New Testament Study Companion: Luke

by Catania Larson
http://thatgoodpart.wordpress.com
Copyright 2014
All Rights Reserved
ISBN - 978-1-312-13476-8
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons AttributionNonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of
this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-ncnd/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street,
Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA.

New Testament Study Companion: Luke/Larson

Acknowledgements
There are a few people who deserve special acknowledgement
here. Thanks to Emily Milmont who edited this entire book. She
did it without any kind of reward or pay. I'm grateful to her,
and you really should be, too. This book would have been a
complete mess without her.

I also want to mention that Stephanie Clawson created the
cover. Again, she did this completely voluntarily, and I'm so
grateful. Without her help, the cover would have been pretty
hideous; instead, you can enjoy a small work of art.

Finally, I want to thank my husband who has been very
patient and supportive of me throughout this crazy project.

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About This Book
This book is designed for you. Use it as you would like.

How to Use This Book
This book is broken down chapter by chapter. Each chapter
contains two main portions: Application and Analysis and Enrich
Your Learning.

Application and Analysis
The Application and Analysis portion of each chapter is a
set of questions that goes through the chapter as you read it.
These questions will help you search through the chapter,
analyze it, and then apply what you have learned from the
scripture in your own life.
Many of the questions in this portion may seem obvious, but
take time to really think about them. Usually, application of
scripture is a process. First you need to search the scriptures.
You need to familiarize yourself with them. You ask the basic
questions: who, what, where, when? As you search the scriptures,
you will then analyze them by asking: why, how? Through
effective searching and analysis, application will follow

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naturally. There are application questions that I include in the
exercises, but you may find more ways that the scriptures apply.
Scriptures are always applicable.
As you complete the Application and Analysis questions,
make sure to listen to the Spirit and write inspiration down in
a scripture journal. You will find that even this basic exercise
can be helpful to your scripture study.

Enrich Your Learning
The Enrich Your Learning portion of each chapter is a set
of various exercises that will help you to study parts of the
chapter in depth. The exercises in this section are pretty selfexplanatory and often quite involved. I think that any given
exercise will take at least 20 minutes to complete.

***

Study this book how you want to. You may want to do each
question in order. You may start each chapter completing the
Analysis and Application section first, followed by the Enrich
Your Learning. You may find that you'd rather only do the
Analysis and Application. Or perhaps you only want to do certain
exercises from Enrich Your Learning. Follow the Spirit and do

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what you like. In a way, I've thought of this book as a
smorgasbord. Each question and activity is a dish, and it is up
to you to select what you like.

Prayerfully consider how you would like to study. The
Spirit is the most important factor in scripture study. So
listen to Him. I have tried to prepare this study guide as
prayerfully as possible. I am, by no means an expert, so I have
tried to keep my own opinions out of this as much as possible.
Of course, since this study guide was my creation, my influence
is here. If you feel like a question I'm asking or a connection
I'm suggesting is wrong, then it might be. I don't claim to have
all knowledge on the scriptures. So please, let the Spirit
direct your path in this scripture study guide.

A final note: you will not be able to complete the Analysis
and Application Questions and Enrich Your Learning Exercises all
in a single day of study. Don't sweat it. You can choose to
spend as much time as you'd like in each chapter. If you want to
study the entire chapter for days, finishing each exercise I've
created, then that's great. Otherwise, you may only want to do
one or two exercises from each chapter, and get through the New
Testament a little more quickly. That's great, too.

Do what you

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want to do.

***
I hope you enjoy this book!

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Luke 1

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
1.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do pause

to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider writing

impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 1:1-7
1.

In the days of King Herod, which priest is

mentioned?
2.

Who was his wife?

3.

How are they described? What else do we learn

about them?

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Luke 1:8-23
1.

What was Zacharias doing at the temple?

2.

While he burnt the incense, who appeared to

Zacharias?
3.

What did the angel say to him?

4.

How did Zacharias respond? Why do you think that

he had trouble believing?
5.

Remember, Zacharias was righteous--we learn this

earlier in the chapter. We see him fulfilling his duties in the
temple. Yet he had a hard time believing in the promise given to
him by the angel. Why do you think that this would have been
hard to believe? How do you think that this might happen in your
own life? How can you cultivate the faith to not only accept
trials but also promised blessings that seem impossible?
6.

What did the angel then do to Zacharias?

7.

Was Zacharias able to speak to the people that

waited for him outside of the temple?
8.

Finally, in verse 23, where did Zacharias go?

Luke 1:24-25
1.
Elisabeth?

After this experience, what happened with

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2.

How did she feel about it?

Luke 1:26-38
1.

What was the name of the angel sent to Nazareth?

2.

To whom did he speak?

3.

What was the message that he gave Mary?

4.

What did Mary ask the angel? Do you think that

she asked this question because she lacked faith?
5.

What does the angel tell Mary to help her

understand that this miracle would indeed happen?
6.

How does Mary finally respond?

7.

What do you think she means when she responds in

verse 38? How do you think that you can apply this kind of
attitude in your own life?

Luke 1:39-45
1.

Where did Mary decide to go?

2.

When Mary came to Elisabeth, what happened?

3.

In verses 42-45 Elisabeth bears her testimony.

What does Elisabeth know about Mary and Mary's child?
4.

How do you think Mary must have felt to hear

Elisabeth say this?

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Luke 1:46-56
1.

Mary now responds to Elisabeth with her own

testimony. Does she seem to understand who she will be bringing
into this world?
2.

How do you feel as you read this testimony of

Mary, the mother of Christ?

Luke 1:57-63
1.

Finally, Elisabeth brings forth her son. When she

does, how do her friends and neighbors respond? How do you think
that this experience might have blessed them and their
testimonies?
2.

What did Elisabeth and Zacharias do on the eighth

day? What did Elisabeth pronounce her son's name to be?
3.

Did the people understand her decision? What did

they then do?
4.

Zacharias still could not speak. How did he

answer their insistence that Elisabeth's son be named Zacharias?
5.

Imagine this decision. Do you think that it would

have been easy to ignore the pleadings of the people? What does
the choice to listen to the angel and name their son John teach
us about Zacharias and Elisabeth?

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Luke 1:64-80
1.

After writing his response, what happened to

Zacharias?
2.

Notice, in verses 67-79, we can read Zacharias'

testimony. What does Zacharias understand about the significance
of his own son's birth?
3.

What would John's responsibilities be?

4.

Imagine this from Zacharias' perspective. It

would be really amazing to know that there was so much in store
for your son, but what does it mean for Zacharias? What kind of
parents do you think that Zacharias and Elisabeth would need to
be in order to rear "the prophet of the Highest"?
5.

Even though you may not be raising "the prophet

of the Highest" how do you think that the examples of Zacharias
and Elisabeth can help you as a parent?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
We are beginning another account of Jesus. Read the
following passage and see how it can teach us more about the
Atonement and your own relationship with the Savior.
1.

Read Luke 1:26-38. Study the corresponding

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Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What do we learn about Mary in verse 27? Why do

you think that it was important to be born to a woman who was
both a virgin and engaged to be married? How would these
qualities about Mary help in raising the Savior to be the one
who would atone for our sins?
3.

As the angel begins speaking to Mary, what does

he say? How does the Lord feel about Mary?
4.

The angel gives Mary the divine message he was

sent to give. What does Gabriel say about the Son that she would
bear?
5.

Look up the meaning of the word Jesus in the

Bible Dictionary. Why do you think that Mary was told to name
her son Jesus? How does the Atonement fulfill the meaning of
Christ's name?
6.

After Gabriel's announcement Mary wonders how

bearing a child would be possible. What does Gabriel explain?
Although we may not fully comprehend the details of how this
miracle occurred, why was it necessary? Whose Son is Christ?
7.

When you consider the Atonement and all that goes

with it (the judgment of Christ, the crucifixion, the
resurrection), why do you think it was necessary for Christ to
be the literal Son of God?

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8.

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To help illustrate the miracle that would be

performed, the angel tells Mary of Elisabeth's condition. Then,
he sums up in verse 37. What does he say?
9.

What do you think about the scripture: "For with

God nothing shall be impossible"? Have you experienced the truth
of this statement in your life?
10.

How would this scripture be a theme in Christ's

life? How does this scripture help us to understand the true
power of the Atonement?
11.

How can understanding that with God, nothing is

impossible help you to apply the power of the Atonement and of
Christ in your life?
12.

Finally, Mary responds to Gabriel. What does she

say? Again, how do you think that her example might have
affected the Savior? How do we see Him echo this kind of
sentiment when He is in the garden of Gethsemane?
13.

How do you think that we might be blessed when we

have a similar response?
14.

As you study through this experience between Mary

and the angel, with the Atonement in mind, what impressions have
you had?

Themes--Prayer

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At the beginning of Luke, we read about the experience of
Zacharias in the temple. If we study it carefully, we will see
that it is a good lesson on the power of prayer.
1.

Read Luke 1:1-23. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

In verse 6, what do we learn about Zacharias and

Elisabeth? What does this verse say that they did?
3.

Think about the commandments and ordinances of

the Lord. What are they? Remember, this is before Christ came,
when the Jews were still practicing the Law of Moses.
Additionally, keep in mind that Zacharias was a priest that
officiated at the temple. What

kinds of things, specifically,

did Zacharias and Elisabeth do when they blamelessly kept the
ordinances and commandments of the Lord?
4.

Do you think that prayer would have been

something that Elisabeth and Zacharias did?
5.

Verse 7 mentions something specific about

Elisabeth. What does it say?
6.

With the understanding that Elisabeth and

Zacharias were righteous, and wanted to keep the commandments of
the Lord, how do you think that they might have felt about not
having children? Do you think that they might have prayed for
children? Yet they were "well stricken in years." Did they think

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that they were going to enjoy the blessing of children? Yet, did
this challenge shake their faith or devotion to God?
7.

In verses 8-10, we learn that Zacharias was at

the temple. What was he doing there?
8.

Learn more about the incense in the temple by

reading the entry for "Incense" in the Bible Dictionary.
9.

Who do we learn was to offer the incense? Keep in

mind that Zacharias lived during the time of the second temple.
How had he been chosen to serve in the temple?
10.

What did the priest do when he completed this

11.

What were the people outside doing?

12.

Learn more about the altar of incense and what it

task?

symbolizes in Revelation 8:3-4. What does the altar of incense
have to do with prayer?
13.

Now go back to Luke 1:11. Who appeared to

Zacharias?
14.

What does the angel say to Zacharias first?

According to the angel, why should Zacharias not fear?
15.

What prayer of Zacharias' was answered?

16.

What does this teach us about the temple? (See

also Matthew 21:13.)
17.

What is Zacharias promised? What does the angel

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explain about Zacharias' coming son? Can you imagine, being
barren your entire marriage--until you were well stricken in
years--then finding that not only will you have a child, but he
would be the prophet to prepare the way of Christ? How do you
think that Zacharias felt?
18.

What was Zacharias' response? Why do you think

that he had trouble believing?
19.

What did the angel do to Zacharias to prove that

the promise would be fulfilled?
20.

What does this question and consequence have to

do with prayers?
21.

The people outside were waiting for Zacharias.

After giving the incense offering, the priest would
traditionally come back out of the holy place and then pronounce
a blessing that is recorded in the Bible. Read it in Numbers
6:24-26.
22.

Based on this blessing, what do you think that

the people outside of the holy place were praying for? Think of
their prayers on a personal and also on a societal level. How
were the tabernacle, a house of prayers, and all of the rites
associated with the tabernacle associated with the Savior?
23.

When Zacharias came out of the temple, was he

able to pronounce this blessing? Even though Zacharias couldn't

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verbalize this blessing, what did he know about its coming
fulfillment?
24.

How do you think that you can learn from

Zacharias' example and increase your faith and efficacy of
prayers, and your acceptance of the Lord's answers?

Three Testimonies
In Luke chapter 1, we read three separate testimonies.
Elisabeth
1.

Read Luke 1:41-45.

2.

When Mary arrives at Zacharias' and Elisabeth's

house, what happens to Elisabeth? What does Elisabeth
immediately recognize?
3.

After feeling her child leap, what does Elisabeth

4.

What did Elisabeth know about Mary's child?

5.

How did Elisabeth know this? What does this teach

say?

us about the power of the Holy Ghost?
6.

When you consider Mary's situation--being

pregnant even though still a virgin--how do you think that
Elisabeth's reception and testimony might have been a comfort to
her?
7.

As you read through Elisabeth's testimony, what

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do you learn? What stands out to you? Why?

Mary
1.

Read Luke 1:46-55.

2.

After Elisabeth's warm welcome and testimony,

what does Mary say in response?
3.

What do you think that Mary means in verse 46

when she says, "My soul doth magnify the Lord"? Check out the
cross-reference to 1 Samuel 2:1. How is Mary like Hannah?
4.

What is Mary's spirit rejoicing in?

5.

Think about this: she rejoices in her Savior, and

she will soon give birth to Him? Obviously Mary has been
considering this--as we will see while reading the rest of her
testimony.
6.

What does Mary understand about her role in the

Savior's life? How did she feel about the opportunity to bear
the Lord?
7.

Was she right? Do all generations call her

8.

In verse 49, what does she praise God for doing?

blessed?

How had God done great things to Mary? Why do you think that she
considered His name to be holy?
9.

Now, as we continue to read the testimony of

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Mary, she is less personal, and more cognizant of the miraculous
power of the Savior--for the entire world. Read Luke 1:50-55.
What has the Lord done that Mary testifies of? What else will
the Lord do?
10.

Why do you think that it was important for Mary

to have a testimony of the Savior--both a personal testimony of
His effect in her life and a testimony of what He would do for
the entire world? How do you think that her testimony affected
her parenting of the Savior?
11.

Although none of us will bring the Savior into

the world, many of us have the opportunity to raise God's
children--as we are all God's children. How do you think that
recognizing the true nature and divinity of our children can
help us to be better parents?
12.

Contemplate Mary's testimony? What strikes you?

What do you learn from it?

Zacharias
1.

Read Luke 1:68-79.

2.

What is immediately noteworthy about Zacharias'

testimony? (See Luke 1:64.)
3.

In verses 68-75, who does Zacharias prophesy and

testify of? Had Christ yet come? Why do you think that Zacharias

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praised and testified of God in this way?
4.

Zacharias continues in verse 76, now speaking in

regards to John. What does Zacharias say? What will John do? How
do you think that Zacharias must have felt to have a son that
would prepare a way for the promised Messiah?
5.

What else do we learn about God's mercy from the

very act of Zacharias being able to speak?
6.

How do you think that Zacharias' experience at

the temple, subsequent cursing and healing affected his
testimony?
7.

Why do you think that the Lord chose to send John

the Baptist to be born of such goodly parents?
8.

How can you be faithful and perceptive like

Elisabeth? Repentant like Zacharias?
9.

As you study through Zacharias' testimony, what

do you learn? What strikes you? What inspires you?

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Luke 2

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
2.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do pause

to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider writing

impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 2:1-7
1.

What decree had been sent forth by Caesar

Augustus? How did this impact Joseph and Mary?
2.

What was the condition of Mary as they began that

3.

Using your maps, find out the distance between

journey?

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Nazareth and Bethlehem. Take a second to imagine being great
with child (or having a wife that is great with child), and then
making this journey. How do you think that you would have felt?
What does this teach us about Joseph and Mary?
4.

Why did Joseph and Mary have to go to Bethlehem?

How is this a fulfillment of prophecy?
5.

Once they arrived into Jerusalem, what happened?

6.

Where did Mary give birth to Jesus?

7.

Truly think about this scenario. What is a stable

like? Have you been in a stable or barn? What is the condition
of a stable/barn--its smells, cleanliness, etc.? How does this
compare to where people usually give birth--especially now?
8.

Why were Mary and Joseph forced to have Jesus

born in a stable?
9.

As you think about Jesus, the King of Israel, the

Savior of the world, what does it mean to you that He was born
in a lowly stable?

Luke 2:8-20
1.

As Mary and Joseph were in the inn, who were also

in the same country? What were the shepherds doing?
2.

What happened in the fields as these shepherds

tended their flocks?

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3.

What did the angel say to these shepherds?

4.

Why do you think that the angel spoke to these

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shepherds first? Why not someone of more importance?
5.

Why do you think that the news of the birth of

Christ is considered to be "good tidings of great joy"?
6.

What was the sign given to the shepherds?

7.

After the angel spoke, what happened?

8.

What did the multitude of heavenly hosts say?

9.

Why do you think that this humble birth was such

a joyous occasion?
10.

After the angels left, what did the shepherds do?

11.

After seeing the Savior, what did the Shepherds

12.

What was Mary's reaction to the entire event?

do?

What do you think that she was pondering in her heart?
13.

How did the shepherds feel when they returned to

their flocks? Imagine, a shepherd leaving his flock to find
Christ. What does this teach us about the shepherds? Do you
think that you are willing to put aside daily tasks--even
important ones--for the Savior?
14.

Notice, also, they went back to their duties. But

did they forget? While we need to make sacrifices sometimes,
does this mean that we need to give up our normal life and

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duties? How do you think that we can learn to prioritize what is
important--when we should "leave our flocks" and then return to
them?

Luke 2:21-35
1.

After eight days, what did Mary and Joseph do

with Jesus? Why did they do this? What does this teach us about
Mary and Joseph?
2.

Once Mary was ready, where did Mary and Joseph

then take Jesus? Why?
3.

In verse 23 we learn the Jewish tradition of the

first-born male. How was this especially true with Christ?
4.

In Jerusalem, there was a man named Simeon. What

was he waiting for?
5.

Why did he go to the temple?

6.

When he arrived at the temple, and saw the baby

Jesus what did he know? How do you think that Simeon knew that
Jesus was the Christ--even though He was still only a small
baby?

Luke 2:36-39
1.

Who was also recorded as being at the temple?

2.

What are some of the facts that we learn about

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Anna?
3.

What did she also realize about the baby brought

by Mary and Joseph?

Luke 2:40-52
1.

What do we learn about Jesus' youth from verse

2.

Where did Jesus' parents go each year at the

40?

feast of the passover? Why?
3.

What happened when they went to the temple when

Jesus was twelve?
4.

When Mary and Joseph realized that Jesus was not

with the company returning home, what did they do? How do you
think that they must have felt--having lost Jesus?
5.

Where did they finally find Jesus? How long had

they been looking for Him?
6.

What was Jesus doing at the temple?

7.

When Mary and Joseph found Jesus, what did they

say to them? How did He respond?
8.

Why do you think that He said this?

9.

Did Jesus' parents understand what He meant?

10.

Again, in verse 51, we read that Mary "kept all

these sayings in her heart." What do you think this means?

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Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In this chapter, we get some insight on Jesus' life as a
young child and youth. We will study one part with the Atonement
in mind to see if it can help increase our understanding of the
Savior and His mission.
1.

Read Luke 2:40-52. Ponder the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

Why did Jesus and His family travel into

Jerusalem? Which feast were they commemorating?
3.

Read through the entry for "Feasts" in the Bible

Dictionary--specifically, the Feast of the Passover.
4.

Why did the Jews celebrate the feast of the

5.

What do you think that the redemption of Israel

Passover?

from Egypt is a shadow of? Now, think about this with the
Atonement in mind. How do you think that Christ must have felt-keeping this feast, knowing that it typified of how He would
redeem Israel, eternally?
6.

Continue to read through the details of the

Passover. What was sacrificed at this feast? How does this

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symbolize Christ and what He would do later on in His life for
each of us?
7.

After completing the feast of the Passover, where

did Jesus' family go? Was Jesus with them? How long did it take
before they recognized His absence?
8.

When they returned to Jerusalem, how long did it

take to find them? Where did they finally find Jesus? Do you
think that the checked they temple first?
9.

Imagine that you had lost your twelve-year-old

son in a city where you were probably accompanied by friends and
family. Perhaps you even stayed with friends and family. Imagine
you have traveled into a city that you visit each year at this
time, so you and your family were relatively familiar with it.
Where do you think that you'd find your twelve-year-old son?
Where do you suppose that Mary and Joseph might have searched
for Jesus before checking the temple? How was Jesus different
from most twelve-year-old boys (see Luke 2:52)? How do you think
that this helped to prepare Him for His life's work--performing
the Atonement?
10.

When they finally find Jesus in the temple, what

is He doing? What does Mary ask her Son?
11.

Can you relate to this? Have there been times

when you thought that you had closeness to the Savior, and

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suddenly, not necessarily through sin, but perhaps neglect, you
have found yourself distanced from the Savior? Have you ever
found yourself able to say, "Why hast thou thus dealt with me?
Behold, I have sought thee sorrowing?" When this has happened in
your life, where did you go to seek the Savior?
12.

How does Jesus respond to Mary's question?

13.

To gain understanding on what Jesus means by His

"Father's business," read the scripture references footnoted to
"Father's" in verse 40. (John 4:34; 6:38-39). What did Christ
spend all of His time doing? Did He ever seek after a selfish
desire? What did He do while He was on earth? According to this
experience in Luke, when did Christ begin the habit of doing the
will of His Father?
14.

With this in mind--Christ always doing His

Father's work--why would Mary and Joseph seek Jesus anywhere
other than the temple? If Mary and Joseph had remembered
Christ's mission and purpose, where do you think that they would
have searched for Him first?
15.

Think now of the Atonement. How will Christ's

question, "Wist ye not that I must be about my Father's
business?" also be applicable later on when He does His
incalculable work of redemption? How do you think committing to
doing His Father's will early in life gave Him the capacity to

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fulfill His mission later in life? Do you think that if Christ
had not chosen to be about His Father's business when He was
young that He would have been adequately prepared to do so when
He needed to fulfill the Atonement?
16.

We know that the Atonement was God's will--to

bring to pass a path for our salvation, yet we must choose to
freely partake. What must we do--as Christ did--in order to
receive the blessings of the Atonement? Whose will must we seek
and submit to? How can Christ's example, in the temple, in the
garden of Gethsemane, and on the cross at Calvary help you to
remember to seek to do the Father's business? How do you think
that seeking God's will can prepare you to live your life to
your fullest potential?

Searching for Meaning Through the Responses to the Birth of
the Savior
In Luke 2, the Savior is born. We will compare and contrast
four experiences of people meeting Jesus as an infant.

The Shepherds
1.

Read Luke 2:8-20. Ponder the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.

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2.

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Before Jesus was born, what were the shepherds

doing? Had they been apprised of the coming birth of Christ? How
do they find out about the birth?
3.

What did they do when they heard the testimony of

the angel?
4.

According to verse 16, in what manner did they go

to Bethlehem?
5.

What do you think that this really means? Why do

you think that they went "with haste"? What does this teach us
about the shepherds?
6.

How can you make this your attitude concerning

your relationship with Christ, or, in other words, how do you go
to the Lord with haste?
7.

What did the shepherds do when they saw the

Christ child? Did they keep this information to themselves? How
did they feel about seeing this baby? Why do you think that
seeing a small baby--a baby with so much promise--caused them to
glorify and praise God?
8.

How do you think that they knew that the promise

of salvation did lie in this baby? Imagine, seeing a baby, a
newborn infant, one that cannot even eat or thrive on his own.
Would you feel, when looking at him, that it would be possible
for him to provide salvation to all of mankind? How do you think

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that they knew He would?
9.

What can we learn from the shepherds to help us

have a spiritual experience--one where the Holy Ghost will
testify of Christ--when we approach Him?

Mary
1.

Unlike the Shepherds, how long did Mary know

about Christ's coming? What kind of preparation did Mary have?
2.

What was Mary's special role in the Savior's

coming to this earth? How do you think that this might have
affected her response to meeting her Son and Savior when the
time came?
3.

Read Luke 2:19. What do we learn that Mary did?

4.

What do you think that this means?

5.

If you have had a child think back on the time

when he/she was born. Did you have a similar experience-bringing a child into the world (especially a first child)--and
suddenly realizing what it actually meant (and perhaps feeling a
bit overwhelmed!)? What are some of the things that you think
might have gone through her mind? Now consider this: this child
that she bore was the literal Son of God, the Savior, the
Redeemer, the Messiah. He was Jesus the Christ. How do you
suppose Mary felt at this moment? How does her meditative nature

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seem a natural fit for her responsibilities?
6.

How do you think that having a meditative

response in this situation may have helped her raise the Savior?
What do you suppose she invited into her life as she pondered
and mediated on this situation? How do you think that the Spirit
would both testify and comfort her in this situation?
7.

What can you do to learn from Mary--to be

meditative and open to the Spirit when you face the Lord?

Simeon
1.

A third person to meet the infant Lord was

Simeon. Read about his experience in Luke 2:25-35.
2.

How is Simeon described in verse 25? What do you

think that it means in verse 25 when it says that he was
"waiting for the consolation of Israel"? What do we learn was
Simeon's companion?
3.

What did the Holy Ghost reveal to Simeon?

4.

Why did Simeon go to the temple that day?

5.

When you consider the closeness that Simeon had

to the Spirit, do you think that he already had a spiritual
witness of the Savior?
6.

What did Simeon do when he saw Mary and Joseph

bring the Christ child into the temple?

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7.

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What does Simeon say in verse 30? How did Simeon

know that this little child, helpless and unable even to care
for Himself, would be Simeon's salvation?
8.

How did Mary and Joseph react to Simeon's

testimony? Why do you think that they marveled?
9.

Simeon then blesses Mary and then prophesies of

Christ. What does he say?
10.

Think about Simeon's example. Did His witness of

the Savior come after he saw Christ at the temple? How had
Simeon been prepared for this moment? How do you think that
spiritual preparation and being close to the Spirit can help you
as you come unto Christ?

Anna
1.

Read about Anna's experience meeting Christ in

Luke 2:36-38.
2.

How is Anna described in verse 36?

3.

What do you think is meant by "prophetess"?

4.

What else do we learn about Anna in verse 37?

Because she had spent so much time devoted to God--in fasting
and prayer--how do you think that this affected her? Was she
close to the Spirit? Do you think that she already had a
testimony of the Savior? Think about what her actions most

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likely imply about her personality.
5.

When she saw Christ, did she recognize Him? What

did she do?
6.

Why do you think that it is significant that she

gave thanks?
7.

Additionally, what did she share with others?

8.

What do we learn from Anna about coming to the

Lord? When we come to the Lord, and we do receive witness, as
Anna did, what should we "give"? Why do you think that gratitude
is a good response to such a spiritual witness?
9.

Finally, how do you think that bearing this

testimony to others affects her gratitude and her own testimony
in the Lord?
10.

Have you felt confirmation of your own testimony

when you have come to the Lord, spiritually? What do you do to
give thanks? Do you share the gospel with others? How can you
become a more grateful disciple through bearing your testimony
of Him, just as Anna did?

Consider these four examples that we have studied. What are
the main qualities you learn from each person? As I studied, I
noticed that the Shepherds went with haste; they obeyed quickly.
Mary was meditative. Simeon was prepared. Anna was grateful. How

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can these characteristics help you as you seek to come unto the
Lord and gain your own witness of Him?

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Luke 3

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
3.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do pause

to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider writing

impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 3:1-20
1.

In verses 1-2, we learn a little bit about the

political and religious leaders of the time. Take note of them.
What role will these men play at the end of Christ's ministry?
2.

What did John (the Baptist) preach?

3.

How do you think John the Baptist's teachings

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helped to prepare the way for Christ?
4.

What did many of the Jews feel that their

ancestry entitled them to? What did John the Baptist say in
response to this assumption?
5.

How do you think that this kind of attitude--that

our righteous ancestry can save us--might happen now? If your
ancestors were numbered among the righteous saints who helped to
build this church in the latter-days, does this mean that you
have some kind of right to inherit the blessings of the Gospel?
Are the blessings of salvation limited only to those with
pioneer ancestry? What do we need to do to be able to receive
the blessings of salvation and exaltation?
6.

After John explains this, the people ask, "What

shall we do then?" How does John the Baptist answer? What do you
think that John the Baptist is trying to teach this group of
people?
7.

What does John the Baptist tell the Publicans to

8.

What does John the Baptist tell the soldiers to

9.

Because of his advice, what did the people start

do?

do?

to wonder about John? Though we know that John the Baptist was
not the Messiah, how do his teachings show that he was the

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prophet to prepare the way before the Savior?
10.

When the people wondered about John the Baptist

and the Savior, what did John the Baptist say about Christ?

Luke 3:21-22
1.

Who do we learn was baptized?

2.

Why do you think that the Holy Ghost is described

as descending like a dove?
3.

What did Heavenly Father express when Jesus was

4.

How do you think that Heavenly Father feels when

baptized?

any of His children are baptized?

Luke 3:23-38
1.

How old was Jesus when He began His ministry?

2.

What does Luke write in verses 23-38?

3.

As you read through this history, do you notice

any names? Think of their stories, their testimonies.

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 3, we read a prophecy of Christ given by John the

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Baptist. Study it to see what we can learn about the Atonement
of Jesus Christ.
1.

Read Luke 3:15-17.

2.

Prior to verse 15, what had John the Baptist been

doing? (Skim through earlier verses to see.) What were the
people thinking as John taught them?
3.

What did John answer them?

4.

What did John have the power to do for the

people? What is the significance of baptizing with water?
5.

What does the baptism with water have to do with

the Atonement?
6.

For more insight on baptism, turn to the Bible

Dictionary entry "Baptism."
7.

Which principles of the gospel is baptism

associated with?
8.

Why do you think that we need to have faith in

Jesus Christ in order to be baptized? What part does the
Atonement play in our faith in Jesus Christ?
9.

Why do you think that we need to be repentant in

order to be baptized? What part does the Atonement play in our
repentance?
10.

While baptism with water is important, is that

all that we need for salvation? What does John teach in verse

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16? What is the difference between being baptized with water and
being baptized with the Holy Ghost? (Refer back to the Bible
Dictionary--Baptism.)
11.

How does Christ's Atonement play into our baptism

with the Holy Ghost and fire? Are we able to be sanctified
without Christ's infinite Atonement? Are we able to receive the
gift of the Holy Ghost without Christ's Atonement?
12.

As John the Baptist explains what the Savior will

do, what does he say? What do you think that he means by verse
17? What do you think that baptism--both of water and fire--and
the gathering of the good ("wheat") has to do with the
Atonement?
13.

How does the Atonement make the gathering of the

"wheat" possible? What does the same Atonement that saves the
righteous do to those who are considered to be "chaff"? Why do
you think that the Atonement has a dual role?
14.

What do we need to do in order to be gathered

safely into Christ's "storehouse"?
15.

How do you think that remembering Christ's

Atonement when you make and keep the sacred baptismal covenant
can help you to better appreciate your own baptism, receiving
the gift of the Holy Ghost? How can these covenants help you
better appreciate the gift of the Atonement?

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Themes--Bringing Forth Good Fruit
Themes are overarching principles that are repeated
throughout the scriptures. When we study the themes in the
scriptures, we can better understand the principles of the
gospel associated with that theme. We will study a theme that
appears in Luke 3.
1.

Read Luke 3:9. What does John the Baptist teach

in this verse?
2.

Before we study the theme, let's take time to

really understand what is being said here. Where has the axe
been laid? What does this suggest?
3.

What will the axe be used for? Will the axe be

used to cut down every tree in sight? Which trees will be cut
down?
4.

To better understand this theme, we will study a

few other scriptures. Here, we have a little bit of help--the
footnotes cross-reference to other places where this theme
appears in the scriptures:

A. Matthew 7:15-20
1.

What is the context of this scripture block?

(Look to the chapter heading for help).

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2.

42

What is the advice that the Savior gives to the

multitude in verse 15? Why do you think that we need to beware
of false prophets? Are these false prophets obvious? How do they
appear? Why do you think that false prophets might be disguised
to be meek, unthreatening sheep rather than show their true
colors as "ravening wolves"?
3.

Even though these false prophets are disguised,

what does Jesus teach us about distinguishing them?
4.

What kind of fruits do good trees bring forth?

Corrupt trees?
5.

Can a good tree bring forth evil fruit? Can a

corrupt tree bring forth good fruit? Why not?
6.

What will happen to the trees that bring forth

evil fruit?
7.

How can these fruits help us to determine the

validity of the false prophets that come to us in sheep's
clothing?
8.

How do you think that you can apply this

information to help you learn to discern?
9.

What do Matthew 7:15-20 and the theme of bringing

forth good fruit teach us about the gospel? What principle does
it help us to understand?

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B. John 15:1-6
1.

What is the context of this scripture? Who is

2.

Who is the true vine?

3.

What do you think that it means for a branch to

speaking?

be "in me" (in verse 2)?
4.

Do all of the branches that are "in Christ" bear

5.

What happens to the branches that don't bear

fruit?

fruit? Did they bear bad fruit? What kind of fruit did they
bear?
6.

Why do you think that these unproductive branches

are cut off?
7.

What does this teach us about bearing fruit? Do

you think that bearing bad fruit is the only thing that will
cause us to be "cut off"? According to this allegory in John 15,
how can the sin of omission (not bearing fruit) be just as
damaging as the sin of commission (bearing bad fruit)?
8.

What happens to the branches that bear fruit?

9.

Though these branches are not cast off, does the

idea of being purged, or pruned, seem like an easy thing? What
does the footnote suggest about the word "purgeth" in verse 2?
10.

How might understanding that the Lord prunes us,

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tests us, tries us, when we are bearing good fruit help us to
endure these refining trials?
11.

In verse 4, what does Jesus tell us to do? Why do

you think that abiding in Christ is necessary in order for us to
bear good fruit?
12.

Can a branch of the vine bear fruit if it is not

"abiding" in the main vine? What would happen to a branch if it
had been somehow disconnected from the vine?
13.

Can we bear good fruit without abiding in Christ?

What will happen to us if we don't abide in Him?
14.

How do you think that you can "abide" in Christ--

thereby bringing forth good fruit?
15.

What does the theme mentioned in John 15:1-6--

regarding bringing forth good fruit--teach us about the gospel?
Which principles does this theme help us to understand? How is
this related to what we learned in Matthew 7:15-20?

C. Jacob 5:1-77
1.

According to verse 3, what does the Lord compare

the house of Israel to?
2.

What began to happen to this tree?

3.

What did the lord of the vineyard do when he saw

it begin to decay and get old?

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4.

Why do you think that the lord of this vineyard

cared so much about this tree? What do you think that he was
trying to do for the tree?
5.

What are some of the things that the lord of the

vineyard had the servant do in order to preserve this tree?
6.

What do you think that this means so far? How

does the Lord feel about His children? Does He care if we are
good and bring forth good fruit? What does He do for us to help
us accomplish this goal?
7.

After all of the work that the lord and servant

did, what kind of fruit did the tree begin to bear? (See verse
17.)
8.

Notice the branch of the tree that had been

planted in the "poor" spot of the vineyard. What kind of fruit
did it bear? (Verses 19-20.)
9.

Why was it able to bear good fruit, even though

it wasn't planted in an ideal location?
10.

What did the lord plan to do to the branches of

the trees that brought forth wild (not good) fruit?
11.

Eventually, what happened to all of the branches

in the vineyard?
12.
corruption?

How did the Lord feel about this widespread

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13.

46

How do you think that our Heavenly Father and

Savior feel when they see us corrupted in a similar manner?
After doing all that they have done for us, how do you think
they feel when we bring forth evil fruit?
14.

Notice verse 46; what does the lord say about

losing his trees? Why do you think that the lord grieves?
15.

What does the servant convince the lord of the

vineyard to do?
16.

Were they able to salvage the vineyard and get

more good fruit?
17.

What did the lord do with the good fruit?

18.

What did the lord do with the branches that

brought forth bad fruit?
19.

What do you learn about the Lord from this

allegory? We know that He wants us to bring forth good fruit,
but does He expect us to do this on our own--independent of Him?
20.

How does He aid in your ability to bring forth

good fruit? How can you better recognize the blessings that the
Lord has put in your life and use them to bring forth good
fruit?
21.

Look again at Jacob 5:46. What is the principle

that the theme of "good fruit" helps you to understand in this
example? How do you think that understanding that the Lord

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grieves at the idea of losing us help to motivate you to follow
Him and produce good fruit?

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Luke 4

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
4.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do pause

to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider writing

impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 4:1-13
1.

In verse 1, what do we learn that Jesus is "full

of"? Where did He go?
2.

Why do you think that after being baptized and

having the Holy Ghost descend upon Him, Christ decided to go and
fast in the wilderness?

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3.

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How do you think that fasting and closeness to

the Spirit can help our development?
4.

Even though Jesus was fasting and communing with

His Father, did Satan take a reprieve from tempting? What did
Satan do?
5.

What do you notice about the ways that Satan

tempted Jesus Christ?
6.

What did Jesus do to ward off the temptations?

Luke 4:14-32
1.

What was Jesus' relationship with the city of

2.

What experience is being related in verses 16-21?

3.

Read through the words of the prophecy. How does

Nazareth?

Christ's coming fulfill the prophecy?
4.

How do you think that you would have felt if you

had been there at the time--looking forward to a Messiah, and
then finding that He had come?
5.

What was the reaction of the people in the

synagogue?
6.

Why didn't they believe that Jesus was the

7.

Yet these people were in the synagogue; they seem

Christ?

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faithful. What was the disconnect between the religiousness of
these people and their Messiah? Why do you think they couldn't
recognize Him?
8.

What story does Jesus relate in order to

illustrate His comment, "No prophet is accepted in his own
country"?
9.

Why do you think it can be hard for people to

accept prophets that they have known, have grown up with, etc.?
10.

What can you do to better accept the prophets?

What can you do to keep your heart softened and open so that you
will be able to accept those who are called of God that you
know--whose foibles, mistakes, and idiosyncrasies that you know?
11.

Where did Jesus go after this experience?

Luke 4:33-37
1.

What miracle takes place in this block of

scriptures?
2.

How did the people react to Christ's ability to

heal this man?

Luke 4:38-39
1.
do?

When entering Simon's house, what did the Savior

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2.

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What did she do in response to being healed?

Luke 4:40-44
1.

Even as the sun was setting, what were people

2.

What did Jesus do? Why do you think that He

doing?

healed all of them?
3.

In verse 42, we learn that Jesus went to a

"desert" place. What do we learn from the JST in the footnotes
about the word "desert"?
4.

Why do you think that Jesus went to a solitary

place? How might have Jesus been feeling after a night of
healing and ministering to others?
5.

Yet, even as He went to a solitary place, what

happened? Why do you think that they sought the Savior?
6.

How do you seek the Savior? Why do you seek Him?

What do you think that the Savior will be able to do for you?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 4, we read of when Christ announced His divinity to
the people in the synagogue. We will study this experience to

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see what it can teach us about the Atonement--how it foreshadows
what will happen, and what it teaches us about Christ.
1.

Read Luke 4:16-21.

2.

What was significant about the relationship

between Nazareth and the Savior?
3.

What day of the week was it? What was Jesus'

custom, or habit, on the Sabbath day?
4.

Since this is His hometown, and Christ habitually

went to the synagogue to worship on the Sabbath day, do you
think that the people there were accustomed to seeing Him?
5.

What was the scripture that Jesus read to the

6.

In verse 18, notice the first phrase. In what way

group?

was the Spirit of the Lord upon Christ? Especially consider His
Atonement. Was the Spirit of the Lord upon Christ? What are some
examples you have of this? Why do you think that it is important
that Christ would have the Holy Ghost with Him?
7.

According to verse 18, why does Christ have the

Spirit? What had Christ been anointed to do?
8.

What does it mean to be anointed?

9.

What is the gospel that Christ preached?

10.

What do you think is meant by "the poor"?

11.

When you consider these questions--(7-10), there

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are many people who had been anointed to do the same thing-prophets. For example, we know that Jesus is reading from
Isaiah. Isaiah, the prophet, had also been anointed by the
Spirit of God to preach the gospel to the poor. How does Jesus
also fulfill this scripture?
12.

Read the Bible Dictionary entry for "Prophet." As

you read through it, take time to note anything that you haven't
really considered before. How is Christ a prophet?
13.

Not only is Christ a prophet, but He is the

Prophet. What is unique about Christ's witness compared to the
witness of other prophets? As you think about this question,
keep in mind the Atonement. How can we be recipients of the
Spirit of God without the Atonement? What is the gospel without
the Atonement?
14.

When you consider that Christ's role is the

Savior, Redeemer, and The One who will perform the Atonement and
make the good news of the gospel possible, how does the prophecy
that He's reading in Isaiah begin to take on new meaning?
15.

Think for another second about the "poor". Can

you think of another time in the scriptures when Christ taught
about the poor? In my mind, I think of Matthew 5:3.
16.

Read Matthew 5:3. Make sure to notice the

footnotes. What do we learn about the idiomatic expression

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related to "poor in Spirit"? How does this help us to understand
what the Lord was sent to do, as stated in Luke 4:18--to preach
the gospel to the poor? How do you think that your humility
might be necessary in order to learn the gospel and accept the
Atonement that Christ has performed for us?
17.

In Luke 4:18, notice what else the Lord had been

sent to do: heal the brokenhearted. What do you think that this
means?
18.

How do you think that the healing of the

brokenhearted is accomplished through the Atonement?
19.

What does this part of Christ's mission teach you

about the Atonement?
20.

Think again on the phrase: brokenhearted. What

does it mean? Look up the scripture 3 Nephi 9:20. What do you
learn about being "brokenhearted" from this scripture? Is being
brokenhearted a condition we merely suffer from? How do we
choose to be brokenhearted?
21.

Either way, whether we are brokenhearted because

of the circumstances of life or by our own choice to be sorry
for our own sins, what will Christ do for those who come to Him?
22.

In Luke 4:18, what is the next thing that the

Lord will be sent to do? What do you think that He means by,
"preach deliverance to the captives"?

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23.

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How are people captives? What have we become

captive to?
24.

How do you think that Christ is able to do this

through His Atonement? How does the Atonement offer us
deliverance?
25.

For an additional understanding of this concept,

turn to Doctrine and Covenants 138:18-19. What did Christ do for
the captives who waited for Him in the spirit world?
26.

How do you think that this kind of deliverance

can help us to understand the power and magnitude of the
Atonement?
27.

Turn back to Luke 4:18. What does the scripture

then say that the Lord has been anointed to do? What do you
think it means?
28.

How do you think that the Savior has restored the

sight to the blind? How does this relate to the Atonement? Do
His power and miracles only relate to the moment that He
suffered in Gethsemane?
29.

How do you think that Christ's Atonement can help

to restore your own sight?
30.

Finally, in Luke 4:18 what is the Lord sent to

do? What do you think that this means?
31.

Think, think, think of the word "bruised."

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Perhaps it is familiar to you. For a little refresher, go to
Genesis 3:15. What do we learn about "bruised" from this verse?
32.

In Genesis 3:15, we learn that the seed of the

woman is bruised. Who is the seed of the woman? Is Christ
included in this? Because of the fall of Adam and Eve, what was
one of the very permanent consequences that would befall all of
their posterity?
33.

Death is how we are "bruised." Yet, we learn in

Luke 4:18 that the Lord will set at liberty them that are
bruised. How does the Atonement accomplish this? How does the
Atonement liberate those (all of us!) who have become
susceptible to death: the fate of the flesh?
34.

In verse 19, what is described as a part of the

Lord's mission? To get more insight on this, read the scripture
included in the footnote: John 12:47.
35.

What do you think that Christ means when He says

that He came not to judge the world, but to save it? Does this
mean that we are not judged for what we have done, but are
blindly saved? Does this mean that Christ will judge and condemn
us for the sins that we are willing to readily repent of?
36.

How does Christ's Atonement enable Him to save

the world rather than to judge it? What can you do to qualify
for the Saving grace that Christ offers?

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37.

After Christ read this passage, what did He do

38.

Based on what you have learned from this passage,

and say?

and how Christ has fulfilled each of the items that He was
prophesied to do through His Atonement, how do you think that
you would have responded to finding out that, indeed, the
scripture had been fulfilled?
39.

How do you respond now knowing that the scripture

Christ read has been fulfilled? What can you do to be a
recipient of the promised blessings He offers?

Miracles
If you are doing a study project of all the miracles, then
follow the directions listed in the Appendix.

In Luke 4, the following miracles are recorded:

Christ casts out the unclean spirit at the

synagogue--Luke 4:33-37

Christ heals Peter's mother-in-law--Luke 4:38-39

Christ heals many in the evening--Luke 4:40-41

We will study one together.
1.

Read Luke 4:38-39. Consider the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.

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2.

What did Jesus do?

3.

Who asked Jesus for the miracle?

4.

Where did this miracle take place?

5.

When Jesus healed her, what, specifically, did He

6.

Notice the footnote in verse 39 for the word

do?

"rebuke." Read the scripture cross-reference: Doctrine and
Covenants 84:68. What do you think is meant in Luke when it says
that Christ "rebuked" the fever?
7.

What happens after Christ rebukes the fever?

8.

What does Peter's mother-in-law do? What do we

learn about her by her response? How can this be an example to
us?

Character Study--Satan
This might seem like a strange character study to do, but
by studying the way that Satan tempts the Savior, we can learn
more about how to fend off the adversary's temptations in our
own lives.
1.

Read Luke 4:1-13. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

At the opening of the chapter, how is Jesus

described? When does this take place? What difference does it

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make to know that Christ was tempted so much after His baptism?
After the Holy Ghost had descended upon Him in the form of a
dove? After Heavenly Father had affirmed the divinity of Christ
and that He was well pleased with His Son's choice?
3.

In verse 2, what do we learn that the Savior had

been doing for forty days?
4.

Though it is hard to imagine fasting for forty

days, think about the way that the Savior may have been
feeling--physically and spiritually. Why do you think that the
devil would choose to tempt Him then? What does this teach us
about Satan? Why do you think it is helpful to remember that
Satan is relentless, and that He tries to tempt us even when we
are feeling full of the Spirit?
5.

How was Jesus feeling, physically, at this point

6.

What did the devil do to tempt the Savior?

7.

Notice what Satan says. First he makes this

in time?

claim, "If thou be the Son of God". What was Satan trying to get
Jesus to doubt or question?
8.

How does Satan do this to us? Why do you think

that forgetting that we are sons and daughters of God can cause
us to yield to sin?
9.

Additionally, Satan tempted Christ to turn the

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stones to bread. Why do you think that Satan would have tempted
Christ in this way? Why do you think that Satan often tempts us
to give in to our physical appetites?
10.

What does Jesus say in response? How do you think

that this knowledge helped Jesus to overcome the temptation that
had been thrown at Him by the devil?
11.

How do you think that your own knowledge of the

gospel can also help you when the adversary tempts you in such a
demanding and physical way?
12.

After this, the Spirit took the Savior up to a

high mountain. What did Jesus see when He was there? What do you
think that this vision would have been like? Keep in mind the
JST. The devil did not show the Savior all of the kingdoms and
creations of the world, but the Spirit did. How might the Savior
have been feeling after this vision?
13.

Along comes the devil. How does he tempt Christ?

14.

Now, think about this temptation and the

circumstances surrounding it. Who was and is Christ? What
relationship does He have with the world--the creation of the
world? Who is Satan? What kind of power, physical power, does he
have?
15.

Satan tempts Christ by offering up the power and

kingdoms of the world in return for Christ worshipping Satan.

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Where is the major flaw in this? Can Satan even offer this
power?
16.

What is Christ's power in comparison to the power

of the kingdoms of the world?
17.

Why is this a silly temptation?

18.

Yet, Satan does this, and it really is a

temptation that often deceives many. How does Satan tempt you by
offering something that you might already have and that he
cannot deliver?
19.

What does Jesus say in response to this

temptation of Satan's?
20.

How can remembering to worship God only help us

in the times when we are tempted to believe Satan's lies
regarding his power? How do you think that worshipping God will
help to remind us of the true source of power--and that it is
God who empowers us, while Satan is impotent?
21.

Finally, the Spirit brought Christ to Jerusalem.

Where was Jesus?
22.

What did Satan then tempt Christ to do? Really

think about this. How is Satan really tempting Christ?
23.

Why do you think that Satan would tempt the

divinity of Christ--that He was the Son of God?
24.

Think about Christ and His relationship with His

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Father. Did Jesus know who His father was? Keep in mind, He had
been baptized only shortly before. What did God announce at the
baptism of the Savior? (See Matthew 3:17; Mark 1:11; and Luke
3:22.) Do you think that there was any doubt that Jesus knew
that He was the Son of God?
25.

Why, then, do you think that Satan tried to tempt

Him to prove this or doubt it?
26.

How do you think that Satan tries to tempt us to

prove God? How do you think that this kind of temptation, when
we give in to it, leads to doubt and loss of testimony? Why do
you think that Satan would try to tempt us in a like manner?
27.

What did Christ do to fend off the Devil's

temptation in this instance?
28.

Why do you think that the scriptures can be so

useful in overcoming temptation?
29.

What have you learned about the way that Satan

tempts us through these examples?
30.

Though his temptations are not always logical

does this mean that they aren't effective? How can having the
Spirit with you help to keep your mind sound and able to
overcome the deceitful ways that the adversary will try to tempt
you? What can you do to strengthen your ability to have the
Spirit with you?

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Luke 5

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
5.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do pause

to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider writing

impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 5:1-11
1.

When Jesus was standing near the lake, what were

the fishermen doing?

to do?

2.

Whose ship did Jesus enter?

3.

After speaking, what did Jesus tell Simon (Peter)

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What was Peter's response? Remind yourself of

what Peter had just finished doing. Think about a fishing net.
Even if you have never gone fishing, do you suppose that fishing
was an easy living? Yet how many fish had they caught?
5.

Additionally, after an unsuccessful night

fishing, they cleaned their nets. What do you imagine this task
to be like? Why do you think that Peter was a little ambivalent
about going fishing again?
6.

Despite Peter's remarks, what does he do? Why do

you think that he does this?
7.

What happens when they let their nets down for

one last draught?
8.

What does Peter say when this miracle occurs? Why

do you think that he says this? How do you think that we might,
at times, act like Peter--a little doubtful yet still obedient?
What is your reaction when you see that you could trust in the
Lord all along?
9.

In verse 9, what does Jesus say to Peter, James,

10.

How do they respond?

11.

What do you think that it means to forsake all?

and John?

Have you chosen to forsake all? Do you think that this is a onetime decision? What can you do to follow the example of these

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apostles, forsake all, and follow Christ?

Luke 5:12-15
1.

Who approaches the Savior in these verses?

2.

What does he desire from the Lord?

3.

What does Jesus do for the leper?

Luke 5:16-26
1.

Where did Jesus go? Why?

2.

Who was brought in to the Lord?

3.

How was this man brought to the Savior?

4.

What did Jesus do for this man?

5.

Why did the Pharisees consider Christ to speak

blasphemies? Was their accusation true? Is Christ able to
forgive our sins?
6.

How do you think that Christ's healing miracles

are a type of the healing that He can offer to our souls?

Luke 5:27-32
1.

Whom did the Lord call in verse 27? What was

Levi's profession?
2.

Why do you think that the Pharisees had a problem

with Christ's association with a publican?

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3.

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What question do the scribes and Pharisees ask

the Savior?
4.

How does the Savior respond?

5.

As you think of Jesus' response, who do you think

need a physician? Do you think that our bishops, stake
presidents, and other servants need a physician? Do you need a
physician? Who doesn't need a physician?
6.

How do you think that remembering this can help

us to support and love one another?

Luke 5:33-35
1.

What do the Pharisees then ask the Savior?

2.

How does Jesus respond?

3.

Think of fasting. What is a reason that you might

fast? Often, who is at the center of your thoughts during a
fast? Whose power and guidance are you seeking?
4.

The Pharisees claim to fast; what do you suppose

that they might have fasted for? Do you think that the power of
the Lord accompanied their fasts? If they were truly fasting
with the Spirit, why do you think that they were not able to
recognize the Messiah?
5.

Do you think that sometimes when we fast and

pray, we are doing it in such a way that is not sanctified by

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the Holy Ghost? How do you think that we can fast in a way that
is productive to our Spirits--rather than simply starving
ourselves?

Luke 5:36-39
1.

What does the Lord then teach to the Pharisees

and scribes?
2.

Why do you think that He tells them this parable?

What does it mean?
3.

How does this illustrate what He has been trying

to teach them?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 5, we find a quick mention that Christ went to
pray. We will read and ponder this simple act to see what we can
learn about the Savior, His Atonement, and our relationship with
Him.
1.

Read Luke 5:16.

2.

Where did Christ go?

3.

Why do you think that He had to withdraw Himself

to go and pray effectively?

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4.

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Think about Christ's life up to this point; was

He very often alone? How do you think that the constant social
interactions may have affected His ability to be close to His
father?
5.

Think about your own life. Do you have many

social engagements or duties tugging at your time? What have you
noticed about how these obligations impact your relationship
with Heavenly Father and your spirituality, in general?
6.

In the footnotes of Luke 5:16, notice the two

referenced scriptures.
7.

Read Luke 4:42. Where did Jesus go?

8.

Why do you think that He went to this solitary

9.

What happened when He went to be alone? Was He

place?

able to have a moment to Himself?
10.

Just because people were following Him, did Jesus

give up on trying to find times and places to pray on His own?
Why do you think that this was always a priority for Him?
11.

How do you think that making an effort to pray

helped to prepare Him for the work of the Atonement?
12.

Read Luke 6:12 (the other scripture referenced in

the footnotes for Luke 5:16).
13.

According to this verse, where did Jesus go? What

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did He do? How long did the prayer last?
14.

Do you think that Jesus really believed in and

knew of the power of prayer? Think about your own prayers and
testimony of prayer. What is it? Do you believe that there is
power in prayer? Really think about, think about your
experiences with prayer. Think about times when your prayers
have been powerful versus times when they have been casual.
15.

Now, think about this pattern that Jesus had in

his life, and think of how it relates to the Atonement. How did
prayer help Him as He performed this great sacrifice?
16.

How do you think that preparing and establishing

a pattern of prayer and communion with God helped the Savior
when He was in His time of greatest need?

Miracles
If you are doing a study project of all the miracles, then
follow the directions listed in the Appendix.

In Luke 5, the following miracles are recorded:

Peter, James, and John let down their nets for

one more draught (at the insistence of Jesus), and catch so many
fish their nets break--Luke 5:1-11.

Man sick with the palsy is healed--Luke 5:17-26

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We will study one together now.
1.

Read Luke 5:1-11. Complete the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What is the setting before this miracle takes

3.

What were Peter, James, and John doing?

4.

Did Peter, James, and John ask for this miracle

place?

to be performed?
5.

Why did this miracle occur?

6.

Would this miracle have occurred if Peter, James,

and John had not lowered their nets?
7.

Why do you think that they chose to lower their

nets--even though it was obviously a laborious task and they had
such dismal luck with getting any fish earlier that night?
8.

What is the miracle that finally occurs?

9.

What was the reaction of these men when they

pulled at their nets, finding them full of fish?
10.

Why do you think that this miracle had such a

profound effect on them?
11.

Did this miracle give the soon-to-be apostles

faith? In what way did this miracle seem to strengthen the faith
that they already had?
12.

After performing this miracle, what does Peter

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say to the Savior? Why do you think that Peter feels this way?
What does he seem to understand about Christ?
13.

After Peter says this, what does Jesus then say

14.

Why do you think that Jesus first comforted Peter

to them?

by saying, "Fear not"? How do you think that this might have
made Peter feel?
15.

Why do you think that Christ wants us not to

fear--especially as we proceed to serve Him? Instead of fear,
what should be guiding our actions and empowering our lives?
16.

What does Jesus then call Peter, James, and John

17.

How do you think that this miracle might have

to do?

been an object lesson? Do you think that they would have been
confident in their ability to preach the gospel and be "fishers
of men" prior to this experience? Think about the times--there
were Pharisees, Sadducees, and scribes. And what did Peter,
James, and John do for a profession? Had they been called by
Christ to be His disciples, how do you think that they might
have felt about their ability to complete such a task?
18.

How do you think that the power of this miracle

might have helped to strengthen their faith to live up to the
task that Christ called them to? Even though we don't know for

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sure, try to put yourself in Peter's shoes. How might this
miracle have been a source of strength for him in hard times?
19.

What did Peter, James, and John do? Did they

choose to follow the Lord? What are the details of their choice
to follow Him? Again, how do you think that the miracle that
they experienced might have affected their willingness to leave
straightway?
20.

Notice also, the increased temptation that could

have arisen. Would it be easier to forsake all when your nets
are full or empty? Yet, what did these disciples choose to do?
Why do you think that they chose to forsake all and follow
Christ?
21.

Why do you think it is required for us to be

willing to give up everything and follow Christ? What is it that
we "give up" when we follow Christ?
22.

Think about the situation again--where did the

fish come from in the first place? Is "forsaking all" really a
big deal when you are following the One who is the supplier of
every need and miracle?
23.

How do you think that this miracle can help you

to galvanize your own faith in the Savior and put your trust in
Him when you find situations where you must forsake some of your
worldly possessions or other desires?

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Parables
If you are doing a study project of all the parables, then
follow the directions listed in the Appendix.

In Luke 5, the following parable appears:

5:36-39

The parable of the new and old wine bags--Luke

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Luke 6

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
6.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do pause

to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider writing

impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 6:1-12
1.

What day of the week is it as the chapter opens?

2.

Why is it important to know this detail?

3.

What do the Savior and His disciples do on the

Sabbath day? Why do the Pharisees have a problem with it?
4.

What does Jesus say in response?

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5.

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On another Sabbath day, when the Savior went to

the synagogue, who was there? What did the Lord do for this
person?
6.

How did the Pharisees feel about Christ healing

on the Sabbath? Why do you think that they had such a problem
with Christ doing good works on the Sabbath day? Did they
understand the Sabbath day?

Luke 6:13-16
1.

After praying, what did the Savior do?

2.

Who were the twelve apostles that were called?

Luke 6:17-19
1.

When the Savior came down with His disciples,

what did they do?
2.

Notice the phrase in verse 19 that says virtue

went out of Him. What do you think that this means? In what way
do you think that virtue is power?
3.

How do you think that understanding the

connection between virtue and power can help you as you navigate
your life in a world that doesn't value virtue?

Luke 6:20-26

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1.

Whom does the Lord teach in these verses?

2.

What are some of the things that the Savior is

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teaching the people?
3.

Why do you think that He is teaching this? What

is the value of these teachings?

Luke 6:27-45
1.

What does the Lord teach the disciples to do?

2.

How was this different than the custom at the

time--eye for an eye; a tooth for a tooth?
3.

What do you think that Christ means when He says

to offer up another cheek to those who smite you? Does the Lord
expect us to remain in abusive relationships? Keep in mind, He's
teaching His newly called apostles. How do you think that this
teaching would help guide them in their discipleship and service
to Him? What do you think that the Lord means by this guidance?
How can you apply it in your own life?
4.

As Christ preaches this higher law, what does He

say about loving others, doing good to others, lending to
others? Why do you think that He wants us to love our enemies?
5.

What does Jesus say about being merciful? Why

does He want us to be merciful? How can being merciful bless you
in your life?

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6.

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What does Jesus teach about judging others here?

Why do you think that He would preach that we shouldn't judge
others?
7.

Yet, as soon as He finishes up with the beam/mote

teaching, He teaches us how to judge--based on fruit. Why do you
think Christ teaches this just after He has instructed the
people not to judge?
8.

What is the difference between being judgmental

(and looking to correct the mistakes of others) and being
discerning (being able to see the difference between good and
evil)?

Luke 6:46-49
1.

Look at the question that Jesus poses in verse

46. It seems to be more or less a rhetorical question, but think
about it. Based on this question, what kind of disciples and
servants do you think that Jesus wants and expects?
2.

What are the comparisons that Jesus then makes?

3.

What can you do to be like the person who builds

on a rock?

Enrich Your Learning

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The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 6, as we have read, the Savior teaches the higher
law. We will study aspects of this higher law in relationship to
the Atonement to see what it can teach us about Christ, the
Atonement, the higher law, and how to keep the law.
1.

Read Luke 6:27-36

2.

In verse 27, what is the first thing that the

Savior tells His disciples to do? How did Christ exemplify this
Himself?
3.

Think about the Atonement--was this made

available even to His enemies? What does this teach you about
the Savior and His love for us?
4.

In verse 28, what does the Lord instruct us to

do? How did Christ fulfill this in His Atonement? Why do you
think that in order to fulfill the higher law, we must bless
those that curse us and pray for those who use us? How do you
think that the Atonement can help you to accomplish this?
5.

As you continue to read through these aspects of

the higher law, what seems to be at the center of everything
that Christ mentions? What is the characteristic that we will
need to have in order to love our enemies, do good to those that
hurt us, bless those that curse us, pray for those who use us,
turn the other cheek, give to others, and be merciful?

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6.

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For more insight, turn to Moroni 7:45-47. What is

charity? How do you think that through obtaining charity we will
be able to keep the higher law?
7.

How do you think that charity is a part of what

made the Atonement possible?
8.

According to Moroni 7:46, will charity fail?

According to Moroni 7:47, what is the "time frame" for charity-when will it "expire"? Now think about the Atonement again. If
it was completed through Christ's pure love, through His
charity, will it fail?
9.

How do you think that understanding charity can

help you to understand the power of the Atonement?
10.

How can understanding charity and the Atonement

help you to keep the higher law that Christ insists we keep? Why
do you think that we need to obtain charity in order for the
Atonement to take full affect in our lives?

Miracles
If you are doing a study project of all the miracles, then
follow the directions listed in the Appendix.
In Luke 6, the following miracles are recorded:

6:6-11

Jesus heals the man with the withered hand--Luke

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Jesus heals various people in a crowd--Luke

6:17-19

Parables
If you are doing a study project of all of the parables,
then follow the directions listed in the Appendix.
In Luke 6, the following parable is recorded:

The blind leading the blind--Luke 6:39-40

We will study it together.
1.

Read Luke 6:39-40.

2.

In this parable, who do the blind people

represent?
3.

What question does Christ ask in this parable?

Think of the idea--a blind person leading a blind person-perhaps on a trail of some kind. What do you think would happen
to the people?
4.

The Lord continues to teach about disciples and

masters. What does He say?
5.

What do you think that this has to do with the

parable that He just taught?
6.

Notice the context of this parable. Who was the

Lord teaching? What had He been teaching them? Why do you think
that they needed to understand this parable?

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7.

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Why do you think that it is important to

understand the relationship between our Master and us? Who is
our Master?
8.

How do you think that this parable and

instruction can guide us in our service to God?

List--Blessings and Woes
Often you can find lists in the scriptures. In Luke 6, we
will study a list that points out blessings and woes.
1.

Read Luke 6:20-26. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions. As you study this list, you
may want to number each item in your scriptures and mark them so
you can spot this list easily.

One: Blessed be ye poor: for yours is the kingdom of God
1.

What does the Lord mean by the descriptor "poor"?

Look in the footnotes for help. Do you think that this only
applies to people who are materially poor? How do you think that
humility and remembering your true relationship to God will help
to keep you worthy of this blessing?
2.

What is it that the poor will inherit? Why do you

think this is a promised blessing? What is the advantage of
inheriting the kingdom of God?

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Two: Blessed are ye that hunger now: for ye shall be
filled.
1.

What do you think that Christ means by "hunger"?

Use the footnotes for help.
2.

How do you hunger and thirst? How do you think

that Christ will fill you?
3.

Why do you think that Christ uses this metaphor?

How does it help us understand our relationship, or spiritual
need, for righteousness and Christ's gospel?

Three: Blessed are ye that weep now: for ye shall laugh
1.

Why do you think that we may "weep" now? What are

the things that cause us to weep?
2.

Do you think that this means that we should be

weepy, sad people? Instead, what does this axiom identify about
our mortal life?
3.

Notice the word "now." Why do you think that

Christ uses it?
4.

At this point, to get a better understanding of

laughter, read through the Topical Guide. What stands out to
you? How does this apply to the usage of the word "laugh" by
Christ here?

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Four: Blessed are ye, when men shall hate you, and when
they shall separate you from their company, and shall reproach
you, and cast out your name as evil, for the Son of man's sake.
Rejoice ye in that day, and leap for joy: for, behold, your
reward is great in heaven.
1.

In your own words, describe this blessing.

2.

Why do you think that we are blessed when others

3.

Why are the disciples of Christ hated? How have

hate us?

you seen this to be true in your life or in the world around
you?
4.

What is the promised blessing of staying true to

the Lord--even when you are hated?
5.

Why do you think that the Lord offers such a

great blessing to those who are hated and persecuted for His
sake?
6.

How can this knowledge help to strengthen you as

you go through your life, especially if you find yourself in a
situation where you are treated unfairly based on your faith?

Five: Woe unto you that are rich! For ye have received your
consolation.

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1.

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In this, what do we learn about those who are

rich? What do you think that Christ means by "rich" here? Do you
think that this is as simple as someone who has wealth? What do
you think is the real problem here?
2.

What do you think the Lord means by "ye have

received your consolation"? Think about those who are rich who
feel they have no need of the Lord. Though they have consolation
now, do you think that they will be at peace in the eternities?
Why or why not?
3.

Compare this woe to the first pronounced

blessing. Those who are "poor" will receive the kingdom of God.
Which kingdom do you suppose that the rich inherit?
4.

How do you think that you can be considered

"poor" and inherit the blessings that God has for you--even if
you have been blessed to live a "rich" life?

Six: Woe unto you that are full! For you shall hunger.
1.

What do you think that the Lord means by this

warning? What might be making us "full" now that will leave us
hungry later?
2.

You may want to think of actual food. Suppose you

consume 500 calories by eating two Bavarian cream donuts. Now
suppose another consumes only 335 calories by eating 2 eggs, 1/2

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cup oats with 1 tablespoon raisins, and a banana. Whom do you
suppose will hunger? Yet who consumed more? How do you think
that this example can help us understand our spiritual natures?
What do we consume? What do we fill our minds with? What are the
spiritual "donuts" we consume--that taste pleasing as we eat
them, yet leave us hungry and malnourished?
3.

Compare this advice to the second blessing listed

by the Lord. What do you learn from these related items?
4.

How do you think that we can learn to hunger and

thirst after righteousness rather than consume wickedness and
starve?

Seven: Woe unto you that laugh now! For ye shall mourn and
weep.
1.

What do you think that the Lord means by this

2.

Compare this woe to the third listed blessing.

woe?

What do you suppose that the Lord is teaching?
3.

What do you suppose is the difference between the

laughter of those who laugh now and of those who will laugh
later? Do you think that they are laughing for the same reasons?
How do you think that these are different?
4.

Personally, this particular phrase intrigues me.

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Because I don't completely understand it, and because it is
really striking to me, I will take a second to ponder.

As you

will notice, there is no footnote to any part of this phrase.
So...think for a second. Can you think of any examples of
laughter in the scriptures--especially of laughter that may have
a negative connotation associated with it?
5.

As I think of laughter, I think of Lehi's dream

and the people in the great and spacious building. Turn to 1
Nephi 8:27. What do we learn about the people in the great and
spacious building? Even though it doesn't mention laughing in
this verse, what are the people doing? How might this be related
to laughter? Why do you think that their mocking, scoffing, and
laughter--though enjoyable at the moment--would lead to mourning
and weeping later?
6.

Go to 1 Nephi 11:36. What happens to the great

and spacious building? How do you think that the people might
have acted when it fell? Were they mocking and laughing any
more?
7.

What do you think that the Lord means by this

woe? Though it is related to the third blessing, how is the idea
of laughter also quite different?

Eight: Woe unto you, when all men shall speak well of you!

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For so did their fathers to the false prophets.
1.

Why do you think that the Lord warns his

disciples of general popularity? Do you think that this is a
standard rule--that no righteous person would be spoken well of?
Who are the "men" that Christ refers to in this verse?
2.

Who did the fathers of these men speak well of?

What is a false prophet?
3.

Why do you think that the men and wisdom of the

world are so attracted to false prophets? Why do you think that
false prophets--who preach lies--are so well received?
4.

In Alma 30, we read of Korihor--an anti-Christ

and false prophet. Read Alma 30:53. What do we learn about why
he taught the words taught to him by the devil?
5.

Notice, now, the fourth blessing. How are the

blessing and the woe related? Why do you think that it is good
for us, as disciples of Christ, to understand this principle?
6.

How do you think that we can overcome the

enticing philosophies of the world--which cater to our carnal
minds--and instead, stand up for the truth, even when it is not
really popular?

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Luke 7

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
7.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do pause

to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider writing

impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 7:1-10
1.

As this chapter opens, what do we learn about the

physical state of the centurion's servant?
2.

What does the centurion want Jesus to do?

3.

What had the centurion done for Israel?

4.

What else teaches us about the kind of person

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that the centurion is?
5.

Did the Lord heal the centurion's servant? Why?

6.

How did Christ respond to the faith shown by the

centurion? Why was his faith so noteworthy? Why do you think
that the centurion had more faith than many of the people of
Israel, who had been traditionally taught of the Messiah?
7.

Why do you think that faith is more important

than tradition? What can you do to strengthen your own faith?

Luke 7:11-18
1.

After healing the centurion's servant, where did

Christ go?
2.

What did the Lord encounter as he came to the

3.

What moved Christ to heal her son?

4.

How did the people, in general, respond to this

city?

great miracle? How did this affect Jesus' reputation?

Luke 7:19-30
1.

Whom did John the Baptist send to Christ? Why did

he send them?
2.
the Baptist?

What did Jesus tell these men to report to John

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3.

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After John the Baptist's messengers departed,

what did Jesus say about John the Baptist? What kind of prophet
was he? Why was he considered to be more than a prophet?
4.

Did the Pharisees accept what Christ had said?

Why do you think that they rejected the counsel of God?

Luke 7:31-35
1.

Jesus seemed to perceive the thoughts of the

Pharisees and lawyers. What did He say about their opinions of
John the Baptist? What did He say about their opinions of Him
(Christ)?
2.

How are the Pharisees paradoxical in their

willingness to believe in these prophets?
3.

It seems that the Pharisees used logic to

discount the divinity of both John's calling and of the Savior.
Why do you think that this is problematic? Yet they also claimed
to be faithful in their religion. What do you think that they
were missing--which prevented them from receiving a testimony of
the truth?
4.

What can you do so that you will not make the

same kind of mistake that the Pharisees made? Is gospel
knowledge and logic enough to give you a testimony? What can you
seek that will help to strengthen your faith and enable you to

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recognize truth?

Luke 7:36-50
1.

According to verse 36, where did Christ go?

2.

What happened as the Savior sat to eat at the

Pharisee's house?
3.

What does Christ begin to say while at this

dinner? Why do you think that He tells this parable?
4.

How do you think that Christ felt about the

simple offering made by this woman? What do you think that the
woman understood about the Savior?
5.

What did the Savior tell the woman to do as the

chapter closed? Why do you think that He said this? What does
this teach us about the forgiveness that we receive from the
Savior when we repent?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In the New Testament, we come across the examples of those
who, like the Pharisees, didn't understand the divine role of
Christ as Savior and Redeemer. On the other hand, we also read
of the examples of the humble and meek people who seem to

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understand Christ's power to forgive. We will read of one such
example and see what it can teach each of us about the Atonement
and how it can help strengthen our relationship with the Savior.
1.

Read Luke 7:36-50. Complete the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

According to verse 36, where did Jesus go? Why

did He go to the Pharisee's house?
3.

In verse 37, a woman is introduced. What do you

learn about this woman in this verse? Why do you think that it
is important to understand that this woman was a sinner? What
did she bring with her?
4.

What did the woman do to the Savior? Why do you

think that she did this?
5.

As the woman washed Christ's feet with her tears,

anointed them with the oil, and kissed his head, what did the
Pharisee begin to think? At this point, in your mind, what sets
apart the Pharisee and the woman? Why do you think that even
though the woman was a sinner, she was worshipping the Lord so
lovingly?
6.

Jesus then speaks to the Pharisee. What does He

begin to teach? Read the parable and think about it: what
happens in the parable?
7.

Notice the question that Jesus asks in verse 42.

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How would you answer this question?
8.

Why did Jesus tell this parable? What does it

have to do with the situation He is in at the Pharisee's home?
9.

What does Christ tell the woman in verse 48? Do

you think that she understood that Christ had this power--to
forgive sins?
10.

Think of your own life--when you have sinned and

then sought forgiveness. Even though the sin may have felt good
or convenient at the time of commission, how did you feel
afterward? What did you seek? What did you do in order to
receive repentance?
11.

How do you think that the woman's actions

exemplified her repentant heart? Though we cannot personally
wash and anoint the Savior's feet, what can we do to show Him
our true desire to receive forgiveness and peace from the sins
we have committed?
12.

Now, think about all of this in connection with

the Atonement. How does Christ's Atonement make your repentance
possible? Why do you think that understanding and acknowledging
His Atonement will help you as you seek forgiveness from your
sins?
13.

When the Savior forgave the woman's sins, what

did those who were eating with the Savior (the Pharisees, for

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example) think in response? What did they not understand about
the Savior?
14.

Again, really think about this situation. What

were these people doing with the Savior? Can you imagine,
sitting with the Savior, eating with Him, spending time with
Him--face to face? If you were in His presence, what do you
suppose your feelings would be? What would you think about Him,
about the situation?
15.

What were those who were eating with Him acting

like? How does this compare to the actions of the woman?
16.

What do the actions of those who questioned

Christ's ability to forgive, as they sat "at meat" with Him,
teach us? Do you think that they understood Christ's divine
role? Do you think that they understood the power of the
Atonement that He would perform? What do you think kept them
from having this witness?
17.

Finally, in verse 50, what does the Savior say to

the woman? What do you think is the connection between faith,
repentance, the Atonement, and peace? How do you think that your
sins might keep your from experiencing peace in this life? What
can you do to strengthen your faith, seek repentance, experience
the power of Christ's Atonement in your life, and experience
peace?

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18.

How does experiencing the blessings of the

Atonement in your life affect your relationship with Christ?
19.

This might be a good time to find a picture of

the Savior and really look at Him. Think about His feelings for
you. Think about your experiences with Him and His infinite
Atonement. How do you think the Savior feels about you? How do
you feel about your Savior? If, like this woman, you have
experienced Christ's redeeming love, write down your testimony
of it in your journal.

Miracles
If you are doing a study project of all the miracles, then
follow the directions listed in the Appendix.
In Luke 7, the following miracles are recorded:

Healing of the centurion's wervant--Luke 7:1-10

Healing of the son of the widow of Nain--Luke

Healing of many--Luke 7:21

7:11-18

We will study one together now.
1.

Read Luke 7:1-10. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What do we learn about the centurion's servant

from this verse?

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3.

How did the centurion feel about his servant?

4.

Who did the centurion seek when he heard of

5.

Was the centurion Jewish? Yet, how did He feel

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Jesus?

about the nation of Israel and its people? What had the
centurion done for them? How do you think that his servant might
have influenced how the centurion felt about Israel?
6.

When Jesus drew near, what did the centurion say

about coming to his house? Why do you think that he felt he was
unworthy to have the Savior come unto his house, or even be in
the presence of the Savior? What does this teach us about the
centurion? Why do you think that this is noteworthy? What,
exactly, is a centurion (use the Bible Dictionary for help)? Do
you think that centurions--those who commanded such power--were
typically so kind to their servants and humble in general?
7.

How does Jesus respond to the request? What

statement does Christ make about the centurion? Why do you think
that He says this?
8.

Was the centurion's servant healed?

9.

How do you think that this miracle might have

affected the centurion?
10.

If you recall, when the Canaanite woman asked

Christ to heal her child, He first refused. Eventually, because

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of her persistence, He acquiesced to her request. Yet, here, the
centurion is not refused, but the Lord heals quickly. Though I'm
not completely sure, I'm guessing it is because the centurion's
servant (the one to receive the actual healing) is of the house
of Israel (likely, given the political circumstances). If we
take this assumption, then what do you think that the influence
of the centurion's servant might have been? How might this
person been an example of faith? Obviously we're reading in
between the lines here, but how do you think the centurion's
servant played a part in his own healing--even though it was the
centurion who asked on the servant's behalf?
11.

What can you learn from the example of the

centurion? The example (implied) of the centurion's servant? How
do you think that our love and faith can be a blessing to those
we love?

Parables
If you are doing a study project of all of the parables,
then follow the directions listed in the Appendix.
In Luke 7, the following parable is recorded:

Creditor and debtors--Luke 7:40-43

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Luke 8

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
8.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do pause

to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider writing

impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 8:1-3
1.

As Jesus went through cities and villages, who

accompanied Him? Be sure to note the JST in verse 1.
2.

Why do you think that these people physically

followed the Savior?

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Luke 8:4-15
1.

Over time, even more people gathered together,

and the Savior told them a parable. Which parable did He tell
them?
2.

What is the meaning of the parable? If you have

already studied this parable, refer back to your notes. If not,
find the assignment to study this parable in Mark 4 or study it
on your own. What is the Savior trying to teach with this
parable?
3.

Why do you think that the Savior teaches this

parable at this point in time?

Luke 8:16-18
1.

What parable or metaphor does Jesus say now? What

do you think that He means by this?
2.

Think of your own life. Are there times when you

put your candle under a bushel? Why?
3.

What do you think that Christ means by putting

your candle on a candlestick? How can you do this in your own
life?
4.

Finally, in verse 18, what does Christ teach?

What do you think that this means? What does it have to do with
hiding our candles under a bushel?

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Luke 8:19-21
1.

Who tried to come to the Lord in verse 19?

2.

What was keeping them from getting to Christ?

3.

What did the people tell the Savior? What did He

say in response? Why do you think that He said this?

Luke 8:22-25
1.

As Christ and the disciples went on the ship to

another place, what happened?
2.

How were the apostles feeling as they began to

suffer in this dangerous storm? Why do you suppose they were
fearful?
3.

What did the apostles do? Did Christ do as they

4.

After calming the storm, what did the Savior say

bid Him?

to the apostles? Why do you think that He rebuked them?

Luke 8:26-40
1.

When the Savior arrived at the country of the

Gadarenes, who met Him out of the city?
2.

What was unique about this individual?

3.

What did the Savior do?

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What do we learn about the evil spirits cast out

of the man?
5.

Why do you think that the evil spirits went to

inhabit the bodies of the swine after being cast out of the
young man? And, even more puzzling, why do you think that the
swine then tried to drown themselves?
6.

How did the general population react to this

great miracle? Why do you think that they were so afraid of the
Savior?
7.

What does this miracle teach us about the

Savior's power? About the gift of our ability to inhabit mortal
bodies? About the way that those who didn't keep their first
estate covet our mortal experience?

Luke 8:41-56
1.

Who approached Jesus?

2.

What did he ask for from the Savior?

3.

As Jesus went forth to heal Jairus' daughter,

what happened?
4.

How do you think that Christ was able to discern

that someone touched Him?
5.

As Jesus headed toward Jairus' house, what

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happened to Jairus' daughter?
6.

What did Jesus then do for the young maid? Why do

you think that Jesus did this? Why did Jesus perform so many
healings? Do you think that He has the power to help heal you?
What can you do to strengthen your faith in His ability to heal
us spiritually AND physically?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 8, the Savior heals a woman afflicted with an issue
of blood--when she touched His hem. We will study this
experience and see what it can teach us about the Savior's power
and His Atonement.
1.

Read Luke 8:43-48.

2.

What is the main event in this scripture block?

3.

When the woman touched the Savior's clothes, what

happened to her disease? How do you think that this healing was
possible--when it seemed that Jesus didn't really heal her in a
proactive way?
4.

After she touched His garment, what did the

Savior ask? What did the apostles say to the Savior? Think of
the situation. Would it seem likely that many people were

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touching Him? What set apart the way this woman touched Christ
from the way that others may have bustled into Him?
5.

What does Jesus explain about the difference in

verse 46? Notice the key word: virtue. Without looking down at
the footnotes, describe what you think virtue is.
6.

Now, look down at the footnotes, what do we learn

about virtue from this?
7.

What do you suppose is the connection between

virtue and power? Keep this question in mind as we continue to
study virtue. Additionally, think of the Savior's power and the
Atonement. What do you think that virtue has to do with power
and the Atonement?
8.

Personally, I'm not exactly sure what virtue has

to do with power. In some ways, I think of virtue as being
closely related to the law of chastity and purity. But as I read
this example of the Savior's, I begin to realize that perhaps
virtue is more than this common understanding. Where would you
go to begin to study virtue? Is the Spirit prompting you to
think of any scriptural examples? If it is, then do not proceed
to number 9, but follow what the Spirit is prompting you to do.
You can then come back to this assignment and finish it if you
wish.
9.

To broaden my understanding of "virtue" I'm going

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to first search the dictionary. Find the definition of "virtue"
in any dictionary (not the Bible Dictionary), but a typical
dictionary. I looked up the definition at dictionary.com.

There

I found that it means "moral excellence; goodness;
righteousness." This applies to the situation of Christ in a
way, but still seems a little off. As I continue to read the
entry, I find that an archaic meaning of the word virtue is "an
effective, active, or inherent power or force." This definition
seems especially applicable to the situation we are studying in
Luke. How does this help you to better understand what Christ
mean when He said that He perceived that virtue went from Him?
10.

When we consider both the current and the archaic

meanings of the word "virtue" what kind of power or force is
virtue? Why do you think that virtue is limited to
righteousness? Can we be virtuous--powerful--people if we are
being unrighteous?
11.

Continue to learn more about virtue by turning to

the Topical Guide. Study the scriptures that stand out to you.
As you study them, note in your scripture journal what you learn
about virtue. Additionally, take this study to a second step by
asking yourself how the Atonement was a virtuous, powerful act.
See if you can find the connection between virtue and what
Christ did in the Garden of Gethsemane.

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We will study a few scriptures together. Read

Psalms 24:4. Though this scripture doesn't mention virtue
directly, it is listed in the Topical Guide. Why do you think
this is? What does having clean hands and a pure heart have to
do with virtue? What does refraining from vanity and
deceitfulness have to do with virtue? Do you suppose that
someone who exercises power through wicked ways--through lying,
murdering, and other manipulative ways--is truly powerful? What
is the difference between power that is pure and righteous and
power that is fit for a Shakespearean villain?
13.

(Continuing with Psalms 24:4.) What does virtue

and purity qualify us for (see verse 3)? How do you suppose that
virtue relates to the Atonement that Christ performed?
14.

Read Proverbs 31:10. What do we learn about

virtue from this verse? Keep in mind that virtue is more than
chastity and purity. What else is it? What does it mean to you
to know that a virtuous woman is morally excellent, good,
righteous and an effective, active, inherent power or force?
With this understanding, how valuable is the trait of virtue?
15.

Read 2 Peter 1:5.

In this verse (and the verses

preceding it), we learn the qualities of a saint. We are told to
be diligent and have faith, but faith isn't enough. We must add
to it virtue. With the understanding that virtue is both moral

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goodness (purity) and power, how does this help you to better
understand the concept of virtue? In addition, we know that
Jesus Christ modeled this behavior for all of us. How do you
think that the Atonement was an example of virtue added to His
faith?
16.

You can continue to study more scriptures if you

like. What have you noticed about the connection between virtue
(as we understand it--purity, chastity, moral goodness) and
power? When you consider that Christ felt His virtue leaving Him
when He healed the woman with the issue of blood, how can you
suppose He felt when He performed the Atonement? How do you
think that having virtue empowered Him to perform this great
work--His life's duty?
17.

How do you suppose that virtue might also help

and bless you?

Parables
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the Parables,
then study these parables following the instructions given in
the Appendix. The parables included in Luke 8 are:

The parable of the sower--Luke 8:4-15

Candle under a bushel--Luke 8:16-18

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Miracles
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the miracles,
then study these miracles following the instructions given in
the Appendix.
The miracles included in Luke 8 are:

Christ calms the raging sea--Luke 8:22-25

Christ casts out "legion"--Luke 8:26-36

Christ heals Jairus' daughter--Luke 8:41-42,

Christ heals the woman with an issue of blood--

49-56

Luke 8:43-48

Christ--The Master Teacher
Christ is the great exemplar. One of the things He modeled
for us was how to teach. We will study a portion of Luke 8 to
see how Christ took every opportunity for a teaching moment. As
you study this, you'll not only learn more about Christ, but how
you might be able to apply this principle to your own life to be
a teacher and example to others.
1.

Read Luke 8:19-21. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

Instead of looking at the principles that Christ

teaches (or at least delving into them), we will study how

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Christ is teaching them.
3.

What is the context of this scripture? What was

Christ's following like at this time?
4.

What parables did He tell the people? What is the

main idea of these parables? What do you think that the Savior
has been trying to teach the people? Do you think that all of
the people who were crowding Christ were truly committed to Him?
Do you think that they understood His divine role? Do you think
that they understood that they could take on His name, and be
His people?
5.

With this knowledge, now read Luke 8:19-21.

Christ has been spending quite a bit of time trying to teach the
people how to be His disciples--His brethren. Now who arrives on
the scene?
6.

When He understood that His mother and brothers

were outside of this vast throng of people, did Jesus dismiss
everyone right away? What did He say instead? Why do you think
that He said this? Do you think that He was being literal--that
He was ignoring His mother and brothers? Then, what did it have
to do with what He was trying to teach the people, in general?
Why do you think that Jesus did this?
7.

How do you think that after teaching the earlier

parables to this crowd of people, Christ's taking the

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opportunity to tell them who his "mother and brethren" are might
have helped them to understand the kind of relationship that
Christ wants with us?
8.

Imagine if Christ had said this without His

mother and brethren seeking Him. The message would have had
importance, but do you think that the real meaning of it would
have been felt the same way? How do you think these
circumstances helped Jesus to teach the message He wanted the
group to understand?
9.

Now, think of your own life. Perhaps you are a

parent teaching a child. Or a neighbor hoping to share the
gospel with others. How do you think that being open to the
Spirit and capitalizing on our circumstances will help us to be
effective teachers? For example, if you find that your child has
taken a candy bar from the store, how might teaching in the
moment be a particularly effective way to explain to them about
stealing?
10.

What do you suppose you must do in order to be

aware of the teaching opportunities that come your way? What can
you do to prepare to be blessed with the right words, questions,
and relationships to make when you teach in these impromptu
situations?

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Luke 9

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
9.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do pause

to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider writing

impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 9:1-6
1.

What power did the Savior give to the apostles

when he called them?
2.

What did Christ send them out to do?

3.

Notice the special instructions given in verse 3.

Why do you think that the Savior is telling them this? Why is it

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so important for the apostles to worry solely about the work
rather than their monetary needs?
4.

How do you think that this instruction applies to

current standards for apostles and missionaries? How do you
think that it might aid in performing the work of the Lord?
5.

What did the apostles finally begin to do?

Luke 9:7-9
1.

Who was Herod the tetrarch? (Use the footnotes to

help find your answer, if necessary.)
2.

Why do you think that Herod was so worried about

what the Savior was doing?
3.

Did Herod know Jesus? Do you think that Herod

understood who Jesus was?

Luke 9:10-17
1.

When the apostles returned to Christ, where did

they seek to go?
2.

Were they able to go to a private, solitary

place? What happened instead?
3.

As the day neared an end, what did the apostles

suggest the people do? What was Christ's answer to their
suggestion?

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4.

What was the miracle that followed?

5.

Why do you think that Christ performed this

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miracle?

Luke 9:18-22
1.

In verse 18, what does the Savior ask the

disciples?
2.

How do the apostles answer?

3.

Think about the situation; what had the Savior

just done for the multitude of 5,000? Yet, did many of them
understand that He was the Son of God?
4.

Notice what the people told Herod. Did people

realize who Jesus was? Why do you think that so many people were
confused?
5.

Yet, there were some who understood Christ's true

identity. Why do you think that the apostles and committed
disciples knew that Jesus was the Christ?
6.

What prophecy does the Savior give the apostles?

How do you think that this prophecy--that Christ will be
rejected, judged, and killed (and resurrected)--relates to the
lack of understanding that so many have of Christ's identity?

Luke 9:23-27

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1.

What must we do if we want to follow Christ?

2.

What do you think that Christ means by denying

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ourselves and taking up our crosses daily? Why do you think that
following Christ requires such a sacrifice?
3.

What is the benefit for following the Savior?

4.

What can you do to follow Him?

Luke 9:28-36
1.

What takes place in these verses?

2.

What happened on the Mount of Transfiguration?

Why do you think that Jesus took Peter, James, and John with
Him?
3.

What witness did they receive during this event?

Luke 9:37-42
1.

After the experience on the Mount of

Transfiguration, who approached the Savior?
2.

Were the other disciples able to heal this man's

son? Why not? Recall that at the beginning of the chapter, the
apostles had been called to preach and heal (see Luke 9:2).
What, exactly prevented the apostles from doing so?
3.

What did Jesus say to the apostles who hadn't

been able to perform the healing?

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How can we refrain from being faithless and

perverse, and thus be able to do all that the Lord has required
us to do?

Luke 9:43-45
1.

How did the people feel about Christ's power?

2.

While they "wondered," what did the Savior tell

them? Did they understand what He said? Why do you suppose that
they were unable to understand?

Luke 9:46-48
1.

What did the apostles (or at least one of them)

then begin to wonder?
2.

What did Christ then do and teach in response to

this thought?

Luke 9:49-50
1.

What did John tell the Savior?

2.

What does Christ say in return?

3.

Why do you think that Christ had no problem with

this other person healing--one who hadn't been "called and set
apart" to do so?
4.

What does Christ teach in response to John's

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statement that they had forbidden this man to heal? Why do you
think that Christ says this?

Luke 9:51-62
1.

When preparing to go back to Jerusalem, what did

Jesus tell His disciples that His purpose was in coming to the
earth?
2.

How do you think that Jesus accomplished this?

3.

While traveling back to Jerusalem, Jesus met

three different people; what did He teach them? What is the
general tone of these teachings?
4.

What do you think that Christ means in verse 58?

5.

How can this help you to be a better disciple of

60? 62?

Jesus Christ?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
Near the end of Luke 9, we read of three experiences Christ
has with some of the people who are trying to decide if they
will follow Him. We will study these examples and what Christ
teaches them while keeping in mind the Atonement. We will apply

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what Christ teaches to the Atonement to see what we can learn
about His infinite and eternal sacrifice and our relationship
with Him.
1.

Read Luke 9:57-62. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What did the man say to the Lord in verse 57?

What do you suppose are the intentions of this proclamation? Do
you think that he understood what he was saying?
3.

What is the Savior's response? Why do you think

that the Lord answered this way? Do you think that the man knew
what would be required of such discipleship? What does this
teach us about following Christ?
4.

Now, think of verse 58 in relation to the

Atonement. Think of the garden of Gethsemane, suffering on the
cross, and dying. When Christ performed the Atonement, where did
He go? Why did He choose to suffer in such a way and descend
below all? What was always His number one priority?
5.

To find out more about following Christ, look up

the footnote in Luke 9:57. Read Matthew 8:19. You will notice
that this is essentially the same scripture. Look to the
footnote for Matthew 8:19.
6.

Read 2 Nephi 31:10-13. According to Nephi, what

does the Savior invite us to do? How do we choose to follow

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Christ? We know that Christ kept all of the commandments, and in
order to follow Him, we must do the same. How did Christ keep
the commandments in completing the Atonement? Would Christ be a
worthwhile person to follow and commit to without the Atonement?
7.

In 2 Nephi 31:11, what are we encouraged to do?

How does the Atonement play a role in our ability to repent and
be baptized? According to verse 12, what is the blessing of
being baptized? When we follow Christ, what will we do?
8.

Read 2 Nephi 31:13. Notice, this is the baptismal

covenant. We choose to 1) follow the Son; 2) repent; and 3) take
on the name of Christ. Again, think of this in terms of the
Atonement. Would we be able to make covenants without the
Atonement performed by the Savior? Notice the blessings we
receive when we are baptized. What does the Atonement, and
choosing to follow the Savior empower us to be able to do?
9.

There have been many good examples and prophets

over the ages--from all religions and walks of life. But have
any of these performed an Atonement that will enable us to speak
with a tongue of angels and reenter the presence of God? Why do
you think that the Atonement plays such a key role in our choice
to follow the Savior?
10.

Turn back to the footnotes of Matthew 8:19. Read

Moroni 7:11. What does this scripture teach us about following

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Christ? Think about the Atonement, too. What impressions do you
have between following Christ and His Atonement?
11.
8:19,

Again, referring to the footnotes of Matthew

read Doctrine and Covenants 4:3. What does this verse

teach us about following Christ? Think about the Atonement. What
do you suppose was Christ's motivation behind His work? Why,
ultimately, did He do it? How do you think that remembering
Christ's Atonement when we choose to serve God will sustain us
when the work we are required to do becomes difficult for us to
complete? Was the Atonement an easy thing for Jesus to do? How
can this example help strengthen us as we choose to serve the
Lord?
12.

Turn back to the footnotes of Matthew 8:19. Read

Doctrine and Covenants 56:2. What do we learn about following
Christ from this verse? What relationship does it have with the
Atonement?
13.

Now, turn back to Luke 9:59-60. What did Jesus

ask another person to do? We have been reading a lot about
following Christ. What does following Christ mean to you?
14.

What was the reply given to the Lord?

15.

What did Jesus say in response to this man's

request? What do you think that He meant by it? How should we
prioritize following the Lord and doing His work? Again, think

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of the Atonement. How do you suppose that Jesus prioritized
this--His mission?
16.

Finally, a third person offered to follow Christ,

but then told him that first, he would bid farewell to those at
home. What did Jesus say in response? What do you think that the
Lord meant by this?
17.

For insight, turn to the footnote: Doctrine and

Covenants 133:14-15. How does this help you to better understand
what Christ teaches in Luke?
18.

Think about the Atonement. When Christ performed

this great task, do you think that He was "looking back"? How do
you suppose that "looking back" would have impeded His ability
to perform the great and last sacrifice?
19.

Think about the Atonement now in a different way.

It empowers us. How do you suppose that through understanding
the Atonement and the part it plays in your life can help
empower you, so that you follow Christ with your eye single to
Him, not looking back? How does the Atonement strengthen your
faith and ability?
20.

As you can see, we can learn more about Christ,

the Atonement, and even ourselves when we study the scriptures
this way. Write down any other impressions you have.

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Miracles
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the miracles,
then follow the instructions given in the Appendix.
The miracles included in Luke 9 are:

Christ heals those that need healing--Luke 9:11

Christ feeds the five thousand--Luke 9:10-17

Christ heals the son afflicted with a devil--Luke

9:37-42

Pattern--Blocking Revelation
The scriptures are full of patterns. Here we will study one
together. This pattern is like a set of instructions. While most
of the patterns in the scriptures teach us what we should be
doing, here we will find a pattern that happens when we don't do
as we ought. This pattern shows us how we might be blocking
ourselves from receiving knowledge and revelation. This pattern,
while negative, can still be helpful in our own quest for
knowledge and added revelation.
1.

Read Luke 9:43-45. Consider the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What is the context of this situation? (Scan

through Luke 9:37-42.)
3.

How did the people feel about Jesus? What does

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Jesus then say to his disciples?
4.

Notice the phrase at the beginning of verse 44.

What is it? How do you think that this could be a part of
receiving revelation? (For now, don't pay attention to what the
Savior said afterwards, just what He instructed them to do.)
What do you think that the Savior meant by this? How do you
think that you can let the words of the Lord "sink down into
your ears"?
5.

According to verse 45, did the disciples

understand? Do you think that they "let it sink down"? Because
of their lack of understanding, what happened?
6.

Because the true meaning of what the Lord was

revealing was hidden from these disciples, what were they unable
to do?
7.

What did the disciples do about it? How do you

suppose that fear interrupted their ability to understand?
8.

Notice the way that things went wrong: 1) they

understood not; 2) it was hidden from them; 3) they perceived it
not; 4)they feared to ask of Him.
9.

What do you suppose the difference is between 1

and 3? How do you think that 2 leads to 3? Finally, when they
realize that they don't understand, how do they feel? Is fear or
shame an acceptable emotion when it comes to receiving

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revelation? What do you suppose would have been a better thing
for them to do?
10.

Because of the way that this pattern played out,

did the disciples ever really learn what the Savior was trying
to teach them? What can you learn about receiving revelation and
understanding the word of the Lord from this pattern?

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Luke 10

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
10.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 10:1-16
1.

As chapter 10 opens, who does the Lord appoint?

What does He send them to do?
2.

What does Jesus say as He sends them out? Why do

you think He says this?
3.

What is the main thing that these witnesses of

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Christ are asked to do? Why do you think that the Lord would
have them do these things?
4.

When we choose to hear the voice of the prophets,

who are we also accepting?

Luke 10:17-20
1.

After returning to the Lord, what did the seventy

2.

What other power did Christ give to them?

3.

What did Jesus tell them that they should be

say?

rejoicing in? Why do you think that this is so?

Luke 10:21-22
1.

Why does the Savior give thanks to His Father?

What do you think that Jesus means by this?
2.

Why do you think that Jesus is happy that these

things have been hidden by those who think they are wise and
prudent in their hearts?
3.

How can we truly come to know Christ and get a

testimony? How do you think that you can receive revelation?

Luke 10:23-24
1.

What did Christ turn to His disciples and say?

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What do you suppose that He meant by verse 24?

Can you think of prophets and kings who might have desired to
live at Christ's time, see the miracles He performed, and
received words from His mouth?

Luke 10:25-37
1.

What did the lawyer who came up to Christ ask?

What was he trying to do to the Savior?
2.

How does the Savior answer?

3.

What question does this lawyer ask in verse 29?

4.

What does Jesus tell him in response? Why do you

think that Jesus teaches the parable of the good Samaritan to
answer this man's question?
5.

How does this parable help you to understand who

your neighbor is?

Luke 10:38-42
1.

Whose house did Jesus go to?

2.

Who else was at the house?

3.

What happened as Jesus was having dinner at

Martha's house?

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Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Relationship with Christ
In Luke 10, the Savior calls, empowers, and instructs the
seventy. We will study this experience to see how it relates to
and what it can teach us about the Atonement.
1.

Read Luke 10:1-16. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

Why has Jesus called and set apart this group of

people? Why do you think that He calls people to aid in His
work?
3.

What does the Lord tell them about material

goods? Why do you think that they need to forget about their
material needs as they go forth and do His work? How do you
suppose that the appearances of the seventy--especially if they
were dressed in fine clothing or appearing showy in some way-might get in the way of the message that they were trying to
teach?
4.

In verse 5, what is it that the Lord wants them

to proclaim to each house? What do you think that Christ means
by peace? Think of what peace means--in terms of the Atonement.
How does the Atonement bring us peace? How do you think that
God's peace might differ from the worldly notion of peace?

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Notice the footnote in verse 5 for peace. Read

the reference in 1 Samuel 25:6. What does this teach us about
peace or about the assignment given to the servants of God?
6.

Now, go to the Topical Guide and search through

the references under the entry "Peace of God." Take your time to
search through the scriptures that strike you. What have you
learned about God's peace? What does it have to do with the
Atonement? Do you think that we can have God's peace without the
Atonement? Why/why not?
7.

What does Jesus tell the seventy to do when they

are received by households and cities and then given food to eat
and drink? Why do you think that receiving such hospitality from
others is something that the Savior would have them do? Wouldn't
this be a burden on the people?
8.

I'm not sure if there is a connection, but

consider it...what is the connection between accepting service
and help from others? Did Christ accept any kind of sustenance
as He performed the Atonement? Why do you think it is Christlike to receive service? What does it teach each of us?
9.

In verse 9, what does the Savior teach the

seventy to do for the sick? Why do you think that the Savior and
His servants so often healed the sick?What do you think the
relationship between the Atonement and physical healing could

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be? What does this teach us about the Savior?
10.

Now read what Jesus instructs the disciples to do

to those who reject Him. What is the consequence? Are these
people simply left alone? Do they still enjoy the blessings that
those who accept God and His servants experience? What happens
instead?
11.

Think about this in terms of the Atonement. If

the Atonement can save those who choose to repent, what happens
to those who do not choose to repent? Can we choose not to
accept Christ's Atonement and resist the consequences of sin?
What is the relationship between the negative consequences of
sin and the Atonement?
12.

Finally, in verse 16, what do we learn is the

connection between the accepting the servants of God and
accepting God himself? In other words, can we accept God while
rejecting His servants? Why do you think that this is so?
13.

To understand this concept better, turn to

Doctrine and Covenants 84:36-38. When we receive the servants of
God, whom will we also receive? When we receive Jesus, whom will
we also receive? When we receive Heavenly Father, what will we
inherit? As you ponder this succession, think of the role that
the Atonement plays in it. What is the message that the servants
of God deliver? What does it have to do with the Atonement? Is

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their message even a possibility without the Atonement?
14.

As we receive the message of the prophets, we

will also receive Christ. What does receiving Christ have to do
with the Atonement? Why do you think that the Atonement is an
essential part of this entire process?
15.

Now, think about receiving Christ, then receiving

Heavenly Father. Is there any way to bypass the servants of God
(who preach the gospel of repentance--the Atonement) and Christ
(who actually performed the Atonement) and instead receive only
God? Is there any way for us to be united with Him again so that
we can inherit all that He has? What separates us from our
Heavenly Father in the first place? When it comes to knowing
Heavenly Father and returning to Him, why is the Atonement such
an important part of the process?
16.

As you consider what you have learned--about the

duty of the servants of God and its connection with the
Atonement--how can you better hear them, be healed by them, and
serve them? How do you think that this will strengthen your
relationship with our Father in Heaven and our Savior?

Scripture Chain--The Blessing of Proclaiming Peace
In Luke 10:5, we learn that the seventy were told to say
"Peace" unto the people that they taught. I'm not sure why, but

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the concept is very striking to me. There are a few scriptures
that come to mind when I read this scripture, and I want to
connect them with a scripture chain. Hopefully, as we read
through these scriptures, we will find added meaning to the
reference in Luke and/or the concept of the blessing of
proclaiming peace.
1.

Read Luke 10:5. What did Jesus command the

seventy to say to every house they entered? Was this message
preserved only to those who believed in Christ? To whom was the
message of peace supposed to be given?
2.

What do you think that the Savior means by peace?

Why do you think that this was the message that the Savior
wanted the seventy to proclaim to every house?
3.

Imagine this task. Do you think that it would

have been easy? Do you think that everyone was receptive to the
message? What do you think were some of the difficulties that
may have arisen? Do you think that there were times that,
despite the message that these servants of God delivered, they
had a hard time feeling peace (think of examples--like Alma and
Amulek who were thrown into prison; Abinadi, who was martyred;
Paul, who was thrown from a ship; Stephen, who was stoned to
death). Though the message is peace, is the calling as a servant
of God who proclaims this message an easy one to accomplish?

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Have you been on a mission? What were some of the difficulties
you faced? Though there are many difficulties associated with
proclaiming the gospel, the scriptures teach us of the blessings
in store for the servants of God.
4.

Read Isaiah 52:7. If you wish to create a

scripture chain, then in the margins of your scriptures (near
Luke 10:5) write, "Isaiah 52:7--the blessings of publishing
peace,"

According to Isaiah, how does the Lord feel about those

who "publish peace"? In what ways do missionaries and other
servants of God "publish peace"?
5.

Mark and read 1 Nephi 13:37. (Include this

reference in the margins of Isaiah 52:7 if you wish to create a
scripture chain.) What blessing is promised to those who seek to
bring forth Zion? What does building Zion have to do with
"publishing peace" and the work that the seventy

were doing in

Luke 10? Think about this blessing: having the gift of the Holy
Ghost. Why do you suppose this is a worthwhile reward for the
difficult effort of missionary work? How do you suppose that the
gift and power of the Holy Ghost will help us to endure? What is
the gift of endurance? How does the Lord see those who publish
peace? What does this mean to you? Is it something that you seek
for your own life? Why/why not?
6.

Mark and read Luke 2:8-14. (Include this

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reference in the margins of 1 Nephi 13:37 if you wish to create
a scripture chain.) Here, we get an example of an angel
"publishing peace." To whom does the angel appear? What is the
first thing that this angel tells the shepherds (not) to do?
What kind of message did the angel have for the shepherds? How
did Christ's birth fulfill the promise of good tidings and of
great joy? Did this proclamation mean that the world would stop
warring; that conflict, difficulty, and contention in this life
would completely cease? What do you think is meant by "peace"?
7.

Mark and read John 16:33. (Include this reference

in the margins of Luke 2:8-14 if you wish to create a scripture
chain.) What does the Savior teach the apostles about peace? How
does this help you to understand the message that Jesus
commanded the servants of God to give? How do you think the
world, at large, would be affected if they sought peace through
Christ--rather than through worldly means?
8.

In the margins of John 16:33, be sure to write a

reference to the beginning of the scripture chain: Luke 10:5.
9.

Often, our current prophets help to expand the

understanding of the scriptures. You may wish to write a quote
on a post-it, or type it in a small font and affix a quote in
your scriptures. I have included this quote from Quentin L.
Cook's talk in the April 2013 conference: "We all long for

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peace. Peace is not just safety or lack of war, violence,
conflict, and contention. Peace comes from knowing that the
Savior knows who we are and knows that we have faith in Him,
love Him, and keep His commandments, even and especially amid
life's devastating trials and tragedies," (Quentin L. Cook,
"Personal Peace: The Reward of Righteousness," General
Conference, April 2013)(http://www.lds.org/general-conference/
2013/04/personal-peace-the-reward-of-righteousness). Ponder this
quote, and think about the message that Jesus told the seventy
to deliver to the people. What is it that Christ really wants us
to know?

Parable--The Good Samaritan
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the parables,
then study these parables using the instructions given in the
Appendix.
Luke 10 includes the following parable:

The parable of the Good Samaritan--Luke 10:30-37

I've Read This Before...How to Make the Scriptures--That
You've Read Time and Time Again--Come to Life
Recently, Elder Holland gave (another) amazing talk. In it,
he related a story from the Bible. I don't know about you, but

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when I listen to Elder Holland retell these stories from the
scriptures, I'm amazed. They touch me more deeply. I feel more.
I learn more.

Elder Holland is a wonderful teacher and speaker. And I
think that we can learn from the way he reads these stories to
us. We can learn how to read them ourselves, and perhaps the
stories that we're already so familiar with will touch us more
deeply. Perhaps we'll feel more, learn more.

So...this assignment is a little different than other
assignments, but we'll give it a try. Just so you know, the
story that we're going to retell a la Elder Holland is Luke
10:38-42.

Before we begin our retelling of the story, we will look at
Elder Holland's example: (Just so you know, he is not telling
the same story that we'll retell...that would be cheating! We're
just going to pattern our own "retelling" of a bible story after
the way that he has done it in conference.) Okay...so here goes.
In the talk, "Lord, I Believe" given by Elder Holland in the
April 2013 conference, he begins:

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"On one occasion Jesus came upon a group arguing vehemently
with His disciples. When the Savior inquired as to the cause of
the contention, the father of an afflicted child stepped
forward, saying he had approached Jesus' disciples for a
blessing for his son, but they were not able to provide it. With
the boy still gnashing his teeth, foaming from the mouth, and
thrashing on the ground in front of them, the father appealed to
Jesus with what must have been last-resort desperation in his
voice:

'If you canst do any thing,' he said, 'have compassion on
us, and help us.

'Jesus said unto him, If thou canst believe, all things are
possible to him that believeth.

'And straightway the father of the child cried out, and
said with tears, Lord I believe; help thou mine unbelief.' (Mark
9:22-24)"

Notice that Elder Holland begins by telling the story
rather simply, but in His own words. His language is descriptive
yet concise. Notice that he uses words like "vehemently" and

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"last-resort desperation." So, now, take a second to read
through Luke 10:38-42. Think of how you would retell this
story--a la Elder Holland. Set the scene. Use language that is
gripping and helps us to feel this story on a deeper level.
Begin by looking to the scriptures to see if you can find the
emotion that may be present in the story.

If you are having trouble with this, it may help to
establish a few facts. Outline the story. What you notice may
look something like this:

Jesus entered into a certain village

A woman named Martha received him into her

house...this also tells us a little bit about Martha--she has a
home, runs a home

She has the Savior as a guest in her house, so

she must have a relationship/friendship with Him; she believes
He is the Christ

Martha has a sister, Mary

Mary sat at Jesus' feet, listening to His word--

Mary also has a relationship/friendship with the Savior

Mary also believes in Christ

Martha is busy. She is "cumbered about much"

Martha is serving the Lord

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The work that Martha is doing is difficult, while

Mary is sitting down listening to Christ

Martha is bold. Though she is serving, she isn't

afraid to point out the obvious fact that she needs help and
Mary is just sitting there

Martha is also wondering why Jesus doesn't seem

to care that Mary is doing nothing to help

Jesus, calmly answers Martha

He calls her by name twice

He tells her that she is "careful" and

"troubled." The footnote indicates that careful = worried.

Jesus seems to be comforting her while correcting

Jesus does not send Mary to work He gently

her

counsels Martha

One thing is needful

Mary chose "that good part"

Jesus teaches Martha about prioritization: one

thing is needful and "that good part"

Yet, Jesus doesn't say that Martha should be

sitting listening at His feet, either

He doesn't deride what Martha's doing. Perhaps it

was best for her to serve and be patient as Mary listened to the

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Savior

Jesus isn't sexist. He doesn't banish either

woman to the kitchen

It is good for women to have personal

relationships with the Savior

You may notice other elements to this story. If you write
them in the outline style, it will help you to organize your
thoughts. It will also help you to think about the story
critically.

After creating the outline, begin to really imagine the
setting: the sounds, the smells, the temperature, the time of
day, how people must have been feeling, etc. Try to put yourself
in the shoes of each player in the story.

Now, begin by retelling this story by setting it up for
us--just as Elder Holland did. Perhaps it might go something
like this:

"As Jesus and His disciples went, traveling from town to
town in Israel, He came upon a certain village. While He had met
rejection and even scorn in many of the places he traveled, in

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this village, he was received by a woman, Martha, into her home.

Martha also had a sister at home, Mary, who sat at the
Savior's feet, humbly listening to the Him. We don't know what
He was teaching to Mary, but we know that she sat there intently
and "heard his word."

But in the background, Martha served.

As Martha was working to create a good experience for her
guests, we learn that she was, "cumbered about much." She was
serving the Lord in a very physical and immediate way. All why
her sister, Mary, sat there calmly listening to the Savior,
letting Martha serve.

This was not lost on Martha. As she served and prepared,
she noticed her sister, sitting. There was too much for one
woman to do. Finally, Martha boldly approached the Lord:

"Doest thou not care that my sister hath left me to serve
alone? Bid her therefore that she help me."

With loving concern, Jesus comforted Martha. "Martha,

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Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many things:" He
recognized her efforts and service. Yet He didn't send Mary into
the kitchen. Instead, He took the moment to teach Martha about
priorities and why it was perfectly fine for Mary to sit as
Martha served: "But one thing is needful: and Mary hath chosen
that good part, which shall not be taken away from her."

So...maybe your retelling of the story went like this. I
don't know. Your story doesn't have to be like mine, and I
hesitated including it because I want you to work on your own,
but it is in here for an example. As you can see, even retelling
it in your own words can add interest and feeling to the story.
But, as we know, Elder Holland doesn't stop there.

Let's go back to Elder Holland's example:

"The man's initial conviction, by his own admission, is
limited. But he has an urgent, emphatic desire in behalf of his
only child. We are told that its good enough for a beginning.
'Even if ye can no more than desire to believe,' Alma declares,
'let this desire work in you, even until ye believe.' With no
other hope remaining, the father asserts what faith he has and
pleads with the Savior of the world, 'If thou cast do any thing,

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have compassion on us, and help us.' I can hardly read those
words without weeping. The plural noun us is obviously used
intentionally. This man is saying, in effect, 'Our whole family
is pleading. Our struggle never ceases. We are exhausted. Our
son falls into the water. He falls into the fire. He is
continually in danger, and we are continually afraid. We don't
know where else to turn. Can you help us? We will be grateful
for anything--a partial blessing, a glimmer of hope, some small
lifting of the burden carried by this boy's mother every day of
her life."

"If thou canst do any thing," spoken by the father, comes
back to him 'If thou canst believe,' spoken by the Master.

'Straightway,' the scripture says--not slowly nor
skeptically nor cynically but 'straightway'--the father cries
out in his unvarnished parental pain, 'Lord, I believe; help
thou mine unbelief.' In response to a new and still partial
faith, Jesus heals the boy, almost literally raising him from
the dead, as Mark describes the incident."

Elder Holland recounts the facts of the story with
explanation, feeling, and application. As he retells the parts

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of the story, he likens the scriptures, and helps us to
understand how the characters in the story must have felt. We
begin to empathize with them as we really put ourselves in their
shoes. While Elder Holland doesn't retell every part of the
story, he does go through a lot of it again, emphasizing details
that help to transport us to the action.

How can you do the same? Read through the story in Luke
10:38-42 again. Read through your outline. Put yourself in
Martha's shoes, Mary's shoes, the Savior's shoes. Additionally,
keep in mind that Elder Holland is using this story to
illustrate a lesson. Think of the lesson that you want to draw
from the story of Martha, Mary and Jesus. For me, I want to draw
out the main lesson of prioritizing the "needful thing" and
choosing "that good part." In addition, there is an undercurrent
of charity that may also be taught in this story of Martha and
Mary.

With these ideas in mind, I will draw out points from the
story that will 1) help the reader really relate to the story;
2) illustrate the lesson that is being taught.

Now, take a second to do as Elder Holland does--help to

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bring this story more meaning and personal application by
likening the story. You will repeat aspects of the story, which
is okay. Do it, even if you feel like it is repetitive. I have
included my example of how I would proceed with the story.

Having a home of my own, and having "received" many people
into my own home, I can only imagine Martha's plight.
Entertaining guests is more than simply opening a door and
letting them inside. When you invite people into your home, you
want to create a positive experience for them. Additionally,
when you have invited a person into your home who is deeply
loved or highly esteemed, you don't just let them walk into a
house with an unswept floor, and unfluffed pillows. You tidy the
house, vacuum the floors, scrub the sinks, and maybe even light
a candle.

Martha didn't have any old guest over. It wasn't her mom,
long-time friend, boss, or priest. She was having the Savior
over. Can you imagine, having the very Redeemer over to your
home for a meal? How would you prepare? "Cumbered about much"
wouldn't come close to describe how I'd be madly scrubbing,
sweeping, and preparing.

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In addition to Martha's preparation of the home, I'm
supposing that she was preparing food. I doubt it would have
been cereal or some quick meal. Her guest was the Savior! She
probably combed through her pantry and cupboards, preparing her
best foods--vegetables, meat, bread. She would make sure that
the Savior (and most likely those who were with him) were
comfortable and well fed. Preparing for a meal is more than
simply cooking. She had to cook, find clean table linens, wash
dishes, tidy tables, and find places for people to sit. She
probably had to fetch water or build a fire. While I can't
imagine the specific things Martha had to do to prepare her home
for guests, I know what it's like to prepare my home for a
guest. In many ways, our homes are extensions of ourselves. When
someone comes over to my house, I want them to have the best
experience possible, and then forever equate me to an evening of
delectable food, comfortable ambience, and enriching
entertainment. I know that so much of a person's experience in
my home has to do with every detailed preparation that I
perform. And, we can't forget, Martha's guest was Jesus.

So, Martha served. All while her sister sat at Jesus' feet.

If Martha was anything like me, or most of us, she most

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likely noticed this "lack" of help long before she made mention
of it. Martha didn't know what the Savior was talking with Mary
about, nor did she have the luxury to know. Most likely, as she
rushed about, she caught snatches of conversation, and longed to
be a part of it--yet so many other demands required her
attention. Martha knew that her guest was the Savior, and who
would rather slave away over a hot stove than sit at His feet,
being filled Spiritually by His words? Yet work needed to be
done, and she was the only one to do it.

We know that this wasn't lost on Martha.

Her exasperation grew to a fever pitch. After all, Mary
isn't a guest. Shouldn't she be helping? Couldn't Mary see all
that Martha was doing? Martha knew that preparations needed to
be made, and she probably "saw" the rest of the night before her
eyes: a few minutes of rest to eat, but then back to the grind
of cleaning up after a meal. Back to work in the kitchen, while
everyone else enjoyed the pleasure of resting and a full
stomach.

Maybe there were pots boiling over, meat burning, and
vegetables getting mushy. Perhaps the table still needed to be

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set and gravy needed to be stirred. Whatever the case, she
finally made the embarrassing, yet justified, request to the
Savior. Martha needed Mary's help.

Martha approached the Savior, and let's not forget that
Mary was sitting there, too, and asked, "Lord, dost thou not
care that my sister hath left me to serve alone?"

Martha wasn't

only feeling overwhelmed, she felt unappreciated. She then
followed with the request, "bid her therefore that she help me."
Martha didn't ask Mary for help. She didn't accept the fact that
maybe she could scale down. Instead, she approached the Savior
with exasperation.

Imagine Mary, sitting there; how embarrassing would it be
to be 'called out' like this? Surely she nervously fidgeted, and
even motioned to get up. Isn't a woman's place in the kitchen?
Martha always seems to take care of everything. Mary loves the
Savior, too, but how is that to be believed when she is just
lazily sitting here chatting with Him?

The Savior, always wise, neither banished Mary nor ignored
Martha's plea and offering of service.

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He calmly spoke to Martha, calling her by name: "Martha,
Martha, thou art careful and troubled about many things:" The
Savior recognized her sacrifices. He addressed them in a simple
sentence of comfort and validation. Yet, He didn't acquiesce. He
gently explained, "But one thing is needful: and Mary hath
chosen that good part,"

Although all of the things that Martha had done were
appreciated, only one was needful. Though it may have been
difficult for Martha to notice this, many of the extravagant
preparations she had been making weren't quite needful. The
Savior doesn't mention whether or not it would have been more
important for Martha to have joined Mary at His feet, but we
know that Mary had chosen to be exactly where she should be. The
Lord refused to have her do otherwise.

So...here we are. The story is fleshed out. It feels real.
We can understand the emotions that Martha was feeling and what
Mary was feeling. We are really putting ourselves into this
situation, and the story is coming alive. We could end here, and
that is totally acceptable, but Elder Holland seems to take this
one step further. He extrapolates a few lessons; he mentions a
few observations. Because we have retold this story twice (first

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for facts, second for analysis), the mind is ripe for
application. Let's see how Elder Holland finishes.

"Observation number one regarding this account is that when
facing the challenge of faith, the father asserts his strength
first and only then acknowledges his limitation. His initial
declaration is affirmative and without hesitation: 'Lord, I
believe.' I would say to all who wish for more faith, remember
this man! In moments of fear or doubt or troubling times, hold
the ground you have already won, even if that ground is limited.
In the growth we all have to experience in mortality, the
spiritual equivalent of this boy's affliction or this parent's
desperation is going to come to all of us. When those moments
come and issues surface, the resolution of which is not
immediately forthcoming, hold fast to what you already know and
stand strong until additional knowledge comes. It was of this
very incident, this specific miracle, that Jesus said, 'If ye
have faith as a grain of mustard seed, ye shall say unto this
mountain, Remove hence to yonder place; and it shall remove; and
nothing shall be impossible unto you.' The size of your faith or
the degree of your knowledge is not the issue--it is the
integrity you demonstrate toward the faith you do have and the
truth you already know.

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The second observation is a variation of the first. When
problems come and questions arise, do not start your quest for
faith by saying how much you do not have, leading as it were
with your 'unbelief.' That is like trying to stuff a turkey
through the beak! Let me clear on this point: I am not asking
you to pretend to faith you do not have. I am asking you to be
true to the faith you do have. Sometimes we act as if an honest
declaration of doubt is a higher manifestation of moral courage
than is an honest declaration of faith. It is not! So let us all
remember the clear message of this scriptural account: Be as
candid about your questions as you need to be; life is full of
them on one subject or another. But if you and your family want
to be healed, don't let those questions stand in the way of
faith working its miracle."

While Elder Holland doesn't "retell" the story another
time, He does take the moment to extrapolate and explain the
lessons he felt the story teaches. After all, this is why he was
telling the story--we are supposed to learn something from it.

Consider the story of Martha and Mary. As you have been
"retelling" the story, what are the lessons that stand out to

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you? For me, I'm thinking about charity/prioritization and "that
good part." Take the time to jot down a few impressions. Write
down your main ideas and observations. Find ways to support what
you're thinking from the story. You might also find other
scriptures that support your observations. Notice also, how
Elder Holland doesn't really need to retell the story because we
are on the same page as he is when he lists his observations.
Find a way to succinctly and very directly address the
observations you have. This is where we can really learn
something from the story and apply it to our own lives.

Here's what I might write:

First observation--is regarding the nature of service and
how easily we become "cumbered about." How do we prioritize our
service? In this story,

Martha is "cumbered about much

serving." Which is a good thing, right? We are taught to be
"anxiously engaged in a good cause." Is this not exactly what
Martha was doing? Of course, when the Savior gently rebukes her,
reminding Martha that Mary had, in fact, chosen "that good
part," we see that perhaps busying ourselves--even if it is in
the name of service--might not always be the "good cause" that
we should be anxiously engaged in. In other words, even though

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Mary wasn't cumbered about, she was anxiously engaged in the
good cause of listening to the words of the Savior at His feet.
In Doctrine and Covenants 66:10, the Lord counsels, "Seek not to
be cumbered." When our lives are too busy with seemingly good
things, we might not have the ability to see what is truly
important. We might find ourselves simply anxiously engaged,
rather than anxiously engaged in a good cause.

Sometimes it is hard to tell if we're doing the right
thing, but I have a feeling that the Spirit will let us know. If
we are cumbered about much, and it is not needful, we might miss
the whisperings of the Spirit. We then are filled with
resentment--to the point where we might find ourselves asking,
"Lord, dost thou not care that my sister hath left me to serve
alone?"

The purpose in Martha's choice to serve was born out of
love. I don't wish to diminish her faith because she was an
intelligent, faithful, and hard-working woman. She received
Christ into her home. Those who receive Christ receive His
Father, and all that His Father hath (Doctrine and Covenants
84:36). Martha is a good, loving woman. But, like any of us, she
got a little carried away in her good deeds. Perhaps her vision

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or expectations became a little too ambitious, and this blinded
her from the ability to see what was good in the present. Don't
we do that? At Christmas-time, don't we fill our calendars with
good activities, empty our pocketbooks buying good presents,
have expectations of sugar-plum fairies, toys, stockings, homemade treats, perfectly decorated tree, Christmas Nativities,
twinkle lights, and more...until we get to the point that we're
stressed and complaining about Christmas? We often get so
cumbered with these good things that we lose vision of the
needful thing, and instead of feeling sustained, validated, and
sanctified, we are weary and complaining to our Master.

The second observation is a variation of the first. In most
situations, although many things might be good, only one is
"needful." The needful thing, that good part, may differ.
Perhaps for Martha, the needful thing was for her to serve. Yet
for Mary it was to sit at the Savior's feet. If it was needful
for Martha to serve and for Mary not to serve, then Martha could
scale back and instead of living up to some perceived
expectation, simply offer up her best and be confident that the
Lord overlooks our shortcomings while blessing our efforts? The
Lord doesn't tell Martha what she should have been doing.
Instead, He only tells her that Mary had chosen what she needed

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to choose. We have the power to choose for ourselves, and the
Spirit will guide us in all circumstances to find the one thing
that is needful.

I love this because often circumstances require different
possibilities for different people. And we learn, from the
Savior Himself, that when we do find what is needful--that good
part--it will not be taken from us. We will be blessed,
sustained, and sanctified.

So...I hope you've tried this for yourself. When you find a
story that is ultra-familiar, instead of thinking,
"Booorrring...I've read this before," see if you can be like
Elder Holland. Use your knowledge of the scripture to your
advantage to dig deeper, learn more, liken the scriptures, and
relate it in a way that will benefit others.

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Luke 11

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
11.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 11:1-13
1.

As Luke 11 opens, what do the disciples ask Jesus

to teach them?
2.

What is the pattern of prayer that Jesus relates

to the disciples?
3.

As a part of His sermon on prayer, what does the

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Savior tell the disciples? Why do you think that He tells them
this parable?
4.

What other advice does the Lord give to the

disciples?
5.

Why do you think that it is important to know

that if we ask, seek, and knock, then we will receive answers?
6.

How can you improve your prayers?

Luke 11:14-26
1.

What happened when the Savior cast out a devil?

2.

How did the people think that Christ performed

the work of casting out devils? Why do you think that they
thought this?
3.

Did Christ heal through Beelzebub? What was the

source of Christ's power?
4.

As you read through the discourse on casting out

spirits, what strikes you? How do you think that you can keep
your body from being a "house" to unclean, evil spirits? Which
power should you look to --not only to drive an evil spirit away
but to keep it out?

Luke 11:27-36
1.

A certain woman comes to the Lord and praises

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"the womb that bare" Him. What does He say in response?
2.

Why do you think that the Lord says this?

3.

Keep in mind this concept: "Blessed are they that

hear the word of God, and keep it," as you read through the rest
of the block.
4.

Which prophet does the Lord compare Himself to?

5.

If the people had "heard the word of God" would

they have needed a "sign" to validate Jesus' divinity?
6.

How do you think that keeping our eyes single to

the Lord will help us to "hear the word of God, and keep it"?

Luke 11:37-54
1.

As the Savior spoke, who besought Him?What did

the Pharisee invite the Savior to do?
2.

When the Savior came, what happened that caused

the Pharisee to marvel?
3.

What does Christ say in response to the Pharisee?

4.

What do you think that the Savior means by these

accusations? Why do you think that Jesus has a major problem
with hypocrisy?
5.

As you consider the Pharisees, how does their

hypocrisy affect them? How do you think that their hypocrisy
affects the church, at large?

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How did the Pharisees and others feel about what

Christ said? What did they want to do to Him?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
Throughout the New Testament, we see various incidents
between Christ and the Pharisees. Most of them result in a
negative impression of the Pharisees. In fact, it would be safe
to say that Jesus wasn't happy with them. We're going to study
one of the reasons why, and see what it can teach us about the
Atonement.
1.

Read Luke 11:37-44. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

Why was the Pharisee marveling at the Savior?

During those times, many of the Pharisees kept traditions that
they considered to be pious, but weren't exactly requirements of
the law. These traditions were supposed to show dedication to
the gospel in that most of the traditions went above and beyond
what was required. This instance may have been a time when there
was no law proscribed, even though there was a tradition.
3.
in response?

When the Pharisee marveled, what did Christ say

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4.

What do you think that the Lord means by this?

5.

Why does the Lord call them fools?

6.

Instead of doing the things that had been

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commanded by the Lord, what did the Pharisees do? How did their
acts make them look clean on the outside, while the inside was
full of wickedness?
7.

What did the Pharisees give for a tithe? What is

the purpose of a tithe? Why do you think that they gave such
fine offerings?
8.

Yet, what did the Pharisees give up; which

commandment did they ignore?
9.

Think about what the Savior has said--up to this

point--with the Atonement in mind. Think about the alms that
Christ gave. Were they to be seen by all? Why did He perform the
work of the Atonement? Why did He heal? What was His motive?
What do you think will be His reward?
10.

Additionally, think of the religion that the

Pharisees purported to believe in. What did the rites and
commandments in the law of Moses point to? Whom did the
Pharisees claim to believe in? Yet did they recognize or follow
the Messiah?
11.

Do you think that the Pharisees understood the

law of Moses, what it represented, the Atonement, or the

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Messiah?
12.

Read Alma 25:15. To help you understand the

context, read the chapter heading. To whom does "they" in verse
15 refer?
13.

Why did they keep the law of Moses? How does this

differ from the Pharisees' attitude toward the law of Moses? How
do you suppose the Lamanites would have treated Christ if they
had been in his midst? Would they have been skeptical and
judgmental like the Pharisees? Do you think that they would have
been able to recognize their Savior? How do you think
understanding the law and its relationship with the Atonement
would have helped the Lamanites to recognize the Savior? How did
this lack of understanding blind the Pharisees who were Christ's
contemporaries?
14.

Read Alma 34:14. What does this verse teach us

about the purpose of the law? Do you think that the Pharisees
truly understood and accepted this concept?
15.

In verse Luke 11:43, what do we learn about how

the Pharisees worshipped? Did they worship humbly? Why do you
think that they loved the "uppermost seats"?
16.

What is the purpose of worship, of the law, of

the rites, covenants, and commandments that we keep? Do you
think that the Pharisees truly understood this?

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17.

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Read 2 Nephi 31:13. Do you think that the

Atonement can empower you if you do not come to Christ
genuinely, but are full of hypocrisy?
18.

What do you think that acting with hypocrisy says

about your feelings and attitudes toward the Atonement?
19.

Read Alma 4:10. During this time, a rash of

wickedness had infected the members of the church. What was its
effect on the church? What was its effect on their efforts to
spread the gospel?
20.

How do you think that the hypocrisy of the

Pharisees might have gotten in the way of the growth and
strength of the church in Jesus' time?
21.

How might hypocrisy now become a roadblock to the

growth of the Church? What can you do to keep from acting like
the Pharisees, and instead keep your inward vessel clean?

Parables
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the parables,
then study these parables following the instructions given in
the Appendix.
The following parables are included in Luke 11:

The friend who lends three loaves--Luke 11:5-8

We will study this parable together.

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1.

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Read Luke 11:5-8. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What is happening in this parable?

3.

What time of night is it when "you" (in the

parable) approach your friend's door to ask for three loaves of
bread?
4.

Why was the bread requested?

5.

What did your "friend" say at first?

6.

Yet, what did the friend eventually do?

7.

Why did the friend eventually give in?

8.

Before Jesus taught this parable, what was He

teaching to the group?
9.

What do you think that parable has to do with

prayer? Why do you suppose that Jesus is teaching us about
persistence in our prayers? How do you think that persistence in
your prayers can help you to obtain desired and needed
blessings?
10.

Notice the concept that Jesus teaches immediately

after this parable. How do you think that this parable helps to
illustrate what the Lord expects when He tells us to ask, seek,
and knock?

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Miracles
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the miracles,
then study these miracles following the instructions given in
the Appendix.
In Luke 11, the following miracles are included:

11:14-26

Christ heals a man possessed with a devil--Luke

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Luke 12

Analysis and Application
Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
12.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 12:1-12
1.

In verse1, how many people are gathered around

Jesus? What does this tell us about His following at the time?
Yet, think of what you know about His future. What will
eventually happen to Him? Do you think that the people who are

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crowding around the Savior are converted and committed to Him?
Why do you think that they are there?
2.

What does Jesus begin to teach to the disciples?

3.

What will happen to people who choose to deny

Christ? The Holy Ghost? Many of the people included in the
throng there might choose to deny Christ, but does this mean
that they have received a witness through the Holy Ghost and are
also denying Him? Why do you think that the Savior delineated
between these two sins while in this crowd?

Luke 12:13-21
1.

What was the question that a man in the company

asked Christ?
2.

How did Christ respond? Why did He respond this

3.

How do you think that this man's request showed

way?

his covetousness?
4.

What does the Savior teach us about what life

consists of?
5.

What do you think that He means by this? How have

you experienced this principle in your own life?
6.

What parable does Christ teach? How does it

illustrate the point He is trying to make?

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Luke 12:22-30
1.

As you read through these verses, what is the

main idea that the Savior is trying to teach to the disciples?
2.

Why do you think that He tells them that they

don't need to worry about some of their material needs?
3.

How do you think that this might be applicable in

our own lives? How might you be able to pay less attention to
material wants and instead put your efforts into building the
kingdom?

Luke 12:31-40
1.

What does the Lord instruct the disciples to

2.

In verse 33, we learn that by giving alms we will

seek?

procure, "a treasure in the heavens that faileth not"; what else
are we taught that does not "faileth"? How do you think that
this verse relates to charity?
3.

How do you think that you can set your heart on

the Kingdom of God and be blessed with charity?
4.
His point?

What parable does Jesus then teach to illustrate

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Luke 12:41-48
1.

Peter then asks the Lord a question. What do you

suppose that the answer would be?
2.

What does Jesus say in response to Peter?

3.

What are the two types of servants that Jesus

describes?
4.

Consider yourself--what kind of servant are you?

5.

Based on this answer Christ gave to Peter, what

do you think that the answer to Peter's question is?
6.

How does the teachings Jesus gave apply to you?

Luke 12:49-53
1.

What does Jesus teach about the reason He came to

the earth?
2.

How does this compare to many other instances

where we learn that Christ is the Prince of Peace? Why do you
think that He says this?
3.

Remember, there is a crowd of people surrounding

Him--so many that they "trode one upon another."

Why do you

think that Christ is giving this teaching at that time? How do
you suppose that this large crowd might be an object lesson?

Luke 12:54-59

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1.

What does the Lord then say to the people?

2.

What do you think that He means by this? How

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would you explain it in your own words?
3.

Why do you suppose that He is saying this?

4.

What do you think the people would have been

like--regarding Christ--had they learned to "discern the times"
as they could discern the weather?
5.

How do you think you can learn to discern the

times that we live in?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 12, the Lord gives the apostles advice on their
calling. Today, we will study this while keeping the Atonement
in mind.
1.

Read Luke 12:22-30. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

In verse 22, what instruction does the Lord give

to the disciples?
3.

Why does He give this instruction (see verse 23)?

What do you think that this means?
4.

Read through the rest of the verses. What

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examples does He give about ravens, lilies, and other creations
of God? What point is He trying to illustrate here?
5.

Now, think of this in terms of the Atonement. In

Jesus' life, and especially when performing the Atonement, did
Jesus follow His own advice? What evidence shows Jesus'
willingness to "take no thought for his life"?
6.

How might Christ's work performing the Atonement

have been affected if He would have been overly concerned about
some of His material and physical needs over His duties?
7.

How do you think that this can apply to you?

Cross-reference--Teaching the Gospel
In Luke 12, the Lord is teaching His disciples how to
fulfill their callings--including how to teach the gospel. We
will study one of the charges He gives them on how to teach and
find a cross-reference that helps illuminate this instruction
and how it can be done.
1.

Read Luke 12:12.

2.

What does Jesus teach the disciples about

teaching the gospel?
3.

How do you think that this is accomplished? What

do you think that it means to have the Holy Ghost teach you what
to say in the hour that you say it? Do you think that this

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means, for example, we can show up to a class that we need to
teach, without having prepared in any way, and then expect the
Holy Ghost to teach through us? Yet, why do you think that the
Lord wants us not to have what we'll teach "pre-meditated?" Why
do you suppose He wants the disciples to learn to really rely on
the Holy Ghost? How do you think that relying too much on
ourselves rather than on the Holy Ghost might inhibit our
ability to teach the gospel?
4.

For more insight on how we might possibly fulfill

this charge and effectively teach, let's look at a crossreference. Before I give you the reference I'm thinking of, can
you think of any reference that might shed light on how to share
the word of God, with power, in the way that Jesus is describing
here?
5.

Turn to Doctrine and Covenants 11:21. What does

this verse teach us about gospel instruction?
6.

What do you think that the Lord means by "declare

my word" in this verse? Why do you think He wants us to be
patient in this regard?
7.

Yet, this doesn't mean that we will never have

the chance to teach the gospel. Before we teach, what should we
seek to do?
8.

How do you think that you can obtain His word?

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What will happen as a result of obtaining the

word of God?
10.

How do you think that this blessing can help you

when you share the gospel? Teach a Sunday school lesson? Give a
talk? Teach your children?
11.

Often, does gospel teaching go according to your

lesson plan? Can you predict what your students will need to
know? When you are teaching your children, can you predict what
will come up on a daily basis? How do you think that you can
prepare to teach something that you won't know you must teach
until the moment strikes?
12.

How will having the Spirit guide you in the

moment to teach help you to effectively teach the gospel?

Parable
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the parables,
then study these parables following the instructions given in
the Appendix.

In Luke 12, the following parables are included:

The rich man who brought forth plentifully--Luke

The servants who watched for their Lord--Luke

12:13-21

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12:36-40
We will study one together.
1.

Read Luke 12:13-21. Ponder the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

Why did Jesus tell this parable? What was the

question He was asked? Were there other people around?
3.

To whom did Jesus tell this parable?

4.

What does this parable say?

5.

Who do you suppose the "rich man" is?

6.

What does the rich man do?

7.

What happened to this rich man and all of His

8.

What is the moral that Jesus gives at the end of

goods?

this parable? How do you think that this parable illustrates
what Jesus was trying to teach?
9.

How do you think that this parable answers the

question that was asked of the Savior?
10.

How does this parable illustrate the teaching

Christ gave in Luke 12:15?
11.

How do you think that you can apply this teaching

in your own life? How can you learn to lay up treasure in
heaven?

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Luke 13

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
13.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 13:1-5
1.

What does Jesus try to teach the people in these

2.

What do you think that Christ means by "except ye

verses?

repent, ye shall all likewise perish"?

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Luke 13:6-10
1.

What is the parable that Jesus teaches here?

2.

What do you think that this parable means? Why do

you think that Jesus taught it to the people?

Luke 13:11-17
1.

Who is introduced in verse 13? What do we learn

about this woman?
2.

What does the Lord do for this woman?

3.

How do the people in the synagogue react to the

miracle that occurred? Why do you think that they reacted this
way? What impression does this make on you? How do you think
that you would react if, while at church, you witnessed such a
miracle? Would it enhance or distract from your Sabbath-day
experience?
4.

What does the Lord say in response to the people

who had criticized Him?

Luke 13:18-23
1.

Christ gives two parables here. What are they?

2.

Why do you think that He taught these parables?

3.

What do you learn from them?

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Luke 13:24-30
1.

In verse 23, someone asks the Savior a question.

What is it?
2.

Before you read what the Lord answers, ponder

what you might think that the answer would be.
3.

What does the Lord say in response to the

4.

What do you think that Jesus means by these

question?

teachings?
5.

Which part of this strikes you? Why? If you find

something standing out to you, take a second to ponder the
meaning of what is standing out to you and how it applies to
your life. Perhaps it stands out to you because you don't
understand it. If this is the case, then seek answers--look in
the footnotes, think of any scriptures that it reminds you of.
Follow the gentle and quiet promptings of the Spirit. Discover
what He will teach you.

Luke 13:31-35
1.

What warning was given to Jesus in verse 31?

2.

How does Jesus respond?

3.

Keep in mind that this is the literal Son of God

the Pharisees are warning. Do you think that their warning was

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much of a shock or surprise to Him? Why/why not?
4.

What does Jesus teach about His future and the

future of the Jews?
5.

How has this prophecy been fulfilled?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 13, someone asks Jesus, "Lord, are there few that
be saved?" (see Luke 13:23). It's an interesting question. Jesus
then answers the question with a short sermon. We will study
this response while considering the Atonement to see what we can
learn about both.
1.

Read Luke 13:23-30. Consider the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What does the Lord say in response to the

3.

Notice the phrase, "strait gate." What does it

question?

mean? Look up the word "strait" to be sure that you are clear of
its definition.
4.

Why do you think that it is so difficult for many

to enter into the "strait gate"?
5.

What happens in verses 26 and 27? What do you

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suppose that these two verses mean? Why would the Lord tell the
people who have "eaten and drunk" in His presence that He didn't
know them? What do you think that He means by this?
6.

How do you think that we can be sure that we come

to know the Lord, and that He knows us?
7.

How do those who are not accepted by the Lord

react? Why do you suppose that they act this way? Who are the
people that are mentioned as living in the kingdom of God?
8.

Are these prophets the only ones to inherit such

a reward? Who else will be able to inherit the kingdom of God?
9.

Now, as you have begun to study this teaching,

think of it with regards to the Atonement. How can the
Atonement--the act of the Atonement, the requirements needed for
it to be implemented in your life, and the blessings of the
Atonement--help you to understand what is meant in verse 24?
10.

We know that Christ atoned for all of us and that

no one is exempt from the Atonement, but does that mean that we
can apply it to our lives in any fashion that we choose?
11.

As we studied, the people who knock at the door

say that they have "eaten and drunk" in His presence; the Savior
taught in their streets. Yet He claims not to know them. What
does this teach us about the Atonement? How do we come to know
the Savior?

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Think of the Jews, they had made covenants and

they shared a religion with the Savior. Why do you think that
they had such a hard time applying the Atonement in their lives?
Does the Atonement automatically work in the lives of those who
are baptized? What must we do to feel the full effects of
Christ's Atonement?
13.

Later in the scripture block, many people are

mentioned as inheriting the kingdom of God. Some of them were
great prophets. What was the relationship between the Jews and
Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob (and all the prophets)? The Jews
claimed to believe in the words of these prophets. Why did the
prophets inherit the kingdom of God, while these Jews were
rejected? How do you suppose the Atonement plays into this?
14.

Does the Atonement save everyone who claims to

believe in Christ? Does the Atonement save everyone who has been
baptized into the Church? What does this short scripture block
teach you about the Atonement and its power to save? What does
it teach you about cultivating a relationship with Christ?

Parables
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the parables,
then study these parables using the instructions given in the

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Appendix.

The following parables are included in Luke 13:

The parable of the barren fig tree--Luke 13:6-10

The parable of the mustard seed--Luke 13:18-19

The parable of the leaven--Luke 13:20-21

We will study one of these together.
1.

Read Luke 13:18-19.

2.

What does the grain of mustard seed represent?

3.

What does Jesus teach us in this parable?

4.

What do you think it really means? Why would

Jesus compare the kingdom of God to a grain of a mustard seed?
What happens to that grain?
5.

How big will the tree get?

6.

What is the context of this parable?

7.

In verses 20-21, the Lord teaches another

parable. What is it?
8.

What question is asked in verse 23? Consider what

the Lord was teaching: in both the parables of the mustard seed
and leaven. Now think about why there would be a person asking
the question in 23.
9.

What do you suppose we are to understand about

the kingdom of God from the parable of the mustard seed?

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Miracles
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the Miracles,
then study these miracles following the instructions given in
the Appendix.
In Luke 13, the following miracle is included:

Christ heals a woman with the spirit of

infirmity--Luke 13:11-17.
We will study it together.
1.

Read Luke 13:11-17. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

To whom are we introduced in verse 11? What is

this woman like?
3.

What did Jesus do for her? How did He heal her?

4.

What did she do in response to His healing?

5.

What does this healing teach about Christ? His

Priesthood? His compassion?
6.

Notice the reaction of the ruler of the

synagogue. Why do you think that he was so critical of what the
Savior did?
7.

How does Jesus respond to the ruler of the

synagogue? How does Jesus feel about this woman?
8.

As you consider this miracle and all of the

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details surrounding it, what strikes you? Write down your
thoughts.
9.

Now, consider why this strikes you. What does it

mean? What does it mean for you?

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Luke 14

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
14.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 14:1-6

the man?

1.

Where is Jesus?

2.

Who approaches the Lord?

3.

What does Jesus do for this man?

4.

What does Jesus teach the Pharisees after healing

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5.

As you read through this set of verses, what

stands out to you? Perhaps it is the Pharisees question, or it
is Christ's response, or something else. Identify what stands
out to you by taking a moment to write about it in your
scripture journal.

Luke 14:7-11
1.

What parable does Jesus tell in these verses?

2.

What does this parable mean?

3.

Why do you think that Jesus tells this parable?

Luke 14:12-14
1.

What does Jesus tell the man who bade Him to

2.

What do you think that the Savior means by this

dinner?

instruction?

Luke 14:15-24
1.

What parable does the Savior tell in these

2.

What does this parable have to do with the

verses?

Pharisees who were sitting with Him?
3.

How do you think will you respond to the Savior

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when you are "bidden"?

Luke 14:25-35
1.

What does Jesus teach to the multitude?

2.

What do you think that Christ means in verse 26?

Don't we believe that the family is incredibly important? What
is the point that Jesus is trying to get across?
3.

Read through the examples that Christ gives in

these verses. What do they teach you about discipleship?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 14, Jesus is teaching a great multitude of people.
We will study one part of His teachings with the Atonement in
mind. As you study, try to make connections between the words
Christ speaks, the principles being taught, and how they relate
to the Atonement.
1.

Read Luke 14:34-35. Make sure to read the JST for

these verses.
2.

What question is asked of the Savior? (Be sure to

read the JST to find this answer.)
3.

Before you read the answer that Christ gives,

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what do you think that the answer should be? Now, think of this
question--especially in terms of the Atonement. How can an
understanding of the Atonement help someone come to the correct
answer to this question?
4.

What does the Savior say in response to this

question? What do you think His answer means?
5.

Why was Christ sent? How does the Atonement

enable Christ to fulfill His mission?
6.

Read Jacob 4:5.

This is an account kept by the

Nephites. In whom did the Nephites believe? Whom did they
worship? Which law did they keep? Why did the Nephites keep the
Law of Moses?
7.

What was the connection between the Law of Moses

and the Atonement?
8.

Back in Luke 14, the Savior compares the Moses

and the prophets with salt. What does He say? What do you think
that He means by this? How is following the prophet without
accepting the Atonement of Jesus Christ like salt that has lost
its savor?
9.

How can this applied in your life today--when it

comes to reading the words of ancient prophets and listening to
modern prophets? How can you make sure that their message is not
ineffective like salt that has lost its savor?

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Miracles
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the miracles,
then study these miracles following the instructions given in
the Appendix.
In Luke 14, the following miracle is included:

Jesus heals a man with dropsy--Luke 14:1-6

Parables
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the parables,
then study these parables using the instructions given in the
Appendix.
The following parables are included in Luke 14:

The parable of those who are bidden--Luke 14:7-11

The parable of a great supper--Luke 14:16-24

We will study one together.
1.

Read Luke 14:16-24. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

As you study this parable, what do you think each

element represents? Whom does the certain man that made a great
supper represent? What do you think is supposed to be
represented by the first group of people invited to the supper?

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What do you suppose the supper, itself, represents? The servant?
Find any other elements of this parable and see if you can
discover a parallel meaning.
3.

Consider each element of the parable. What do you

think the Lord's purpose is in teaching it? What message is He
trying to convey?
4.

When was this parable given? To whom does Jesus

tell the parable? What is the general context of the situation
and the reason for Jesus giving this parable?
5.

Did Jesus give any other parables at this time?

What was the main idea of it's teaching? How does the other
parable Christ gave help you to understand what the Lord tried
to teach in this parable?
6.

What strikes you in this parable? What is the

Spirit trying to teach you now? If any part of this parable is
standing out to you, seek an answer to why it does. Write your
discovery in your scripture journal.

List--Discipleship
In Luke 14, The Savior teaches about discipleship. If you
read through this chapter, you will discover a list with points
on what Christ expects of His disciples.
1.

Read Luke 14:25-33. Study the corresponding

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Analysis and Application questions.
2.

In verse 26, we have the first point on the list.

What does Christ teach in this verse (be sure to read the JST at
the bottom)?
3.

What do you think that Christ means by this? When

we choose to be disciples of Christ, to whom should we be most
loyal? Which commandment (in the ten commandments) does this
point remind you of?
4.

How can you be sure that you have no other

"gods"; and instead are most loyal to Christ, becoming His
disciple?
5.

In verse 27, we read the second point on the

list. What is it (be sure to read the JST)?
6.

What do you think that Jesus means by "bear[ing]

his cross"? Does this mean that we need to be crucified? How do
we bear our cross and follow Christ?
7.

We find the final point in verse 33. What is it?

8.

The Savior helps to illustrate this last point in

the verses leading up to Luke 14:33.

What does the Lord teach

in verses 28-32? How do these illustrations help us to
understand the requirements of a disciple?
9.
you have?

What do you suppose it means to forsake all that

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Consider the three points in this list. What do

they teach you about discipleship? How do you think that you can
apply these ideas to your life and become a better disciple of
Christ?

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Luke 15

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
15.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 15:1-7
1.

Who drew near unto Christ? Why?

2.

What did the Pharisees say when they saw that

Christ would teach the sinners and publicans?
3.

What parable did Christ begin to tell in response

to the Pharisees?

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4.

What is the meaning of the parable of the lost

5.

How does Heaven respond when one of the lost

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sheep?

sheep is found?

Luke 15:8-10
1.

Which parable does Christ now relate?

2.

What is the meaning of this parable?

3.

How do the angels respond when a sinner repents?

How does the parable that Christ related illustrate this
concept?

Luke 15:11-32
1.

What parable does Christ now tell?

2.

What is the meaning of this parable?

3.

How do you think that Heavenly Father feels when

"one who is lost is found"?
4.

Why do you think that Heavenly Father, the

angels, and heaven rejoice so much when people return to Him?
5.

How can you ensure that you maintain a

relationship with Heavenly Father? How can you help Him to find
His lost sheep, His lost silver, or His prodigal son?

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Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 15, Jesus teaches the Pharisees three parables. In
these parables, we can learn more about the Atonement in our
lives.
1.

Read Luke 15:1-7.

2.

What is the role of the Savior in this parable?

3.

What does this parable of the lost sheep teach us

about the Atonement?
4.

Why do you think that when the power of the

Atonement helps to salvage those that are lost, the heavens
rejoice?
5.

Read Luke 15:8-10.

6.

What is the role of the Savior in this parable?

7.

What does this parable teach us about the

Atonement?
8.

How do the angels react when we use the power of

the Atonement in our lives? Why do you think that this is the
case?
9.

Read Luke 15:11-32.

10.

As you read through this parable, think of the

Atonement. Try to see what the parable is teaching you about the

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Atonement. What strikes you? In your scripture journal, write
about what stands out to you and discover why this is making an
impact on you. Try to discover what it is that the Spirit is
trying to teach you.
11.

Think about what you have learned with each of

these parables. What have you learned about the Atonement? How
can you apply what you have learned into your life?

Three Parables--Compare and Contrast
As you know, in Luke 15, three parables are recorded. The
Savior teaches these three parables to the Pharisees in one
sitting. He is trying to teach them many facets of a single
concept by giving three illustrations. In my mind, the parables
should be studied together. Often, we study these parables
independently of each other. While it is good to study the
parables independently, we miss the bigger idea of what Christ
is trying to teach. We will study each of these parables in
depth, then see how they build upon each other and how they help
us understand many different facets of the main principle that
the Savior is teaching.

Before we begin--the context
1.

In verses 1-2, find the context of these

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parables. Why do you think that Christ is motivated to teach
them?
2.

Keep in mind the context of these parables as you

study them.

One--The Parable of the Lost Sheep
1.

Read Luke 15:3-7. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What do the ninety-nine sheep represent?

3.

What does the one lost sheep represent?

4.

What happened to the one sheep?

5.

As you think about sheep, grazing animals, do you

think that this sheep purposely rebelled against the group? What
is suggested, by the very nature of sheep, about the reason why
this one sheep was lost? Think about this in terms of members of
the church. Are there some members who "lose their way", not
through rebellion, but just because they wander?
6.

What do you think that you should do if you are

in the shoes of the shepherd?
7.

Eventually, when the sheep was found, what did

the shepherd do? Why do you think that he did this?
8.

What does Jesus teach us about heaven's response

when a lost sheep is found? Why do you think that the heavens

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rejoice?
9.

Why do you think that Jesus taught this parable

to the Pharisees?
10.

What can you do to be like the shepherd who

leaves the ninety-nine and goes after the one sheep until he
finds it?

Two--The Lost Piece of Silver
1.

Read Luke 15:8-10. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What do you think that the pieces of silver

represent?
3.

Whom does the woman represent?

4.

What happens to the woman and her silver?

5.

How do you suppose that she lost this silver?

6.

How do you think that this can be related to

members of the church? Often, we might have ten active members,
and then one "falls through the cracks". How do you think that
as leaders and teachers in the church, there are times when we
"lose a piece of silver?"
7.

What does the woman do when she loses the piece

of silver?
8.

What can we do when we, as members of the church,

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lose someone?
9.

How does the loss of the piece of silver differ

than the sheep that wandered and was lost? What is similar about
the loss of the piece of silver and the sheep that wandered and
was lost?
10.

How do these differences and similarities help us

to understand what we, as members of the church, should do when
others are "lost"?
11.

When the woman finds her silver, what does she

do? Why do you think that she is so happy?
12.

How does this woman's experience help us to

understand the way that angels feel when a sinner is found and
repents?
13.

Why do you think that Jesus taught this parable

to the Pharisees?
14.

What can you do to be like this woman: to light a

candle, sweep the house, and seek diligently for those that are
lost?

Three--The Prodigal Son
1.

Read Luke 15:11-32. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

Whom do you think that the father represents? The

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Prodigal Son? The other son?
3.

What does the prodigal son do? What makes him

"prodigal"?
4.

Compare his leaving to the lost sheep and the

lost piece of silver. How are they similar? How are they
different?
5.

Think of the Prodigal Son as a general member of

the church. How was he lost? Did it happen accidentally, as the
sheep in the first parable had become lost? Was the prodigal son
lost through negligence or happenstance, as was the lost piece
of silver? What is unique about the prodigal son? Are there
members of the church that sometimes become lost through their
own deliberate choices?
6.

Does the father, like the shepherd, leave his

homestead and everything in order to go looking for his son?
Does the Father light a candle, sweep the house, and look
diligently for his son? What does his father do? Why do you
think that he takes such a relaxed approach?
7.

What happens to the prodigal son?

8.

In verse 17, what does the son remember about his

Father? What does this teach us about the general personality,
actions, and habits of his father?
9.

How do you think that we, church members and

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leaders, can be like the father in this instance? Even though
the father didn't go looking for the son, he had left an
impression that eventually saved the son. What can you do to
show the kind of love that will help give someone hope even if
they end up choosing to rebel and leave the church for a time?
10.

When the son returned, what did the Father do?

What did his other son do? Why do you think that the Father
reacted with such charity and gratitude when his prodigal son
returned? Why do you think that the faithful son reacted with
jealousy when his prodigal brother returned?
11.

How do you think that you can learn to be like

the Father, and overcome the temptation to be like the brother,
when prodigal members of your ward and church family choose to
return?
12.

How do you suppose that Heavenly Father feels

when those who have left--who have chosen to be lost--repent and
return to Him?
13.

Why do you think that Jesus taught this parable

to the Pharisees?
14.

How does this parable, in combination with the

other two, give you ideas on how to be a tool in the Lord's
hands when people are lost--whether they wander off and are
lost, become lost through negligence, or choose to leave?

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As you have been reading through this chapter,

what stood out to you? Why do think this stood out to you?
Discover what the Spirit will teach you by pondering the points
that strike you.

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Luke 16

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
16.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 16:1-12
1.

What parable does the Savior teach to the

disciples here?
2.

Why do you think that He teaches them this

parable? What do you suppose He wants them to learn?
3.

Why do you think that it is important to learn to

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be a wise steward over the material blessings that you have
received in your life?

Luke 16:13-18
1.

What does Jesus teach about serving two masters?

Why do you think that it is impossible to serve both God and
mammon?
2.

What is mammon? (Be sure of the definition by

looking it up in the dictionary.)
3.

How did the Pharisees feel about Christ's

teachings? Why were they so put off by Christ?
4.

Think again on what Christ taught in verse 13.

How do you think that this relates to covetousness?
5.

What did the Pharisees claim to believe in (be

sure to read the JST in the Appendix of your scriptures)? Yet,
they said that they would not receive Christ. What is ironic
about their supposed devotion to the law and prophets and
rejection of Christ?
6.

What does Christ say in response?

7.

Think about verse 17 (found in the JST in the

Appendix of your scriptures). What is the testimony of Christ
that you have received through the law and the prophets? Take
some time to write this down. Think of specific examples.

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The Pharisees claimed to believe in the law and

the prophets, yet did they accept Christ? Why/why not?
9.

What was the effect that the Pharisees were

having on the church? How do you think that hypocrisy today
might hurt the church?
10.

Finally, to whom does the Lord liken the

Pharisees?

Luke 16:19-31
1.

What parable does Christ give here?

2.

What do you think that Christ is trying to teach

to the Pharisees by telling them this parable?
3.

Who did the Savior liken the Pharisees to? Why do

you think that He said the Pharisees were like the rich man?
4.

What stands out to you in this parable or

chapter? Why? Contemplate, by writing in your scripture journal,
what stands out to you and what the spirit is trying to teach
you.

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 16:16-18, the Lord addresses the Pharisees. In

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verse 14, we can find the way that the Pharisees were feeling in
regards to Christ and his teachings. In the Joseph Smith
Translation, we can learn more of what the Lord taught the
Pharisees. We will study the portion found in the JST along with
a cross-reference while keeping in mind Christ's Atonement to
see what we can learn about His Atonement and how to apply it in
our lives.
1.

Read JST Luke 16:16-23. (Found in the appendices

of the Bible after the Bible Dictionary). Study the
corresponding Analysis and Application Questions.
2.

Read 1 Nephi 13:37. What is this verse teaching?

What will happen to those who seek to bring forth Zion? How do
you think that having the power and gift of the Holy Ghost is a
blessing for such work? How do you think that having the gift of
the Holy Ghost might help us to endure to the end? What is the
blessing of enduring the end?

How does the Lord describe those

who "publish peace"? What do you think that it means to "bring
forth Zion"? To "publish peace"? Who are the types of people
that are bringing forth Zion and publishing peace currently?
Anciently? When you think of Christ, and think of the Atonement
He performed, how does this give you additional insight to the
message of this verse and why Heavenly Father is so pleased with
those who share the gospel?

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Now, think of 1 Nephi 13:37 and the Pharisees.

What were the Pharisees supposed to be? Do you think that they
were the types of people described in 1 Nephi 13:37? Should they
have been? What did they claim to believe and pretend to do?
4.

Now, go back to JST Luke 16:16-23. In verse 23,

what did the Pharisees say to the Lord? Do you think that the
Pharisees understood what they purported to believe?
5.

What did the Lord say in response to the

Pharisees? Think of the Atonement and Christ's mission on this
earth. Why do you think that the law and prophets testified of
Christ?
6.

What do you think that the Lord means in verse

19? How does the Atonement fulfill every tittle of the law?
7.

In verse 20, what does the Lord ask the

Pharisees? How did they both teach the law and deny it? If they
taught the law, then do you think that they claimed to believe
in the Atonement? Yet, did they accept the One who came to
Atone?
8.

What does the Lord accuse the Pharisees of doing

in verse 21? How did they pervert the law and commit the sins
that the Lord condemned the of? Did the Pharisees ever verbally
say that there is no God? How did they say this in their hearts?
What do you think that this has to do with their ability to

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accept the Atonement? Do you think that the Atonement took power
in their lives?
9.

Again think back on 1 Nephi 13:37. Do you think

that the Pharisees, who were supposed to be teachers, would be
included in the group described in 1 Nephi? Are those those
preach the gospel beautiful and blessed in and of themselves?
What do you suppose makes them beautiful and blessed? Why do you
think that those who build God's kingdom and truly teach the
gospel--which is the gospel of the Atonement--described in such
a positive way? How does Christ fit into this verse?
10.

How do you think that understanding the Atonement

and implementing it in your own life through making and keeping
covenants can help you to be as those described in 1 Nephi 13:37
rather than as the Pharisees?

Parables
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the parables,
then study these parables using the instructions given in the
Appendix.
The following parables are included in Luke 16:

16:19-31

The parable of the unjust steward--Luke 16:1-12

The parable of the rich man and Lazarus--Luke

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We will study one of the parables together
1.

Read Luke 16:19-31. Complete the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

Who does the rich man represent? Why do you think

that we learn that he "was clothed in purple"? What does this
tell you about him?
3.

Who do you think that the beggar represents?

4.

What happens to the beggar? What happens to the

5.

What does the rich man ask Abraham? In verse 24?

6.

What is Abraham's response? What do you think is

rich man?

meant by this?
7.

What does this response teach us about charity?

8.

Why else can't Lazarus be sent to the rich man as

explained in verse 26?
9.

What do you suppose that this gulf represents?

10.

What does the rich man then ask of Abraham?

11.

How does Abraham respond? What do you think that

Abraham means by this response?
12.

When did Jesus tell this parable?

13.

Scan through the rest of the chapter (don't

forget the JST for Luke 16:16-23), what is the context when this
parable is given? Why do you think that the Savior taught this

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parable to the Pharisees?
14.

What do you think that the Savior wanted his

audience (including you) to understand from this parable?
15.

Why do you suppose he made these comparisons?

16.

How do you think that you can apply these

principles taught? Are there times when it is easier to "hear"
the words of the ancient prophets and ignore the teachings of
our modern prophets? Are there any current teachings that you
struggle with? How do you think that gaining a testimony to
these teachings may help to strengthen your relationship with
and testimony of the Savior? If you do not struggle with modern
day teachings, then think of how they have enriched your life
and strengthened your testimony of the Savior.
17.

What are the principles being taught in this

parable? How has this parable helped you to better understand
these principles? How do you think that the principles that you
have studied can help you to be a better disciple of Christ?

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Luke 17

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
17.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 17:1-2
1.

According to Jesus, what are we bound to

experience? Yet, what does he warn? Why do you think that there
is a woe pronounced on the one through whom an offense comes?
2.

What are the consequences of offending a little

one? Why do you suppose that the consequence is so grievous?

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Luke 17:3-10
1.

What does the Lord teach us we should do if

another trespasses against us?
2.

Why do you think that it is important for us to

forgive those who offend us?
3.

In verse 5, what do the disciples ask the Lord?

4.

What does the Lord then say about the power of

5.

Why do you think that He compares the power of

faith?

faith to a small seed?
6.

Do you think that faith is easy to come by?

7.

How do you think that strengthened faith might

benefit your life right now, specifically? What can you do to
strengthen your faith?
8.

Now, Christ asks the disciples a series of

hypothetical questions. What do you think that He is trying to
teach them?
9.

What do you think that the Savior means by

"unprofitable servants"? Write down a few impressions. After
thinking about this phrase, if you haven't already, then look to
the cross-references for "unprofitable" in verse 10.
10.

What do we learn about being an "unprofitable"

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servant from Romans 3:12? How can you do more good in your life,
and give the Lord an offering that would be considered good
work?
11.

What do we learn about being an "unprofitable

servant" from Mosiah 2:21? How does this differ from the concept
taught in Romans 3:12? Can any person bring forth enough good
works to "catch up" with God or to pay our debts? Why do you
think that King Benjamin felt it important for us to understand
that no matter our service or good works we are always still
indebted to our Father in Heaven and Savior?

Luke 17:11-19
1.

When Christ went to Jerusalem, what kind of

village did he pass?
2.

What happened in this village?

3.

What did Christ do for them?

4.

How did the lepers respond to Christ's miracle?

5.

Why do you think that only one came back to thank

6.

What can you do to show your gratitude to the

Christ?

Lord when He performs miracles in your life?

Luke 17:20-37

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1.

What did the Pharisees ask of Christ in verse 20?

2.

How does the Savior answer their question? How do

you think that this is true? Do you think that if the Pharisees
understood the true nature of Christ, they would have asked Him
this question?
3.

Why do you think that the Pharisees might have

had a hard time understanding that Jesus was the Christ? Based
on what the Lord is telling them in the following verses, what
do you think that the Pharisees thought about Christ's coming?
4.

The prophecies given by Christ, recounting some

of the troubles of other dispensations, are descriptions of the
conditions that will exist before Christ's second coming. What
stands out to you in these teachings that Christ gives?
5.

Would any of these things happen during the

Pharisees' lifetime? Why do you think that the Lord spent the
time telling them the signs of His second coming when they
seemed incapable of noticing His presence among them?
6.

How might understanding the great and terrible

day of the Lord's second coming help us in our lives--even if we
don't see this day in our mortal lives?

Enrich Your Learning

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The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 17, the Pharisees ask the Lord when The Kingdom of
God would come. This, in and of itself, is worth some studying,
but for now, we are going to study one part of His response. You
can find what the Savior said to the Pharisees and the extra
teaching the Lord gave to the disciples in Luke 17:21-37. We
will study one part of the exchange and think about what it can
teach us about the Atonement and it's application to our lives.
1.

Read Luke 17:28-33. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What is the context of this block of scriptures?

What is Christ teaching to the Pharisees?
3.

What was life like in Sodom during the days of

light, according to verse 28? What else do you know about Sodom
during that time? What did the people do?
4.

Do you think that while the people were eating,

drinking, buying, selling, planting, and building that they
would have expected destruction of the city? Why or why not?
5.

What happened to Sodom when Lot left?

6.

Why did such destruction happen to Sodom?

7.

Think of this in terms of the Atonement, when we

know that the Atonement exists for us to receive mercy and
salvation, why did the Lord allow Sodom to be destroyed?

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What does the Lord say in verse 30? What do you

think that He means by this?
9.

Why do you suppose that the revelation of the Son

of Man will be such a huge event--that natural wonders and other
amazing signs will accompany it? What is it that sets Christ
apart from other men, to the point that even nature testifies of
Him? What can this teach us about the significance of the
Atonement?
10.

Now, in verse 31, Christ is no longer talking

about Lot's day but is talking about the day of the Lord (the
second coming) what does He say? Why do you think the people
should leave their homes, possessions, and fields alone? What do
you think that Christ means by this?
11.

Whom does Christ tell us to remember in verse 32?

What is the significance of Lot's wife? How is Lot's wife
relevant--especially in regards to what Christ says in verse 31?
12.

Why do you think that the Lord wants us to

remember Lot's wife? What should we learn from her?
13.

Now, think of this in terms of the Atonement. Do

you think that Lot's wife had a deep, abiding testimony of the
Atonement? Do you think that she was fully committed to Christ:
her Redeemer?
14.

Perhaps Lot's wife had a testimony of the

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Atonement. I have no idea; right now we're just thinking to see
what we can learn from this. Imagine that Lot's wife had a
testimony of the Atonement. What do you think, then, caused her
to "look back"? Notice in verse 31, the Lord warns not to
"return back". What do you suppose this means in regards to the
Atonement, our sins, and our commitment to the covenants that
you have made with the Lord?
15.

What do you think will happen if you find

yourself, like Lot's wife, returning back to your familiar ways
of sin?
16.

In verse 33, what does the Lord then teach? How

does understanding Lot's wife help us to understand this verse
better?
17.

What do you think that the Lord means when he

says "loses"?
18.

Think now, about the Atonement that the Lord has

performed, and what is required in order for you to have it take
effect in your life, what do you suppose is required in order
for you to "lose" your life?
19.

When you think of the Atonement, how does losing

your life ensure that you will preserve it?

Miracles

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If you are doing a comprehensive study of the miracles,
then study these miracles following the instructions given in
the Appendix.
In Luke 17, the following miracle is included:

Christ heals the Ten Lepers--Luke 17:11-19.

We will study it together.
1.

Read Luke 17:11-19. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application Questions.
2.

As Jesus was going to Jerusalem, what kind of men

did he see afar off?
3.

If you have been studying the gospels, you have

now heard about Leprosy often. What was the life of a leper
like? Why did he have to stay separated from the rest of
society?
4.

How can the disease of Leprosy be an object

lesson about sin and our tolerance of it?
5.

How are we all like the lepers? Who are we cast

away from? Who/what do we need to be welcomed back?
6.

What did the lepers ask Christ when they saw Him?

7.

How did Christ choose to heal them?

8.

Often, in our own lives, do we ask for a miracle

or healing from God? Typically, does He

perform the work

Himself, or does he perform His miracles through others?

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Why do you think that the Lord allows each of us

to participate in His work of healing by serving one another?
How does this nurture the faith of both the person being healed
and the one who is doing the healing?
10.

After the lepers were cleansed, how many of them

turned back and gave thanks to Christ? Why do you think that
only one did? Do you suppose that the other nine were truly so
ungrateful? If this was the case, why do you think they didn't
express thanks to Christ, what do you suppose that they didn't
understand?
11.

What does Jesus ask the one leper who expressed

gratitude?
12.

In verse 19, what does the Lord tell the leper?

We already know that all ten of the lepers were healed from
their leprosy. What does Christ mean when he says that the faith
of the grateful leper had made him whole? Aren't the other
lepers healed, too? What does Christ mean by this? How is only
one leper made whole, even though all ten had been healed of the
physical ailment?
13.

What do you learn, personally, from this miracle?

Of course gratitude is the main theme, but what do you really
learn? What stands out to you? Why? Is there anything that
puzzles you in this story? If so, then try to discover the

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solution.

Simile
Similes are often used in the scriptures to help us
understand abstract concepts. In Luke 17, specifically, the
Savior uses similes to help the disciples understand the "day of
the Lord." Similes are comparisons that use the words "like" or
"as." We will study one of the similes found in this chapter.
1.

Read Luke 17:24.

2.

Notice the second word in this verse. What is it?

3.

What is being compared in this verse?

4.

Think about the first part of the comparison.

Have you ever seen lightning? Does lightening light up more of
the sky than where it originates?
5.

What else does this image conjure in your mind?

6.

What is lightening being compared to?

7.

How do you think that the Lord's second coming

will be like lightening in the sky?
8.

How does this scripture help you to better

understand when the Kingdom of God will come?
9.

How does the Lord's use of simile help you to

better understand the abstract concept of the coming of God's
Kingdom?

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Luke 18

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
18.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 18:1-14
1.

As the chapter opens, what does Christ tell the

people that they should do?
2.

Immediately, the Savior then tells a parable.

Which parable does He tell?
3.

Why do you think that the Savior used this

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parable to illustrate the instruction given in verse 1?
4.

In verse 9, Jesus begins another parable. How is

the audience of this parable described?
5.

What is the parable that Jesus tells?

6.

Why do you think that Jesus spoke this parable to

his audience that "trusted in themselves that they were
righteous, and despised others"?

Luke 18:15-17
1.

Who were brought to the Savior?

2.

What did the Savior do to these infants?

3.

Why do you suppose that people wanted the Lord to

"touch" their infants? Do we do this in some way, today?
4.

How did the disciples respond to the people?

5.

What did Jesus say in response?

6.

Why do you think that he said this? Why do you

think that he esteems children so highly?
7.

As you think about this instruction, consider the

parable that Christ just taught about the humble and the proud.
Why do you think that being child-like is a quality needed for
inheriting the kingdom of God?
8.

What do you think that you can do to become more

childlike, humble, and faithful?

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Luke 18:18-30
1.

A certain ruler asks the Savior a question in

verse 18. What question does he ask?
2.

How does Jesus respond in verse 19? Why do you

think that He says this?
3.

Jesus then continues to teach. What does he say

to the ruler? How had the ruler conducted his life up to this
point?
4.

Even though the ruler had kept the commandments,

was he worthy to inherit eternal life? What did he still need to
do?
5.

How did the ruler respond to Christ's

instruction?
6.

Why do you think that the ruler was so upset?

7.

What does Jesus remark in verse 24? Why do you

think that he says this? How do you think that having riches
could be such an impediment to inheriting eternal life?
8.

The apostles react to Christ's lamentation by

asking, "Who then can be saved? What does Jesus say in response?
(See verse 27--remember to read the JST.) As you read this, what
do you learn about the problem with riches? Is it riches that
make us incapable of entering into the kingdom of God? In order

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to enter the kingdom of God, whom should we trust in?
9.

Why do you think that it is easy to become so

trusting in riches, especially when we have them? What do you
think that you can do to be sure that you trust in the Lord
above riches?

Luke 18:31-34
1.

In verse 31, to whom is the Lord speaking?

2.

What does He tell them?

3.

Why do you think that He is prophesying of His

coming suffering and death?
4.

Did the apostles understand? Notice what it says

in verse 34: "this saying was hid from them," What do you think
that this means?

Luke 18:35-43
1.

As Jesus was walking near Jericho, who was

sitting by the way side?
2.

When the blind man found out that Jesus was

passing by, what did he do?
3.

What did those who went before Christ say to the

blind man? Did he listen to them? What did he do?
4.

Think about these people who were in the

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multitude before Christ. What kind of people were they? How do
you think that they felt about the Savior? How do you think that
they felt about the gospel? Considering that it is likely that
faithful people were traveling with the Savior, why do you
suppose that they rebuked the blind man when he made his
request?
5.

In what way do you think that there are times

when we, the Lord's disciples, those who believe, might get more
caught up with the "throng", the direction we're going, the
church, and then rebuke the one who needs healing?
6.

What does the Lord say about the blind man? What

does he do?
7.

What does the blind man do after receiving his

8.

What would this story have been like if the blind

sight?

man had listened to the rebukes of the people and then backed
down?
9.

Liken yourself, now, to the blind man. What can

you do to see through the rebukes of others, even if they come
from people who otherwise have good intentions? How do you
maintain your vision and faith in Christ in these circumstances?
10.

Notice, also, afterwards, what the blind man did.

Does the blind man refuse to walk with this group who is with

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Christ based on the fact that they had originally rebuked him?
What kind of heart does this blind man have?
11.

What can you do to forgive others--especially

church members--who might be mistaken and rebuke you as you seek
the Lord? How can you be like the blind man, and instead of
holding a grudge against these people travel with them, with the
Savior, and praise Him together?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
The end of Christ's life is drawing near, and Christ
prophesies of His coming death and resurrection to the Apostles.
1.

Read Luke 18:31-34. Consider the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

In verse 31, what does Jesus tell the apostles?

Why do you think that the prophets had written about the course
of events that would take place? What does this teach about
Christ's mission and the Atonement?
3.

What would happen to the Savior?

4.

Why do you think that the mocking, spiteful

"entreatment," being spit upon, scourging, and even death were
essential parts of the Atonement?

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Even though Christ knew and understood that this

is what would take place, do you think such knowledge made it
"easier" for him to endure? How do you suppose He might have
felt as He completed the work of the Atonement as His own
covenant people mocked Him, hurt Him, and put Him to death?
6.

Despite the difficulty and sadness of what would

befall the Savior, what would happen on the third day?
7.

Of course, the Savior's resurrection is

miraculous. No other person on the earth has the power to give
up or take up life. Now, think about the resurrection in terms
of the Atonement. What does the Savior's death and following
resurrection mean to us, as a people? What does the Savior's
death and following resurrection mean to you, personally?
8.

In verse 34, we lear that the apostles didn't

understand what the Savior meant. Why do you think they didn't
understand? What difference does their lack of understanding
make when it comes to the Atonement, in general? Think of the
Apostles' role in the Atonement--Judas, Peter, James, and John.
How might they have acted differently if they truly grasped what
the Lord was teaching? Why do you think that they're inability
to understand was a part of the Atonement?

Scripture Chain--Pray Always

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As Luke 18 opens, Jesus teaches a parable that illustrates
the concept of praying always. As I read this, I realized how we
hear it so often in the scriptures and from our church leaders,
so it might be a nice time for a scripture chain.
1.

Read Luke 18:1. What does Jesus teach His

disciples? What do you think that Christ means by "not to
faint"? These scriptures that follow are not a part of the
scripture chain, but take a moment to learn more about the
concept of faint by reading

Proverbs 24:10, 1 Nephi 4:2, and

Doctrine and Covenants 89:20-21. Now what do you think that
Christ means when He says, "not to faint"?
2.

Now, let's start creating a scripture chain. We

will do this together (as much as possible). Begin by thinking
of as many scriptures as YOU can on the subject of praying
always. Try to do it on your own before you look in the topical
guide or any kind of online search.
3.

The following scriptures have come to mind for

me: Doctrine and Covenants 10:5, Alma or Amulek's sermon on
prayer (can't remember the reference right now, but we'll look
it up in a second), 2 Nephi 32:8-9, Alma 13:28, Psalms 55:17. I
also like the idea of looking at the Bible Dictionary definition
of prayer. Finally, David A. Bednar's conference talk from a few
years ago is coming to mind, and I think that I'd like to find a

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quote that I can either insert in my scriptures (with a post-it
note or small handwriting) or link to in my online lds.org
account. What scriptures have you thought of? Perhaps some of
them are the same as what I've mentioned. Obviously, I can't
know what you are thinking, so we will study the scriptures I
have listed, but don't let that stop you from adding your own
scriptures from the chain. In fact, you might like some of the
scriptures that you have thought of more than what I have
listed. Simply substitute one of the scriptures you have found
or add to my list. Just be sure to study it well, and find how
it connects to the rest of these scriptures.
4.

In the margin of your scriptures at Luke 18:1,

write the scripture reference, "Doctrine and Covenants 10:5-pray always." Now turn to Doctrine and Covenants 10:5. What is
the benefit of praying always? Is it only Satan that we are
trying to defeat in this mortal life?

Why do you think that

prayer will help you to conquer Satan and his servants?
5.

Let's figure out the next scripture reference. I

want to study the sermon taught by Amulek (or it could have been
Alma)--to pray in your fields, closets, etc. In order to find
this, I'm going to turn to the topical guide and search under
prayer, and scan ahead to Alma 30-something because I feel like
that is where it is in the Book of Mormon. See if you can find

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the reference.
6.

In the margin of your scriptures at Doctrine and

Covenants 10:5, write the scripture reference, "Alma 34:17-27-Pray always." Now read Alma 34:17-27. What should we be asking
the Lord for? Why do you think that we need to ask the Lord for
mercy? How will we be blessed when we pray to the Lord for
mercy? After we have prayed for mercy, should we stop praying?
Notice where Amulek suggests that we pray to the Lord. You may
want to list these in your scripture journal. Why do you think
that we should pray in all of these diverse places? How does
this relate to the scripture in Luke 18:1? How do you think that
praying in them any situations you face in life will help you
not to faint? How does Amulek describe the secret prayer in
verse 26? What do you think that it means to "pour out your
soul"? Why do you suppose we should pray this way? Are you able
to pray like this on a regular basis? How do you think you might
be able to follow this instruction? Finally, when we are not
audibly praying, what does Amulek teach that we should be doing?
How might this be accomplishing the charge to pray always?
7.

As I was studying the scripture in Alma, another

scripture came to mind. I think that I'd like to look it up and
see if it would be good for the scripture chain. I'm thinking of
the scripture in 3 Nephi, during Christ's visit, where the

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people were praying so much that Jesus actually asked them to
stop praying for a second (but to continue praying in their
hearts). So...it's to the Topical Guide we go to find the
reference for this Scripture. Again, I'll look up the entry for
prayer and scan down to 3 Nephi--after chapter 11, since I know
that Christ doesn't appear until then.
8.

Now, I've looked up the reference (3 Nephi 20:1),

and I can see that I don't want to include it in this scripture
chain, but as I searched for this scripture, I found another
reference that would be really good for our scripture chain, so
we'll do it next.
9.

In the margins of your scriptures in Alma, write

the next reference: "3 Nephi 18:15-21--pray always." Now turn to
the scripture and read it. In verse 15, the Savior teaches the
people that they must "watch and pray always" what do you think
that He means by watch? How ought we to pray? Why do you think
that we should follow Christ's pattern for prayer? In verse 18,
what does he tell the multitude about the reason for constant
prayer? According to verse 19, how should we pray? Why do you
think that we should pray this way? What does verse 19 teach us
about Christ's role in our relationship with God? What type of
prayer does the Savior encourage us to do in verse 21? How do
you think that prayer will benefit our families? How do you

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think that a good effort at daily prayer will benefit you and
your family?
10.

Now, in the margins for the scripture in 3 Nephi,

write the next reference: "2 Nephi 32:8-9--pray always." Turn to
2 Nephi 32:8-9. According to verse 8, who teaches us not to
pray? Why do you think that an evil spirit would teach you not
to pray? This sounds kind of simple, but have you experienced it
in your life? What are some of the reasons that make you feel
like you don't want to pray?What can you do to overcome these
feelings? Nephi then teaches, in verse 9, that we must "pray
always, and not faint." What else does Nephi teach about prayer
in this verse? How do you think that the Lord will consecrate
our performance when we pray? How might praying before we make
decisions or do things help us to choose the right? How do you
think that this kind of prayer helps us not to faint?
11.

In the margins of your scriptures in 2 Nephi,

write the next reference: "Alma 13:28-29--pray always". Turn to
the reference and read it. What should our attitude be when we
go before the Lord in prayer? According to this verse, what is
the benefit of prayer in regards to overcoming temptation (or
fainting not)? When we pray and are led by the Holy Spirit, what
other attributes will we develop? Eventually, how will we be
blessed? Prayer seems like such a simple thing--it almost seems

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silly--but ultimately what is the power that comes from
continual prayer?
12.

In the margins of your scriptures in Alma, write

the next scripture: "Psalms 55:17--pray always". I like this
little scripture. When does the psalmist pray? Notice what else
we learn about the prayers, are they said and just left in the
void? What is the Lord's part in our prayers? How does it make
you feel to know that the Lord hears your voice?
13.

Originally, I wanted to include the Bible

Dictionary definition of prayer in this scripture chain, but I'm
reconsidering. Although I love the definition given in the Bible
Dictionary, it has less to do with praying always, and I'd like
for this chain to keep that focus. So, I'm going to forgo the BD
entry and move on to my last part of the scripture chain. I
remember a talk given by Elder Bednar about prayer. He taught
about praying throughout the day, and how it can help us to obey
the command to "pray always." I can't remember the name of the
talk, but I have access to it online, so I will do a search now.
(You can, too).
14.

What do you know...the title of the conference

talk is Pray Always! What are the three principles that Elder
Bednar teaches in this scripture? How might they help you to
pray always? How can you follow the example that Elder Bednar

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gave and then begin to experience constant prayer in your life?
If you have already put this into practice in your life, how has
it benefitted you?
15.

Now, you have a few options for ending this

scripture chain. If you are studying your scriptures on an
electronic device using the Church's Gospel library, then you
can link the talk directly to the scripture. Simply follow the
instructions online. Easy.
16.

However, if you are studying in your physical

scriptures, then you might want to pick a small quote, write it
in the margins or on a post-it note and insert it in your
scriptures at Psalms 55. I chose the following quote: Morning
and evening prayers--and all of the prayers in between--are not
unrelated, discrete events; rather they are linked together each
day and across days, weeks, months, and even years. This is in
part how we fulfill the scriptural admonition to 'pray always.'
Such meaningful prayers are instrumental in obtaining the
highest blessings God holds in store for His faithful children."
Additionally, in the margins of your scriptures at Psalms 55,
write the reference to the first scripture (Luke 18:1), thus
"closing" the chain with its final link.
17.

If you don't want to write a quote in your

scriptures, then you can also write the reference for this talk

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in the margins of your scriptures--" 'Pray Always,' David A.
Bednar, October 2008 General Conference" Don't forget to close
the chain by also adding the reference to Luke 18:1.
18.

You are finished with the scripture chain! How

has this helped your understanding to pray always and not faint?

Parables
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the Parables,
then study these parables following the instructions given in
the Appendix.
The following parables are included in Luke 18

The parable of the unjust judge--Luke 18:1-8

The parable of the Pharisee and the Publican--

Luke 18:9-14

Miracles
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the Miracles,
then study these miracles following the instructions given in
the Appendix.
In Luke 18, the following miracle is included:

Christ heals a blind man--Luke 18:35-43

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Luke 19

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
19.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 19:1-27
1.

As Jesus was walking into Jericho, whom did he

see? Where was Zacchaeus? Why was he in the tree?
2.

What did Jesus tell Zacchaeus? How did the crowds

respond to this?
3.

What did Zacchaeus then tell the Lord? Why do you

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think Zacchaeus made this offer?
4.

How does the Lord respond? Why did He respond

5.

According to verse 11, why did the Lord tell a

this way?

parable? Which parable does He tell?
6.

What happens in the parable of the pounds? How

does this relate to what Christ was saying He would teach--about
the coming of the kingdom of God?

Luke 19:28-40
1.

Where was Jesus going in verse 28?

2.

Before reaching Jerusalem, what He did have two

of his disciples do? Why did He have them do this?
3.

What were the people doing as Jesus entered into

Jerusalem?
4.

Why do you think that they were rejoicing?

5.

Think about the many mighty works that Jesus had

performed during His ministry. Which do you think would have
caused you to rejoice?
6.

Consider your own life now. What are the might

works that the Savior has performed in your life?What do you do
to rejoice?
7.

Did the Pharisees understand why Christ received

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such a reception? What does the Lord say to them?

Luke 19:41-48
1.

When Jesus came near Jerusalem, what did he do?

2.

Why do you think that He wept over Jerusalem? Did

they understand who Christ was? Why do you think that they
didn't understand? Yet, who, above all else should have
understood?
3.

What would eventually happen to the Jews?

4.

After lamenting over Jerusalem, what did Christ

do? Why do you think that Christ cleansed the temple? What does
this teach us about the temple? What can you do to be sure that
you keep the house of the Lord clean and Holy?
5.

After cleansing the temple, we learn that Jesus

taught daily in the temple. Anciently the temple was a house of
learning, how does this relate to our temples today? How do you
think that you can prepare yourself for temple attendance and
instruction from the Lord?
6.

What did the chief priests want to do to the

Savior? What was preventing them from doing so? We already know
what will happen to the Savior later in the week. What does this
insight about the Pharisees and chief priests tell us? What kind
of people were they? Do you think that they understood the

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gospel they purported to teach? Why do you think that they had
such a hard time accepting their own God? Do you think that they
truly worshipped God, or were they more loyal to something else?
If you have been baptized, or if you are considering to covenant
with God, what can you do to be sure that your commitment stays
focused on the Lord?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 19, the life of Christ is drawing to a close. This
chapter marks the first day of the final week of Christ's mortal
ministry. One of the hallmarks and fulfilled prophecies of this
final week in the Savior's life was His triumphal entrance into
Jerusalem. We will study the Lord's triumphal entry and see what
insights it gives us about the Atonement.
1.

Read Luke 19:28-40. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

What did the Savior tell the apostles to go and

do? In verse 31, what did the Savior tell the disciples to say
if anyone questioned what they were doing?
3.

What occurred while they went to retrieve the

colt? Did they perform as they had been instructed?

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Why do you think that the Lord had them do and

say these things? How are they a part of the bigger picture:
Christ's life and His eventual Atonement?
5.

Imagine these disciples. What do you think they

were thinking when they went to retrieve the colt? Do you think
that they understood what was happening (at Christ's triumphal
entry)? Do you think they comprehended that later in the very
week, the Savior would suffer in Gethsemane and then die on the
cross?
6.

As Christ entered into the city, what were the

people doing?
7.

Why do you think that they were rejoicing in

8.

How is Christ's entry into Jerusalem a

Christ?

"triumphal" entry? Who is Christ in relation to Israel and the
entire world? How does the Atonement set Him apart? What part
does the Atonement play in Christ's triumphal entry into
Jerusalem?
9.

As the Savior enters into Jerusalem, and the

people praise Him, how do the Pharisees respond? Why do you
think that the Pharisees want the Lord to rebuke His disciples?
10.

Does Christ do as the Pharisees suggest? What

does He say instead?

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What do you think that the disciples understood

about Christ, yet was lost on the Pharisees? Now think of this
in terms of the Atonement. How does the Atonement play into
Christ's role as King? How does this then make Him deserving of
praise and adulation from us?
12.

Why do you think that the Pharisees had such a

hard time recognizing that Christ was their King? Think, again,
of the Atonement while considering this question. Do you think
that the Pharisees understood the King who was prophesied of in
the Old Testament? How did their understanding of the promised
Messiah interfere with their ability to recognize the Messiah
when He came? How do you think that an understanding of an
Atonement and their need for it might have helped them to
recognize their King?
13.

How do you think that a better understanding of

and appreciation for the Atonement will help you in your
discipleship? What can you do to better recognize the Savior as
your King and praise Him accordingly?
14.

As you consider the triumphal entry, how does it

play a part in Christ's Atonement? Think of the triumphal entry,
itself. How does it compare to what will be happening later on
in the week in the Garden of Gethsemane and on Golgotha? How do
you think that this high point figures into the bigger work of

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the Atonement of the Lord?

Parables
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the Parables,
then study these parables following the instructions given in
the Appendix. The parables given in Luke 19 include:

The parable of the pounds--Luke 19:11-27.

Cross Reference--Nature Testifies of Christ
In Luke 19, the Savior mentions something to the Pharisees
about how even nature would cry out and praise Him. We will
study this verse and a cross reference that will help us to
better understand this declaration made by the Savior.
1.

Read Luke 19:28-40. Consider the Analysis and

Application questions. You may also want to study the Exercise:
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ.
2.

We will focus mostly on the end of this scripture

block, but it is important that you have the entire block read
for background information. In verse 39, what do the Pharisees
say to Christ? Why do you think that they tell Him to do this?
3.

What does Christ answer? What do you think that

He means by this?
4.

When Christ says, "if these should hold their

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peace, the stones would immediately cry out," I am reminded of a
scripture in the Book of Mormon. We will cross-reference the two
scriptures to find more understanding on this scripture. Turn to
Alma 30:44.
5.

Read the chapter heading for Alma 30 to get a

better understanding of the context of the scripture we will
read.
6.

In verse 44, to whom is Alma speaking? What does

Alma say to Korihor?
7.

What are the testimonies that Korihor has been

given? Did he recognize or accept the testimonies of his
brethren and the holy prophets? How is Korihor like the
Pharisees? Which testimonies had they been given in their lives?
8.

Although the Pharisees claimed to believe in the

prophets that testified of the Messiah, had they truly received
the witness that had been given them? What do you suppose kept
Korihor and the Pharisees from receiving such a witness?
9.

Besides the witnesses of the Prophets, what else

does Alma teach witnesses of the Savior? Do you think that this
is true?
10.

Think of this in regards to the scripture in

Luke. Though the rocks weren't crying out during the triumphal
entry, why do you think Christ says that they would have? Why do

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all of the natural creations--the rocks, the planet, everything
on the face of the planet, the stars, they sky, the universe-why do you think that all of these natural creations witness of
Christ?
11.

How have these witnesses increased your personal

testimony?
12.

Be sure to note the cross-reference in your

scriptures.

Cross-Reference--Christ laments over Israel
In Luke 19, we read of Christ lamenting over Jerusalem.
Let's find a cross-reference that will help us to understand Why
Christ wept over it.
1.

Read Luke 19:41-42. Why is Christ weeping over

Jerusalem?
2.

What do you think that Christ means in verse 42?

3.

To help us better understand what Christ is

saying in verse 42, let's study a cross-reference.
4.

Read 2 Nephi 10:3-5.

5.

In verse 3, what reason does Jacob give for

Christ's coming to Jerusalem?
6.

Why was it that no other nation would crucify

their God? What was it that those in Jerusalem ignored? What

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clouded their faith and ability to recognize their Savior?
7.

With this understanding, think again on what is

happening in Luke 19. The Lord knows what will unfold through
the duration of the week: His Atonement and Crucifixion. Why do
you think that the Lord weeps? How does this scripture in 2
Nephi help to clarify your understanding of the matter?
8.

How do you want the Savior to speak to you--with

happiness and compassion because of your faith and good works,
or with a feeling of defeat and weeping, like He spoke about
Jerusalem? What can you do to accomplish this? Really think,
specifically. If you are studying these scriptures, then most
likely you believe in the Savior, but think of the ways that you
might be able to improve in your devotion to the Lord.

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Luke 20

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
20.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 20:1-18
1.

After Christ's triumphal entry into Jerusalem,

what did He spend time doing? Where was He when He was doing
this?
2.
taught?

What did the chief priests ask when Christ

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How did the Savior respond when the Pharisees

questioned His authority?
4.

Think about the priests. From whom have they

claimed to receive their authority? Why do you think that they
would then be motivated to question Christ's authority?
5.

After Christ "answered" their question, what

parable did He tell them?
6.

What is the meaning of this parable? Why do you

think that He told it to the Pharisees and chief priests?
7.

As you think about the Pharisees and chief

priests, it is easy to look down on them and their decisions,
but what can you learn from them? What can you do to avoid
making the same types of mistakes that they did?

Luke 20:19-26
1.

What did the chief priests and scribes want to do

to the Savior after he told the parable? What stopped them from
going through with their desire?
2.

What did the scribes and chief priests decide to

3.

Notice, in verse 20, the phrase, "which should

do?

feign themselves just men." What do you think that this means?
Why do you think that the Pharisees, chief priests, and scribes

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had to feign themselves just men? What does this teach us about
them? How do you think that the Savior felt about people who
pretended to be his servants?
4.

What do the chief priests and scribes ask the

5.

Why do you suppose they asked Him this question?

6.

Is Christ fooled by their treachery? How does He

Lord?

respond to the question?

Luke 20:27-38
1.

According to verse 27, what is a distinctive

characteristic of the Sadducees?
2.

What did the Sadducees ask the Savior?

3.

How did the Savior respond? What did He teach

them about marriage, life after death, and the resurrection?

Luke 20:39-47
1.

After all of this questioning, what did the

scribes say to the Lord?
2.

What question did Christ then ask them?

3.

Did they have an answer for Him?

4.

What warning did the Savior offer to the people?

5.

Think of all that you have read throughout this

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chapter? Why do you think that Christ gave this warning?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 20, Christ is speaking with some of the groups that
oppose Him. One of these groups is the Sadducees. We will study
the exchange between the Savior and the Sadducees to see what it
can teach us about Him and the Atonement.
1.

Read Luke 20:27-38. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

If the Sadducees deny a resurrection, why do you

think that they asked Jesus the questions they asked Him?
3.

What does Jesus teach them about marriage? Do you

think that they really wanted to know about marriage? What do
you think that their question really was about?
4.

When does the ordinance of marriage take place?

Why do you suppose that it is done on earth? How is this like
other ordinances? Can we perform our own ordinances after we
have passed away? Why or why not?
5.

What does Jesus teach the Sadducees about our

nature once we have been resurrected--in verse 36?
6.

Jesus states, "Neither can they die any more:"

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Let's think about the concept of death in big terms--what it
actually is from God's perspective, and not only our own.
Remember, Christ Atoned for our sins. So, what is significant
about Christ, the One who overcame death and hell for each of
us, stating that "Neither can they die any more"?
7.

How was death introduced into this world? After

Adam's fall, what was their hope of Salvation? Did salvation
come to Adam and Eve right away? Why? What would they have to do
before receiving Salvation from God? Really think about this.
This question is kind of big. Think of the purpose of our mortal
lives (see Abraham 3:25-36), Think of how much time and how many
generations separated Adam's life from Christ's life, who came
to offer salvation for Adam's fall. As you think about these
ideas, write anything that strikes you in your journal
8.

Christ mentions, in verse 36, that the children

of God are the children of the resurrection. What do you suppose
He means by this? Turn to John 11:25. What does Jesus tell
Martha? Now, think about Christ being the Resurrection and
compare it to His declaration in Luke 20:36. How are the
children of God also the children of the resurrection? How do
Christ and His Atonement make this possible?
9.

Finally, in verse 38, what do we learn about God?

How is it possible that God is not a God of the dead, but of the

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living? Each person--faithful or not--that comes to the earth
will die. How is God, then, a God of the living? Is He God only
to those who are alive? What has He done to make this statement
true? In other words, what is the significance of the Atonement
when you ponder that God is "not a God of the dead, but of the
living"?
10.

What does verse 38 mean to you? Think of your own

life, and eventual death. Or, think of the lives and deaths of
loved ones. How does it make you feel to know that through the
Atonement, none are bound by death? How does it make you feel to
know that Heavenly Father is a God of the Living? Have you been
able to receive a testimony of this in your life? Think (and
write) about the experiences you have had that have taught you
this declaration made in verse 38 is true.
11.

How does understanding the concept of

resurrection help you to better understand the Atonement? What
does this teach you about the Savior?

Parables
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the Parables,
then study these parables following the instructions given in
the Appendix. The parable listed in Luke 20 includes:

The Parable of the Wicked Husbandman--Luke

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20:9-18

List--The Scribes
Often, lists are included in the scriptures. It is kind of
fun to find them and note them in your scriptures. In Luke 20,
we can find a list. We will study it now.
1.

Read Luke 20:45-47.

2.

What is the audience Christ is speaking to? How

does this apply to you?
3.

Whom does the Savior warn the disciples of?

4.

Why should we "beware of the scribes"? You will

notice several reasons why we should beware: Christ gives us a
list! Find each point in the list.
5.

What is the first thing the Lord says about the

scribes? What do you think that He means by this warning? Why do
you suppose the scribes would desire to walk in long robes? Is
this simply a matter of fashion, or is there something else that
the scribes want? How do you think that people "walk in long
robes" today? What can you do to avoid this pitfall?
6.

What is the second thing on the Lord's list? What

do you think that the Savior means by this? Do you think that
the scribes love for greeting in the market was simply a desire
for social stimulation? Why do you think that they loved these

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greetings? Keep in mind that they love to wear long robes. How
do you suppose the long robes and greetings in the market could
be related? How might people react if they saw a person in these
distinctive robes in a highly public marketplace? Why do you
suppose that seeking this kind of attention is something we
should beware? Do you think that this happens today? What can
you do to avoid it?
7.

What is the third item on the Lord's list? What

do you think that He means by this item? Notice the footnote for
"highest". How does this definition help you to understand what
Jesus is saying? Why do you suppose that the scribes, who like
to stand out and love attention from people in public places,
would want to sit in the first or most honorable chair at the
synagogue? How do you suppose that this quality interrupted
their ability to worship the Savior? How is this done in our
modern times? Remember, scribes were members of the church, so
these warnings really apply to us. What can you do to avoid
becoming like a scribe in this instance?
8.

What is the fourth item on the Lord's list? What

do you think that this means? What do you suppose that the
scribes thought of themselves? Of others? How might this kind of
behavior inhibit their discipleship? How do people seek the
"chief room at feasts;" today? How can you avoid becoming this

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way?
9.

What is the fifth item on the Lord's list? Begin

to ask yourself the questions that we've been asking all along.
What does this mean? Why would Christ say it? How did this
impact the scribes and their supposed faith? Why do you think
that Christ would warn us against it? As you study this point,
can you think of any other examples in the scriptures? If you
think of other scriptures that relate to what you are studying,
don't be afraid to break from this list, and study them. If the
Spirit is prompting you to take another direction, then follow
it to see what He is trying to teach you. Don't get so worried
about studying this list quickly. Instead, take your time
studying each point.
10.

What is the sixth item on the list? Again, ask

yourself questions to discover more meaning and to better
understand what the Savior is teaching. Additionally, don't
forget to apply this to current times. Ask yourself how this
happens today. Think of modern day examples of scribes and how
they might "for a shew make long prayers." Additionally, think
of yourself, and see if you need to make any kind of
improvements in your own life.
11.

Finally, what do we learn will happen to the

scribes? After studying this list, why do you suppose that the

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Scribes will receive such a great damnation? Why do you think
that Jesus took the time to give us this list and warning?

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Luke 21

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
21.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 21:1-4
1.

What does Jesus see occurring at the temple?

2.

What does he teach after witnessing this woman?

3.

What do you think that he means by the teaching?

Luke 21:5-24

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1.

What is the Lord teaching about in this section?

2.

What will happen to the temple at Jerusalem? Why

do you think that the Lord would allow His temple to be
destroyed?
3.

What are some of the signs that Christ gives that

will tell of His Second Coming?
4.

Yet before His Second Coming, what will happen to

Jerusalem and the apostles?
5.

What do you think that Christ means by "the times

of the Gentiles"?
6.

Have we seen the fulfillment of any of the

prophecies given here by Christ?

Luke 21:25-33
1.

What are some of the signs that the Lord gives of

His coming in verses 25-26?
2.

Be sure to read the JST for Luke 21:25. What

extra insight does the JST give to this scripture?
3.

What will happen after the signs are fulfilled?

Has this prophecy come to pass?
4.

What does the Lord tell the disciples to do in

verse 28? What do you think that this means?
5.

How can you do as the Lord instructed? How can

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you "look up" and "lift up your heads:" and prepare for the
Redemption that Christ offers you?
6.

What parable does the Savior then give to the

disciples? Why does He tell it to them?
7.

According to verse 32, when will this happen?

(Make sure to note the JST.)

Luke 21:34-38
1.

What warning does the Lord give in these verses?

2.

What does he mean in verse 34 when He says "at

any time your hearts be overcharged with surfeiting, and
drunkenness, and cares of this life"? What are some of the ways
that these things come into your life and distort your vision?
3.

Although surfeiting, drunkenness, and cares of

this life may seem appealing at times, what does it create in
our lives if we give into them?
4.

What can we do to avoid this snare? Why do you

think that prayer and keeping the commandments are so effective?
5.

Have you been able to keep the advice the Savior

gives here? How have being watchful, praying always, and keeping
His commandments helped you?
6.

In the last two verses, we learn a little bit of

what Christ was doing in this, his final week. What was He

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doing? Where did people go to find Jesus? Where can you go to
find Jesus and be instructed of Him?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Relationship with Christ
Near the end of Luke 21, the Lord gives a warning. We will
read through what Christ teaches and see how it sheds light on
the Atonement or how the Atonement relates to what is being
taught.
1.

Read Luke 21:34-38. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

When you think about the warning given in verse

34, how does it relate to the Atonement that Jesus Christ
performed? How do surfeiting, drunkenness, and cares of this
life come into play in the gospel sense? Think about Christ as
He suffered in Gethsemane and on the Cross. Did he give in to
any of these things? How might the Atonement have been affected
if He had?
3.

Think about your own mission on this earth. How

does submitting to surfeiting, drunkenness and the cares of this
world impact your ability to fulfill your mission?
4.

How will the second coming of Christ come upon

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all who dwell on the face of the earth? How does the Atonement
help us to prepare for that day?
5.

Why do you think that the Second Coming of Christ

is considered a "snare"? How does the second coming of Christ
fit in to His work and His Atonement?
6.

How might we be accounted worthy to stand at the

day of the Lord? What relationship does Christ's Atonement have
with our ability to watch and pray and eventually escape the
horrible things that will come to pass?
7.

How will Christ appear when He comes again? (Be

sure to check in the JST for verse 36.) What do you think that
it means to be "clothed in the glory of his father"? Why do you
suppose that Christ is able to be clothed in His glory? What
does His performance of the Atonement have to do with this
moment?
8.

What does this exchange teach you about Christ,

His Atonement, and your relationship with Him?

Compare and Contrast--The rich men and the widow
As Luke 21 opens, we read of people who were casting their
alms at the temple. We see two types of people giving: the rich
men and the poor widow. You are undoubtedly familiar with this
story. For now, we will compare and contrast the rich men with

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the old woman.
1.

Read Luke 21:1-4. Consider the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

In verse 1, what is the type of person we are

introduced to?
3.

What is meant by the word "rich"? Look in the

footnotes and read the suggested scriptures: Mosiah 4:23 and
Doctrine and Covenants 56:16 for more insight.
4.

According to Mosiah 4:23, what is a

characteristic of "substance"? Is this true? Will our substance
and riches die when we die? Is being "rich" confined to earthly
substance?
5.

What do we learn about riches in Doctrine and

Covenants 56:16? What kind of importance do riches play during
our mortal lives? Can riches empower us after death the way that
they seem to during life? Why do you think that we sometimes put
such an importance on riches, confusing their actual lack of
eternal power?
6.

With this understanding of "rich" what kind of

men do you think the rich men in Luke 21:1 were? Now, these men
were at the temple, giving a monetary donation, weren't they
righteous? What can we learn from this example?
7.

After the rich men cast in their money, who did

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Christ see? What did she contribute to the treasury?
8.

In verse three, what does the Savior say about

the poor widow's contribution?
9.

Why is she considered to have given "more than

they all"?
10.

Let's take a moment more to think about these two

examples. What do the rich men and the poor widow have in
common? Try to think of all of their similarities. Write these
similarities down.
11.

Now, how are the rich men and the poor widow

different? Write down their differences.
12.

What can you learn from these two examples? What

do they teach us about sacrifice and dedication to the Lord? Do
you think that the Lord loves poor people more than rich people?
What do you think that the Lord is trying to teach here? How can
you apply His teaching into your own life?

Parables
If you are doing a comprehensive study of the parables,
then study these parables following the instructions given in
the Appendix. Luke 21 includes the following parable:

The parable of the fig tree--Luke 21:29-33

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Scripture Chain--Christ and the Temple
At the end of Luke 21, we read that Christ had been
teaching in the temple. Specifically, in verse 38, we read, "And
all the peole came early in the morning to him in the temple,
for to hear him."
Personally, I am struck by the people going to the
temple to hear Christ. As Latter-day Saints, we are a templegoing people, and this verse shows an association between Christ
and the temple.
Because I have a strong interest in this subject, I
think that it would be a good time to work on a scripture chain.
I will include it here, and we will study together.
While we are studying this, pay attention to the
process of making a scripture chain. When YOU are intrigued by a
subject and when you realize that you've been noticing it a lot
on your studies, stop reading what you're reading and work on a
scripture chain. It can be a very illuminating experience.
I hope that this scripture chain will help you to find
ways to form your own. Additionally, if there are scriptures you
think of to include in this scripture chain that I haven't
included, then by all means, add them to your scripture chain!
1.

Read Luke 21:38. Why are the people coming to the

temple? What does this image--learning from Christ at the

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temple--mean to you? How have you experienced this in your own
life?
2.

Now, look again at verse 38. Are there any cross-

references?
3.

Because we don't have any cross-references, we'll

have to start this scripture chain on our own. The first thing I
like to do is to rack my own brain and memory. Don't worry!
We'll use other devices in a few minutes. But sometimes it is
nice simply to think. Please try it. Remember, the Holy Ghost
will bring all things to your remembrance. Before you go to the
Topical Guide or your computer, think about any other scriptures
or even conference talks that reference the temple and
especially Christ in the temple.
4.

Personally, as I think about this idea, I think

of Christ at the temple when he was 12, Christ appearing to the
Nephites at the temple, Moses on Mt. Sinai (although Mt. Sinai
wasn't a temple per se, the Lord commanded Moses to take off his
shoes because it was Holy ground.), and the dedication of the
Kirtland temple in the latter-days.
5.

Begin by studying through the examples that you

have thought of. If you like any of these examples, then note
which ones they are on a piece of paper so we can mark them in
your scriptures later.

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Now go ahead and look in your Topical Guide and

Bible Dictionary. Read through the entries and if one strikes
you, then add it to your list. After studying through the
Topical Guide and Bible Dictionary, I have an idea of what I'd
like to include in my "Christ and the Temple" scripture chain.
7.

Study through all of the scriptures that you have

looked at. Now whittle the list down to only your favorite ones,
or the ones you feel should fit into this scripture chain.
Perhaps you want all of them. Maybe you want the chain to be
specified to appearances of Christ at the temple. Consider what
you want carefully, follow the Spirit, and then study each
scripture and mark them in your scriptures as you have marked
other scripture chains.
8.

Be sure that you mark the last scripture and

connect it to your first scripture--so that the chain is
complete.
9.

A final note, I went ahead and did a short search

on lds.org to read some of the things that the latter-day
prophets and apostles have said about the temple in General
Conference. You may or may not decide to do this. If you find
something that will fit into your scripture chain, make sure to
note the title of the talk somewhere in your scriptures so that
you will be able to remember it when you are studying this

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scripture chain.
10.

The nice thing about scripture chains is that you

have a series of scriptures ready at your fingertips. This is
great for talks, lessons, etc.

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Luke 22

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
22.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 22:1-6
1.

What holiday was approaching? What were the chief

priests and scribes plotting? How does this plot fit in with the
feast of the Passover? How is this situation ironic?
2.

What is meant in verse 3, when the scriptures

relate that "Then entered Satan into Judas surnamed Iscariot"?

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What did Judas do?

Luke 22:7-23
1.

Where did Jesus send Peter and John? What did He

send them to do?
2.

What is significant about this Passover, this

last supper?
3.

What did Jesus do at this last supper?

4.

What do the wine and the bread represent?

5.

What does Jesus indicate in verse 21 about his

own fate and that of another apostle?

Luke 22:24-30
1.

Why was there "a strife" among the apostles?

2.

What does Jesus teach about greatness? How does

Christ's teaching compare with what the world considers great?

Luke 22:31-38
1.

What warning does the Lord give Peter? (Make sure

to read the JST.) What do you think that this means?
2.

How do you suppose Peter felt during this

conversation with the Lord?

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Luke 22:39-46
1.

Where did Christ and His disciples go?

2.

Why did they go to the Garden of Gethsemane?

3.

What did Jesus do in the Garden of Gethsemane as

He suffered?
4.

How do you think that prayer helped Him in His

time of extreme trial?
5.

How has prayer helped you during your seasons of

6.

When Christ prayed to have the cup removed, did

trial?

Heavenly Father do it? Did Heavenly Father altogether ignore
Christ? What did He bless the Savior with?
7.

Even though Christ received strength from an

angel, we learn that Christ's suffering went on in this
miserable trial. How does Luke describe Christ's suffering? How
is this significant to you?

Luke 22:47-53
1.

After performing the Atonement in the Garden of

Gethsemane, what happened?
2.

What was Christ's reaction to Judas' kiss?

3.

Was Jesus caught off-guard by Judas' betrayal?

Why do you think that He asks Judah this question, then?

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In verse 50, what does one of the disciples do?

Why do you think that he did this?
5.

What does Jesus do in response? Think about it,

he healed the ear of a man who is about to take Him into custody
to be sentenced to death. What does this act teach us about the
Savior? About those who condemned Him?
6.

What does Jesus ask the chief priests? Why do

they wait until this time to capture Him?
7.

Notice the last phrase in verse 53: "but this is

your hour, and the power of darkness." What does it mean to you?
How is the capture of the Lord "the power of darkness"? How can
this phrase describe the way that the chief priests have been
operating?

Luke 22:54-62
1.

In this set of verses, what is Peter doing?

2.

Why do you think that Peter had denied Christ?

3.

How many times did Peter deny Christ?

4.

The rooster crowed, the Lord looked at Peter, and

then what did Peter remember?
5.

How did Peter feel about His denial of the

6.

How did Peter's denial of Christ differ from

Savior?

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Judas's betrayal?
7.

Although Peter denied Christ, do you think that

he truly repented and learned something from this experience?
What do you think he learned?

Luke 22:63-71
1.

What did the men that held Jesus do to Him?

2.

What question did they ask Him? Though He did not

answer, was this because He was unable to?
3.

Once it was day, what did the chief priests and

elders begin doing?
4.

What was Christ's response to their questioning?

5.

How did the chief priests and elders take this

prophecy? Why do you think that they considered it blasphemy?
6.

How is it ironic that the chief priests and

elders accused the Lord of blasphemy? Who was doing the real
blaspheming here? What does this situation make you think of?
7.

How do you think we can apply this lesson to our

own lives? What can we do to avoid such spiritual blindness that
we cannot see our own Savior and God?

Enrich Your Learning

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The Atonement and Your Relationship with Christ
In this chapter, we read the actual suffering and
performance of the Atonement in Gethsemane. It is actually a
very difficult even for me to fully comprehend. The idea of
Christ suffering for all of us overwhelms me. So, we will study
a scripture chain that will help to treat the meaning of the
events that took place in Gethsemane. As you study, note how it
helps you to understand the Atonement and feel the love that the
Savior has for you in your life.
1.

Read Luke 22:39-46. Complete the Analysis and

Application questions. As you study this portion of the chapter,
what stands out to you in regards to Christ's suffering in
Gethsemane? How does reading this make you feel?
2.

In the margin of your scriptures, write, "Mark

14:32-39--The Atonement of Christ". Now read Mark 14:32-39
(including the JST). What were the disciples wondering about
Christ? Which of the apostles did He take with Him? What did
Jesus have them do? What happened to the Savior? As Jesus
experienced this great trial, what did He do? Is it okay for us
to pray to be relieved from our trials? What was the final
caveat in Christ's prayer? Why is this significant? What were
the apostles doing when the Savior came back? How do you think
that this made Him feel?

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In your scriptures (in Mark), write the next

reference: "Mosiah 3:7--The Atonement of Christ." Now read
Mosiah 3:7. What does King Benjamin teach about the Atonement in
this verse? Is there any kind of pain that the Savior does not
understand?
4.

In your scriptures (in Mosiah), write the next

reference: "Doctrine and Covenants 19:18--The Atonement of
Christ." In this verse, Christ describes what He went through in
Gethsemane. What does He say about it? What do you find striking
in His description of the experience?
5.

In your scriptures (in D&C), write the next

reference: "Isaiah 53:3-5--The Atonement of Christ." What has
Christ gone through in His life? What do you think "borne our
griefs," "carried our sorrows," "wounded for our transgression"
and "the chastisement of our peace was upon Him" mean? How do
Christ's stripes heal us?
6.

In your scriptures (in Isaiah), write the next

reference: "Alma 7:11-12--The Atonement of Christ." What does
Christ experience in these two verses? What is the purpose of
His suffering? How do you feel to know that He suffered for you,
personally?
7.

Remember to write "Luke 22:39-46" in the margins

of your scriptures in Alma to complete the chain.

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How do you think that understanding more about

the Garden of Gethsemane and what happened there can help you
with your overall testimony?
9.

How do you work to internalize what he Lord did

for you there on that lonely, miserable night?

Cross-reference--Satan and Deception
In Luke 22, Judas betrays Jesus. It is a wonder to think
that one of the apostles would do such a thing. We will study a
cross-reference that can help explain how this might have come
to be.
1.

Read Luke 22:3. What does it say about Satan and

Judas? How do you suppose that Satan entered into Judas?
2.

Because Satan entered into Judas, what does this

teach us about our own "safety"? Do you think that Judas had a
testimony of Christ? Think about Christ and the experiences that
He had with the apostles throughout His ministry. Judas was a
part of these experiences. Does being a disciple or apostle make
us "safe" from Satan's temptations and influence?
3.

We don't have a cross-reference in verse 3 that

can help us to better understand the situation, so we will try
to make a cross-reference of our own. Can you think, off the top
of your head, of a scripture that might explain the workings of

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Satan?
4.

If you can, then go to that scripture, study it,

and see how it might help you to understand how Satan entered
into the heart of Judas.
5.

If you can't think of another scripture, then

look in the Topical Guide for a scripture that might work for
this purpose. I will now include the scripture that I have
thought of.
6.

Read 2 Nephi 28:20-23.

7.

In verse 20, what is one of the ways that Satan

will enter into our hearts? How do you think that rage destroys
us and others? How does the devil tempt you with rage? What do
you suppose is the antidote to such an emotion?
8.

In verse 21, what will the devil do with others?

What do you think that Nephi means by "lull them away into
carnal security"? How do you think that this kind of complacency
happens? What is a result to giving in to the Devil's
pacification?
9.

In verse 22, what does the devil do to others?

What is meant by "flattereth"? How does the devil try to flatter
us? What is the result of such flattery and lies? How do you
think that we can ignore the flattering lies that the Devil will
try to speak to us?

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We do not exactly know the method that Satan used

to enter into the heart of Judas, but how does the scripture in
2 Nephi shed a little light on how Judas might have been swayed
by Satan? Did Judas have a choice in the matter?
11.

What can we do to keep our hearts set on the

Savior?

Compare and Contrast--Rooms
In Luke 22, we read of the preparation of the upper room
for the Passover. We will read it and compare this to another
part of the Savior's life.
1.

Read Luke 22:7-13. What did the Lord have Peter

and John do in order to prepare for the Passover feast?
2.

Who were Peter and John told to find?

3.

In verse 11, what was the question that Peter and

John were supposed to ask the man that they met? Do you think
that he understood what they meant by "the Master"?
4.

What does this man do in response to the question

asked by Peter and John?
5.

Why do you think that the furnishing of this room

for the feast of the Passover is significant? What would happen
in this room? How do we commemorate this Last Supper today?
6.

As you ponder this room, can you think of any

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other "rooms" (or lack of "rooms") in Christ's life?
7.

I am thinking of the time of Christ's birth--when

there was no room. Let's study this experience.
8.

Read Luke 2:7. What does this scripture tell us?

What does it tell us about "rooms"?
9.

How are these two experiences similar?

10.

How do these two experiences differ?

11.

What do these two experiences teach you about the

12.

As you think about these two rooms and making

Savior?

room for Christ in your life, what do you learn from these two
examples?

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Luke 23

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
23.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 23:1-7
1.

At the beginning of Luke 23, take a moment to

refresh your memory. What was happening with Christ? Where was
he being taken?
2.

What did Pilate ask the Savior? How did Christ

respond? What was Pilate's verdict concerning the guilt of

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Christ? Why do you think that Pilate thought Christ to be
innocent?
3.

How did the Jews respond to Pilate's judgment?

4.

Why do you think that it was possible for Pilate

to see Christ as innocent, yet the Jews--Christ's own people-were so determined that He be found guilty?
5.

Where was Christ sent?

Luke 23:8-11
1.

How did Herod feel about Christ being brought to

2.

When Christ Herod questioned Christ, how did He

3.

Why do you think that Christ remained silent?

4.

Where was Christ then sent?

him?

respond?

Luke 23:12-26
1.

What do we learn about the relationship of Herod

and Pilate in verse 23?
2.

What did Pilate say when the people had brought

Christ back?
3.

What did Pilate propose to do? Why?

4.

How did the people respond when Pilate said he

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would release Christ?
5.

Again, what did Pilate try to do?

6.

Yet, what did the people say in response? (See vs

7.

What does Pilate ask them? What evil had Christ

8.

Again, the question must be asked, Why do you

21.)

done?

think that Pilate could see Christ's innocence so easily, while
Christ's own people were determined that he would be crucified?
9.

What did the people say when Pilate suggested to

release Christ for a third time?
10.

What did Pilate finally decide to do?

Luke 23:27-33
1.

Who were following Christ as he was going to be

crucified?
2.

What did Jesus say to these women?

3.

What do you think that he meant by this prophecy?

(See the JST in verse 31 for help.)
4.

What finally happened to the Savior? Who was

crucified with Him?

Luke 23:34-38

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What does Jesus say while He's on the cross? Who

is this concerning (see the JST)?
2.

Why do you think that Jesus feels that they are

worthy of forgiveness? Do you suppose that they would have
crucified the Savior if they understood He was the Christ?
3.

What did the soldiers do after crucifying Him?

4.

What do the people say to the Savior?

5.

What else happens to the Savior while He is on

the cross, but before He dies?

Luke 23:39-45
1.

As Christ and the malefactors hung on the cross,

what did one of the men say?
2.

How did the other respond?

3.

What does He then ask Jesus?

4.

What does Jesus tell the malefactor?

5.

What happened to the sun and the veil of the

6.

Why do you think that these things occurred?

temple?

Luke 23:46-49
1.

What did Jesus say right before he died? Why,

then, did Christ finally die?

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What did the Centurion say when he saw what

happened?

Luke 23:50-56
1.

In verse 50, who is introduced?

2.

What is significant about Joseph? What is meant

in verse 50 by "counselor"? (See the footnote for help.)
3.

Though he was a member of the Sanhedrin, had

Joseph counseled with the other chief priests and Pharisees to
have Christ killed?
4.

Why did Joseph go to Pilate?

5.

What happened to Christ's body after he had died?

6.

How does it make you feel to know that there were

some who cared about the Savior?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
Like the previous chapter, Luke 23 is very directly related
to the Atonement. Obviously, we can learn a lot about the
Atonement from these chapters. Today, however, we will focus on
Jesus and the malefactors to see what His experience with them
teaches us about the Atonement.

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Read Luke 23:39-45. Complete the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

In verse 39, what does the cross-reference tell

us about the word "railed"? How did the first malefactor
blaspheme against the Savior? Was he the only one committing
this sin at the time? Why do you suppose that the first
malefactor would have said this to the Savior?
3.

How was reproach an important part of the

Atonement?
4.

Have you ever been mocked or reproached because

of your beliefs? What do you learn from the Savior's example
here?
5.

What did the Savior do in response? Who responded

to the malefactor? What did he say?
6.

What relationship does the malefactor make

between the Savior and the others being crucified (including
himself)? What does He say about Christ's guilt? Why do you
think that this malefactor is able to see the falseness of the
accusation against Christ? Do you think that the others knew
that Christ was falsely accused? Why do you think that they went
on with the Crucifixion?
7.

What do you think that the false accusation and

judgment of Christ has to do with the Atonement? Why do you

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think that it happened this way? What does this teach us about
the Savior?
8.

In verse 42, the malefactor makes a request to

Jesus. What does He ask? Why do you think that he asks this of
Christ? What does this show us about the heart of the
malefactor?
9.

Does Christ respond to the malefactor? What does

He say? Imagine the scenario, the malefactor is a man who has
committed a crime worth of death, yet He is promised, by the
Savior, to go to paradise. Why? What does this teach about the
Atonement? What does it teach us about how we should approach
the Savior when we desire forgiveness? What does this teach
about Christ's willingness to show mercy and forgive?

Character Study--Herod
One of the "characters" of Christ's life is Herod. In Luke
23, we read an interesting exchange between Herod and the
Savior. We will study this exchange and also more about Herod to
see why Christ acted the way He did when he was brought before
the Jewish ruler.
1.

Read Luke 23:8-11. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

How did Herod feel, initially, about Christ being

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brought before him? Why was Herod "glad"? Do you think that
Herod believed in Christ's divinity? Why do you think that Herod
wanted to see Christ perform a miracle? What does this teach us
about Herod's feelings toward Christ?
3.

When Christ is brought before Herod, he is

questioned. How does verse 9 describe this questioning? What
does Christ say in response? Why do you think that Christ says
nothing? How does Christ seem to feel about Herod and the chief
priests?
4.

In verse 11, what does Herod do to the Savior?

How had Herod's entire experience with the Savior been an open
mockery against Him? Do you think that Christ already knew this
about Herod?
5.

What do you learn about Herod from this

experience? Write down the attributes you can think of.
6.

Now, think about this situation--Christ seemed to

be so perturbed with Herod that he would not even speak. That's
right! The Savior wouldn't even give Herod the time of day. This
is an interesting response--especially in light of what we know
about the Savior. The Savior healed the soldier's ear, forgave
the soldiers who put him to death, and promised paradise for a
malefactor! Yet he wouldn't even speak to Herod. Obviously,
Christ had good reasons for what He did. We will study more

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about Herod's character to see why Christ would be motivated to
remain silent around Herod.
7.

First, let's turn to the Bible Dictionary to

learn more about Herod. There is more than one "Herod" mentioned
in the New Testament, so it would be good to get our "Herods"
straight.
8.

What do we learn about the Herodian family? Had

Israel remained a free state, would the Herodian family have
inherited the crown? Who would have been the rightful king of
Israel?
9.

How did Herod (the Original Herod) align himself

in such a way that he could become a ruler in Israel?
10.

Herod had an alliance with Augustus. How did he

try to gain favor with the Jews?
11.

Though Herod had built a temple, generally, what

kind of king was he? What were some of the acts of cruelty he
committed? Notice, the order to massacre infants in Bethlehem.
Why did Herod give this order?
12.

According to the Bible Dictionary entry, is

Herod, who ordered the massacre, the same Herod that judged the
Savior? What happened to the first Herod?
13.

Herod Antipas is the "Herod" that judged Christ

later. What do we learn about Antipas in this Bible Dictionary

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entry?
14.

Now, let's read the scripture references given to

learn more about Herod and his character.
15.

Read Matthew 14:1-12. What did Herod think about

Jesus when he heard of Christ's fame? Why was Herod worried that
Jesus was actually John the Baptist--raised from the dead? What
had Herod done to John the Baptist?
16.

As you read through this scripture block, what do

you learn about Herod's character? What kind of man was he?
17.

Read Mark 6:14-30. Again, this is a record of

Herod's beheading of John the Baptist. Though it relates much of
the same information that you read in Matthew, what else do you
learn about Herod's character?
18.

How does Herod feel about John the Baptist,

according to verse 20? Yet, what does Herod do to him? Why? What
does this reveal about Herod's character?
19.

Keep in mind Christ's relationship with John the

Baptist. What was it? How do you suppose Christ felt about
John's beheading? How do you think that this might have impacted
Christ's refusal to communicate with Herod at the time of his
judgment?
20.
Christ of?

Read Luke 13:31-35. What had the Pharisees warned

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What did the Savior say in return? Why do you

think that He called Herod a fox? What does this tell us about
Herod's character?
22.

As you have studied Herod, what have you

discovered about his character? What kind of man was he? When
Christ is brought before him, and he is "glad" to see the
Savior, what does this really mean? Does he see Jesus as the
Savior, the Messiah? What does Herod think of Christ?
23.

As you have come to know Herod's character, why

do you think that Jesus ignored Herod?
24.

What does this character study teach you about

yourself? How can you be more like Christ when you are in a
situation with a person like Herod?

Compare/Contrast--The Jews who had Christ Killed, The
Romans, and Those who wept at His death
In Luke 23, we read of Christ's crucifixion. Throughout
this account, we read of three very different types of people.
We will study the groups mentioned in Luke 23.
The People Who Wanted Christ Killed
1.

Read Luke 22:1-6. What kind of people is this

first group comprised of? What did they want to do? What are the
characteristics you notice so far?

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Read Luke 22:63-65. How did this group of people

treat Jesus? Why do you think that they mocked and smote Him?
What are your feelings as you read through these verses?
3.

Read Luke 23:8-11. What was Christ's experience

with Herod like? Keep in mind that Christ was sent to Herod
after Pilate had questioned Him. What did Herod and the people
do? What was Herod's feeling about the Savior?
4.

Read Luke 23:13-23. What is happening in this

block of verses? Does Pilate want to sentence the Savior to
death? Why not? Yet, how do the chief priests and unbelieving
Jews respond? Whom did the Jews insist be released instead of
Christ? What had Barabbas been guilty of? In verse 21, how did
they respond do Pilate's desire to release Jesus? Finally, in
verse 23, how did the Jews respond? Notice the actual words used
in this verse. How would you describe this group of people?
5.

Read Luke 23:35. What were the people saying as

Christ was being crucified? What is ironic about what they are
saying? Will Christ save Himself (kind of a trick question)
maybe he won't immediately, but will He save Himself from the
fate of death ultimately? What do you suppose motivated these
people to treat the Lord with such vitriol and hate?
6.

Read Luke 23:48. What did the people who came to

see Christ's crucifixion do? Why do you think that they did

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this? What does this teach about them--their nature, hearts,
etc.?
The Romans Who Killed the Messiah
1.

This next group of people included the Romans who

actually carried out the crucifixion of the Savior, but they
differ than the Jews who insisted on Christ's death. We will
read a few verses about them.
2.

Read Luke 23:1-7. What was Pilate's involvement

with Christ? Did Pilate believe that Christ was guilty? What did
he do with the Savior?
3.

Read Luke 23:13-26. What do we learn about Pilate

in these verses? Does Pilate want to have Jesus crucified? Why
does he finally give the order? Do you think that he understood
exactly what he was agreeing to?
4.

Think about Pilate and Herod. What do they have

in common? How are they different? What can you learn from each
example?
5.

Read Luke 23:34-38. What group of people is

mentioned here? Why do you think that Jesus asks the Father to
forgive them--even as they are killing and mocking Him? What
were the soldiers doing? What do you think motivated them to
crucify the Savior? Do you think that they would have mocked and
killed Him without Pilate's order to do so?

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Read Luke 23:46-47. What was the soldier's

reaction to Christ's death? Why do you think that He said this?
Did the other Jews react in this way? Do you think that the
Romans purposely blinded themselves from the truth--that Christ
was the Son of God?
7.

Think about the Roman soldiers and the crowd of

Jews (who wanted the Savior killed). What do these groups have
in common? What is different about them? How do their motives to
kill the Savior compare? How do their motives differ?
8.

Why do you think that the Lord asked Heavenly

Father to forgive the Soldiers but doesn't really address the
other Jews? What can you learn from these two examples?
The Believers who Wept at Christ's Death
1.

We will now read about the final group of people

mentioned in Luke 23. Read Luke 23:27-31.
2.

How is this group described in verse 27? Why do

you think that there is a special mention made of women? What
were they doing? How do you think they felt about the
crucifixion of the Savior?
3.

What did the Savior say to them? Why do you think

that He said this? Do you think that the believers understood
that the Savior would rise again in three days? Did any group of
people mentioned in Luke 23 understand that Christ would be

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resurrected?
4.

Read Luke 23:49-56. What does this final group do

when Christ is crucified? What does Joseph do? Why do you think
that He wants to take Christ's body and bury it in his own
sepulcher?
5.

What did Joseph have in common with the

Pharisees? What kind of covenants had they made and beliefs did
they profess?
6.

How did Joseph differ from the other Pharisees?

Why do you think that some Pharisees insisted on Christ's death
while others, like Joseph of Arimathaea, believed in Christ?
7.

Finally, what did the women who followed Christ

do? What does this teach us about their feelings and devotion
toward the Savior? How does this group of women compare with the
groups who didn't know the Savior, or who specifically wanted
Him put to death? How do these women differ?
8.

What can we learn from these three contrasting

9.

Do you see people like this today--those who

groups?

fight against Christ, those who are indifferent, and those who
believe? What group do you feel like you identify with? How can
you be like Joseph of Arimathaea or the women who anointed
Christ's body and grow stronger in your devotion to Him?

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Luke 24

Analysis and Application
Search and ponder the following questions as you study Luke
24.

You do not have to answer all of the questions, but do

pause to truly think about what you are reading.

Consider

writing impressions in a scripture journal.

Luke 24:1-12
1.

As the chapter opens, what are the women doing?

2.

What did these women find?

3.

Who were the two men in shining garments? What

did they ask the women?
4.

What did the women learn about the Savior?

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After learning that the Savior was risen, what

did the women do? Who were the women that had learned about the
Savior's resurrection?
6.

What did Peter and the apostles think about what

the women had told them?
7.

Do you think that any of these people--the women

or the apostles--truly understood what had happened to the
Savior at this point?

Luke 24:13-35
1.

While walking on the road to Emmaus, what were

two of Christ's disciples discussing?
2.

Who joined these two on their journey?

3.

What had these two disciples believed about

Christ? Did they seem confident that Christ would still redeem
Israel?
4.

How did the Savior, still undiscovered by the two

disciples, respond to their concerns?
5.

What did Christ do with them after expounding the

scriptures?
6.

Finally, what did the two disciples understand

about this man that they travelled with on the way to Emmaus?
7.

How did the men describe feeling? What do you

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think that this kind of feeling--a burning heart--is?
8.

After realizing that they had been with Christ,

what did the two disciples do?

Luke 24:36-48
1.

As all of the apostles spoke, who appeared in

their midst?
2.

What did the apostles think of Christ's

appearance? Why do you think they were afraid?
3.

What did Christ do to help them understand that

they didn't need to be afraid? Why do you think that He did
this?
4.

Was Christ a personage of Spirit? What was He

5.

What did the Savior ask for as the apostles sat

like?

with Him in amazement?
6.

What does Christ explain to the apostles after he

ate before them?
7.

Imagine yourself as an apostle or disciple of

Christ. Already, had there been any person to live a life like
Christ's--a master teacher, healer, etc.? Recall what they had
hoped about Christ (in Luke 24:21). Additionally, recall the
environment in Israel at the time--they lived under harsh Roman

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rule and hoped for the promised Messiah. How do you think that
you would have felt if you were waiting for a Savior to come and
deliver your people, and then someone who seemed to fit the bill
came? Then, imagine if this person, who seemed to have so much
potential to redeem you and your people, was then taken and
crucified by the oppressive government you sought freedom from.
How would you have felt? Would you have understood what Christ
meant by his prophecy of resurrection? Had anyone ever been
truly resurrected at this point in history?
8.

Now, imagine that you find Christ's tomb empty.

What would you think?
9.

Finally, imagine being an apostle, standing in

the room and having Christ appear in your midst. How do you
think that you would have reacted?

Luke 24:49-53
1.

What promise did the Savior give to the apostles?

2.

Where did the Savior and His disciples go in

3.

What happened to the Savior?

4.

How did the disciples feel? Do you think that

verse 50?

they understood that Christ was a living God, and that even
though they were still living under harsh Roman rule, they had

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indeed been redeemed?
5.

What was the kind of redemption that Christ

offered to them and to all of us?

Enrich Your Learning
The Atonement and Your Personal Relationship with Christ
In Luke 24, the resurrected Lord appears to the apostles.
We will study this experience and find what it teaches us about
Christ's mission and the Atonement.
1.

Read Luke 24:36-48. Study the corresponding

Analysis and Application questions.
2.

Acquaint yourself with the context of this story.

Who had told the apostles that they had just seen the
resurrected Lord? (See vs. 33-35.)
3.

As the two disciples talked with the apostles,

who came into their midst? What did He declare to them?
4.

Think about the phrase, "Peace be unto you." What

does it mean?
5.

Notice the footnote for peace. Look it up in

Doctrine and Covenants 19:23. What do we learn about having
peace in Christ from this verse? How do you think Christ's offer
of peace is different than our worldly definition of peace?

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Turn to John 14:27. What does Jesus teach the

apostles about peace in this scripture? How is Christ able to
offer peace in a way that is not offered by the World? What does
this have to do with the Atonement?
7.

Turn to John 16:33. What does Christ tell the

8.

What does this scripture teach about peace?

9.

What is the connection between peace (as used by

apostles?

Christ) and the Atonement?
10.

When I think of the idea of peace and the Savior,

I instantly am reminded of Christ's title: The Prince of Peace.
Why do you think that this is one of the Savior's titles? Is it
only because He is a nice-guy, and He doesn't really like
contention? How do you think the Atonement is what sets Him
apart as the Prince of Peace?
11.

Even though Christ greets the apostles with

peace, how do they react when He appears? What did they think
that they had seen? Why do you think they had this reaction?
12.

Does Christ comfort them right away? What does He

ask the apostles?
13.

Imagine that you are an apostle, how would you

answer the Savior's questions?
14.

The Savior doesn't make the apostles answer His

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question. Instead, what does He offer? Are the fears of the
apostles legitimate? Is the Savior a spirit?
15.

Did they understand that this was the Resurrected

16.

While the apostles marveled, what did the Savior

Savior?

ask for? What did He do? Why do you think that he had the
apostles touch Him, handle Him, and then watch Him eat?
17.

So far, what does this experience--the visitation

of the Resurrected Savior--teach us about the Atonement? Recall
the words of the angels spoken in Luke 24:5. What did the angels
say to the women who had come to the tomb to anoint Christ's
body? How does this relate to the apostles later on in the
Chapter? What does this question, "why seek ye the living among
the dead?" teach about Christ's Atonement?
18.

After Christ ate the fish and honeycomb, he

taught the Apostles. What did Christ teach them? Why do you
think that He taught them about the Atonement? What was the
purpose of Christ's entire life?
19.

How do you think that Christ's instruction

brought the apostles peace? How do you think that a greater
understanding (and application) of the Atonement can bring you
peace?

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Cross-Reference--Remember
As Luke 24 opens, we read of the women who went to anoint
the Savior's body after His death. When they arrive at the tomb,
they find that the Lord's body is gone. They are perplexed and
then find two angels there who explain that the Lord is risen.
We will study a portion of this exchange and a cross-reference
to bring us greater understanding of "remembering."
1.

Read Luke 24:6-7. What are the angels telling the

2.

Read Luke 24:8. When they heard the angels'

women?

explanation, what did the women do?
3.

In this verse, do you think that the act of

remembering was as simple as recalling some information? What is
implied here?
4.

Let's study a cross-reference to help us

understand the act of remembering.
5.

Turn to John 14:26. What does this scripture

teach about remembering? How do you think that this scripture
applies to the women as mentioned in Luke 24:8?
6.

Do you think that when Christ was alive and

explained that he would suffer, die, then rise again the women
truly understand what He meant?
7.

How did the Spirit bring the women both

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remembrance and understanding?
8.

How can this knowledge--that the Spirit will

bring all things to your remembrance--help you in your life?
What do you think you can do to be worthy of the Spirit to have
this gift?

I've Read this Before--Making Familiar Scripture Stories
Come to Life
If you are doing these scripture study assignments, then
you are most likely somewhat familiar with the scriptures. You
have probably read or heard these stories time and time again.
Sometimes hearing the same story can feel a little tedious, and
you may even find yourself thinking, "I've read this before."

With this in mind, we are going to re-tell the story of the
two disciples on the road to Emmaus.

In the scripture study assignment for Luke 10, I have
listed an example given by Elder Holland and I've also included
my own example of retelling a scripture story. You may want to
familiarize yourself with the detailed instructions there.

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For now, I will give you a few hints and reminders.

One - Read through Luke 24:13-35. Consider the
corresponding Analysis and Application questions.

Two -Establish a few facts. Outline the story. Don't try
telling it yet, just gather information.

Three - Notice other elements of the story and be sure to
write them in outline style. Think about the story critically.

Four - Imagine the setting: the sounds, the smells, the
temperature, the time of day, etc. Imagine how the people in
this story were feeling; physically, spiritually, and
emotionally. Try to put yourself in the shoes of each player of
the story and then relate it in a way that the audience can do
the same.

Five -

Begin retelling this story rather simply but in

your own words. Make sure that your language is descriptive but
concise. Use words that accurately and powerfully explain the
situation of this story. This first part of retelling the story
should really be a set-up. This is where you make sure that the

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audience is on the same page. Don't make any assumptions about
your audience--as in, don't assume that they know facts.
Describe and tell everything that you want them to know.

Six--Continue with the story by recounting the facts of the
story with explanation, feeling, and application. As you retell
the story, liken the scriptures! Help the audience sympathize
with the characters of the story. You don't have to retell every
single detail of the story as it is written in the bible, but go
through it again, emphasizing details that will inspire the
audience to action.

Seven--Make sure that you are getting details and depth by
putting yourself in the shoes of every character involved. In
this case: the disciples and the Savior. Keep in mind that this
story can illustrate a concept or lesson. Think of the lesson
that you want to draw from this story--it can be anything-whatever stands out to you.

Eight--With the ideas of what you want to teach, draw out
points from the story that will help the audience 1) relate to
the story, and 2) understand the lesson being taught. As you do
this, you may repeat parts of the story that you have already

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told. This is okay. Even if it feels repetitive, do it. You need
to bring the audience along with you on this journey. Don't
assume that they are going from point a to point b
automatically. Take them with you.

Nine--After fleshing out the story, making connections, and
drawing out lessons from the story we can end here. However, we
can also take it one step further. We can continue with
application in mind. Take a moment to extrapolate and explain
the lessons you felt that the story taught. You may find that
you use the story itself to support the "lessons" that you have
extrapolated. Additionally, don't be afraid to find other
scriptures or quotes that will support your observations. This
is the time we can really learn something and apply it to our
lives. The audience, because you have helped them to understand
and analyze the story, is ready to apply it to their own lives!

Ten--Finally, read through what you have written. Does it
make sense? Does it help you to understand the story at a deeper
level? Do you feel inspired to change and apply the lessons you
learned from the story into your own life? Share your story with
others--use it in a FHE, talk, lesson, etc. Or, if you write a
cool "retelling" of a story, and don't have a platform, email it

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to me at chococatania@gmail.com, and I'd love to publish it on
my blog. Remember to write it in your scripture journal for your
posterity.

No matter what you do with the story you have retold,
performing this exercise will, no doubt, help you to understand
the scriptures more deeply and intimately.

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Appendix

Miracles Study Instructions
In the New Testament, Christ spends His life performing
many miracles. To enrich your understanding of them, you may
want to study them in-depth and keep track of what you're
studying as a special project.

Begin by finding a notebook specifically for studying the
miracles of Christ or create a computer file where you can track
the miracles. You could even use post-it note to flag the
miracles that you find in the New Testament.

Study these miracles.

Consider tracking the following

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information so that later you can compare the miracles to one
another, hopefully gleaning some knowledge as you study Christ's
process. As you study the miracle, go through it in painstaking
detail. Ask yourself questions. Think of times when you are
reminded of other stories. If you have any ideas or thoughts,
chase them!

Where in the scriptures is the miracle found?

What is the miracle performed?

Who requests the miracle of Christ?

What are any details of this request?

How does Christ respond to the request?

What are the details in Christ's Healing--how

does He do it?

What are any other special directions or details

of this healing?

Does this or any of the details in the miracle

remind you of another experience in the scriptures? If so, find
the other scripture, and also study it carefully.

What is it that you think the Lord wants you to

learn from this miracle?

Record any other notes and/or observations.

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After you study each miracle on its own, compare the
miracles. Compare like miracles; compare different miracles.
Notice the similarities; notice the differences. Ask yourself
why they may differ. Notice how the accounts of the same miracle
have different details. How do these different accounts help you
to better understand the miracle as a whole? Take time to really
analyze these miracles.

As you study, don't forget to see how the information you
learn can be applied into your life. Most likely, while you are
analyzing the scriptures, the Spirit will help you to see how
they apply to your life.

Parables Study Instructions
In the New Testament, Christ often teaches by telling
parables. A parable is a concrete story that teaches an abstract
concept. In Matthew 13, the Savior explains why He teaches in
parables. To enrich your understanding of the parables that
Christ taught, you may want to study them in-depth. Keep track
of what you're studying as a special scripture study project.

Begin by finding a notebook specifically designated for

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studying the parables taught by Christ or open a computer file
where you can track the parables. You could even use post-it
notes to flag the parables that you find in the New Testament.

Study the parables one at a time. Consider tracking the
following information so that later you can compare the miracles
to one another, hopefully gleaning some knowledge as you study
Christ's teachings. As you study the parable, go through it in
painstaking detail. Ask yourself questions. Think of times when
you are reminded of other ideas in the scriptures. If you have
any prompts, then chase them!

Find the meanings of the objects in the parables.

A parable is a "side by side" comparison, so we can find that
the items in a parable all have a corollary.
they are and record them.

Figure out what

By doing this, you're essentially

asking yourself about the "what?" of the parable.

time?

When was the parable given?

What is the context of the parable?

To whom was Jesus telling the parable?

Did the Lord give more than one parable at a

What other parables were given at the same time? (Keep in

mind that there may be connections between a series of parables

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especially if they are given during the same discourse.)

Once you feel comfortable with the facts of the

parable, you will be able to start analyzing it.

Why did Jesus

give us this teaching?

What do you think that Christ wanted His audience

(including us) to understand?

Why do you think that the Savior chose to make

the comparisons He did?

If Jesus gave a series of parables together, how

do the similarities connect them and how do differences give the
subject more depth?

Throughout this process, you may also consider

"What does this mean for me?"

What does the Spirit want you to know as you

Does the principle taught help you directly in

study?

your life?

How do you think that understanding the

principles behind the parables might help you to be a better
disciple of Christ?

After you gather this information, take some time to
compare the parables one to another.

New Testament Study Companion: Luke/Larson

307

You will also find that some parables are repeated in the
gospels.

If they are, make sure that you delineate between each

gospel account.

Look for any similarities and differences

between each account of the same parable.

What is the extra

insight gained from each version of the parable?

Finally, look for repeated themes, patterns, concepts, and
connections between parables.

As you study the parables, you

will begin to feel promptings from the Spirit on what you should
focus on and learn.

Be receptive to the questions you have.

Don't be afraid to wonder.

Take your time.

This could be a

really fun project.

One final note, don't forget to see how the information you
learn can be applied to your life. While you are analyzing the
scriptures, the Spirit will help you to see how they apply to
your life.

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