mass: Saturday - 5:15 p.m.;
Sunday - 8 and 10:30 a.m.
April 17 mass 7 p.m., April 18 service 1 p.m., April
19 mass 8 p.m. April 20 8 a.m.,10:30 a.m. masses
United Methodist of Stoughton
525 Lincoln Avenue, Stoughton
E-mail: Stoughtonumc@Wisconsinumc.org
Sunday: 8 a.m. - Short Service;
10 a.m. - Full Worship
West Koshkonong Lutheran Church
1911 Koshkonong, Stoughton
Sunday: 10:30 a.m. - Worship
Western Koshkonong
Lutheran Church
2633 Church St., Cottage Grove,
Sunday: 9:30 a.m. worship
11 a.m. Bible study
Give Your Life Completely to
God
It is a commonplace in conversion narratives
for people to say that they wanted to hold back
something in their life from God, some small
area of their life that they refused to give up
to God. Many have said that they refused to
completely give their lives to God for fear that
they would be missing out on some worldly
pleasure. People contemplating religious vows
know that they will be giving up having a fam-
ily, acquiring wealth, and perhaps also their
independence. But this holding on to our old
lifestyle, including all the trappings of both
material and social wealth only prolongs the
bondage. Ironically, we are only truly free when
we completely give our lives over to God, hold-
ing nothing back. Give your life completely to
God and you will find complete joy. If you are
holding back something from God, some area
of your life that you refuse to let go of, then you
are still in shackles and really are missing out on
the complete experience of living for God.
–Christopher Simon via Metro News Service
So give yourselves completely to God. Stand
against the devil, and the devil will run from you.
Come near to God, and God will come near to
you. You sinners, clean sin out of your lives.
You who are trying to follow God and the world
at the same time, make your thinking pure.
James 4:7-8
Community calendar
Coming up
Submit your community calendar
and coming up items online:
ConnectStoughton.com
Thursday, April 24
• 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Friends of the Library book sale,
library
• 10 a.m., Coffee With the Coaches (girls track
coach Eric Benedict and baseball manager Jeremy
Dunnihoo), senior center
• Noon, hernia relief presentation with surgeon Dr.
David Melnick, Stoughton Hospital, 873-2356
Friday, April 25
• 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friends of the Library book sale,
library
• 6:30-8 p.m., Sandhill’s Got Talent, Sandhill
Elementary School, 877-5400
Saturday, April 26
• 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Friends of the Library book sale,
library
• 9 a.m. to noon, medication disposal and sharps col-
lection, fire department, 873-6677
Sunday, April 27
• 4-6 p.m., “Our Daily Bread” free meal provided by
Stoughton area churches, First Lutheran Church, 301
E. Washington St.
Saturday, May 3
• 2-3:30 p.m., kids make Mother’s Day bracelets,
library
• 5:30 p.m., Annual Relay For Life Cancer Survivors’
Dinner, American Legion Hall Otis Sampson Post 59,
803 North Page Street, Stoughton, 873-7455
Monday, May 5
• 3 p.m. music appreciation class, Christ Lutheran
Church
• 5:30-6:30 p.m., The Gathering Table free community
dinner, Senior Center, 248 W. Main St., 206-1178
• 7 p.m., orchestra concert, River Bluff Middle School,
877-5500
Tuesday, May 6
• 6:30-8 p.m., Stoughton Relay For Life planning team
meeting, for location details call 220-8783
Thursday, May 8
• 6:30 p.m., “Thursdays With Murder,” featuring “The
Butler Did It!,” library
Tuesday, May 13
• 1-2 p.m., Exploring world cultures: Venezuela, senior
center

Friends of the library book sale
From Wednesday, April 23 to Saturday, April 26, the
library is hosting this annual event. The sale will go from
9 a.m.-8 p.m. Thursday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m.-2
p.m. Saturday.
Drug drop-off
Safely dispose of unused medication and sharps at this
annual collection event from 9 a.m. to noon, Saturday,
April 26 at the Stoughton Fire Department. People are
asked to bring medications in original containers if pos-
sible, and use a black market to cross off personal marker.
Sharps must be dropped off in a registered container or thick
plastic laundry detergent bottle. The Lions and Lionesses will
also collect eyeglasses. Call 873-6677 for information.
Capital City Jazz Fest
The Madison Jazz Society will kick off its second
quarter century of festivals with the 26th annual Capital
City Jazz Fest at the Madison Quality Inn & Suites, 2969
Cahill Main, Fitchburg. For more information, call (608)
850 5400 or go to madisonjazz.com.
Stoughton Senior Style Show
The Stoughton Lionesses will hold a Style Show at April 27.
For tickets, contact Amy Hermes at 516-8720 or ahermes@
stohosp.com. The cost is $20 and the event will be held at
Banushi’s Bar and Grill, 800 Nygaard St. from 12:30-2 p.m.
Hwy. 14 meeting
State officials are looking to continue planning for one
of the major highways leading south of Madison.
Although Hwy. 14 has seen many improvement projects
in the past decade, officials are looking for more feedback
on preservation plans for the road south of Hwy. 92 to the
interstate near Janesville.
A public involvement meeting to discuss the current
study from 4-7 p.m. Wednesday, April 30 at J.C. McK-
enna Middle School in Evansville, 307 S. 1st Street, with
a brief presentation at 5:30 p.m. Project maps and other
information will be on display and WisDOT staff will be
available to explain the study and answer questions.
Stoughton’s First Saturdays
Enjoy downtown Stoughton’s street fair atmosphere on
the first Saturday of each month from May through Sep-
tember from 10 a.m. to noon, with live music, food, artists
and sales.
Disc golf tournament
The Stoughton Kiwanis will hold its 2014 Disc Golf
tournament Saturday, May 3. The annual event includes
different skill level brackets like Men/Women’s Advanced
Open begins, starting at 9 a.m. and beginner groups, start-
ing at 10 a.m.
A new feature this year is that parents bringing a paid
K-12 entrant can play for free. The first 20 K-12 entrants
will receive an official “tournament quality” disc. For
more information, visit stoughtonkiwanis.org.
Cancer survivors’ dinner
The annual Relay For Life Cancer Survivors’ Dinner
will be held Saturday, May 3, at American Legion Hall
Otis Sampson Post 59, 803 North Page Street, Stoughton
at 5:30 p.m. Cancer survivors are invited to a social eve-
ning and a free spaghetti dinner. Guests are welcome, and
are asked to contribute a good will donation at the door.
Call Kathy Horton at 873-7455 to reserve your seat.
Relay For Life meetings
Stoughton Relay For Life will hold planning team meet-
ings May 6 and June 3. Each meeting is 6:30-8 p.m. New
members are always welcome. For details, call 220-8783.
Hunger food drive
Saturday, May 10 marks the 22nd anniversary of the
National Association of Letter Carriers “Stamp Out Food
Hunger Drive.” Customers can leave a non-perishable
food donation in provided bags by their mailbox on Sat-
urday, May 10.
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
7
Stoughton Opera House
Americana, country music in upcoming lineup
BILL LIVICK
Unified Newspaper Group
Two bands whose reper-
toires overlap in traditional
old-time music will make
their first appearances at the
Stoughton Opera House in
the next week.
The Sweetback Sisters
perform classic country and
honky tonk music with a
bit of old-timey tunes on
the side. The six-piece band
features the vocals of Emily
Mills and Zara Bode, who
formed the band in 2006.
They’ll appear at the Opera
House Friday night.
Next Thursday, May 1,
The Steel Wheels will return
to Wisconsin after perform-
ing last year at the Sugar
Maple Traditional Music
Fest i val near Madi son.
The quartet’s sound is pure
Americana, with elements of
folk, bluegrass, country and
traditional old-time music.
Sweetback Sisters
Emily Mills and Zara
Bode were living in New
York City in June 2006 when
a friend asked them if they’d
like to open an upcoming
show he’d booked at a local
bar. The pair had been sing-
ing together “just for fun,”
Mills said in a telephone
interview, and quickly put
together a band for the event.
Mills said the group was
so well received they decided
to make it more than a one-
night stand.
“Right now we’re touring
about once a month, and it
can range from a weekend to
two weeks,” she explained.
“It’s pretty varied. This tour
is starting in Minneapolis
and working our way back
East, ending at Oberlin Col-
lege in Ohio.”
The band’ s mat er i al
sounds like classic country
and is obviously influenced
by the likes of Merle Hag-
gard, Buck Owens, George
Jones and Pete Wells.
“But it’s all stuff that
we’ve written, and then some
of it is country classics that
people have heard as well –
a little bit of Hank Williams
here and there,” Mills said.
The music is built around
the family-style harmonies of
Mills and Bode, and there’s
an element of Wanda Jack-
son in the group’s energy and
sassy approach.
The band’s press promo
says the Sweetbacks “are
concerned with the tradi-
tional subjects of heartbreak,
revenge, remorse and staying
strong in the face of relation-
ships gone wrong, albeit with
a contemporary sensibility.”
“We’re a renegade retro
band that mixes up coun-
try, swing and honky tonk,”
Bode says. “Sometimes what
we deliver is straight out
of the 50s; other times it’s
BR549 meets The B52s.”
They released their debut
CD, “Chicken Ain’t Chick-
en,” in 2009. The band fol-
lowed with “Looking for
a Fight” last year, which
balances yesterday’s hits
with contributions from the
band’s four songwriters:
Bode, Miller, guitarist Ross
Bellenoit and fiddler Jesse
Milnes.
Mi l l er sai d si nce t he
Sweetbacks started, she’s
noticed there are “more and
more bands doing this classic
country thing, which I love.”
“I’m just really excited
about being able to hear
good, danceable country
music all over the country,”
she said.
Mills also loves the fact
that country music has a very
broad scope.
“I kind of consider country
music to include the tradi-
tional music that we play as
well as honky tonk stuff up
through modern country,”
Mills said. “But I feel like
modern country has gotten
a disproportionate amount
of the exposure over the last
10-15 years, so it’s nice to do
some of the honky tonk stuff
out there.”
The Steel Wheels
Trent Wagler, frontman
and founder of The Steel
Wheels, hails from the
Shenandoah Valley and the
Blue Ridge Mountains in
Virginia, a place rich with
history, natural beauty and
traditional music.
He said the band members
have made music together
for almost a decade, although
it was only in 2009 that they
quit their day jobs and “real-
ly decided to go full-time as
a touring band.”
He thinks the years of
playing together have paid
off in the band’s tight sound.
“It’s one of those things
where I do feel there’s a lot
to be said for putting in the
time to just play, and you
find your sound by putting
in nights of playing music,”
Wagler said in a telephone
interview from his home in
Harrisonburg, Va.
“It’s been a fun explora-
tion for us in that way, and it
definitely feels at this point
that we have a good sense for
what we do well.”
His point is underscored
by the band’s success.
The Steel Wheels’ break-
out album, “Red Wing,”
came out in 2010 and gar-
nered critical praise. It spent
13 weeks on the Americana
Music Association’s Top 40
Chart, where it reached the
No. 15 slot. It also cracked
the Euro Americana Chart
Top 10.
The band was nominated
for five Independent Music
Awards in 2010, with the
single “Nothing You Can’t
Lose” taking top honors as
Best Country Song.
Following 2011’s release,
“Live at Goose Creek,” The
Steel Wheels continued to
take the Americana scene
by storm with their album,
“Lay Down, Lay Low” in
2012. It spent 10 weeks on
the AMA’s Top 40 Chart
and was the 2012 Americana
Album of the Year from the
Independent Music Awards.
Wagler said while such
recognition isn’t why the
band makes music, it’s been
nice to be noticed at the
national level.
“It is a real honor when
people who are listening to
music all the time feel you
deserve something like that,”
he said. “Everybody wants to
be recognized in their field,
and by the nature of what we
do, it’s a pretty public recog-
nition.”
The four-pi ece st ri ng
band marries old-time musi-
cal traditions with their own
innovative sound. The band
is renowned for their chem-
istry on stage, where the four
often gather around a single
microphone to produce pure
and clear four-part harmo-
nies.
Leadi ng t he way i s
Wagler’s unmistakable tenor,
supported by Eric Brubaker
on fiddle, Brian Dickel’s
grounded upright bass and
Jay Lapp’s signature mando-
lin style.
It’s easy to see why The
Steel Wheels have wowed
the contemporary Americana
scene. But the band didn’t
start off with such lofty
goals.
“Years ago, when the guys
in the band talked about
what we wanted to do, we
didn’t have any illusion that
we would be touring nation-
ally necessarily,” Wagler
explained. “We thought if
we could get to Merlefest
(the annual traditional music
festival held in Wilkesboro,
N.C.), that would be just
amazing.
“For us, that was all there
was. And so in many ways
we’re in a very good place.
We’re going to Merlefest
this week, and it’s the second
time we’ve been there.
“But when we get to stand
on stage and be playing
alongside or after or before
artists that we’ve been listen-
ing to for years and we really
have a tremendous amount
of respect for, that to me is
the time when I feel like we
really are experiencing some
magic.”
Two years ago, as the band
was driving back from its
debut at the festival, the guys
began talking about creat-
ing their own festival in the
Shenandoah Valley.
They launched Red Wing
Roots Music Festival last
year and are hosting it again
in July.
“We wanted to bring in
the people we wanted to see;
the different styles of music
that we represent ourselves,”
Wagler said.
The festival will feature
dozens of acts, many of
which have appeared in the
past year or two the Opera
House, including Sara Jaro-
sz, Tim O’Brien and Darrell
Scott, Pokey LaFarge, and
The Duhks. Other headliners
include Trampled by Turtles
and Peter Rowan’s Bluegrass
Band.
Wagler said he’s been
strongly influenced as a
songwriter by Doc Watson,
Tim O’Brien, and Gillian
Welch, along with such
western icons as Townes
Van Zandt and Guy Clark.
“That’s the vein that we
want to be in and to stay in,”
he said of the band’s music.
“We want to pay homage to
the traditions that we know
and love, and also hopefully
push them forward in some
different ways.”
Janet’s Antiques
Furniture Sale
Sale ends Saturday, May 3
(don't miss it!)
China and Glass
Flow Blue Dinner Service
Fostoria Stemware, Sterling Vases
Cups & Saucers, RS Prussia
Cut Glass Bowls, Stemware, Carafe
Furniture
Cherry Dresser, Floor Mirror
Round Oak or Mahogany Tables
Tall Victorian Bookcase w/doors
Carved Chinese Arm Chairs
3800 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53705
608-238-3300 • Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. U
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Other upcoming shows
Who: Jim Brickman: The Love Tour
When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 26
Where: Stoughton Opera House, 381 E. Main St.
Tickets: $45 reserved
• • •
Who: Dailey and Vincent
When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 3
Where: Stoughton Opera House, 381 E. Main St.
Tickets: $35 reserved
Call: 608-877-4400
Website: ci.stoughton.wi.us
*See website for detailed ticket information
If you go
Who: The Sweetback
Sisters
When: 7:30 p.m. Friday,
April 25
Where: Stoughton Opera
House, 381 E. Main St.
Tickets: $25 reserved
• • •
Who: The Steel Wheels
When: 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 1
Where: Stoughton Opera
House, 381 E. Main St.
Tickets: $25 reserved
Photos submitted
The Steel Wheels, above, bring
their Americana music to the
Opera House early next month.
The Sweetback Sisters, right,
will perform April 25 at the
Opera House. The New York-
based group draws its sound
from classic country music.
8
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
lakes since the 1970s. “The
lake water quality is not
getting better. It’s not get-
ting notably worse. It’s as
if the interventions we’re
doing are just holding the
line.”
Algae and bacteria, both
caused by pollution, con-
tinue to be the prime causes
for dozens of beach clo-
sures each year. Kirsti Sor-
sa, who has been manag-
ing the Madison and Dane
County Public Health beach
monitoring program since
2001, said the situation is
“highly variable” at beach-
es, changing by the day.
Since 1996, the agency
has closed the 16 beaches
it manages more than 1,300
days (one day’s closure at
one beach), averaging about
75 closure days each sum-
mer, according to an analy-
sis by the Wisconsin Center
for Investigative Journal-
ism. The shutdowns ranged
from 26 total days in 1999
to 193 days in 2009. The
monitored beach season
lasts about 100 days.
The years 2008 and 2009
were “awful” for harmful
algal blooms, Sorsa said,
while the 2012 drought
brought less runoff. Last
year, cool temperatures
inhibited floating algae
scums. Total beach closures
those two years were just
43 percent of the two peak
years.
“We led a charmed life
this year,” Carpenter said in
September as the beach sea-
son came to a close.
Health risks
Harmful algal blooms
and bacteria cause state and
local governments to cau-
tion beach users or close
the beaches along the Great
Lakes and at inland lakes
across Wisconsin.
Algae can cause a slew
of probl ems, i ncl udi ng
asthma-like symptoms; at
worst, it can be fatal to peo-
ple or pets.
Some bacteria cause gas-
trointestinal illness, but the
strains of E. coli used in
most beach tests are gener-
ally harmless and used as
an indicator for other patho-
gens – bad bacteria, virus-
es, parasites or diarrhea-
causing protozoa – that are
harder to test for.
The Wisconsin Depart-
ment of Natural Resources
has listed or proposed to
list 31 beaches statewide
as “impaired” for exceed-
ing the state’s E. coli water
quality standard, including
11 of the 16 Yahara lake
beaches. Bet ween 2009
and 2013, the Wisconsin
Department
o f He a l t h
S e r v i c e s
received 144
compl ai nt s
o f h u ma n
and ani mal
illness asso-
ciated with
e x p o s u r e
t o har mf ul
algal blooms, most com-
monly gastrointestinal dis-
tress, rashes, and respira-
tory or cold-like symptoms.
Since 2009, three out
of 11 illnesses reported in
Dane County that had a
connection with lake water
occurred at Lake Kegonsa.
Even on a good day in
Lake Monona, the beach
water is generally too green
for submerged swimmers to
see their own feet. On a bad
day, toxic algae scums float
on the surface.
They are symptoms of
what ails the Yahara chain:
Thousands of pounds of
phosphorus flow into the
lakes each year – about
80 percent vi a manure
or nutrient-rich soil from
farms – the rest from urban
sources like dead leaves
and construction erosion.
It is what allows the blue-
green algae to flourish.
Cleaning up the phospho-
rus would go a long way
toward helping the beach-
es. Doing so would take
aggressive management of
runoff, said Carpenter, who
believes it would be pos-
sible to cut the phospho-
rus running into the lakes
to 10 percent of what it is
now. He said in the 1830s,
boaters could see all the
way to the bottom of Lake
Mendota in July, instead of
the three to nine feet that
is normal today. The phos-
phorus pollution then was
probably one-tenth of what
it is today.
“We probably can’t go
back t o t hat unl ess we
revegetate the watershed
with the original savannah
vegetation, which is not
going to happen,” he said.
“But we could do a lot bet-
ter than we’re doing now.”
Global interest in
Yahara
The Yahara watershed
is one of the few places in
the world where people are
trying new ways to clean
up the scourge of nonpoint
pollution — that is, the kind
that does not come from
the end of a pipe, like agri-
cultural and urban runoff.
Nobody knows how to do it
well, Carpenter said.
“People in the discipline
pay attention to what hap-
pens in Mendota,” Carpen-
ter said, noting that it is one
of the most famous lakes
in the world because of the
long history of science and
management. “The world is
watching, actually.”
One of t hose experi -
ments is a regulatory tool.
The Madison Metropolitan
Sewerage District, under
an EPA-driven hammer to
reduce pollution that even-
tually flows into the Rock
River, is trying something
called “adaptive manage-
ment.” Instead of installing
expensive pollution con-
trols at the sewage treat-
ment plant, the utility can
pay farmers to reduce nutri-
ent pollution upstream.
If it succeeds, it will aid
another ambitious cleanup
effort. A nonprofit envi-
ronmental group, the Clean
Lakes Alliance, has also
drawn many players togeth-
er and converged upon a
14-point plan to halve the
phosphorus loading into
each of the four Yahara
chain lakes.
The latest efforts have
sparked some hope in sev-
eral longtime lake watchers
and researchers, including
Trina McMahon, a UW-
Madison civil engineering
professor who studies the
lakes and has seen promis-
ing biological signs. Blue-
green algae are not all the
same, and the species that
began appearing in Mendo-
ta in June the past few years
are different from their pre-
decessors, she said. They
are more characteristic of a
healthy lake.
“We think that they’re a
hallmark of the lake recov-
ering,” McMahon said.
She is not certain, and
she is eager to see how the
al gae communi t i es fare
after this winter’s long ice
cover. Overall she is “cau-
tiously optimistic, because
there’s so much momentum
now with the Clean Lakes
Alliance, and the county
and researchers.”
“I t hi nk i t ’s possi bl e
event ual l y, ” McMahon
said. “Is it on time scales
t hat peopl e woul d care
about?”
Capital Times reporter
Jessica VanEgeren con-
tributed to this report. The
nonprofit Wisconsin Center
for Investigative Journal-
ism (WisconsinWatch.org)
collaborates with Wiscon-
sin Public Radio, Wiscon-
sin Public Television, other
news media and the UW-
Madison School of Journal-
ism and Mass Communica-
tion.
60
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GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS SALE!
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168 West Main St. Stoughton, WI 53589
(608) 873-5199
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Store Hours: Monday-Friday
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Saturday 10am-5pm
Closed Sundays
U
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Stoughton High School 46th Annual Band Variety Show
“Channel Surfing”
Saturday May 3rd 7:00 PM●SHS Performing Arts Center
I Love Lucy, Brady Bunch, Game of Thrones,
Simpsons, Hawaii Five-O, and more...
Adults $8
Students K-12 $6
Under 5 Free

TICKET SALES AT DOOR 6:30 PM, or
IN ADVANCE—Contact:
Dan Schmidt (608)877-5745
dan.schmidt@stoughton.k12.wi.us
U
N
3
4
6
7
3
0
Lakes: Bacteria, algal blooms lead to multiple beach closures along Yahara Lakes
Continued from page 1
Dane County’s dirtiest beach?
According to researchers, some years it’s Lake Mendota’s Spring
Harbor, near a large stormwater outfall that brings pollution from
as far away as West Towne Mall. Some years, it is shallow, weedy
Hudson, on Lake Monona. Overall, the medal goes easily to Vilas
Beach, on Lake Wingra, thanks in large part to the flocks of geese
that produce so much waste there.
In 2010 it was closed for 29 days at a stretch, and 43 total; more
recently, closures have dropped. Richard Lathrop, a retired DNR
scientist with an honorary position at UW-Madison’s Center for
Limnology, recalled the waste while working on a Wingra carp-
removal project in 2007: “I had to wear rubber boots just to go to
the bathroom.”
Carpenter
SPORTS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, April 24, 2014
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectStoughton.com
Courier Hub
9
Baseball
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
The Stoughton High School baseball team celebrates in a dog pile following Austin Miller’s game-winning run in the bottom of the 10th inning Monday in a Badger South
Conference game against Oregon. Stoughton won 5-4.
Extra special
Vikings stave off upset
with walk-off in the 10th
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Stoughton High School base-
ball team was coasting along by the
strength of senior pitchers Chris
Lund and Josh Eugster Monday
until a throwing error allowed Ore-
gon to tie the game.
But Eugster didn’t flinch for the
host Vikings, stranding go-ahead
runners on second and third in the
top of the seventh and picking up
four of his eight strikeouts in extra
innings.
Oregon senior pitchers Logan
Laski and Ross Galloway were hav-
ing similar success on the mound
after Laski gave up four early runs,
but an error on a throw from cen-
ter field to third base on a tag-up
attempt allowed Austin Miller to
race home for the game-winning
walk-off run in a 5-4 win in 10
innings.
“Josh coming in and throwing 5
1/3 innings of quality baseball – that
was fantastic for us,” Stoughton
head coach Jeremy Dunnihoo said.
“It kept us in it even though our bats
weren’t in it. We just got a break
from them and took advantage of it.”
That break came in the bottom of
the 10th. Miller walked to lead off
the inning, which was the first walk
given up by Oregon pitching, and he
reached second on a stolen base.
Lund drilled a fly ball to center,
and Miller tagged up to go to third
with two outs. The throw came in
and sailed past the base, and Miller
was able to bounce up and race
home – eventually ending up in a
dog pile in the celebration.
But the Vikings (6-1 overall,
3-0 Badger South) had a chance to
put the game before the game went
to extra innings. Eugster relieved
Lund in the bottom of the fifth, and
he struck out Oregon first baseman
Andrew Pliner with runners on sec-
ond and third to end the inning. The
Panthers (3-5, 1-2) already scored
two runs that inning on RBI doubles
by Laski and Galloway.
Eugster came back in the sixth
and pitched a 1-2-3 inning with two
more strikeouts, and he started the
Boys lacrosse
Vikes crush
St. John’s for
third win
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Senior Nathan Dhuey,
junior Dylan Wenker and
freshman Tanner Gutche
each scored three goals
for t he St ought on boys
lacrosse team Monday in
a 13-0 win over St. John’s
Nor t hwest er n Mi l i t ar y
Academy.
Dhuey, who scored 58
goals and had 24 assists in
2013, was the team MVP
l ast season. Andre and
Dhuey are team captains
along with senior Hank
Guzman. Gutche is listed
as a key newcomer this
season.
Al l f our pi c ke d up
assists.
Also listed as key new-
comers, sophomore Parker
Kruckenberg and freshman
Dylan Gross added two
goals each. Kruckenberg
also had two assists.
Sophomore Jack Ander-
son had six saves in the
shutout.
St ought on t r avel s t o
Baraboo at 5 p.m. Thurs-
day, and it hosts Oregon at
5 p.m. Tuesday, April 29.
Season preview
Head coach Josh Wol-
lin said this year’s Vikings
are younger than the No.
1-seeded squad in Division
2 last season.
“We will still compete
for conference,” he said.
“We are not as experienced
as last year but there is a
lot of potential.”
Wollin sees Sauk Prairie,
La Crosse and DeForest as
the main competition for
Stoughton.
Sauk Prairie defeated the
Vikings in the Division 2
state semifinals in 2013
and return a lot of its start-
ers.
La Crosse was 11-1 in
the Madison Area- White
Lacrosse conference last
season, but it loses a bunch
of key seniors, Wollin said.
DeForest returns after
having eight all-conference
players in 2013.
Track and field
Posick wins pole vault with new PR
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
Juni or Hannah Posi ck once
again leapt to a personal best in
the pole vault Tuesday in a Bad-
ger South Conference triple dual
against Monroe and the Panthers
at Oregon High School.
Posick reached 10 feet, 6 inches
and secured first place with the
next best being 9 feet by Stough-
ton senior Mykala Conroy.
Although the Lady Vikings fell
79-66 to Oregon, they defeated
Monroe 92-46 and won several
events.
Junior Alexa Deutsch (100 high
hurdles), senior Hannah Sonsalla
(100, 300 low hurdles), senior
Maren Schultz (high jump), junior
Megan Reese (long jump) and
junior Savanna Smith (shot put)
all picked up wins.
Deutsch’s time is unknown due
to an error, but Sonsalla took the
100 in 12.87 seconds and the 300
hurdles in 50.22.
Schultz won the high jump in
4-10, while Reese took the triple
jump in 15-7 1/2. Smith won the
shot put in 34-2 1/2.
BOYS
On the boys side, the Vikings
lost to Oregon 76-69 and Monroe
77-66, but they picked up five
wins.
Junior John McCune (800),
senior Kyle Patun (discus, shot
put) and senior Luke Logan (pole
vault) all joined the 4x800 relay of
freshman Owen Roe, junior Ryan
Sperle, freshman Tristan Jenny
and freshman Jackson Hampton.
McCune t ook t he 800 i n
2:07.15, while Patun won the dis-
cus with a throw of 119-9 and the
shot put with a heave of 45-2 1/2.
Logan added a first in the pole
vault with a height of 11-6.
The 3,200 relay won in 9:07.26.
The boys and girls travel to
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Junior Hannah Sonsalla jumps the last hurdle in the 300 low hurdles Tuesday,
winning the event in 50.22 seconds. The Vikings split with Oregon and Monroe.
Turn to Baseball/Page 11
Turn to Track/Page 11
10
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
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Five-run fifth buries Panthers
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Stoughton softball managed
to get in Monday’s make-up
game against Badger South
Conference rival Oregon
despite storms around the area
and won 7-1.
Leading 2-1 entering the
fifth, the visiting Vikings
quickly turned the tide in their
favor following back-to-back
hits to lead off the inning.
While Oregon (1-4 overall,
1-3 Badger South) recorded a
fielder’s choice to get the lead
runner at third one batter later,
the Vikings (2-2 overall, 2-1
conference) kept swinging.
Five hits and one walk later
Stoughton buried the Panthers
behind five runs in the fifth
inning.
Suzy Brickson got things
rolling with a double inside
the left-field chalk to push the
Vikings’ lead to two runs.
“Suzy had been hitting the
ball so hard, she finally got
that ball in fair territory and it
was a huge hit for us,” Vikings
head coach Kristin Siget said.
Vance and Cassie Adams
followed that up with back-
to-back singles before head
coach Mike Derrick went to
the bench.
With Cee Cee Herale
unable to pitch due to linger-
ing elbow problems, Oregon
called on Mikayla Berge.
An Oregon throwing error
led to another run before
Berge walked the bases load-
ed. Lead-off hitter Saman-
tha Tepp capped the five-run
fifth with an RBI single to left
before Berge struck out Liz
Auby. Panthers’ catcher Dani
Moore then picked Aly Moe
off third to end the inning.
“Our bats had been roll-
ing throughout the game we
just couldn’t string anything
together until the fifth,” Siget
said. “In that inning we were
finally able to put some bunts
down, run the bases and get
some big hits.”
The lopsided final score
couldn’t have been farther
from how the game began.
Despite a triple by Auby in the
top of the first and an infield
single by Morgan Neuenfeld,
Oregon escaped the inning
only allowing one run on a
throwing error by Herale.
The Panther shortstop
quickly made up for the mis-
cue though, launching a solo
home run to center with two
outs in the home half of the
inning.
“As soon as Cee Cee hit
that I was already telling the
girls not to touch her until she
crosses home plate,” Derrick
said. “She wasn’t even to first
yet, that thing was a rocket.”
Despite getting the lead-
off hitter on base in the sec-
ond and seventh inning and
a runner on with two outs
in the third and sixth, Ore-
gon couldn’t find an answer
against the Vikings.
Seaton went the distance,
striking out 10, including
seven out of the first 12 batters
she faced.
“I know some girls on that
team, so if felt great to get the
win, especially with 10 strik
outs,” Seaton said. “That real-
ly good too.”
Auby (3-for-5) and Tepp
(2-for-5) paced Stoughton at
the plate, while Moore fin-
ished 2-for-3 at the plate for
the Panthers.
Freshman Lacey Fluck-
inger got the start in the circle
for Oregon, working 4 1/3
innings but was ultimately
charged with the loss.
“The improvement we’ve
made as a team from last year
to this season don’t show up
in the win column,” Derrick
said. “People want to start see-
ing wins. We want it as much
as anyone else.”
Across the diamond Siget
was pleased with the way her
team responded coming off
losses in its last two games.
“This was a great win for us,
especially being a conference
team that’s so close to us,”
Siget said. “Coming off two
losses and rolling into a four-
game weekend, hopefully we
can keep it going.”
MIlton 12,
Stoughton 0 (6 inn)
Stoughton hosted the unde-
feated Milton Red Hawks on
Tuesday and lost 12-0.
Courtney Perrill threw a
four-hitter for Milton.
Seaton, who got the start
in the circle for the Vikings,
went all six innings for
Stoughton. She allowed eight
earned runs on 12 hits, while
collecting two of Stoughton’s
four hits.
Monona Grove 11,
Stoughton 1 (6 inn.)
Earlier in the week the
Vikings traveled to Taylor
Prairie Elementary School in
Cottage Grove where they fell
11-1 to Monona Grove in six
innings.
Seaton went 5 1/3 in the
loss last Thursday, allowing
10 earned runs on 12 hits and
two walks. She struck out six.
Stoughton’s offense was
limited to just five hits with
Vance collecting two singles
and Tepp hitting a solo home
run for the Vikings’ lone run.
Sophomore Kelsey Stinson
struck out eight for the win.
She also helped her cause at
the plate with a double and
triple for MG.
Tough competition at Monday invite
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
The Stoughton High School boys golf
team got a crash course into what it
needs to do to succeed in its tough sec-
tional Monday at the Wisconsin Junior
PGA High School Rewards Invitational at
Maple Bluff Country Club.
Seven schools the Vikings will see
in the postseason in about a month fin-
ished ahead of them, including first-place
Middleton (305) and fifth-place Madison
Memorial (332).
Stoughton, which took 16th out of 23
teams (360), also watched all Badger
South Conference teams finish ahead.
Madison Edgewood was tied for third
(324); Fort Atkinson was sixth (335);
Monroe was ninth (349); Oregon was
10th (353); Milton was 12th (357); and
Monona Grove was tied for 13th (357).
Despite the struggles on a tough course
with rainy conditions early in the day,
freshman Sam Anderson and senior Max
Fergus did finish in the top 25. Anderson
was tied for 18th (81), while Fergus was
tied for 24th (82).
Sophomores Austin Kotlowski (98)
and Gunnar Goetz (99) finished the
scoring for the Vikings.
Catholic Memorial’s Dylan Allen (72)
won the invitational, followed by Lodi’s
Adam Miller (73) and Middleton’s Josh
Haunty (74).
Fort Atkinson’s Nate Gilbert (75) was
fourth, and Oregon’s Carson Torhorst,
Madison Memorial’s Kellen Rice, and
Eau Claire Memorial’s Sawyer Weiss all
tied for fifth (76).
Stoughton continues the season at 3:30
p.m. Thursday, taking on Oregon at Fox-
boro Golf Course. It then travels to Gene-
va Nation Golf Club in Lake Geneva at 9
a.m. Monday, April 28, for an invite and
hosts Milton at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, April
29, at Stoughton Country Club.
Monona Grove invite
Stoughton traveled to The Oaks Golf
Course in Monona Grove last Thursday
for an invite and finished tied for 13th out
of 24 teams with a 353.
Fergus led the Vikings with an 82,
while Anderson shot an 89. Goetz (90)
and Fitzsimmons (92) finished the scor-
ing.
Monroe also shot a 353.
Milwaukee Marquette won the event
with a 310, while Beloit Memorial and
Fort Atkinson tied for second (320).
Softball
Photo by Jeremy Jones
Sarah Seaton struck out 10 Monday as the Vikings defeated the
host Oregon Panthers 7-1.
Boys golf
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior Max Fergus chips onto the 18th green Monday in the Wisconsin Junior PGA High School
Rewards Invitational at Maple Bluff Country Club. Fergus finished tied for 24th with an 82.
Boys tennis
Vikings drop season debut against Monona Grove
JEREMY JONES
Sports editor
Senior Austin Scheel and
sophomore Asher McMullin
played to a 6-3, 6-0 win at No.
1 doubles Tuesday evening.
It turned out to be Stough-
ton’s lone win in a 6-1 Badger
South Conference dual loss.
“Both Austin and Asher
improved quite a bit over the
offseason,” Vikings head
coach Ryan Reischel said.
Number 1 singles player
Matthew Gharrity had the
only other close match, falling
6-4, 6-2.
Stoughton travels to the
Madison East invite this
weekend.
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Girls soccer
Lady Vikings win twice last week
The Stoughton High School girls soccer
team won 3-1 over Poynette-Portage on Thurs-
day and 1-0 over Cambridge Tuesday in two
non-conference games.
Stoughton (3-4 overall, 0-1 conference) got
two goals and an assist from junior forward
Celia Holton on Thursday. Freshman forward
Madeline Posick had the other goal, and senior
forward Hayley Bach added an assist.
Bach picked up the goal Tuesday, while
Holton had an assist.
Hannah Wood had five saves against
Poynette-Portage and two against Cambridge.
Stoughton hosts Fort Atkinson at 7 p.m.
Thursday and travels to Belleville at 7 p.m.
Tuesday, April 29.
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
11
CITY OF STOUGHTON
NOTICE OF ALDERMANIC VACANCY
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN BY
THE CITY OF STOUGHTON,
IN DANE COUNTY, WISCONSIN THAT:
Applications will be accepted from qualifed individuals living within the City of
Stoughton Aldermanic District 4 for appointment to a vacant seat on the Common
Council. The appointment term will cover a period from the date of appointment until
the Spring Election in April 2015. The seat will be up for election in April 2015 to fll
the remainder of the term which ends in April 2016.
If interested in being appointed, please submit your resumé and an aldermanic
appointment questionnaire to the City Clerk’s Offce. The questionnaire is available
on the City’s website or by request in the Offce of the City Clerk, 381 E. Main Street.
Candidates will be interviewed at the regular meeting of the Common Council on
May 27, 2014. It is anticipated that the appointed candidate will be seated and sworn
into offce at the selected meeting.
If you have questions, please contact the City Clerk’s Offce at (608) 873-6677
U
N
3
4
6
1
6
3
Saturday, April 26th
9:00 a.m. to noon
FREE drive through service
Stoughton Fire Department
(enter from Main Street)
• Bring all medications in original containers (if possible)
and cross off personal info with black marker
• Sharps must be dropped off in a registered sharps
container or thick plastic laundry detergent bottle
• The Lions/Lioness will also be collecting used eye
glasses and hearing aids
For additional information, please contact Stoughton City
Hall at 873-6677 or stoughtonwellness@hotmail.com.
Medication Disposal
& Sharps Collection
Stoughton
Wellness Coalition
Saturday, April 26th
9:00 a.m. to noon
FREE drive through service
Stoughton Fire Department
(enter from Main Street)
• Bring all medications in original containers (if possible)
and cross off personal info with black marker
• Sharps must be dropped off in a registered sharps
container or thick plastic laundry detergent bottle
• The Lions/Lioness will also be collecting used eye
glasses and hearing aids
For additional information, please contact Stoughton City
Hall at 873-6677 or stoughtonwellness@hotmail.com.
Medication Disposal
& Sharps Collection
Stoughton
Wellness Coalition
Saturday, April 26th
9:00 a.m. to noon
FREE drive through service
Stoughton Fire Department
(enter from Main Street)
• Bring all medications in original containers (if possible)
and cross off personal info with black marker
• Sharps must be dropped off in a registered sharps
container or thick plastic laundry detergent bottle
• The Lions/Lioness will also be collecting used eye
glasses and hearing aids
For additional information, please contact Stoughton City
Hall at 873-6677 or stoughtonwellness@hotmail.com.
Medication Disposal
& Sharps Collection
Stoughton
Wellness Coalition
UN346531
seventh with another. But
Eugster allowed his first hit
to Laski, who was 3-for-4,
when he singled with one
out.
After another strikeout,
pinch hitter Mitch Weber
was able to slap a single into
right field to put runners at
the corners. Galloway, who
was 2-for-5, followed with
an RBI single to right, but
Eugster still had control.
With runners on second
and third, Eugster got ahead
of Pliner, but junior catcher
Zach Hasselberger attempt-
ed a pick-off to second base
and threw the ball into cen-
ter field, allowing Weber to
score.
“We want, in that situa-
tion, Josh going and getting
the batter and finishing the
game out,” Dunnihoo said.
“Obviously if we can get
an out we’ll take an out, but
we don’t ever want to force
throws in situations when we
feel the pitcher has control
up there.
“We have to learn to battle
through games like this. We
have to learn to be aggressive
when plays are there, but we
can’t force it. It will definite-
ly be a teachable moment for
us.”
Stoughton started the
scoring in the first inning.
Miller was hit by a pitch,
and junior Cade Bunnell
followed with an RBI triple
to right-center. Lund then
knocked an RBI double in
almost the spot to make it
2-0.
In the fifth, senior PJ Roso-
wski picked up an infield sin-
gle, and junior Alex Zacha-
rias and senior Braden Poirer
followed with singles to load
the bases. Junior Alec Show-
ers hit the fourth single in a
row for an RBI with no outs,
and Hasselberger drilled a
sacrifice fly to center to pick
up an RBI and make it 4-0
Stoughton.
The Vikings’ offense end-
ed there until the 10th, how-
ever. Dunnihoo said a lot of
it came from Laski settling
down and changing speeds to
keep Stoughton off balance,
but he said everyone helped
out by chasing bad pitches
and letting hitable ones go.
“That has kind of been
our theme this year. We get
off to early leads and kind of
either coast to a win or have
to fight and claw after we let
a team back in it,” he said.
“But we have to find a way
to keep those good at bats
going throughout the whole
game and not just the first
couple of innings.”
The good news for Stough-
ton is that the pitching didn’t
let up. Lund added six strike-
outs, and he and Eugster
often left Panthers’ batters
perplexed at the plate. With
an offense that has scored 56
runs in seven games to open
the season, Dunnihoo said
he thinks Stoughton will be
scary when it can have both
offensive and pitching suc-
cess on the same day.
Lund went 4 2/3 innings
and allowed two runs on six
hits. Eugster allowed three
hits and a walk for the win.
The 14 strikeouts the two
combined for is what Oregon
head coach Kevin Connor
said was the difference.
“It looked like we were
hesitant, not ready to just
pull the trigger and swing the
bat,” Connor said. “The story
in that game was strikeouts.
… We have to do a little bit
better job of putting the ball
in play.”
Laski went seven innings
and allowed four runs on
nine hits. He struck out
six and hit a batter. Gal-
loway pitched the final 2
2/3 innings and allowed an
unearned run on one walk.
He also struck out one.
Stoughton continues the
season at 5 p.m. Thursday
against Monroe at home
before traveling to Roosevelt
Field in Oconomowoc for a
non-conference game at 4:30
p.m. Friday. The Vikings
finish the week at 5 p.m.
Tuesday at Fort Atkinson.
Stoughton 3, MG 2
Stoughton won in another
walk-off last Thursday in
a 3-2 victory over Monona
Grove at home.
After the Silver Eagles tied
the game at 2 in the top of the
seventh, the Vikings were
able to bounce back in the
bottom of the inning with an
RBI single by Bunnell with
one out and the bases loaded.
Rosowski finished 2-for-3
with an RBI. Miller added an
RBI.
Rosowski pitched seven
innings and allowed two
earned runs on eight hits. He
struck out four and walked
three. Jason Bilke picked up
the loss for MG. He allowed
two earned runs on seven hits
in 6 1/3 innings. He walked
two and struck out two.
Stoughton 5, Milton 0
The Vikings traveled to
Milton on Tuesday and shut
out the Red Hawks 5-0 on
the strength of Rosowski’s
complete-game, 13-strike
out, one-hit shutout.
Tim Johnson led Stough-
ton with two hits, while
Showers, Bunnell and Lund
all collected RBIs.
Milton had two errors in
the loss.
Continued from page 9
Baseball: Vikings win in last at bat against Monona Grove
Monroe at 4:30 p.m. Friday for a
relay invite. They host a confer-
ence quad against Madison Edge-
wood, Milton and Monroe at 4:30
p.m. Tuesday.
Portage invite
The Vikings traveled to Por-
tage High School last Thursday
for the Badger Conference Invi-
tational.
GIRLS
The girls won the invite with
143 points.
Senior Maren Schultz (high
jump) and juniors Kelsey Jenny
(800), Megan Reese (triple jump)
and Nikki Staffen (1,600) all led
the way with first places.
Schultz won the high jump
with a height of 4 feet, 10 inches.
Junior Hannah Posick also had
a 4-10 jump and took second.
Freshman Payton Kahl was fifth
(4-6).
Reese won the triple jump
(31-4 1/4), while freshman Mya
Lonnebotn was second (30-11
1/4). Reese added a third place in
the long jump (15- 1/2).
J enny won t he 800 i n 2
minutes, 31.55 seconds, while
Staffen won the 1,600 in 5:26.4.
Sophomor e Mar en Gr yt -
t enhol m pl aced t hree t i mes.
She finished third in the 400
(1: 05. 32), fourt h i n t he 100
(13. 46) and sixth in the 200
(27.9).
Junior Alexa Deutsch led the
way in the hurdles. In the 100,
she took second in 17.61, and
she grabbed third in the 300 in
53.10. Sophomore Shelby Orcutt
was third in the 100 hurdles in
17.85, and freshman Kylie Lynch
was seventh in the 300 hurdles in
55.36.
Junior Savanna Smith took
fourth in the discus (33-6 1/4)
and fifth in the discus (103-2).
Junior Alexus Crockett was sixth
in the shot put (32-7 3/4).
Senior Ashley Harnack add-
ed a fifth place in the 3, 200
(12:39.67).
The 4x200 r el ay ( Megan
Boettcher, Isabel Dennis, Reese
and Posick) took third in 1:57.42.
BOYS
The boys took fourth at the
invite with 79 points, led by
senior Luke Logan with a first
place in the high jump (5-10).
Junior Brad Graffin was fourth in
the high jump (5-6).
Logan added a second place in
the pole vault (11-0), while soph-
omore Derek Schultz was third
(10-6).
Senior River Hoaglin was sec-
ond in the triple jump (38-5 1/2),
while senior Jayce YellowBird
was sixth (37-5).
Junior John McCune was third
in the 800 in 2:04. 41, while
freshman Owen Roe was sixth in
the 1,600 in 10:39.5.
Senior Will Clark was seventh
in the 200 (24.09), while sopho-
more Josh Hitchcock was eighth
in 11.84. Junior Ryan Sperle took
eighth in the 400 in 56.57.
Sophomore Davi d Krueger
added a seventh in the discus
(116-0).
The 4x200 and 4x800 relays
each took third. The 800 relay
(Jakob Benson, Logan, Clark and
YellowBird) finished in 1:36.75,
while the 3,200 relay (senior
Santiago Sarthou, Giles France,
McCune and Sperle) finished in
8:56.93.
Track: Stoughton girls win Portage invite, boys take fourth
Continued from page 9
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
Senior Luke Logan stretches in the 200 Tuesday for a second-place finish in
22.93.
12
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
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Much of the attention in
Dane County and the state
lately has focused on hero-
in, which about five or six
years ago began to resur-
face as a cheaper alternative
to addictive painkillers. But
opiate-based prescription
painkillers – such as Vico-
din or Oxycontin - haven’t
gone away, either.
They still account for
nearly two-thirds of Dane
County’s overdoses, Bull-
ard-Cawthorne notes, and
three-quarters of opiate
users – recovering or cur-
rent – say their addiction
started with prescription
pain meds.
Scarce data
In Stoughton, local offi-
cials stop short of saying
heroin and other opiates
are rampant. But police and
emergency personnel say
an uptick in overdoses in
recent years has remained
steady.
Police and EMS officials
here don’t track heroin- or
opiate-specific data. But
between 2007 and 2011,
there were 67 hospitaliza-
tions in Stoughton’s 53589
ZIP code for drug overdos-
es, according to PHMDC.
That’s about an average
rate for communities sur-
rounding Madison.
Tina Strandlie manages
t he Emergency Depart -
ment at Stoughton Hospital.
While the hospital “hasn’t
seen an alarming rise” in
drug overdoses, she said
staff responds to three to
five a month. She added,
however, t hat her dat a
doesn’t specify the type of
drug used or distinguish
between unintentional over-
doses and suicides.
In 2001, local ambulanc-
es started carrying Narcan,
a drug used to counteract
overdoses from heroin or
other opiates, said Stough-
ton EMS director Cathy
Rigdon. But local EMTs
rarely, if ever, needed it for
the first few years.
Last year, first respond-
ers administered Narcan
only once, and the depart-
ment doesn’t have data for
previous years. But Rigdon
said overdose calls don’t
all require Narcan and are
more common than they
used to be.
“You di dn’t hear t he
word heroin 10 years ago
like you do today,” Rigdon
said. “I do think there’s a
problem here, but I don’t
know exactly how bad the
problem is.”
Stoughton police note
similar signs. Detective
Brandon Hill said that in
his first eight years here,
he rarely heard of an over-
dose call. But over the
past half-dozen years or
so, it happens “a couple of
times a year.” And much of
Stoughton’s problems trav-
el to Madison, where users
commonly obtain their her-
oin, he said.
Exampl es abound. In
October 2011, four men
between the ages of 19 to
23 drove from Stoughton to
the parking lot of a Madi-
son grocery store to buy
heroin. Three were from
Stoughton and one, from
Oregon, nearly died of an
overdose after shooting up
in the parking lot. A month
earlier, a Madison police
officer revived a 20-year-
old Stoughton woman who
overdosed on heroin out-
side a west Madison shop-
ping mall. Last August,
police arrested a 22-year-
old Stoughton woman for
using stolen credit cards to
buy goods she pawned for
heroin. Last October, Madi-
son police arrested Stough-
ton resident Todd R. Pink,
for burglarizing a home to
pay for his heroin habit. He
was later convicted of felo-
ny burglary.
Expensive habit
Not that Stoughton is
immune from local drug
crimes. During a single
five-day span in April 2012,
St ought on pol i ce made
seven drug-related arrests,
including four for delivery
or possession of heroin.
Primarily, however, the
t ri ckl e-down effect for
Dane County suburbs like
Stoughton is more thefts
and burglaries by addicts
desperate to pay for their
habit. Hill said that just last
month, he spoke to a home-
less, unemployed Stough-
ton woman spending up to
$350 a day on heroin. He’s
also heard of locals prosti-
tuting themselves in Madi-
son for money.
Almost all heroin in Dane
County comes to Madison
via Chicago, said Lt. Jason
Fr eedman of t he Dane
Count y Narcot i cs Task
Force. While most users
still come to Madison for
the drug, he said dealers are
traveling more to the sub-
urbs in recent years.
“I’m very confident this
is not an urban-only prob-
lem,” Freedman said.
While prices fluctuate,
Freedman said a gram of
heroin typically sells for
between $120 and $150 in
the Madison area. That’s
enough for three to 10 dos-
es, depending on the user.
Not a ‘dramatic jump’
Bullard-Cawthorne and
others aired concerns that
first-time users of heroin
or painkillers are starting at
younger ages.
But whi l e opi at e use
appears to be rising, local
teens aren’t using them in
big numbers, according
to local responses to the
2012 Dane County Youth
Assessment survey.
Just over half of Stough-
ton High School students
surveyed said they’d tried
alcohol or illegal drugs
before, and nearl y hal f
of seniors surveyed said
they’d ridden in a car driv-
en by someone who’d been
drinking. Nearly four in 10
SHS students had tried mar-
ijuana.
By contrast, more than
98 percent of respondents
said they’d never tried her-
oin, while 91 percent said
they’d never illegally used
prescription drugs. Both
figures mirror countywide
stats.
Stoughton also tracks
its own numbers, using
its “Youth Risk Behavior
Survey.” That survey has
shown some declines in
the use of heroin, prescrip-
tion drugs, the drug ecstacy
and alcohol among Stough-
ton teens over the past four
years, said Nancy Crass-
weller, AODA prevention
coordinator for the Stough-
ton Area School District.
By and large, Stoughton
High School has not seen a
marked increase in students
coming to school high or in
possession of drugs as hero-
in and painkiller abuse has
risen countywide, said Pete
Wilson, the district’s direc-
tor of student services.
“We have seen cases here
or there,” he said. “Have
we seen a dramatic jump? I
would say no.”
Wilson notes that admin-
istrators receive training
to detect when a student is
high, and counselors are
in place to help struggling
kids. He expects informa-
t i on about prescri pt i on
drug abuse and heroin will
be part of future district-
sponsored parent-education
events, too.
Raising awareness
As awareness of opiate
abuse has grown, so have
efforts to combat it, Bull-
ard-Cawthorne said.
One example is the Safe
Communities initiative of
Madison and Dane County,
a program that, for exam-
ple, has pushed for med-
drop boxes in communi-
ties to eradicate supplies
of painkillers and is reach-
ing out to the medical and
dental profession to curb
prescriptions of addictive
drugs.
Stoughton opened a per-
manent drop site outside
the police station in 2012,
in fact.
Bullard-Cawthorne said
there’s still work to be done
to see addiction as a disease
that requires treatment, not
just punishment. And, she
added, stigmas that addicts
are “junkies” on the street
are outdated.
“It’s just this wrong per-
ception,” she said. “These
are your neighbors, your
neighbors’ kids. It’s a wide
spectrum of people.”
Th e Ne wma n f a m-
ily knows that all too well.
Growi ng up i n Cot t age
Grove, Chase Newman
was a smart, fun kid who
thrived in his high school’s
DECA program, his mother
said. But he struggled with
addiction for years, attend-
ing five recovery programs.
In his early 20s he was
diagnosed as bipolar, and
in 2010, his older brother,
who also struggled with
depression, took his own
life.
The combi nat i on was
“too much,” Jeff Newman
said. At his best moments,
Chase was clean for up
to a year. The death of
two Monona Grove High
School classmates and close
friends in 2010 shook him
up. Still, he kept relapsing.
At his funeral and after-
wards, Jeff Newman said
numerous people told him
how Chase had “saved their
life” as a mentor, helping
them fight off their own
addictions.
In her eul ogy, Lesl i e
Newman i mpl or ed her
son’s friends to seek help.
“You should be going to
each other’s weddings,”
she said at the time, rather
than “have the heartache
of hanging out at anoth-
er funeral of a friend of
yours.”
Nearly two years later,
the couple is still reeling.
Reading emails and letters
from Chase’s old friends
still makes them cry. Being
act i ve i n t hei r church,
where they help run a sup-
port group for people strug-
gling to overcome addic-
tions or just bad habits, has
helped, Jeff said. But about
their only respite is know-
ing that Chase is “finally
free from his addictions,”
Leslie said.
They still hope his death
will steer others from ever
trying heroin, even if it’s
hard to talk about.
“I want people to know
that this drug is out there
and what it’s doing,” Leslie
said. “You can’t make it go
away by being quieter.”
By the numbers
Total hospitalizations and ER visits due to “drug
poisonings” by ZIP code, 2007-2011
Public Health department of Madison-Dane County
“Tiers” assigned by hospitalizations/ER visits per 10,000 people
Heroin-related deaths in Dane County
Through August 2013
Heroin: Despite scarce reporting, officials see uptick in heroin-related calls
Continued from page 1
‘These are your
neighbors, your
neighbors’ kids. It’s
a wide spectrum of
people.’
Lisa Bullard Cawthorne,
health educator with
Public Health for
Madison and Dane
County
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
13
143 NOTICES
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
150 PLACES TO GO
ASHLAND GUN & Knife Show April
25-27. Ashland Civic Center. Friday 4-8.
Sat 9am-4pm. Sun 9am-3pm. Adm $5
good for all days. Info call Ray 715-292-
8415 (wcan)
163 TRAINING SCHOOLS
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
Saturdays! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on Facebook! Next class
begins 9/6/2014. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
173 TUTORING & INSTRUCTION
THE PATH to your dream job begins with
a college degree. Education Quarters
offers a FREE college matching service.
Call 800-902-4967 (wcan)
340 AUTOS
1999 FORD Contour Sport
47,000. Green. Good condition, one
owner. 608-873-9038
DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT or Motor-
cycle to Rawhide. Donate before Decem-
ber 31st for a tax deduction and help a
life in your local wisconsin community.
888-653-2729 (wcan)
342 BOATS & ACCESSORIES
2005 BAYLINER I/O boat and trailer in
excellent shape. 608-877-7790
BOAT WORLD Over 700 New & Used
Pontoons, Fishing Boats, Deck Boats,
Ski-boats, Bass & Walleye Boats, Cud-
dys, Cruisers up to 35 feet & Outboards
@ the Guaranteed Best Price! Crown-
line/Axis/Malibu/Triton/Alumacraft/Mor-
rocraftMisty Harbor & Crest Pontoons.
American Marine & Motorsports Super
Center, Shawano. Where Dreams come
True. 866-955-2628 www.americanma-
rina.com (wcan)
SHOREMASTER DOCK & LIFT
Headquarters. New & Used. We do it
all.Delivery/Assembly/Install/Removal
American Marine & Motorsports,
Schawano = Save
866-955-2628 (wcan)
THE Courier Hub CLASSIFIEDS, the
best place to buy or sell. Call 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
355 RECREATIONAL VEHICLES
2001 17' High-Low Trailer. Excellent
Condition. Lightly Used. $6800/OBO.
608-873-1601
ATVS SCOOTERS & Go-Karts. Youth
ATV's & Scooters (80mpg) @ $49/mo.
Sport & 4x4 Atv's @ $69/mo. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports, Schawano
=Save= 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
360 TRAILERS
TRAILERS @ LIQUIDATION Pricing.
Boat, ATV, Sled or Pontoons. 2 or 4
Place/Open or Enclosed. American
Marine, Shawano 866-955-2628 www.
americanmarina.com (wcan)
402 HELP WANTED, GENERAL
CAR WASH ATTENDANT. P/T 20 hrs,
wk/ave. Mainly morning and alternating
weekends. Excellent for retired person.
Must be 18 and able to work outside in
the elements, lift heavy items and mop
cars. Customer service skills, mechanical
aptitude and computer experience a plus.
Pick up an application at Baywash Car
Wash, 1704 Hwy 51, Stoughton or call
608-884-6426.
FLOWER WRAPPERS. Wrappers need-
ed for Mother's Day April 29-May 7
in Stoughton. $8-$10 an hour. Flexible
hours. 575-2327
FOUR WINDS Manor, Inc., Verona,
is now hiring dedicated caregivers.
If you share our committment to a
positive attitude, respect for residents,
and are a team player who enjoys
working with the elderly please
consider joining us. We have various
shifts and positions available. A part
time housekeeper from 8am-2pm in
our assisted living facility. A full time
RN for the PM shift. A full time NOC
CNA for our 60 bed skilled facility. A
full time NOC Resident Assistant for
our CBRF. These positions include
every other weekend and holidays
with shift differential for PM, NOC
and weekends. Excellent benefits
with full time hours including health,
dental, PTO, flex spending and
401K. Applications available at www.
fourwindsmanor.com or
303 S Jefferson St.

FULL TIME Cook. Immediate opening at
Koffee Kup Restaurant in Stoughton. Pay
based on experience. Apply in person at:
355 E. Main
FULL TIME manufacturing
position. Responsible, organized
& dependable. Apply At: Midwest
Rubber, 250 Industrial Circle,
Stoughton, WI 53589
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS NOON
Monday FOR THE Stoughton Courier Hub
GROWING CONCRETE company look-
ing for EXPERIENCED Flat work finisher,
foundation form setter, concrete foreman
and operator with CDL. MUST have
valid drivers license. Competitive wages,
insurance benefits. 608-289-3434
PART-TIME RETAIL Merchandiser
needed to merchandise Hallmark
products at stores in Verona. To
apply please visit www.hallmark.
candidatecare.com
PT ADMIN Assistant 20 hrs. pr/wk.
Tuesday-Friday 8:30-1:30. MS Office
experience. Bookkeeping. Full job
description at fpcoregonwi.org.
E-mail resume to: oregonfpc@gmail.com
440 HOTEL, FOOD & BEVERAGE
SUPER 8 VERONA is seeking Front
desk associates and Housekeepers.
Experience preferred but willing to train
the right people. Paid Training. Paid
Vacation. Free Room Nights. Flexible
Hours. Apply in person at: 131 Horizon
Drive, Verona
444 CONSTRUCTION,
TRADES & AUTOMOTIVE
HVAC TECHNICIAN for installation and
maintenance work. Experience or train-
ing required. Good pay and benefits.
Contact Dave at Ok Heating 845-9494 or
dave@okheating.biz
449 DRIVER, SHIPPING
& WAREHOUSING
$2000 SIGN On Bonus! Class – A 2yrs
Exp Company Drivers .44cpm East &
.40 all other Health/Dental/401K-Local,
Regional & OTR Owner Op's 78% of line
haul 100% FS Plate Program, No elec-
tronics Tom: 800-972-0084 x6855
DELIVERY DRIVER Organic produce
farm near Evansville needs driver for
Tuesday, Thursday, Friday routes
to Madison and Milwaukee. 10+ hour
days, 22-foot reefer. CDL preferred but
not required. Must be in good physical
shape. Job involves lifting and hand-truck
work. Additional farm work available if
interested. Starts mid-May. Contact
Steve or Beth at 608-882-6196 csa@
tipiproduce.com
FLATBED DRIVERS. New Pay Increase.
Great Miles/ Pay & Home time, New
2014 trucks w/APU's & Refrigerator. Full
Benefits + Flatbed Equipment Supplied.
CDL-A, 2yrs exp. 855-219-5996
OTR DRIVERS WANTED
Above Average Mileage Pay including
Performance and Safety BONUSES!
Health/Dental/Vision/HSA/Matching
401K/Vacation pay and Holiday Pay.
Avg 2500-3500 miles/week 100% No
Touch 12 mo. CDL/A Exp Preferred
888-545-9351 ext 13 Jackson, WI www.
doublejtransprot.com (wcan)
453 VOLUNTEER WANTED
YOUTH AROUND the world and right
here in Dane County will be addressing
critical issues through service to others
during Global Youth Service Days! Vol-
unteer projects will take place on April
22, Earth Day and continue on April
25-27. Last year over 2000 youth par-
ticipated and we hope to have over 2200
participate this year. Madison English as
a Second Language School is seeking
volunteers to design and present classes
in their areas of expertise to international
students to help improve their English.
Volunteers may also choose to do one-
on-one tutoring. United Way 2-1-1 is
seeking volunteers to become Informa-
tion and Referral Specialists. If you are
looking for an opportunity to learn more
about community resources and would
like to assist people in finding ways to
get and give help, United Way 2-1-1 may
be the place for you! Our volunteers staff
our telephone lines, answering ques-
tions about resources available in the
service area. Call the volunteer center at
608-246-4380 or visit www.volunteery-
ourtime.org for more information or to
learn about other volunteer opportunities.
508 CHILD CARE & NURSERIES
SMALL INHOME Daycare- Stoughton
Has an opening for one school age child.
Call Maria at 877-1196
516 CLEANING SERVICES
J/ K HAULING Home/property clean-up.
Haul/dispose any unwanted items. Call
Krista or Jason 608-921-6105.
548 HOME IMPROVEMENT
A&B ENTERPRISES
Light Construction/Remodeling
No job too small
608-835-7791
ALL THINGS BASEMENTY! Basement
Systems Inc. Call us for all your base-
ment needs! Waterproofing? Finishing?
Structural Repairs? Humidity and Mold
Control? Free Estimates! Call 888-929-
8307 (wcan)
ASPHALT SEAL COATING Crack
filling, striping No job too small. Call
O & H at 608-845-3348 or
608-832-4818
DOUG'S HANDYMAN SERVICE
GUTTER CLEANING
"Honey Do List"
No job too small
608-845-8110
HALLINAN-PAINTING
WALLPAPERING
**Great-Spring-Rates**
35 + Years Professional
Interior/Exterior
Free-Estimates
References/Insured
Arthur Hallinan
608-455-3377
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for the Courier Hub unless
changed because of holiday work sched-
ules. Call now to place your ad, 845-
9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
NIELSEN'S
Home Improvements
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
554 LANDSCAPING, LAWN,
TREE & GARDEN WORK
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing,
trimming, roto tilling, Garden
maintenance available.608-235-4389
JAYS LAWN MAINTENANCE
Spring Cleanup, Garden Roto tilling
Lawn mowing, Brick and Flagstone
walkways and patios, Hedge Trimming
608-728-2191
LAWN MOWER Blade Sharpening in
Stoughton. $5. per blade. Call 608-
235-4389
LAWN MOWING Residential and com-
mercial. 608-873-7038
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon Fri-
day for the Courier Hub unless changed
because of holiday work schedules.
Memorials for those we love and remember.
WISCONSIN MONUMENT & VAULT CO.
159 W. Main St. • 873-5513
Serving Stoughton since 1989.
U
N
3
4
3
5
0
7
Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
ANTIQUES
17th ANNUAL MADISON , WI ANTIQUE SHOW.
May 3-4. Alliant Energy Center. Sat. 9-6, Sun 1-4.
$6.00/$5.00 with ad. Madisonantiquesshow.com. $1.00
appraisals-Smalls only. Scavenger Hunt! (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- MANAGERIAL
RIVER COUNTRY COOPERATIVE of South St. Paul,
MN, is seeking a qualifed CEO/General Manager. This
is a successful retail / bulk energy, grain, agronomy and
feed cooperative with sales of $140 million with multiple
retail locations. Financial and personal management
experience is required. Email: larry.fuller@chsinc.com
or fax (888-653-5527) resume to: Larry Fuller, 5213
Shoal Drive, Bismarck ND 58503. (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
PICKUPUP TRUCKS NEEDED NOW! Move RV
trailers from Indiana and delivery all over the USA
and CANADA. Many trips headed WEST! Go to:
horizontransport.com (CNOW)
Hiring One Ton and 3/4 Ton Pickup trucks to deliver
RV’s. 10¢/mile Sign-On Bonus, 4 Terminals & 8
Backhaul Locations. Call 866-764-1601 or www.
foremosttransport.com (CNOW)
Knight Refrigerated CDL-A Truck Drivers Needed. Get
Paid Daily or Weekly. Consistent Miles. Pay Incentive &
Benefts! Become a Knight of the Road. EOE. 855-876-
6079. (CNOW)
$1000 SIGN ON BONUS! Looking for Lease purchase,
O/Operators and O/Operator-drivers to pull our trailer
or yours. We offer excellent revenue, miles, FCFS
dispatch, weekly settlements, direct deposit, home
time. Call Recruiting for incentive info @ 800/845-5838
(CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
This classifed spot for sale! Advertise your product or
recruit an applicant in over 179 Wisconsin newspapers!
Only $300/week. Call this paper or 800-227-7636 www.
cnaads.com (CNOW)
Legals
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
The City of Stoughton Planning
Commission will hold a Public Hearing
on Monday, May 12, 2014 at 6:00 o’clock
p.m., or as soon after as the matter may
be heard, in the Council Chambers, Pub-
lic Safety Building, 321 South Fourth
Street, Second Floor, Stoughton, Wis-
consin, 53589, to consider a proposed
Conditional Use Permit Application by
Elijah Pitney, for an outdoor display
use (automobile sales) at 1005 N. Page
Street, Stoughton, Wisconsin. The prop-
erty at 1005 N. Page Street is owned by
Mark & Judy Rosenbaum, and is more
fully described as follows:
Parcel Number: 281/0511-052-9911-
2,
LOT 1 CSM 4032 CS17/22&23
R4080/66&67-12/22/82 DESCR AS SEC
5-5-11 PRT SE1/4NW1/4 (34,373 SQ FT)
For questions regarding this notice
please contact Michael Stacey, Zoning
Administrator at 608-646-0421
Michael P Stacey
Zoning Administrator
Published April 17 and 24, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF BOARD OF
REVIEW MEETING
CITY OF STOUGHTON,
DANE COUNTY, WISCONSIN
Public notice is hereby given
that the Board of Review for the City
of Stoughton will meet in the Council
Chambers, Public Safety Building, 321
South Fourth Street, on Monday, May 12,
2014, from 10:00 o’clock a.m. to 12:00
noon, for the purpose of reviewing and
examining the assessment roll of real
and personal property in said City, and
all sworn statements and valuations
of real and personal property therein,
and of correcting all errors in said roll,
whether in description or otherwise, and
to perform such other duties imposed
by law.
Please be advised of the following
requirements.
No person shall be allowed to ap-
pear before the Board of Review, to
testify to the Board by telephone or to
contest the amount of any assessment
of real or personal property if the per-
son has refused a reasonable written
request by certifed mail of the Assessor
to view such property.
After the frst meeting of the Board
of Review and before the Board’s fnal
adjournment, no person who is sched-
uled to appear before the Board of Re-
view may contact, or provide informa-
tion to, a member of the Board about the
person’s objection except at a session
of the Board.
No person may appear before the
Board of Review, testify to the Board by
telephone or contest the amount of any
assessment unless, at least 48 hours
before the frst meeting of the Board
or at least 48 hours before the objec-
tion is heard if the objection is allowed
because the person has been granted a
waiver of the 48-hour notice of an intent
to fle a written objection by appearing
before the Board during the frst two
hours of the meeting and showing good
cause for failure to meet the 48-hour
notice requirement and fles a written
objection, that person provides to the
Clerk of the Board of Review notice as to
whether the person will ask for removal
of any Board members and, if so, which
member will be removed and the per-
son’s reasonable estimate of the length
of time that the hearing will take.
When appearing before the Board,
the person shall specify, in writing, the
person’s estimate of the value of the
land and of the improvements that are
the subject of the person’s objection
and specify the information that the per-
son used to arrive at that estimate.
No person may appear before the
Board of Review, testify to the Board by
telephone or object to a valuation; if that
valuation was made by the Assessor or
the Objector using the income method;
unless the person supplies to the As-
sessor all of the information about in-
come and expenses, as specifed in the
manual under Section 73.03(2a), that the
Assessor requests. The municipality or
county shall provide by ordinance for
the confdentiality of information about
income and expenses that is provided to
the Assessor under this paragraph and
shall provide exemptions for persons
using the information in the discharge
of duties imposed by law or of the duties
of their offce or by order of a court. The
information that is provided under this
paragraph, unless a court determines
that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the
right of inspection and copying under
Section 19.35(1).
The Board shall hear upon oath,
by telephone, all ill or disabled persons
who present to the Board a letter from
a physician, surgeon or osteopath that
confrms their illness or disability. No
other persons may testify by telephone.
CITY OF STOUGHTON
Maria Hougan, City Clerk
Publish: April 17, 24 and May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE
The City of Stoughton Planning
Commission will hold a Public Hearing
on Monday, May 12, 2014 at 6:00 o’clock
p.m., or as soon after as the matter may
be heard, in the Council Chambers, Pub-
lic Safety Building, 321 South Fourth
Street, Second Floor, Stoughton, Wis-
consin, 53589, to consider a proposed
Conditional Use Permit Application by
James Brooks, for an Indoor Commer-
cial Entertainment use (ftness facility)
at 1060 W. Main Street, Unit 8, Stough-
ton, Wisconsin. The property at 1060
W. Main Street, Unit 8 is owned by 1050
Associates LLC, and is more fully de-
scribed as follows:
Parcel Number: 281/0511-071-0214-
4,
REPLAT OF BLOCK 2 EMERSON
PARK LOTS 4 & 5 BLOCK 2 & ERICK-
SON PARK BLOCK 1 LOTS 1 & 2 EXC S
33 FT SD LOT 2 & ALSO INCL PRT VAC
ELM ST ADJ SD PRCL IN M274/565
For questions regarding this notice
please contact Michael Stacey, Zoning
Administrator at 608-646-0421
Michael P Stacey
Zoning Administrator
Published April 24 and May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The City of Stoughton Common
Council will hold a Public Hearing on
Tuesday May 13, 2014 at 7:00 o’clock
p.m., or as soon after as the matter may
be heard, at the Public Safety Build-
ing, Second Floor, 321 S. Fourth Street,
Stoughton, Wisconsin, 53589, to consid-
er an amendment to the City of Stough-
ton Municipal Code of Ordinances, Dane
County, Wisconsin. The proposed ordi-
nance amendments are to sections 66-1,
66-204, 66-501, 66-502 and to Appendix
1, Chapter 66, Land Division Ordinance
For questions regarding this notice
please contact Rodney Scheel, Director
of Planning & Development at 608-873-
6619 or rjscheel@ci.stoughton.wi.us
Rodney Scheel
Director of Planning & Development
Published April 24 and May 1, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
NOTICE
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
I hereby certify that:
FAMOUS YETIS LLC., CALE J.
RYAN, AGENT, dba WENDIGO TAVERN,
in the City of Stoughton, Wisconsin,
has applied to the Common Council of
the City of Stoughton, Wisconsin, for
a Class “B” Beer & “Class B” Liquor
License for the period ending June 30,
2014, at the tavern or place of business
located at:
121 E. MAIN STREET
Maria P. Hougan
City Clerk
Published: April 24, 2014
WNAXLP
* * *
Obituary
Robert B. Valentine
Robert B. Valentine, age
88, passed away on Tues-
day, April 15, 2014, at
Skaalen Nursing and Rehab
Center. He was born Sept.
9, 1925, in Sycamore, Ill.,
t he son of Ri chard and
Ruth (Bryan) Valentine.
On Sept. 21, 1951, he mar-
ried Marjorie Buzzell at
the Sycamore Methodist
Church. Marjorie preceded
Robert in death in August
of 1996. Robert married
Rhoda Sorenson in August
of 1997.
Robert joined the Army
Ai r Cor p i n 1943 and
served until
hi s honor -
a b l e d i s -
c h a r g e i n
1946. After the military
Robert worked for many
different companies, most
recent was for Sub Zero
where he retired in 1990.
Both Marjorie and Rob-
ert loved to volunteer at
t he Meri t er Hospi t al i n
Madison. He also liked to
escape to his favorite fish-
ing hole on Lake Waubesa.
Robert had a passion for
music and art, and sang in
many church and commu-
nity choirs.
He was pr eceded i n
death by his parents, his
two brothers Howard and
James, sister Marian, and
his first wife Marjorie.
Robert is survived by
his wife, Rhoda; daughters
Linda Kunz and Cheryl
(John) Delavan; and step-
children Barbara (John)
James, Dale (Beth) John-
son, Terry Johnson and
David (Kathy) Johnson.
He is also survived by nine
grandchildren, ten great-
grandchildren, and many
nieces and nephews.
Services were held at on
Monday April 21, 2014, at
First Lutheran Church with
the Rev. Richard Halom
and the Rev. Bill Lehman
presiding. Robert will be
laid to rest at Roselawn
Memorial Park in Monona.
Memorials may be given
to First Lutheran Church,
Ska a l e n Nur s i ng a nd
Rehab Center, and Nurses
Christian Fellowship.
The family would like to
thank the staff at Skaalen
for the love and care they
have given dad these past
few years.
Please share your memo-
ries at cressfuneralservice.
com
Cress Funeral Home
206 W. Prospect
Stoughton, WI 53589
873-9244
Robert B. Valentine
Submit obituaries, engagement,
wedding, anniversary and birth announcements online:
www.ConnectStoughton.com
14
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
ROTOTILLING, SKIDLOADER, Small
Dumptruck for Brooklyn, Oregon, Evans-
ville and surrounding areas. 608-513-
8572, 608-206-1548
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
Ag Lime Spreading
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Lawn Mowing
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Summer Clean-Up
Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
APPLIANCE REPAIR
We fix it no matter where
you bought it from!
800-624-0719 (wcan)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Monda for the Stoughton Courier Hub
unless changed because of holiday work
schedules. Call now to place your ad,
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
MY COMPUTER WORKS - Computer
Problems? Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer Issues, Bad Internet Connec-
tions - FIX IT NOW! Professional, US
based technicians. $25 off service. Call
for immediate help. 888-885-7944 (wcan)
ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! Fast and
Reliable Handyman Services. Call Ser-
viceLive and get referred to a pro today.
Call 800-604-2193 (wcan)
576 SPECIAL SERVICES
BANKRUPTCY- STOUGHTON and sur-
rounding area. Merry Law Offices. 608-
205-0621. No charge for initial consulta-
tion. "We are a debt relief agency. We
help people file for bankruptcy relief
under the bankruptcy code."
580 TAXES & BOOKKEEPING
BOOKKEEPING SERVICE
For your small business.
Joy 608-712-6286
jhammer9780@tds.net
586 TV, VCR &
ELECTRONICS REPAIR
BUNDLE & SAVE! DirecTV, Internet &
Phone from $69.99/mo. Free 3-months
of HBO, Starz, Showtime & Cinemax.
Free Genie 4-room Upgrade. Lock in 2
year savings. Call 800-918-1046 (wcan)
DIRECTV 2 Year Savings Event. Over
140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only
Directv gives you 2 years of savings and
a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 800-320-
2429 (wcan)
DISH TV RETAILER. Starting at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet
starting at $14.95/month (where
available) Save! Ask about same day
installation! Call now -
800-374-3940 (WCAN)
REDUCE YOUR Cable Bill! Get whole-
home Satellite system installed at NO
COST and programming starting at
$19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR Upgrade to
new callers, so call now. 888-544-0273
(wcan)
601 HOUSEHOLD
NEW MATTRESS SETS from $89.
All sizes in stock! 9 styles. www.
PlymouthFurnitureWI.com
2133 Eastern Ave. Plymouth, WI Open 7
days a week (wcan)
OAKWOOD VILLAGE
Resale Shop Sale
Saturday, April 26, 9am-3pm
6203 Mineral Point Rd, Madison
see photos on craigslist
604 APPLIANCES
FOR SALE 30" GE Stove
Self cleaning. $300. 608-424-0141
606 ARTICLES FOR SALE
PROM DRESS SALE! Hundreds of
dresses. Save $50 to 50% OFF. Edith's
Fond du Lac & Princess Prom, Fox Rover
Mall, Appleton. www.ediths.com (wcan)
618 BUILDING SUPPLIES:
TOOLS & FIXTURES
FOR KNOW-HOW, Deals, Great Tools &
Supplies! WoodworkersDepot.com,, M-F
8-6, Saturday 8-4. Oneida St. off Hwy
41, right @ Subway. 2965 Ramada Way.
Breen Bay 800-891-9003 (wcan)
638 CONSTRUCTION &
INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT
FARMI 3PT Logging Winch's,
Valby 3pt PTO Chippers, New 3pt
Rototillers, Loader Attachments and 3pt
Attachments, New Log Splitters. www.
threeriversforestry.com
(866) 638-7885 (wcan)
648 FOOD & DRINK
ENJOY 100%GUARANTEED, delivered
to the door Omaha Steaks! SAVE 74%
plus 4 FREE burgers - The Family Value
Combo - ONLY $39.99. ORDER today.
800-831-1898 Use Code 49381GVT or
www.OmahaSteaks.com/sp25 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: ORDER mouthwa-
tering gifts! 100% satisfaction guaran-
teed. Fresh-dipped berries from $19.99
+ plus s/h. Save 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 800-975-3296 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
650 FURNITURE
1960'S MATCHING 3-piece Maple bed-
room set. Very good condition. 608-
253-4073
ANTIQUE DESK: Special features
include: Burl Wood drawer fronts with
Ebonized wood drop pulls, pull out
desk top, carved wood embellish-
ments & cylinder roll top. Measures:
41.5Wx25"Dx42"H. $1000. 608-835-
9421
CHINA HUTCH: Excellent condition
58"Wx40"Dx80"H Constructed w/select
hardwood Oak finish. Lighted, glass
shelves w/mirror, 2 pieces. $1500. 608-
835-0421
652 GARAGE SALES
BROOKLYN 104 Stacie Ct. April 24-25,
7am-5pm. April 26, 7am-3pm. Girls,
boys, young men, adult clothes, DSI,
games, lego sets, toys, movies, house-
hold items, bike carrier, planer, screen
tent, air compressor, smoker, more.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Monda for the Stoughton Courier Hub
unless changed because of holiday work
schedules. Call now to place your ad,
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
BROOKLYN 107 Lincoln, Apr 24-27,
8-5pm. Garden sculptures, Antiques,
Collectibles, Furniture, Gemstones,
Marbles, Buttons, Colored Glass, China,
Jewelry, Toys, Books, Tools, Household,
Prints, Lamps, LP Records
BROOKLYN 349 Juniper St. Thurs-
Saturday, 8am-4pm. Multi-family. Mens,
womens, infants clothing & equipment,
Christian & secular books, holiday decor,
crafts, quilting fabric, household items,
filing cabinet, bookcase, Thirty-One prod-
ucts for cash & carry, more.
BROOKLYN HUGE TWO FAMILY
GARAGE SALE! 235 Easy St.
April 24-26, Thurs-Sat. 8am-7pm.
BROOKLYN MOVING SALE! April
24-25, 7:30am-6pm. 3pc solid oak curio
cabinet, some electronics, records/CD's,
games, household items.
FITCHBURG 2364 S. Syene Rd.
Thurs-Friday, April 24-25, 8-5pm
Huge multi-family. see craigslist.
HUGE DOWN Sizing Sale. 3205 Old
Stage Rd. April 24, 25, 26. 8am-6pm.
STOUGHTON- 978 Hwy N.4/24 4-7, 4/25
8-5, 4/26 8-1. House and garden items,
clothes, books, dryer, 2 Bridgestone 16"
tires, weight bench & wieghts, etc.
VERONA EASTVIEW Heights/Military
Ridge, Annual Neighborhood Sale.
Thursday, Friday, Saturday. April 24-26.
Old Cty PB to Whalen Rd or Forest View
Dr. Watch for signs.
664 LAWN & GARDEN
3'-12' EVERGREEN and Shade Trees.
Pick Up or Delivery! Planting available.
Detlor Tree Farms
715-335-4444 (wcan)
666 MEDICAL & HEALTH SUPPLIES
MEDICAL GUARDIAN Top-rated medi-
cal alarm and 24/7 monitoring. For a
limited time, get free equipment, no acti-
vation fees, no commitment, a 2nd water-
proof alert button for free and more. Only
$29.95 per month. 800-281-6138
SAFE STEP WALK-IN TUB Alert for
Seniors. Bathrooms falls can be fatal.
Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Thera-
peutic Jets. Less than 4 inch step-in.
Wide door. Anti-slip floors. American
made. Installation included. Call 888-
960-4522 for $750. off (wcan)
668 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
AMP: LINE 6 Spider IV 75 watt guitar
amp. Tons of built in effects, tuner, and
recording options. Like new, rarely used,
less than 2 years old. Asking $250 OBO.
call 608-575-5984
THEY SAY people don’t read those little
ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you?
Call now to place your ad, 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
GUITAR: FENDER American made
Standard Stratocaster guitar. Tobacco
burst finish, mint condition. Includes
tremelo bar, straplocks, and custom fit-
ted Fender hard-shell case. Asking $950
OBO. Call 608-575-5984
672 PETS
SASSY CAT Free to good home! 8 yr
old inside, shorthair tabby with white fur
collar and paws. 608-669-2243
676 PLANTS & FLOWERS
PROFLOWERS SEND Bouquets for Any
occasion. Birthday, Anniversary or Just
Because! Take 20% off your order over
$29 or more. Flowers from $19.99 plus
s/h. Go to www.Proflowers.com/ActNow
or call 800-315-9042 (wcan)
688 SPORTING GOODS
& RECREATIONAL
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" now. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawano 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan)
696 WANTED TO BUY
TOP PRICES Any Scrap Metal
Cars/Batteries/Farm Equipment
Free appliance pick up
Property clean out. Honest
Fully insured. U call/We haul.
608-444-5496
WANTED TO BUY Furniture or Mattress
store, new or used store inventory. Will
pay cash. Call 608-317-6895. Ask for
Bob. (wcan)
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks.
We sell used parts.
Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.
Newville Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
WILL BUY Standing Timber/Wooded 40
acres or more. Northern WI or Upper MI.
Highest prices paid. Close in 30 days.
Send to: PO Box 544, Rhinelander, WI
54501 (wcan)
705 RENTALS
2 BEDROOM Townhouse apartment w/
full basement on Racetrack Rd-Stough-
ton $775/mo includes utilities. No Pets.
Security deposit and references are
required. Available Now for an approved
applicant. Call 608-241-6609
BROOKLYN DUPLEX 2 Bedroom, no-
smoking, A/C, appliances, newer floor-
ing, large yard, quiet neighborhood,
$695/month plus utilities. 608-558-7017 .
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
OREGON 1-BEDROOM Apartment.
2-Car garage. $650/month. No pets.
Jane 608-271-7071
OREGON 2-Bedroom in quiet well kept
building. Convenient location. Includes
all appliances, A/C, blinds, private park-
ing, laundry and storage. $200 Security
deposit. Cats OK. $665/month. 608-219-
6677
STOUGHTON 211 E Main, 490sqft
efficiency, appliances/utilities included.
A/C, parking, decks. $550/mo. Available
5/1.
608-271-0101. www.hoserealty.com
STOUGHTON- 517 E Jefferson 2 bed-
room, Upper. $720 Utilities included Call
608-455-7100.
STOUGHTON/KENILWORTH- QUIET
2-bedroom, balcony, water. Private
Owner. No Pets. $750/mo. Available
June 1st 608-212-0829
720 APARTMENTS
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
for spring/summer. Great central loca-
tion. On-site or in-unit laundry, patio,
dishwasher and A/C. $720-$730/month.
Call 255-7100 or www.stevebrownapts.
com/oregon
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN
Harmony Living Centers LLC is seeking a
Part-Time individual to provide maintenance
services to our assisted living facilities in
the Madison Area. A personal vehicle will
be required for travel. This position requires
“hands-on” routine maintenance of our
buildings and equipment, including minor
repairs and painting. Previous healthcare
and/or multi-location experience preferred.
If you have a strong background in property
maintenance and a desire to be part of a
dynamic, growing organization, this may be
the job for you. We provide competitive
wages and benefits and will provide appro-
priate training to the right candidate.
Please send your resumes and
salary history to:
Human Resources
Harmony Living Centers LLC
N94 W17900 Appleton Avenue Suite 101
Menomonee Falls, WI 53051
e-mail: hr@harmonyresidence.net
Fax: 262-946-0083
EOE

****DRIVERS****
OVER THE ROAD
Flatbed Tractor- Trailer Driver needed for a delivery
Private Fleet Operation based in Janesville, WI
for North American Pipe Company. Work week is
Monday through Friday.
*Rate of Pay:
$.4100 per mile single
$16.40 per hour
* Health Insurance with Family Coverage, Dental,
Life Insurance, Vision, Disability Insurance
*401K Pension Program
*Paid Holidays & Vacation
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a minimum
of 2 years flatbed tractor- trailer experience and
meet all DOT requirements. Email resumé to
b.kriel@callcpc.com or call CPC Logistics at
800- 914- 3755.
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** DRIVERS **
FULL TIME DRIVERS NEEDED FOR REGIONAL WORK
$750 GUARANTEE WKLY
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s Private
Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI. Drivers make hand
deliveries to Walgreen’s stores within a regional area (WI,
IL, IA, MN, ND, SD). Workweek is Tues ~ Sat. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
*Earn $21.90/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
* Full Beneft Pkg includes Life, Dental, Disability, & Health
Insurance with Prescription Card
*401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
*Paid Holidays & Vacation
*Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min of 18 months
T/T exp or 6 months T/T exp WITH a certifcate from an
accredited driving school and meet all DOT requirements.
Send resume to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755
Part-Time Administrative Assistant
Stoughton Area Resource Team, Inc. (START)
The Stoughton Area Resource Team (START), a United Way of Dane County
non-profit agency, provides a safety net for families in crisis. It links Stough-
ton area families with community resources and provides support in housing,
health, employment and financial assistance. The position averages 2 hours per
week with schedule determined in collaboration with the START Program Direc-
tor. Pay is $10.00 per hour.
Responsibilities: Deposits checks, records transactions and reconciles the
bank account, inputs financial information into EXCEL data base, acknowledges
gifts and donations, coordinates reservations for the annual fundraising event,
assists in maintaining client records, maintains confidentiality.
Qualifications: Good interpersonal skills, willingness to be flexible with duties
and hours to meet varying program needs, computer skills including Word and
EXCEL, good organizational skills, ability to enjoy detailed work, and ability to
creatively problem solve.
Request application from Katy Polich Kluge, START Program Director,
248 W. Main St., Stoughton, WI 53589, STARTofstoughton@gmail.com or (608)
577.5650. Application and cover letter due no later than May 2, 2014.
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WANTED
Opening for a responsible adult
for Pet Sitter/Dog Walker.
Part-time, midday hours, 2-3
days a week; additional hours
available. We care for dogs, cats,
birds, rabbits, and other small
pets. Candidates need a car and
should reside in the greater Stoughton area.
Contact The Pet Au Pair LLC at
info@petaupairwi.com or (608) 346-2616
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OUTSIDE ADVERTISING
SALES CONSULTANT
Do you have excellent communication skills?
Creative ideas? The ability to develop and maintain
client relationships? An interest in print and web
based media? We have an established account list
with growth potential. If you possess excellent
communication and organizational skills, a pleasant
personality, and the ability to prospect for new
business we would like to speak to you. Previous
sales experience desired. Media experience a plus.
Competitive compensation, employee stock option
ownership, 401(k), paid vacations, holidays,
insurance and continuing education assistance.
For consideration, apply online at
www.wcinet.com/careers
Oregon Observer, Stoughton Courier Hub, Verona Press,
The Great Dane Shopping News
Unified Newspaper Group is part of Woodward Community Media,
a division of Woodward Communications, Inc.
and an Equal Opportunity Employer.
CDL DRIVERS
WANTED
Health Insurance / Vacation / 401K
Call (608) 275-7627
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Equal Opportunity Employer
April 24, 2014 Courier Hub ConnectStoughton.com
15
740 HOUSES FOR RENT
STOUGHTON-3BDRM, 1.5 Bath, large
kitchen, spacious dining room, living
room. 3 season porch, all appliances
included, 1 car detached garage. Very
nice quiet neighborhood. $1195 w/$500
security deposit. Call 608-286-5282
750 STORAGE SPACES FOR RENT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900
C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind
Stoughton Lumber.
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
770 RESORT PROPERTY FOR RENT
LOG CABINS FOR RENT:
Forest Co. ATV Trail, Lake Access,
Dock. $350/week 715-674-7752
gilliganlodging.com (wcan)
801 OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT
STOUGHTON 307 S Forrest Retail or
Office Space. 400 sq ft. $299/month utili-
ties included. 608-271-0101
STOUGHTON 316 S Gjertson St. Office/
Retail space. 1200 sq ft. $850/month,
utilities included. Will build to suit. Private
customer parking. 608-843-9125
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
820 MISC. INVESTMENT
PROPERTY FOR SALE
ABSOLUTE AUCTION - 80acres QDM
Hunting Land west of Elderon in Mara-
thon Co. Numerous food plots & per-
manent deer stands. Nolan Sales LLC,
Marion, WI 800-472-0290 Wi Lic Auc-
tioneers #165 & #142. www.nolansales.
com (wcan)
840 CONDOS &
TOWNHOUSES FOR SALE
6924 TOTTENHAM Rd Madison
Beautiful 2 bdrm, 1.5 bath condo w/2 car
garage, fireplace, convenient to West
Towne & Epic, $139,900 OPEN Sunday
1-4 (or by appt)
608-273-2515
870 RESIDENTIAL LOTS
OREGON BERGAMONT
Lot 442 with full exposure
Gated. By owner. Make offer!
608-212-2283
THE Courier Hub CLASSIFIEDS, the
best place to buy or sell. Call 845-9559,
873-6671 or 835-6677.
965 HAY, STRAW & PASTURE
GRASSY HORSE Hay. Small squares
$4.50/ea. Alfalfa mix. Big squares.
Delivery available.
608-669-7879
970 HORSES
PONIES W/SADDLES three six years
old and one older. Partially broke. Also
Davis 20 inch corn roller/cracker $300.
815-742-1914
WALMERS TACK SHOP
16379 W. Milbrandt Road
Evansville, WI
608-882-5725
975 LIVESTOCK
REGISTERED BLACK ANGUS.
Yearling bulls. Semen tested, docile,
great EPD's. Also wrapped hay bales.
2nd/3rd crop. 608-655-3370
980 MACHINERY & TOOLS
ANTIQUE FARMALL Cub tractor with
cultivator (runs) 1996 INTERNATIONAL
EAGLE semi-tractor (190,000 miles on
out-of frame rebuild), great condition, like
new tires, 608-877-7790
990 FARM: SERVICE
& MERCHANDISE
RENT SKIDLOADERS
MINI-EXCAVATORS
TELE-HANDLER
and these attachments. Concrete
breaker, posthole auger, landscape rake,
concrete bucket, pallet forks, trencher,
rock hound, broom, teleboom, stump
grinder.
By the day, week, or month.
Carter & Gruenewald Co.
4417 Hwy 92
Brooklyn, WI, 608-455-2411
995 FARM: WANTED TO BUY
BUYING STANDING WALNUT
Prices are High - Great time to Sell!
608-513-8678
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
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Customer Service Representative
Home Savings Bank is looking for an energetic
customer service representative to join our Stoughton
Team.
Position Summary: This position processes bank
transactions for our existing customers, provides
exceptional service and identifies customer’s financial
needs and finds solutions to meet those needs.
Education and Experience – Minimum Qualifications:
High school diploma or equivalent; previous cash
handling and customer service experience is preferred;
availability to work Saturdays on a rotating basis.
Interested candidates should email resumés to
HR@home-savings.com or mail
to Home Savings Bank,
Attn: Human Resources,
PO Box 1070, Madison, WI 53701
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Part Time Tellers
We are currently offering an excellent part time
opportunity within a professional environment
for individuals who enjoy serving customers
and believe the customer’s bank experience
should be a positive one. Previous teller
experience preferred.
Responsibilities include: Daily processing of
customer transactions, cross-selling and
providing information on bank products and
services. This position requires prior cash
handling experience.
If you possess a great attitude, enjoy serving
customers, are well organized, detail oriented
and thrive on a variety of tasks, this position is
for you. Computer proficiency is a plus!
Flexible schedule(s) possible. This is a great
opportunity for those attending school and
working.
Although our tellers may on occasion, float
between locations, these part time teller
positions are based out of our McFarland & Sun
Prairie locations.
Please submit your resume to:
McFarland State Bank
Attn: Holly Heuer, VP Marketing & HR
P.O. Box 7, McFarland, WI 53558
or e-mail hheuer@msbonline.com.
McFarland State Bank is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.
Concrete Finishers
and Laborers
Experienced w/valid DL.
CDL preferred.
Competitive wage and benefits.
Call Jeff: 608-884-9725.
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Accounting Manager - Oversee monthly consolidation of
all domestic and int’l entities. Be a key player in consoli-
dation SW implementation process & perform as admin-
istrator. Analyze financial data & prep accurate reports.
Prep reports incl bank covenant related & GAAP finan-
cial stmts. Prep annual financial stmts under U.S. GAAP
for audit & filing w/key stakeholders. Resolve complex
accounting issues. Develop & maintain accounting prin-
ciples, practices & procedures. Improve process & con-
trols for accounting & consolidation process. Train, su-
pervise, & review work of accounting staff. Master’s in
Accounting or Accounting Info Sys. Exp in consolidation
incl. foreign subsidiaries, acquisition & disposition. Exp
in GAAP, SOX, financial stmts, & SEC filings in a public
accounting firm. Exp in gen. ledger, analysis of financial
info, & financial closing process. Exp in &/or knwldg of
Excel, data mgmt, migration of accounting sys, & Ac-
counting GL system-Oracle. CPA license req’d. Resumes
to job loc: Nelson Global Products, Inc. Attn: Human
Resources 1560 Williams Dr Stoughton, WI 53589 or
hr@nelsonglobalproducts.com
EOE/M/F/Vet/Disability
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Service Technician.
Will train the right
person. Must have clean driving
record. Knowledge of plumbing helpful.
Job entails: Drain cleaning, residential to municipal
work, televising service lines & more. To apply
stop by our Mcfarland location or send resumé to
4808 Ivywood Trl., Mcfarland, WI 53558
608-256-5189
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Sienna Meadows
Memory Care
989 Park Street Oregon, WI
608.835.0000
Attn: Chris Kiesz, RN

Sienna Crest & Sienna Meadows-
Oregon has immediate job opportunities
to join their compassionate
Care Specialist Team.

We offer competitive wages designed
to attract and retain quality staff.

Go to www.siennacrest.com
To Print An Application
TODAY!
Return your completed application to:
Various
Shifts Available!
E.O.E


Attention
All Caregivers!
Sienna Crest
Assisted Living
981 Park St Oregon, WI
608.835.7781
Attn: Lois Gilbert, LPN
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FOOD SERVICE
Skaalen Nursing & Rehabilitation Center has
openings in the Nutrition Services Department
for dietary student aides. You must be at least
15 years old, able to work 8-hour shifts on
weekends, holidays and during the summer.
During the school year the position is 3-hour
shifts in the afternoon/evening and working
every other weekend. The dietary student
aide averages 12-15 hours per week. Job
duties include assisting with meal preparation,
serving meals and clean up.
Interested candidates should submit application to:
Lori Maerz, Food Service Coordinator
(608) 873-5651 Ext. 216
Fax (608) 873-0696
Lmaerz@skaalen.com
Equal Opportunity Employer
Smokefree/Tobacco free campus
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Award/Trophy Builder
Full-time start immediately. Seeking
individual with experience in computer
engraving and trophy assembly.
Call for appointment
835-5791 or 276-6050
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16 - The Courier Hub - April 24, 2014
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Register to Win
a Hanging Basket Daily or:
OUR GRAND PRIZE:
$
200 KOPKE’S SHOPPING SPREE
RUNNER UP:
$
100 KOPKE’S SHOPPING SPREE
3RD & 4TH PRIZES:
$
50 KOPKE’S GIFT CERTIFICATE
Grand Prize drawing to be held 4/29/2014
April Hours:
Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
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CTY. M
Directions fromStoughton:
Take 138 toward Oregon. Go past Eugster’s
Farm Market, one mile and turn right on
Sunrise Rd. Go one more mile then turn left
on Town Line Rd. Continue on to Sand Hill Rd.
(approximately one mile) and turn right.
Directions fromFitchburg:
Take Fish Hatchery Road south to Netherwood
Road. Turn left and go through Oregon past
Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Road.
Directions fromVerona:
Take Cty. M to Fish Hatchery Rd. Turn
right and go to Netherwood Road. Turn left
at Netherwood Rd. through Oregon past
Walgreen’s to a left on Sand Hill Rd.
#
Come visit Wisconsin’s premier grower of quality
bedding plants and hanging baskets
Recycle your pots & containers at our farm location
Support local agriculture!
Shop outside the
box store.
GRAND OPENING
April 23-28, 2014
1828 Sandhill Rd.
Oregon, WI
608-835-7569
Quality Bloomers,
Reasonable Prices
KOPKE’S KOUPON
FLOWER, VEGETABLE & HERB
SEEDS
50
¢
off each packet
Expires 4-28-14
NO LIMIT!
KOPKE’S KOUPON
50
¢
off each
PERENNIAL SPECIAL
Expires 4-28-14
SAVE UP TO $6
Limit 12 per Koupon per day.
KOPKE’S KOUPON
$
2
00

OFF
Any 1 Garden Tool
Expires 4-28-14
1 Koupon per Kustomer per day.
SALE
Made in America
Tru Temper Garden Tools
$9.99 Reg $12.99
while supplies last
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KOPKE’S KOUPON
$
2
00

OFF
HANGING BASKETS
Expires 4-28-14
2 per Koupon, 1 Koupon per Kustomer per day.