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Next GOP Generation
Pushing Progress
Young Conservatives for the Freedom to Marry propose marriage-equality party platform
Deaton
by Justin Snow
C
HANGE WAS AFOOT IN
the Nevada desert earlier this
month.
It was there, April 12, at
the South Point Hotel in Las Vegas, that
the Nevada Republican Party did what
its counterparts in some of the most lib-
eral states in the nation haven’t even done:
adopted a statewide party platform that
dropped opposition to same-sex marriage.
The adoption of the platform, which
not only stripped opposition to same-sex
marriage but also opposition to abortion,
came after a debate over the future of the
Republican Party and stood in contrast
to GOP platforms in states across the
country. Even in Massachusetts – the
first state to legalize same-sex marriage
– the party platform opposes same-sex
marriage and abortion. Last month, gay
Republican congressional candidate
Richard Tisei boycotted his party’s con-
vention over the socially conservative
party platform.
“I think it was about inclusion, not
exclusion,” said Nevada Republican
Party Chairman Michael McDonald,
according to the Las Vegas Review-Jour-
nal. “This is where the party is going.”
A challenge to Nevada’s same-sex
marriage ban is currently before the 9th
Circuit Court of Appeals and, in Febru-
ary, Nevada Attorney General Catherine
Cortez Masto, a Democrat, and Gov.
Brian Sandoval, a Republican, agreed to
drop their defense of the law. Sandoval
cited the nation’s changing legal land-
scape as making the arguments for the
state’s defense “no longer sustainable.”
If the Republican Party is to have
a future in the changing electorate, all
signs indicate it must diversify not only
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on issues like same-sex marriage, but also
immigration reform. A Pew Research
Center poll released in March found that
61 percent of Republicans and Republican
leaners under 30 support same-sex mar-
riage, while just 35 percent are opposed.
That’s compared to 27 percent of Republi-
cans 50 years old and older in favor.
“The Republican Party is at a cross-
roads,” said Gregory T. Angelo, executive
director of Log Cabin Republicans, in a
statement. “[I]n a year where the Mas-
sachusetts GOP rolled back the clock and
added divisive social issues to its plat-
form, the state Republican Party respon-
sible for nominating Sharron Angle in
2010 seems to have finally learned to
focus on the issues that truly matter to
voters, which will lead to massive Repub-
lican wins at the ballot box this fall.”
While the Republican Party as a whole
might be pointed toward inclusion, the
debate over whether that is the morally
correct road to follow certainly isn’t over.
As Nevada Republicans debated the posi-
tion of their party on same-sex marriage,
Louisiana lawmakers debated whether
to remove the state’s unconstitutional
ban on sodomy from the state’s “crimes
against nature” statute.
On April 15, the Louisiana House of
Representatives voted down the proposal
to amend the language, 67 to 27, despite
the fact that in 2003 the U.S. Supreme
Court ruled anti-sodomy laws unconsti-
tutional in Lawrence v. Texas. Eleven
Democrats joined 55 Republicans and one
independent in voting against the bill.
The Republican Party has seen enor-
mous gains in support for LGBT equality
in recent years, although it has moved
at a slower pace than the rest of the
country. Three Senate Republicans —
Rob Portman (Ohio), Mark Kirk (Ill.)
and Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) — have
come out in support of marriage equal-
L
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News
Now online at MetroWeekly.com
Poliglot: Marriage challenge filed in Georgia
Last Word: USPS reveals Milk stamp
5 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
Next GOP Generation
Pushing Progress
Young Conservatives for the Freedom to Marry propose marriage-equality party platform
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LGBTNews
6
all conservatives around our core beliefs
of freedom, family, and limited govern-
ment.”
The announcement comes a little
over a year after the Republican National
Committee released an “autopsy report”
of the GOP that recommended, among
other things, that candidates campaign
within the gay community and “com-
munities where Republicans do not nor-
mally go to listen and make our case.”
The RNC report made no mention of
marriage equality nor did it specifically
argue for the adoption of a national posi-
tion on LGBT rights.
Under the proposal from Young Con-
servatives for the Freedom to Marry,
anti-gay and anti-same-sex-marriage ref-
erences would be struck from five differ-
ent sections of the GOP’s national plat-
form and replaced with the following:
“We believe that marriage matters
both as a religious institution and as a
fundamental, personal freedom. Because
marriage – rooted in love and lifelong
commitment – is one of the foundations
of civil society, as marriage thrives, so our
nation thrives.
“We believe that the health of mar-
riage nationwide directly affects the
social and economic well-being of indi-
ity since March 2013, and the Employ-
ment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA)
passed the Senate with the support of 10
Republicans — the most Senate Repub-
lican votes ever cast for a piece of gay-
rights legislation. Although ENDA is
being blocked by Republican leadership
in the House of Representatives, it gained
its seventh GOP co-sponsor earlier this
month with the support of Rep. Mike
Coffman (Colo.). There are also currently
three gay Republican candidates running
for the House vying to become the first
openly gay Republican ever elected to
Congress.
Advocates, however, are hoping to
go a step further. Last week, on April 16,
Young Conservatives for the Freedom
to Marry, which is under the umbrella
of the organization Freedom to Marry,
launched a $1 million campaign aimed at
reforming the Republican Party’s nation-
al platform before the 2016 Republican
National Convention.
“It’s time to modernize the Republi-
can Party,” said Tyler Deaton, campaign
manager for the Young Conservatives for
the Freedom to Marry, in a statement.
“Our aim is to make the national platform
less divisive toward gay people and their
families – and more focused on unifying
viduals and families, and that undermin-
ing families leads to more government
costs and more government control over
the lives of its citizens. Therefore, we
believe in encouraging the strength and
stability of all families.
“We recognize that there are diverse
and sincerely held views on civil mar-
riage within the Party, and that support
for allowing same-sex couples the free-
dom to marry has grown substantially in
our own Party. Given this journey that so
many Americans, including Republicans,
are on, we encourage and welcome a
thoughtful conversation among Republi-
cans about the meaning and importance
of marriage, and commit our Party to
respect for all families and fairness and
freedom for all Americans.”
The group is expected to begin tour-
ing early primary states such as New
Hampshire, Iowa, Nevada and South
Carolina beginning this spring to tout the
proposal. Although such inclusive lan-
guage may be a tough sell, with 2016 an
overly ambitious target date, Deaton says
it isn’t difficult to figure out which way
the winds blow: “The future of the Party
is clear on the marriage issue — a seismic
shift is already underway in support of
the freedom to marry.” l
APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Maryland Coalition Launches
“Stand for Fairness”
Campaign
Multimedia outreach effort supports new transgender-rights law
ahead of possible ballot backlash
by John Riley
T
HE MARYLAND COALITION
for Transgender Equality
(MCTE) – a bloc of more than
50 political, social-justice, reli-
gious and community groups advocating
on behalf of transgender rights – on April
16 launched a campaign aimed at educat-
ing the public about a recently passed
transgender-rights bill that is expected
to be signed into law by Gov. Martin
O’Malley (D).
The bill, SB 212, which is also known
as the Fairness for All Marylanders Act,
passed the Maryland Senate 32-15 and
the House of Delegates 82-57 in March.
It prohibits discrimination based on a
person’s gender identity or expression in
employment, housing, credit and public
accommodations. Such laws already ex-
ist on the local level in Baltimore City,
Baltimore County, Howard County and
Montgomery County, as well as in the city
of Hyattsville, Md.
The new multimedia campaign, “Stand
for Fairness,” aims to counter misconcep-
tions about the details and impact of the
legislation in hopes of building broad sup-
port for its nondiscrimination provisions.
As part of that effort, the campaign will
provide answers to “Frequently Asked
Questions” about SB 212, and provide per-
sonal stories from transgender Maryland-
ers and allies who may be impacted by the
law. The coalition is urging allies of the
transgender community to sign a pledge
that they back the legislation, which will
also allow the coalition members to re-
cruit volunteers and keep supporters in-
formed of the campaign’s progress.
“The Stand for Fairness campaign will
give our broad base of supporters the op-
portunity to share all the reasons why they
support fairness for transgender Mary-
landers, as well as put a face to the issue by
elevating the stories of transgender people
facing discrimination,” Carrie Evans, the
executive director of Equality Maryland,
one of the chief members of the Coalition
for Trans Equality, said in a statement.
“This year Maryland’s elected officials
stood for fairness by passing The Fairness
for All Marylanders Act. Now we’re work-
ing to make sure Marylanders in every cor-
ner of the state understand the bill.”
The multimedia campaign could also
serve as a pre-emptive strike against an
attempt by opponents to petition the law
onto the 2014 ballot. The right-wing web-
site MdPetitions.com, which successfully
petitioned the 2012 marriage-equality law
onto the ballot, thereby forcing support-
ers to run an ultimately successful but ex-
7 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
LGBTNews
8
pensive campaign to defend the law, has already been reaching
out to its supporters to gauge support for collecting 55,736 valid
signatures from registered voters needed to force a referendum
in November.
Although a Goucher College poll in March found that 71 per-
cent of Maryland residents supported including gender identity
in the state’s nondiscrimination laws, opponents have tried to
portray the bill as harmful to society and a threat to the safety of
women and girls in public restrooms, derisively referring to the
measure as “the bathroom bill.” Opponents have also recycled
one of their chief arguments from the 2012 marriage debate,
claiming the expanded protections for transgender individuals
do not provide sufficient protections or exemptions for religious
employers or organizations.
“Educating Marylanders about this law is essential,” Del.
Luke Clippinger (D-Baltimore City), the chief sponsor of the
gender-identity bill in the House of Delegates, said in a state-
ment. “During debate in the House of Delegates, we heard a lot
of incorrect and misleading statements being made. I am glad to
see that MCTE is initiating this discussion on the law.”
Other members of the coalition also released statements
praising the campaign and highlighting its importance in in-
forming Marylanders about the provisions within SB 212.
“HRC has worked on this law for many years, and we want
to ensure the public is informed about the elements of this law,”
said Marty Rouse, HRC national field director.
“As a transgender woman, it’s important to me for my fel-
low Marylanders to know that the Fairness for All Marylanders
Act is about my ability to get a job, have a roof over my head, or
take my son to dinner at a restaurant without being denied ba-
sic rights just because I’m transgender,” said Jenna Fischetti of
TransMaryland.
Added Vann Michael of Black Transmen, in a statement,
“Now is the time for Marylanders to show that we have zero tol-
erance for discrimination, and stand for fairmess!”
For more information about Stand for Fairness or the Maryland
Coalition for Trans Equality, visit mdtransequality.org. l
APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
E
QUALITY MARYLAND PAC, THE POLITICAL
action committee for the Free State’s most prominent
LGBT-rights group, announced last week it is endors-
ing state Sen. Brian Frosh (D-Montgomery Co.) in the
race to succeed Attorney General Doug Gansler, an LGBT ally
who is pursuing a bid for governor.
Frosh, a longtime supporter of LGBT equality, chairs the
Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee, which oversaw delib-
erations regarding both the marriage-equality bill during the
2011 and 2012 sessions and the recently passed bill to pro-
hibit discrimination in employment, housing, credit and public
accommodations based on gender identity or expression.
“Brian Frosh has been a firm ally and leader on LGBT issues
in the General Assembly,” Carrie Evans, the executive direc-
tor of Equality Maryland, said in a statement announcing the
endorsement. “He has the maturity, experience and commit-
Equality Maryland Backing Frosh
LGBT PAC endorses state senator’s run for attorney general
by John Riley
ment to be an effective advocate for the LGBT communities of
Maryland as our next Attorney General.”
Equality Maryland PAC’s endorsement decision was based
on Frosh’s responses to a questionnaire and an in-person inter-
view with staffers and board members from Equality Maryland,
as well as some of the organization’s regular members. Both
Frosh and one of his two opponents in the Democratic primary,
Del. Jon Cardin (D-Baltimore Co.), submitted questionnaires
and were interviewed. Del. Aisha Braveboy (D-Prince George’s
Co.), Frosh’s second Democratic opponent, was determined to
be ineligible for Equality Maryland’s endorsement because of
her vote against the marriage-equality bill in 2012.
“Equality Maryland members were already aware of Brian
Frosh’s record of support on our issues,” Timothy Williams, the
chair of Equality Maryland PAC, said in a statement. “During
his interview with us he spoke convincingly about his commit-
ment to fairness and how his own convictions were shaped by
the example of his father, who supported civil rights for African
Americans as a member of the Montgomery County Council
more than 50 years ago.”
Frosh’s endorsement marks Equality Maryland PAC’s sec-
ond endorsement for statewide office and its fifth endorsement
of a non-incumbent. The PAC has endorsed Lt. Gov. Anthony
Brown (D) and his running mate, Howard County Executive
Ken Ulman, in the race for governor and lieutenant governor.
“Senator Frosh has more than 35 years of experience as a
practicing attorney and has served in the General Assembly for
27 years,” Stephanie Bernstein, Equality Maryland board chair,
said in a statement. “He understands the duties of the Attorney
General and articulates a clear vision for how this office can
continue to move Maryland forward on fairness or equality. We
strongly urge the LGBT community and its allies to support Sen-
ator Frosh in his bid to be Maryland’s next attorney general.” l
9 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
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14 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
FRIENDS MEETING OF WASHINGTON meets for
worship, 10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW, Quaker
House Living Room (next to Meeting House on
Decatur Place), 2nd floor. Special welcome to
lesbians and gays. Handicapped accessible from
Phelps Place gate. Hearing assistance. quakersdc.org.
INSTITUTE FOR SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT,
God-centered new age church & learning center.
Sunday Services and Workshops event. 5419 Sherier
Place NW. isd-dc.org.
LUTHERAN CHURCH OF REFORMATION invites
all to Sunday worship at 8:30 or 11 a.m. Childcare is
available at both services. Welcoming LGBT people for
25 years. 212 East Capitol St. NE. reformationdc.org
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
WASHINGTON, D.C. services at 9 a.m. (ASL
interpreted) and 11 a.m. Children’s Sunday School at
11 a.m. 474 Ridge St. NW. 202-638-7373, mccdc.com.
RIVERSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, a Christ-centered,
interracial, welcoming-and-affirming church, offers
service at 10 a.m. 680 I St. SW. 202-554-4330,
riverside-dc.org.
UNITARIAN CHURCH OF ARLINGTON, an
LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation,
offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow UU
Ministry. 4444 Arlington Blvd. uucava.org.
UNIVERSALIST NATIONAL MEMORIAL
CHURCH, a welcoming and inclusive church. GLBT
Interweave social/service group meets monthly.
Services at 11 a.m., Romanesque sanctuary. 1810 16th
St. NW. 202-387-3411, universalist.org.
MONDAY, APRIL 28
SAGE METRO DC offers “Re-think Your Job
Search” workshop. 6:30 p.m. Residences at Thomas
Circle, 1330 Thomas Circle NW. RVSP appreciated:
sagemetrodc1@gmail.com.
GLCCB hosts community town hall/discussion on
Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP). 7-9 p.m. Waxter
Center, Mason Lord Room, 1000 Cathedral St.,
Baltimore. glccb.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
DC SCANDALS RUGBY holds practice, 6:30-
8:30 p.m. Garrison Elementary, 1200 S St. NW.
dcscandals.wordpress.com.
NOVASALUD offers free HIV testing. 5-7 p.m. 2049
N. 15th St., Suite 200, Arlington. Appointments:
703-789-4467.
The DC Center hosts COFFEE DROP-IN FOR THE
SENIOR LGBT COMMUNITY. 10 a.m.-noon. 2000
14th St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
Whitman-Walker Health HIV/AIDS SUPPORT
GROUP for newly diagnosed individuals, meets
7 p.m. Registration required. 202-939-7671,
hivsupport@whitman-walker.org.
TUESDAY, APRIL 29
CHRYSALIS arts & culture group tours private
homes/gardens in Fredericksburg, Va. Tickets $30,
WEEKLY EVENTS
ANDROMEDA TRANSCULTURAL HEALTH
offers free HIV testing, 9-5 p.m., and HIV
services (by appointment). 202-291-4707 or
andromedatransculturalhealth.org.
BET MISHPACHAH, founded by members of the
LGBT community, holds Saturday morning Shabbat
services, 10 a.m., followed by kiddush luncheon.
Services in DCJCC Community Room, 1529 16th St.
NW. betmish.org.
DC AQUATICS CLUB (DCAC) practice session at
Marie Reed Aquatic Center, 2200 Champlain St.
NW. 8-9:30 a.m. swimdcac.org.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk; or
10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.
DIGNITY NORTHERN VIRGINIA sponsors Mass
for LGBT community, family and friends. 6:30 p.m.,
Immanuel Church-on-the-Hill, 3606 Seminary
Road, Alexandria. All welcome. dignitynova.org.
GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical
languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellie’s,
900 U St. NW. RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@
gmail.com.
SUNDAY, APRIL 27
ADVENTURING outdoors group bikes 33-mile
loop, D.C. and Maryland, trails/residential streets.
Bring water, lunch (or buy), $2 fee. Starts 10 a.m.,
Columbia Island Marina parking lot off southbound
GW Parkway. Jerry, 703-920-6871. adventuring.org.
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer
organization helps the Lost Dog & Cat Rescue
Foundation, Potomac Yards. To participate:
burgundycrescent.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS MEMORIAL
EPISCOPAL CHURCH celebrates Low Mass at 8:30
a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral Ave. NW.
202-232-4244, allsoulsdc.org.
DIGNITY WASHINGTON offers Roman Catholic
Mass for the LGBT community. 6 p.m., St.
Margaret’s Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW. All
welcome. Sign interpreted. dignitynova.org.
THURSDAY, APRIL 24
WEEKLY EVENTS
HIV TESTING at Whitman-Walker Health. The
Elizabeth Taylor Medical Center, 1701 14th St. NW,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. At the Max Robinson Center, 2301
MLK Jr. Ave. SE, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Call 202-745-
7000. Visit whitman-walker.org.
WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE for young
LBTQ women, 13-21, interested in leadership
development. 5-6:30 p.m. SMYAL Youth Center, 410
7th St. SE. 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a Narcotics Anonymous
Meeting, 6:30-7:30 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave. NW.
The group is independent of UHU. 202-446-1100.
FRIDAY, APRIL 25
CAGLCC holds annual Awards Dinner and Gala.
6:30-9:30 p.m. Mayflower Renaissance Hotel, 1127
Connecticut Ave. NW. $210. caglcc.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
PROJECT STRIPES hosts LGBT-affirming social
group for ages 11-24. 4-6 p.m. 1419 Columbia Road
NW. Tamara, 202-319-0422, layc-dc.org.
SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social
atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,
featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movies and
games. catherine.chu@smyal.org.
SMYAL offers free HIV Testing, 3-6 p.m., by
appointment and walk-in, for youth 21 and younger.
Youth Center, 410 7th St. SE. 202-567-3155,
testing@smyal.org.
SATURDAY, APRIL 26
ADVENTURING outdoors group holds Spring
Potluck at private home, Alexandria. All welcome.
4-8 p.m. For logistics: John, 703-914-1439.
adventuring.org.
BURGUNDY CRESCENT gay volunteer
organization helps at Food & Friends. To
participate: burgundycrescent.org.
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in
the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to
volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to
calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon
of the Friday before Thursday’s publication. Questions about
the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly office at
202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
marketplace
15 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
marketplace
16 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
carpool and lunch extra. Leave D.C. area after a.m.
rush hour, return late afternoon. Craig, 202-462-
0535, craighowell1@verizon.net.
WEEKLY EVENTS
ASIANS AND FRIENDS weekly dinner in Dupont/
Logan Circle area, 6:30 p.m. afwash@aol.com,
afwashington.net.
SUPPORT GROUP FOR LGBTQ YOUTH ages 13-21
meets at SMYAL, 410 7th St. SE, 5-6:30 p.m. Cathy
Chu, 202-567-3163, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
US HELPING US hosts a support group for black
gay men 40 and older. 7-9 p.m., 3636 Georgia Ave.
NW. 202-446-1100.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30
GLAA’S 43RD ANNIVERSARY RECEPTION
celebrating individuals and organizations for service
to LGBT communnity. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Policy, 1904
14th St. NW. Tickets $55. 202-667-5139, glaa.org/
anniversary.
THE LAMBDA BRIDGE CLUB meets for Duplicate
Bridge. No reservation needed. All welcome. 7:30
p.m. Dignity Center, 721 8th St. SE. For a partner:
703-407-6540.
WEEKLY EVENTS
PRIME TIMERS OF DC, social club for mature gay
men, hosts weekly happy hour/dinner. 6:30 p.m.,
Windows Bar above Dupont Italian Kitchen, 1637
17th St. NW. Carl, 703-573-8316. l
17 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
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scene
Whitman-Walker
Health’s Be The Care
Annual Spring Affair
Thursday, April 17
National Museum of
Women in the Arts
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
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with your
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Awesome Con
Saturday, April 19
Walter E. Washington
Convention Center
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
ARAM VARTIAN
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APRIL 24, 2014
VOLUME 20 / ISSUE 51
PUBLISHER
Randy Shulman
EDITORIAL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Randy Shulman
ART DIRECTOR
Todd Franson
MANAGING EDITOR
Will O’Bryan
POLITICAL EDITOR
Justin Snow
STAFF WRITER
John Riley
CONTRIBUTING EDITORS
Rhuaridh Marr, Doug Rule
SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER
Ward Morrison
CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS
Christopher Cunetto, Julian Vankim
CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS
Scott G. Brooks, Christopher Cunetto
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Daniel Burnett, Christian Gerard,
Brandon Harrison, Chris Heller, Troy Petenbrink,
Richard Rosendall, Kate Wingfield
EDITOR EMERITUS
Sean Bugg
WEBMASTER
David Uy
MULTIMEDIA
Aram Vartian
ADMINISTRATIVE / PRODUCTION ASSISTANT
Julian Vankim
ADVERTISING & SALES
DIRECTOR OF SALES
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Rivendell Media Co.
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LGBTOpinion
IN MY EARLY
teenaged years as
I navigated ado-
lescence and high
school, it was
hard to imagine
what my future
would hold.
Where would I go to college? What
kind of career would I have?
And one of the most pondered ques-
tions: Would I find that special some-
one to share my life with?
For many, these questions are famil-
iar. It’s in our nature to want answers.
But what is different for young adults
who identify as LGBTQ is that answers
to these questions aren’t so simple,
especially when there aren’t often vis-
ible models for navigating while queer.
This was the case for me.
Now, many years later, I have made
it a point to show up as an example of
what is possible as an openly gay per-
son. While my efforts and those of so
many others are important, they don’t
necessarily reach a wide audience. For
this reason, gatherings like Youth Pride
Day are essential to creating supportive
and safe spaces.
If you’ve ever had a chance to wit-
ness a Youth Pride Day event, chances
are that you’ve seen groups of young
people kicking back and enjoying an
afternoon with their friends while par-
taking in many diverse entertainment
options. To the average spectator this
may appear no different than any other
youth-focused event, but this is much
more. This is an expression of commu-
nity that might save a life.
Forty percent of all homeless youth
identify as LGBTQ. When it comes
to the reasons listed as the causes for
youth homelessness, the No. 1 cause
cited is rejection from one’s family.
This same population of young adults
is more likely to experience harassment
and/or violence. LGBTQ youth are also
often underserved when it comes to
comprehensive health care services,
including mental heath services. For
these reasons alone, Youth Pride Day
serves as not only a celebratory space
but also as a place where youth can
access a wide array of resources with-
out fear of judgment.
As a member of the board of Youth
Pride Alliance, which hosts the annual
Youth Pride Day celebration, I can say
that this event brings hope to many
young LGBTQ adults in the D.C., Mary-
land and Virginia area. It’s hope that
we believe will linger, helping in times
of challenge. It’s the sort of hope that I
often searched for in my own adoles-
cence.
I also hope that you will take pride in
our talented, courageous and inspiring
youth while supporting initiatives like
Youth Pride Day that provide healthy
and safe spaces – and by modeling what
living out loud can be.
The Youth Pride Alliance’s 18th annual
Youth Pride Day is Saturday, May 3,
from noon to 5 p.m., in Dupont Circle,
and includes speakers, entertainment
and much more. For more information
about attending or sponsoring Youth
Pride Day, visit youthpridedc.org. Follow
the alliance on Twitter @YouthPrideDC.
Angela Ferrell-Zabala is a Youth Pride
Alliance board member. She may be con-
tacted at taferzab@gmail.com. l
Finding Hope
at Youth Pride Day
One day in Dupont Circle invites LGBTQ young
people into a fearless celebration of
affirming possibility
by Angela Ferrell-Zabala
22 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
23
LGBTOpinion
THE RAIN OF RIDICULOUS RAVINGS
from America’s political right continued
unabated as spring took hold. Let’s look at
a few examples.
Last week, Chelsea Clinton announced
that she and hubby Marc Mezvinsky are
expecting a child. Conspiracy mongers in
the right-wing media went crazy. Steve
Malzberg of Newsmax suggested, based
on a thick file of nothing, that the pregnancy was deliberately
timed to help Grandma Hillary’s expected presidential cam-
paign. Oh, sorry, he did have one bit of evidence: Chelsea had
mentioned in an interview that her mom was constantly asking
about grandchildren.
News flash: This is what mothers do. My own mother,
despite having several grandchildren already, used to ask if I
would be giving her one, though she was unprepared to discuss
surrogate pregnancies. The notion that the Clintons could have
ordinary human impulses is apparently unthinkable to some.
LifeNews.com reported on what we might as well call “Baby-
Gate,” as “Abortion supporter Chelsea Clinton announced today
that she’s pregnant – not with a fetus or clump of cells but with
a ‘child.’”
OMG, she’s pro-choice but she’s having a baby?! What
hypocrisy! What murderous gall! I hardly know where to begin
with the loopy malignancy of this, which made me laugh out
loud. It perfectly captures the presumptuousness of people who
cannot get their heads out of other people’s uteruses. Only in
the fevered busybody brain could respecting a woman’s right
to make her own reproductive choices mean that you actively
desire the killing of unborn babies.
I write this with fresh memories of an adorable little girl
in her Easter finery running happily up and down the aisle at
Israel Baptist Church while a deacon told the congregation that
she was fine and to let her be. (To the reader who accuses me of
genocide for being pro-choice, who is wondering what a demon
like me was doing in church Easter morning: I was invited by my
friend Rev. Mark Thompson, who led a vigil for the murdered
Dr. George Tiller in 2009 and called him a martyr. Feel free to
have an aneurism.) I confess I was more attentive to what the
restless children near me were doing than to what the deacon
was saying. The little girl especially enjoyed twirling around
with her arms outstretched like Julie Andrews in the Alps.
Believe it or not, as I sat there with my Baptist friends and
their families, it did not once occur to me that the little monsters
should not have been born. I love children, not in the sense W.C.
Fields did (“preferably parboiled”), but for their rambunctious
and questioning little selves. Those of us who don’t want to see
a party in thrall to fanatics retake the Senate cannot point out
often enough that religious bullies have no monopoly on loving
children. The obsessed anti-abortionists in Congress recently
showed their godly devotion to child welfare by cutting food
stamps.
In other news: Touting the latest in science education, Carl
Kerby of the creationist group Answers in Genesis claims that
dinosaurs (tiny baby dinosaurs) were aboard Noah’s Ark. Cre-
ationists think the biblical flood happened just over 4,000 years
ago, whereas the fossil record shows that dinosaurs disappeared
65 million years ago. Off by a whisker!
Meanwhile, Alan Keyes praised Apocalypse-seeking rancher
Cliven Bundy, calling him a latter-day Rosa Parks. Sure, refusing
to pay grazing fees like other ranchers for using public land is
totally like being an African American in Alabama in 1955.
Bundy’s armed standoff with the Bureau of Land Manage-
ment also prompted the head of Tea Party Nation to plug
Operation American Spring, next month’s planned pro-coup
Washington rally to force President Obama from office.
As a defensive measure, I recommend self-medication.
Here’s to the revolution.
Richard J. Rosendall is a writer and activist. He can be reached at
rrosendall@starpower.net. l
Ding-A-Lings of Spring
Political pregnancies, creationists and cattle-rancher Cliven
by Richard J. Rosendall
METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
Finding Hope
at Youth Pride Day
24 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
It’s a new world for LGBT youth, full of opportunities and challenges
by Will O’Bryan

25 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
S
PRING, DESPITE ITS LINGERING
chill in 2014, is a time to think of birth,
of growth, of renewal. That means
youth – LGBT youth, in particular.
Like D.C.’s spring, LGBT youth can
also be chilly – and sunny and breezy
and all the rest. There is no universal
template for people, certainly not the youngest among
us. They are bois and grrrls, queer and kindred. They
are everything at once, coming out, testing their wings
and getting a better look at those generations ahead
of them who have laid the groundwork, and whom
they will gradually replace.
In the D.C. metro area alone, they represent
thousands of unique perspectives. Ahead of the
Youth Pride Alliance’s May 3 Youth Pride Day, Metro
Weekly checked in with three of them.
Young
Pioneers
It’s a new world for LGBT youth, full of opportunities and challenges
by Will O’Bryan

26 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
27 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
I
N THE WORLD OF ANNIE, A HARD-KNOCK LIFE
means a nasty orphanage full of toil and show tunes, with
a “Daddy” Warbucks tap-dancing along to make your
life magic. In the world of Lundyn Terry-Smith, things
worked a little differently.
“I was living in Baltimore City and I was homeless,”
says Terry-Smith, now 17, of a time shortly after he’d turned 14.
The abuse, he says, came primarily from his father. While his
mother wasn’t abusive, she was also long absent – since he was
8 months old. But there was also abuse at school. “In elemen-
tary school, I got along okay. In middle school it was a little bit
tougher, because that’s when I figured out I was gay. In high
school, it was just terrible. I never really came out and said,
‘Hey, I’m gay.’ People assumed, and they were correct. That’s
just how it was. I did get bullied a lot for it. It got pretty bad. It
got to the point I was fighting every day, getting shoved in lock-
ers, all that other good stuff.”
The way out, as Terry-Smith saw it, was to run away from
home. And, indeed, that ended the daily abuse. Still, the trajec-
tory of his life was far from taking a positive turn. Things were
going to get much worse before they got better.
“I was jumping from house to house, with friends and
stuff,” Terry-Smith says of the start of his life on the streets.
“Then I found an abandoned home. It had a couch, and the
electricity hadn’t been shut off. I stayed there for a little bit.
I got addicted to some pretty nasty drugs. Finally, I got really
tired of that life. I went to my aunt for help.”
Cue the happy-ending music? Oh, no.
Terry-Smith’s aunt was able to get him off the streets and
into a 90-day program operated in Maryland by Texas-based
Arrow Child & Family Ministries. As a self-identified Pagan,
Terry-Smith says his experience with the Christian social-ser-
vices provider may have provided him a safe harbor, but did
little to assuage his sense of isolation.
Whatever his feelings about Arrow, the program did, at
least, get him a step closer to that happy ending. Still, Terry-
Smith clearly remembers his dissatisfaction coloring his first
meeting with Justin and Philip B. Terry-Smith.
“The first thing I said was, ‘Get me the hell out of here.’”
The shared last name is the spoiler — you know where this
is going. Following months of getting acquainted and the at-
tendant paperwork and court dates, Lundyn Terry-Smith is
officially – right down to the legal last name – part of the fam-
ily, living in Maryland with his two dads, and thriving in ways
that have given him a new lease on life. Not only does he have
a roof over his head, but he’s also got his own bathroom. And,
unlike plenty of people his age, Terry-Smith seems to embrace
his chore list.
“It’s right here if you’d like me read it to you,” he says. “Sun-
days I have to dust surfaces and do the kitchen floor. Monday is
two hours of studying. Tuesday is my laundry day. Wednesday
is trash day. Thursday, I have to clean my bathroom. Friday, I
have to clean and vacuum my room and the hallway. Saturday,
I have to dust and vacuum the living room and dining room.”
He even makes dinner once a week: “Thursdays are my
night to cook. Last night I cooked orange chicken. It was the
first time I ever made it. It turned out really good.”
In a safe and stable home, Terry-Smith can actually turn
his attention from staying warm and fed – or feeding an addic-
tion – and concentrate on the here and now. He’s continuing
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me who he was, then he told me he was gay. We kept talking and
things happened.”
Terry-Smith says the marriage will have to wait a couple
years, until José’s Army tour ends, but a boy can dream.
“Justin will walk me down the aisle, and Phil will marry us,”
he says of the fixed points. Attire is still up in the air. “I kind of
want to wear a dress to my wedding and be all dragged up. But
I’m debating.”
Terry-Smith is more definitive, however, when it comes to
where the community could do a better job regarding the young-
er end of the LGBT spectrum. He says there’s a critical need for
more service organizations that target LGBT youth, for more
culturally competent support groups to help them navigate these
first years of having an LGBT identity.
In the meantime, he, at least, has found his own support group.
“Not only do I have homosexual parents, but I have the large
group of LGBT friends that they have,” he says of the social circle
he adopted along with his socially prominent parents. “I feel so
welcome. It’s amazing. I have such a large support group now. I
wish everybody did. Without it, life gets pretty hard.”
Seems Lundyn Terry-Smith’s “Tomorrow” has already ar-
rived, and the sunshine couldn’t be much brighter.l
“I have such a l arge
support group now. I wi sh
everybody di d. Wi thout
i t, LIFE GETS PRETTY
HARD.” – Lundyn Terry-Smi th
Accepted and
Excelling
his high school education online, often heading to Anne Arun-
del Community College with his father Philip, who serves as an
assistant professor of sociology there, and crafting a future as a
cosmetologist and professional belly-dancer. That’s not all he’s
got planned for the future.
“April 12, 2013,” says Terry-Smith. That’s the day his fiancé,
José, popped the question. “We’ve known each other since we
were little. He found me and messaged me online. He reminded
I
N APRIL 2012, MARYLAND’S BOWIE STATE UNIVER-
sity made history. Two years ago, it became the first of the
“Historically Black Colleges and Universities” (HBCU) to es-
tablish a permanent resource center specifically for “lesbian,
gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and intersex” students.
Not long after, Simone Mathis made her own history by
starting college – at Bowie State, of course – where she discov-
ered not the resource center, necessarily, but the school’s Gay-
Straight Alliance (GSA).
“One of my friends from high school had already been a mem-
ber of the GSA,” Mathis, a Beltsville native, recalls of her first
year in college. “He took me one day and I loved it. My next se-
mester, I became the treasurer. The semester after that, I ran for
president.”
Today, a 20-year-old sophomore majoring in English, Mathis
continues as president of the GSA on a campus she characterizes
as neither hostile nor overtly welcoming. Rather, everything is
just comfortably matter-of-fact.
“It’s not like we’re secluded,” Mathis says of her GSA’s role on
campus, with about 30 to 35 members. “We’re involved in some
of the on-campus activities. It’s just like being any other student.
Every year we mark the Day of Silence. We do LGBT History
Month every October with certain events. Every now and then
we’ll throw in a random one. We do try to stay active.”
The low-key yet involved nature of the Bowie State GSA fits
Mathis perfectly, in that her own life has run largely along the
same lines. Coming out might have thrown a couple bumps in the
road, but they were tiny and easy to navigate.
“Coming out, I lost a significant amount of friends,” she says,
remembering being 15 years old at Bowie High School. “Other
than that, the people who were really my friends stood by me.
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‘It’s okay. We love you for who you are. That’s fine.’ Coming out
to my parents was a little more difficult. I didn’t actually come
out; they just found out. That was a little difficult. But my family
and friends love me for who I am. It really wasn’t that hard.”
29 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
30 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Not only did she find family acceptance, she found it in abun-
dance.
“I live at home with my mom. She loves me. She loves my girl-
friend – my girlfriend lives here now, too,” Mathis shares. “My
mom likes to take in everybody, so all my sisters still live here, and
my aunt and grandmother live with us. We’re big family people.”
As for that girlfriend, a student at Baltimore’s Stevenson
University, it’s a relationship that illustrates another corner of
Mathis’s life where being a lesbian has just not caused much
of a ripple.
“We grew up together, went to church together,” says Mathis,
referring to Beltsville’s Queen’s Chapel United Methodist
Church. “She used to be the youth pastor for our church. We’re
still pretty active. Our church is full of family members.”
So, welcoming campus, welcoming family, welcoming church?
“Yep. That’s very lucky,” she confirms with a playful laugh.
Despite the apparent ease that colors Mathis’s life, she still
sees room for improvement, and it comes down to a practical
dollars-and-cents sensibility.
“Definitely more scholarships,” Mathis answers immediately
when asked what the older end of the LGBT community might
be able to offer its younger counterparts. “I cannot stress that
enough. As a struggling college student, definitely more schol-
arships. Every other race, ethnicity, group has a scholarship for
something. I don’t think we have that many. We definitely need
more scholarships.”
If things go as planned, one day it might even be Mathis’ stu-
dents applying for such scholarships, as she has her sights set on
being a high school English teacher. Sponsoring a GSA for her
students, wherever she might land, is also on her radar, as are
kids of her own. Whatever her future holds, exactly, it’s a fairly
safe bet that Mathis will bring to the world the kind of accep-
tance and community that the world has already shown her. l
“The peopl e who were real l y my
fri ends stood by me. ‘I t’s okay.
We l ove you for who you are.
That’s fi ne.’ COMING OUT TO
MY PARENTS WAS A LITTLE
MORE DIFFICULT.” – Si mone Mathi s
SMYAL’s Eager
Ambassador
S
UPPORTING AND MENTORING YOUTH ADVO-
cates and Leaders – née the Sexual Minority Youth As-
sistance League, but best known as SMYAL, whatever
the iteration – throws a heck of a brunch every year.
In 2013, it featured Marco Herndon, a young man who
moved to Arlington, Va., from Georgia, ahead of his
sophomore year of high school, roughly five years ago. SMYAL had
asked him to come and share his experience with the organization.
“I talked about how SMYAL has affected my experiences as an
LGBT youth,” Herndon recalls. “I talked about how I learned a lot of
leadership skills through them. I talked about how they exposed me
to the diversity of the LGBT community. Growing up in the suburbs
in Arlington, I didn’t have exposure to a lot of LGBT youth. SMYAL
exposed me to a lot of different types of LGBT youth and experienc-
es. What I knew of gay culture was mainly Dupont Circle, or very
well-to-do gay men. … It was the first time I met transgender youth
who were my age. Just knowing there were other LGBT youth in the
area was really cool. I got to express myself in ways I couldn’t in high
school. I was always trying to act ‘not too gay.’ In this other space, I
was able to just be myself. It really challenged me, as well. Through
SMYAL, I learned that there are a lot of different experiences.”
That foundation has had a great influence on Herndon’s experi-
ence at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, where the
20-year-old is focusing on urban and legal studies. From finding
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SMYAL when he was 16, to volunteering, to becoming a member
of SMYAL’s Youth Advocates Program during his senior year of
high school, Herndon learned not only more about himself and
his community, but also about communicating in a variety of
environments and about the nuts-and-bolts of operating a non-
profit. All of it useful.
“I’m part of the Lambda Alliance at UPenn. It’s the under-
grad umbrella organization for LGBT students. I’m on the board,
pretty involved with that,” Herndon says of campus life. “I’ve
also been able to explore more intersections of the LGBT com-
munity. I’m Latino. I’ve been able to understand what it means
to be a Latino gay man within the wider LGBT community. As
part of my role in this organization on campus, I’ve had to orga-
nize retreats. I’ve evolved a lot of the skills I started learning at
SMYAL. Whenever I have to plan something or talk about these
types of issues, when I have to talk about these ‘soft skills,’ I al-
ways think back to conversations or events at SMYAL. That was
a really good starting point in learning how to talk about social
issues, learning how to tackle them.”
It’s also a question of conversations, he says, when thinking of
what’s lacking for his generation – young gay men, in particular.
Herndon would like to see more conversations about sex, more
guidance from the older generation, in an effort to counter high
HIV infection rates among his peers.
“My generation of gay men, we have this pervasive hook-up
culture, but we don’t really have a lot of exposure to what it means
to be an openly gay young person,” says Herndon, describing his
generation as pioneers of sorts, a group that may have come of
age in high schools with Gay-Straight Alliances – but among the
first to do so. Their age of exploration and identity is beginning
younger than their forefathers’, but without the cultural infra-
structure of their straight peers. “I’d argue we’re one of the first
generations to be totally open, but there’s no real standard, no
format. We don’t really have an idea of how relationships are sup-
posed to work at our age.
“The HIV/AIDS crisis is happening all over again with LGBT
youth, especially 17 to 24 year old gay men, who are the most
prone to HIV. There are a lot of different stress points on a young
LGBT person. We don’t feel like there’s a place in the mainstream
LGBT movement that’s concerned about this.”
Youth leaders like Herndon – with skills learned at SMYAL
– may be the ones to start the conversation. While Herndon of-
fers that message to an older generation, he also has a message
for those a bit younger, living in the D.C. area, across the LGBT
spectrum.
“I’d like them to know that SMYAL is a place where you
can be yourself, but that it’s also a place that challenges you to
think about who you are, and it challenges you to be indepen-
dent,” says Herndon. “It makes you think about your identity in
a multidimensional way. It’s not just about being lesbian, gay, bi-
sexual, transgender or queer youth. It’s also about exploring the
wide array of things that define you. In exploring that, you really
empower yourself. You realize you can’t be reduced to just one
thing, that your identity is really a collection of things.”
The Youth Pride Alliance’s Youth Pride Day is Saturday, May 3,
from noon to 5 p.m., in Dupont Circle. For more information, visit
youthpridedc.org. l
“I ’d argue WE’RE ONE OF THE
FIRST GENERATIONS TO BE
TOTALLY open, but there’s no
real standard, no format.”
– Marco Herndon
35 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
APRIL 24 - MAY 1, 2014
SPOTLIGHT
JARMAN (ALL THIS MADDENING BEAUTY)
The performance ensemble company force/
collision, founded by local theater maverick John
Moletress, premieres its latest complicated creation,
a part-film/part-performance show inspired by the
late queer activist and filmmaker Derek Jarman
(The Last of England, Caravaggio, Sebastiane).
Moletress directs and performs live in Jarman (all
this maddening beauty), developed in part with noted
Latin-American playwright Caridad Svich and force/
collion’s team of theater designers. In addition, Ben
Carver serves as the production’s filmmaker, and
worked with a small cast of actors and voiceover
artists. Remaining shows Friday, April 25, and
Saturday, April 26, at 8 p.m., and Sunday, April 27,
at 4 p.m. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St.
NE. Tickets are $20, or $10 with a Capital Fringe
Button. Call 202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org or
force-collision.org.
JUN KANEKO’S CERAMIC SCULPTURES
In advance of its May production of The Magic
Flute, the Washington National Opera presents an
installation of ceramic sculptures by Jun Kaneko, the
set and costume designer for WNO’s new version of
Mozart’s final opera. A renowned visual artist and
painter, Kaneko balances the aesthetic elements
of his Japanese-American heritage in his work,
represented in this exhibition with pieces from his
“dumpling” series HEADS, Dangos as well as his
series about a mischievous shape-shifter Tanuki.
Through May 19. Kennedy Center Hall of Nations.
Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
MODELS INC. RUNWAY FUSION 2014
An evening of fashion and elegance featuring East
Coast designers in an event produced by Iran Bang
Paylor and Aaron Handy to raise awareness about
HIV. Models Inc. is a community-based modeling
company that strives to create a safe haven and
reduce high-risk behaviors among young aspiring
models. Friday, April 25, at 7:30 p.m. Mead Center
for American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW. Tickets are
$30, or $40 for VIP. Visit modelsincdc.org.

THE WASHINGTON BALLET
Tour-de-Force is a gala-style program of provocative
and engaging classical and contemporary ballets,
this year centered on George Balanchine’s Theme
and Variations with music by Tchaikovsky. Also on
the bill: Flames of Paris by Vasily Vainonen with
music by Boris Asafyev and D-Construction by the
Washington Ballet’s own Septime Webre and music
by John Cage. Remaining shows Thursday, April 24,
and Friday, April 25, at 7:30 p.m. Kennedy Center
Eisenhower Theater. Tickets are $35 to $125. Call
202-833-9800 or visit kennedy-center.org.
TRASH PHOTO CONTEST,
EARTH BLANKETS & REMNANTS
Touchstone Gallery encourages everyone to take
photos of “atrocious trash” and enter its Trash
Photo Contest, just one of two exhibits presented
in April in commemoration of Earth Day. The other
36
Compiled by Doug Rule
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F IT WEREN’T FOR BRENDA LEE, LEVI KREIS WOULD LIKELY NOT BE
making his D.C. theater debut with Smokey Joe’s Café at Arena Stage.
“I had to say yes to this show,” he explains, “because this music has been
part of my direct history of learning how to sing soulfully.” Turns out the female
country/pop legend Lee was Kreis’s first mentor, a friend of his mom’s in small-
town Tennessee who showed him the ropes. “I remember being on her tour bus at
6 years old,” the now 32-year-old Kreis says. “A lot of the music that I get to sing
in Smokey Joe’s Café I heard for the first time from stage with her.”
The show, one of the earliest and longest-running revues in Broadway history,
focuses on the rock and R&B tunes written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, from
“Hound Dog” to “Stand By Me.” Randy Johnson returns to Arena Stage after One
Night with Janis Joplin to direct what Kreis calls “a reimagined take” on the show,
beefed up with a more urban feel and more relationships — and of course the
local vocal firepower of Helen Hayes Award winners E. Faye Butler and Nova Y.
Payton. “They’re really so impeccable that rehearsal is a joy,” Kreis says, adding
that during rehearsals, “I literally am giggling like a child, because I can’t believe
what’s coming out of their faces!”
Kreis got his start singing gospel — until he came out and the gospel/Christian
music industry would have nothing to do with him. After that rejection he moved
to Hollywood and started acting in film, to say nothing of his Tony Award-winning
detour to Broadway in 2010, playing Jerry Lee Lewis in the revue Million Dollar
Quartet. But even today Kreis is chiefly focused on music — only this time as a suc-
cessful, self-produced LGBT pop singer-songwriter. A hit on iTunes, last year’s set
Imagine Paradise was funded by one of the most successful Kickstarter campaigns
yet. “As a gay man I’ve never had a major label behind me,” Kreis says, “but what I
have had is incredibly loyal fans who are the reason I have been able to do this for
a living for nine years.” — Doug Rule

Smokey Joe’s Café opens Friday, April 25, and runs to June 8 at Arena Stage, 1101
6th St. SW. Call 202-488-3300 or visit arenastage.org.
APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Levi’s
Café
Commitment
LGBT pop artist Levi Kreis “had to say yes” to Smokey Joe’s Café
37 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
38
Stricklin. Closes this Sunday, April 27. Andrew
Keegan Theatre (formerly Church Street Theater),
1742 Church St. NW. Tickets are $35. Call 703-892-
0202 or visit keegantheatre.com.
MOTH
Studio Theatre’s experimental-focused 2nd Stage
presents the U.S. premiere of Moth, Australian
playwright Declan Greene’s story about two teen
outcasts who escape the horrors of high school
through their friendship and obsessions with anime
and emo. Tom Story directs Allie Villareal and David
Nate Goldman in this show exploring the intimate,
devastating betrayals of adolescence. To May 4.
Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW. Tickets are $30
to $35. Call 202-332-3300 or visit studiotheatre.org.
TENDER NAPALM
Signature Theatre presents the Washington
premiere of an edgy, new battle-of-the-sexes drama
by Philip Ridley, whom The New York Times’ Ben
Brantley shouted about in a review as “one of the
most linguistically vivid dramatists on the planet!”
Signature’s associate artistic director Matthew
Gardiner directs this story about a man and a
woman, played by Elan Zafir and Laura C. Harris, at
a crucial point in their relationship in the aftermath
of an extraordinary loss. To May 11. Ark Theatre at
Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Ave., Arlington.
Call 703-820-9771 or visit signature-theatre.org.
THE ADMISSION
Theater J took a lot of heat from conservatives and
Israeli hardliners last year when it announced a
production of Motti Lerner’s play about a contested
attack by Israeli soldiers on Arab civilians early in
the country’s history. In response, the DC Jewish
Community Center’s theater company downgraded
Unconventional Queer Fest
Eboné Bell’s Capital Queer Prom begets this weekend’s TaggFest
A
FTER YEARS OF PRODUCING A QUEER PROM, EBONÉ BELL DECIDED TO KICK THINGS UP A NOTCH
and launch a full-day LGBT convention-type event.
From workshops on sex, relationships and identity, to a self-defense class, to a craft beer tasting with DC Brau,
TaggFest was designed “to bring the whole queer community together, no matter how you identify,” Bell says. “We created
breakout sessions that aren’t just all really serious, but also a little fun, in an environment where people feel safe, where
they can voice their opinions, educate and inspire one another and hopefully have conversations afterward.”
In fact, TaggFest is just one of two events Bell, in conjunction with her local lesbian magazine Tagg, is throwing this
Saturday, Aug. 26, at downtown’s Almas Temple. A few hours after TaggFest ends, Bell and company offer the Masquerade
Gala. “Anyone who enjoyed the prom,” she says referring to the Capital Queer Prom, “will definitely still get that same feel
from the Masquerade Gala.”
DJ Rosie and DJ MIM will encourage dancing among the gala-goers, dressed up in semi-formal or formal wear as well
as masks. Danella Sealock from NBC4 will serve as special guest and host for the gala, which will feature a silent auction
as well as a Duke and Duchess competition similar to the prom’s King and Queen. Both events benefit the Wanda Alston
Foundation.
Whether there will be another Capital Queer Prom, which Bell and her team produced the last seven years, is unlikely.
“Honestly, we’re not sure,” Bell says. “The whole goal is to basically evolve the prom, and I feel that TaggFest and
Masquerade Gala is essentially the prom, but just evolved.”
The prom and the gala, for one thing, appeal equally to those who like dressing up.
“How many times,” asks Bell, “do we get dressed up to hang with our friends, dance and enjoy each other’s company?
It doesn’t happen a lot.” —Doug Rule
TaggFest is Saturday, April 26, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., followed by the Masquerade Gala, 7 to 11 p.m., at Almas Temple, 1315
K St. NW. Tickets are $30 for TaggFest, $45 for the gala, or $65 combined. Visit taggfest.com.
APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
between Israel and Egypt, to yet stand the test of time
in the modern-day Middle East. Molly Smith directs
a cast that includes Richard “John Boy” Thomas
as President Jimmy Carter, Ron Rifkin as Israeli
Prime Minister Menachem Begin, Khaled Nabawy as
Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Hallie Foote as
first lady Rosalynn Carter. To May 5. Kreeger Theater
at the Mead Center for American Theater, 1101 6th
St. SW. Tickets are $75 to $120. Call 202-488-3300 or
visit arenastage.org.
GOLDA’S BALCONY
Tovah Feldshuh reprises the role that earned her
a Tony nomination a decade ago, portraying Golda
Meir in a show that set the record for the longest-
running one-woman show in Broadway history.
William Gibson’s Golda’s Balcony presents the story
of the state of Israel in the 20th century and is
presented as part of Theater J’s Voices From A
Changing Middle East Festival. Closes this Sunday,
April 27. The Aaron & Cecile Goldman Theater,
Washington, D.C.’s Jewish Community Center, 1529
16th St. NW. Tickets are $30 to $55. Call 202-518-
9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.org.
HAIR
The Keegan Theatre presents a production of
the pioneering rock musical Hair, both a joyous
celebration of youth and a poignant journey through
tumultuous 1960s America. The company’s leaders
and husband-and-wife team Susan Marie Rhea and
Mark A. Rhea direct the show whose book and
lyrics were written by Gerome Ragni and James
Rado with music by Galt MacDermot. In addition
to the classic songs such as “Aquarius,” “Let the
Sunshine In” and “Sodomy,” Keegan’s production
features choreography by Rachel Leigh Dolan and
a large ensemble cast led by Paul Scanlon and Josh
is Rosemary Luckett’s Earth Blankets & Remnants,
photo collages and photo-printed fabric blankets
pointing to what is covered and what is revealed in
today’s American landscape, exploring changes in
the natural world and the environment. On display
through a closing reception, during which the Best
Atrocious Trash Photo will be selected, Friday,
April 25, from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Touchstone Gallery,
901 New York Ave. NW. Call 202-347-2787 or visit
touchstonegallery.com.
XANADU
Every Friday and Saturday night, Landmark’s E Street
Cinema shows films at midnight that are more risqué
or campy than the usual fare, including monthly
screenings of The Rocky Horror Picture Show. But
this weekend it’s the guilty pleasure starring Olivia
Newton-John as a Greek muse enlivening Earth
while on a pit stop. Robert Greenwald’s musical
comedy Xanadu features enchanting music by Jeff
Lynne and the Electric Light Orchestra. Friday, April
25, and Saturday, April 26, at midnight. Landmark’s E
Street Cinema, 555 11th St. NW. Call 202-452-7672 or
visit landmarktheatres.com.
STAGE
CAMP DAVID
Arena Stage presents a world premiere from Pulitzer
Prize-winning New Yorker writer Lawrence Wright
(My Trip to Al-Qaeda, the new scientology exposé
Going Clear). Camp David is Wright’s dramatization
about the historical multiday meeting in 1978 among
a few key world leaders, held in the show’s namesake
Maryland retreat, attempting to forge peace in the
Middle East. The meeting resulted in really the only
treaty, the Camp David Accords, establishing peace
the production to a “workshop presentation” —
which translates to less theatrical showmanship
and fewer performances. Even so, the theater is
bracing itself for protests during the show, which
is intriguingly billed as an Israeli homage to All
My Sons and set in Haifa during the first Intifada.
Sinai Peter directs a strong cast including Danny
Gavigan, Kimberly Schraf, Michael Tolaydo and
Pomme Koch. Closes this Sunday, April 27. The
Aaron & Cecile Goldman Theater, Washington,
D.C.’s Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW.
Tickets are $30 to $55. Call 202-518-9400 or visit
washingtondcjcc.org.
THE AMISH PROJECT
The acclaimed local theater collective Factory449
presents the D.C. area premiere of Jessica Dickey’s
The Amish Project, about the 2005 shooting at the
one-room Amish schoolhouse in Nickel Mines,
Penn. Helen Hayes Award Winner and Factory449
member Nanna Ingvarsson takes on the task of
portraying the seven characters in this production
of the show, which was partially inspired by Moises
Kaufman’s The Laramie Project. And there’s even
a direct link to last fall’s stellar production of The
Laramie Project at Ford’s Theatre: Holly Twyford,
who starred in that ensemble show and now directs
Factory449’s production. To May 11. Anacostia Arts
Center, 1231 Good Hope Road SE. Tickets are $20.
Call 202-355-9449 or visit factory449.org.
THE THOUSANDTH NIGHT
MetroStage offers Carol Wolf’s unconventional spin
on the Arabian Nights in repertory with another
show performed by a solitary actor, Glen Berger’s
Underneath The Lintel (see separate listing). Marcus
Kyd stars as Guy de Bonheur in this comedic drama
set in occupied France in 1943, about a French actor
accused of subversive behavior who tries to redeem
himself. To May 18. MetroStage, 1201 North Royal
St., Alexandria. Tickets are $50, or $88 for both
shows. Call 800-494-8497 or visit metrostage.org.
THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA
The Folger Theatre welcomes New York’s
Fiasco Theater for its typically inventive spin on
Shakespeare, in this case the dizzying romantic
comedy The Two Gentlemen of Verona about mistaken
identity featuring bandits and an anthromophized
bulldog. Fiasco’s co-artistic directors Ben Steinfeld
and Jessie Austrian direct the ensemble production
in which Austrian acts alongside Zachary Fine, Noah
Brody, Paul L. Coffey, Andy Grotelueschen and
Emily Young. To May 25. Folger Theatre, 201 East
Capitol St. SE. Tickets are $30 to $72. Call 202-544-
7077 or visit folger.edu.
MUSIC
ANI DIFRANCO, ERIC HIMAN
Nearly 25 years after helping chart the DIY path
to success as a contemporary folk-rock singer-
songwriter, Ani DiFranco is still out constantly
touring. Next stop: Baltimore’s Ram’s Head Live,
inviting her charming and handsome gay protégé
Eric Himan to be her opening act. Saturday, April
26, at 8 p.m. Ram’s Head Live!, 20 Market Place,
Baltimore. Tickets are $40. Call 410-244-1131 or visit
ramsheadlive.com.
KINGS OF LEON
This Southern-fried brothers-led hard rock band
brings Young The Giant and Kongos as openers on
this just-announced third leg of the 2014 Mechanical
Bull Tour. Tickets on sale Friday, April 25, at 10 a.m.,
for Friday, Aug. 15, show at Jiffy Lube Live, 7800
Cellar Door Drive, Bristow, Va. Tickets are $29.50
to $88.60. Call 703-754-6400 or visit livenation.com.
39 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
40
MEGAN HILTY
The next artist to get the Barbara Cook Spotlight at the Kennedy Center is this
star from NBC’s Smash, who returns to the Kennedy Center for an intimate affair
after last season’s NSO Pops concerts. Friday, May 2. Tickets remain for 9:30 p.m.
show. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are $60. Call 202-833-9800 or visit
kennedy-center.org.
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Osmo Vanska leads the National Symphony Orchestra in a performance of
Mendelssohn’s Symphony No. 4, otherwise known as the “Italian Symphony.”
The program also features the NSO debut of Martin Frost performing Aho’s
Clarinet Concerto, plus Sibelius’s Symphony No. 3. Thursday, April 24, at 7 p.m.
Also Friday, April 25, and Saturday, April 25, at 8 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert
Hall. Tickets are $10 to $85. Call 202-833-9800 or visit kennedy-center.org.
RASCAL FLATTS, SHERYL CROW
A Disney Music Group blockbuster country act from Ohio and the Missouri-reared,
former Michael Jackson-backup-singing rock solo star tour together on a Rewind
Tour with Gloriana also on the bill. Tickets on sale Friday, April 25, at 10 a.m., for
Saturday, Aug. 2, show at Jiffy Lube Live, 7800 Cellar Door Drive, Bristow, Va.
Tickets are $29.75 to $89.80. Call 703-754-6400 or visit livenation.com.
SWEETLIFE FESTIVAL
Lana Del Ray, Foster the People, Bastille and Fitz and The Tantrums are the
headliners for this year’s Sweetlife Festival, organized by local gourmet fast-food
salad chain Sweetgreen, in partnership with the 9:30 Club’s IMP Proudctions.
In its fourth year at Merriweather Post Pavilion, Sweetlife draws upwards of
20,000 people wandering throughout the woodsy setting, beyond the concert
stages, to explore pop-up stores and tables staffed by Sweetgreen and its many
local restaurant and farm partners. Other notable acts on tap include Capital
Cities, St Lucia, Bombay Bicycle Club and Gems. Saturday, May 10, starting at
noon. Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia,
Md. Tickets are $75 to $150. Call 800-551-SEAT or visit sweetlifefestival.com.
TEMPO
This experimental music performance organization, established and run by
graduate students at the University of Maryland School of Music, premieres new
music from beyond campus. Monday, April 28, at 8 p.m. Clarice Smith Performing
Arts Center’s Gildenhorn Recital Hall, University of Maryland, University
Boulevard and Stadium Drive, College Park. Free. Call 301-405-ARTS or visit
claricesmithcenter.umd.edu.
THE CHORAL ARTS SOCIETY OF WASHINGTON
Scott Tucker leads the chorus in a tribute to Argentina. Tango! Soul and Heart
opens with two spiritual pieces, Ginastera’s Lamentations of Jeremiah and Misa
Tango, and concludes in a second half featuring singers and dancers performing
the tango. Sunday, April 27, at 5 p.m. Kennedy Center Concert Hall. Tickets are
$15 to $75. Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org. l
Zoo Story
The National Zoo is set to welcome gay species Saturday
O
N SATURDAY, MAY 3, IN ADDITION TO THE USUAL DRAWS — FROM PANDAS TO MONKEYS — THE
National Zoo will also be overrun with animals of a different species, those from the figurative taxonomy of the gay
kingdom. You know, bears, otters, pups, social bees.
“It’s a nice time where you get to see everyone come together in the community,” says Jacob Pring, the local promoter
responsible for organizing the second annual Gay Day at the Zoo, a fundraiser for The DC Center, the city’s primary LGBT com-
munity center. Last year’s event attracted about 2,000 people and raised $3,500, and Pring expects to exceed those totals this
year with greater promotion and participation, including a sizeable contingent of parents and children from Rainbow Families.
“It’s just a regular day at the zoo,” Pring says. But it’s also one in which LGBT zoo-goers are encouraged to wear T-shirts in
this year’s official color of teal blue/jade — “as close to that color as possible.” That is, if they aren’t able to buy in advance the
event’s official Nellie’s-sponsored T-shirt for $20, the proceeds of which go directly to The DC Center.
“It just so happens to be Kentucky Derby day too,” Pring adds, “so if people want to be cute and wear a derby hat, all the
better.” — Doug Rule
Gay Day at the Zoo is Saturday, May 3, from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., at National Zoo, 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free.
Visit gaydayatthezoo.com.
APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
LO-FANG
Matthew Hemerlein, a native of Columbia, Md., now based in Los Angeles, returns
for a hometown show nearly two months after opening for Lorde at Echostage. The
international pop superstar personally tapped Hemerlein to perform as her tour’s
one and only support act. This time, though, the singing multi-instrumentalist who
records as Lo-Fang will have other musicians to help him play through his great
electronic-orchestral pop tunes as featured on Blue Film. Saturday, April 26, at 8
p.m. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue. 600 I St. NW. Tickets are $15 in advance or $18
day of. Call 202-408-3100 or visit sixthandi.org.
41 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
It’s good to be king: Gero
Oh, Henry
STC’s Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2, deliver the
bard’s bounty with big stage presences
and strong vision
L
IKE 16TH CENTURY VERSIONS OF THE BIOPIC,
Shakespeare’s Richard II, Henry IV (Parts 1 and 2),
and Henry V, contemplate fascinating lives through
an auteur’s expansive lens. Equal parts historical
page-turner and human drama, each track the political intrigues,
power plays and battles spawned, while offering rich soil for
Shakespeare’s contemplations on the human condition.
If this sounds like heavy lifting, then the place to start might
well be with the Shakespeare Theater Company’s Henry IV,
Parts 1 and 2, in which the somber episodes of Henry IV’s reign
over a volatile Britain share time with the carefree exploits of
the antithetical Falstaff’s reign over the local ne’er do wells –
who happen to include the king’s tear-away son, Hal. In this
combination, both plays offer a “something for everyone” acces-
sibility, including even a bit of above-average swordplay. And
since they’re playing in rep, the plays can be seen on separate
nights but still in order — a unique opportunity to follow not only S
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APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Keach
43 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
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Henry’s history, but also the way in which Shakespeare darkly
and interestingly evolves his characters.
Carrying both plays, Henry IV, Falstaff and Hal are crucial
linchpins and there is no doubt that, whether or not the interpre-
tations speak to you, Edward Gero, Stacy Keach and Matthew
Amendt, respectively, make for a strong and memorable conti-
nuity. Big stage presences working within the strong vision of
director Michael Kahn, these three flawlessly maintain the vibe
of their respective worlds and conundrums as they live in paral-
lel, and then as they finally begin to collide. Thus, even with a big
cast (in which many play multiple roles across the two produc-
tions) and despite an overarching plot that the uninitiated may
find obtuse, most will find the drama unfolding among the three
men eminently accessible.
For what does it really boil down to? Two aging men, Henry
and Falstaff, each in their own ruthless, sometimes noble, ways
controlling respective domains, now beginning to turn inward
as the pressures of personal and political survival mount. Caught
between them is the young Hal, who though happily slumming it
in Falstaff’s world, never quite forgets he belongs elsewhere. As
war threatens, all three must accept change: Hal must decide who
he really wants to be, his father must accept him as not only as
heir apparent but also as a capable man, and Falstaff must come to
terms with the fact that he has ever only been a weigh station in a
much larger and inevitable scheme. None are wholly happy with
where they land, but then who is? It’s a dynamic we can relate to
without ever claiming royal blood or a tavern for a home.
For sheer gravitas and the kind of muscular but emotionally
poetic integrity that brings Shakespeare into stark immediacy,
Gero takes the day with his King Henry IV. At first fully engaged
in ruling the various bellicose British factions, Gero fills his
Henry with a convincing expedience and intelligent steel. Hal
may blithely mock him (at first), but it is no accident that Henry
has no time for frivolity; he has been wracked with responsibil-
ity and a morally ambiguous reign. By Part 2, Gero completes a
subtle seismic shift and reveals with brilliance the shadows in
this man’s soul.
And it is a brilliance made all the more potent by Kahn’s
choice to steep these productions fully and gloriously (except
for one small, but wonderful, moment) in full-on classical mode.
Tightly sprung, perfectly pitched and paced, these productions
are the bloody steaks and tannic reds of the theater; rich, gratify-
ing and offering an energy that endures long after the evening
has ended. This essential approach is enhanced by Alexander
Dodge’s rough-hewn but restrained sets, which evoke Henry’s
medieval era while serving as symbol for the unsettled nation
he must rule.
Counter to Gero’s deadly serious Henry is Keach, playing
his Falstaff to please the crowd. Embodying his man with some
clever prosthetics and a doddering walk, Keach manages the
none-too-easy task of entertaining on disparate levels. Thus,
while some will howl with joy at the vaudevillian moves while
others will cringe, pretty much everyone will find pleasure in
his facility with Shakespeare’s language and the clever way in
which he clearly and yet deftly delivers the bard’s wit. It’s a
writ-large rendering with whiffs of the Old American West, but
it is warm, engaging and speaks to the subtle pathos that inflects
the character.
Completing the triangle is Amendt’s Hal, who is wholly more
complicated. Exuding what can only be called an unlikable
charm, he is an undeniable force whenever onstage — compel-
ling, memorable and well matched to the two charismatic older
men. But there is an ever-so-slight dampener at the heart of
the performance that seems to emanate from something akin
too much calculation and not enough being. More specifically,
Amendt is master of the language, of Hal’s emotions (he cries
real tears!), the comic timing, even the staged unexpected; yet,
unlike his seasoned co-leads, Amendt doesn’t quite generate
the sense of the man who is the sum of all these parts. It is all
the more distracting when it mingles with Hal’s slightly devious
characterization: Is it Hal, or Amendt playing Hal?
Still, it’s a small question in a bigger, very wonderful whole.
Rounding out the central action in this large cast are many finely
tuned performances, with standouts dominated, without doubt,
by the senior players. Ted van Griethuysen outdoes himself
with beautiful comic portraits. Kevin McGuire brings much
potency and poetry to his Shakespeare. Steve Pickering offers a
nicely grounded gravitas. Derrick Lee Weeden brings gratifying
urgency to his Lord Chief Justice. And Bev Appleton and Brad
Bellamy bring big laughs in little roles.
Of the younger members, John Keabler is a suitably fiery
rebel Hotspur, thorn in the king’s side, but would do well with
a less-is-more approach to this man’s energy. As his wife Lady
Percy, Kelley Curran is a striking figure with a memorable edge,
while Chris Genebach offers a compelling presence and voice
that leaves one wanting more.
All in, these are two productions guaranteed to deliver “argu-
ment for a week, laughter for a month, and a good jest for ever.”
Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2 (HHHHH) run to June 8 in Shakespeare
Theatre Company’s Sidney Harman Hall, 610 F St. NW. Tickets
are $20 to $110 for one play, with discounts available for combined
purchase. Call 202-547-1122 or visit shakespearetheatre.org. l
44 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Land Rover’s latest
Big Apple Autos
Taking a small bite out of the
New York Auto Show
I
T’S NOT OFTEN THAT NEW YORK CITY, A GLOBAL
center of fashion, culture, knowledge, politics, economics
and commerce, would compare unfavorably to Detroit. But
if you want to find one area in which the Big Apple can’t
match Michigan’s largest city, look no further than Detroit’s
nickname: Motor City. Cars are the lifeblood of Detroit, whereas
New York is little more than a skyscraper-lined traffic jam, filled
with angry taxi drivers and overflowing parking garages. This
could explain, then, the relatively tepid New York Auto Show,
which pales in comparison to its Detroit compatriot. It offered
few surprises and even fewer standout autos, but we’ve hand-
picked six that did manage to rise above the humdrum banality
of most of the manufacturers present — for better or worse.
ALFA ROMEO 4C LAUNCH EDITION — We start with something
guaranteed to get any auto nut’s blood pumping: Alfa Romeo is
officially back on U.S. soil. Yes, the Italian brand, revered by car-
lovers the world over, will make its grand — though consistently
delayed — re-entry to the American market this summer, and its
doing so with one hell of a car. The 4C, Alfa’s stunning, bespoke
coupe, will be the marque’s first model offered for sale since the
164 sedan left these shores in 1995 (a handful of its stunning,
limited-run 8C sports cars in the late ’00s notwithstanding).
The nimble coupe will be offered to the first 500 customers in
a Launch Edition guise, which sees it wearing one of three col-
ors: Alfa Red, Rosso Competizione or Madreperla White. Out-
side, new, clear bi-xenon headlights replace the cheap-looking
plastic covers of European models, while a carbon-fiber spoiler
and mirror caps complement all-new forged wheels. Under-
neath, there’s firmer suspension, stiffer sway bars, retuned shock
bars that should offer better performance, and a new racing
exhaust to better help the 4C’s 240hp, 4-cylinder engine sing.
The tiny, Italian pocket rocket will reach these shores in
gears
by RHUARIDH MARR
45 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
June. Better get that checkbook ready.
BMW X4 — BMW is something of a marvel. The German marque
seems perfectly content plundering every niche possible with
its vehicle range. It takes a standard sedan and turns it into a
convertible, a coupe, a hatchback GT model and an SUV. What’s
more, BMW makes these niche models profitable. It does, how-
ever, beg the question of when enough is enough — and BMW
may finally have answered that with the introduction of the X4.
Styled after the X6, itself a niche vehicle, it takes the standard
BMW X3 SUV and cuts the back off, turning the X4 into a coupe/
hatchback hybrid on stilts. Ignoring that it’ll likely be impeccable
to drive and offer BMW’s excellent Xdrive AWD system and a
nicely appointed interior, let’s examine the need for this vehicle
to exist in the first place. The X4 starts at $46,000. If you want
6-cylinders powering it, that number will be closer to $50,000.
The X3, which is a perfectly fine SUV, starts at $40,000. Want
more style in a crossover-esque body? The 3 Series Gran Tur-
ismo is available. Want more practicality? The 3 Series Sports
Wagon offers better versatility. Like a hatch but don’t want to
sacrifice looks? Get the 4 Series Gran Coupe.
With so many models offering a variation of the X3 SUV,
what, exactly, is the point of the X4’s existence?
DODGE CHARGER — When Dodge reintroduced the Charger in
2006, it brought muscle-car good looks to the full-size sedan seg-
ment. Those looks, though, have somewhat faded over the years,
which is why Dodge looked at both its past and present for the
2015 redesign. Taking inspiration from the classic 1969 Charger
and borrowing liberally from its handsome new Dart, the latest
Charger offers a modern slant on old-school good looks. It’s a
mean, rippling beast.
LED head- and tail-lamps; a blacked-out, crosshair grille; and
muscular, bulging bodywork give the Charger a stance few cars
in the segment can match. Inside, the Dart’s fresh interior has
been upgraded to suit the Charger’s price point, with an 8.4-inch
screen in the center stack and a 7-inch display behind the wheel,
more premium materials and a steering wheel lifted straight
from the Jeep Grand Cherokee. Under the hood, Chrysler’s ven-
erable 3.6-liter V6 is offered, but you’d be remiss not to consider
the 5.7-liter Hemi V8, which should offer a 370-hp growl worthy
of the Charger’s new face.
It’s a bold reworking of a car that already stood out from
the full-size pack. Alongside the Durango, Dart and a refreshed
Challenger, Dodge has one of the most masculine, attractive
fleets on the road.
NISSAN VERSA — It’s hard to tell what Nissan was thinking with
the 2015 Versa Sedan. For a car that has always put space and
cost ahead of its looks, it would have been foolish to expect a
drastic redesign to better aid the Versa’s exterior appeal. It has
been redesigned, but instead of making the Versa attractive, Nis-
san have transformed an insipid car into one that’s just plain ugly.
A bulbous, awkward new front end borrows the grille from
its Altima brother. The rear has been reworked to feature a lip
spoiler. Neither is welcome, but its the sporty pretensions of the
latter which draws the most confusion in a car powered by a 109-
hp, 1.6-liter engine. Still, for under $12,000, perhaps it’s wrong of
us to expect a little style for little money.
TOYOTA CAMRY — It’s hard to tell what Toyota was thinking with
the 2015 Camry. For a car that has always put reliability and
comfort ahead of its looks, it would have been foolish to expect
a dra- wait. What?
Yes, that dramatic, almost sporty, sedan is in fact a Toyota
Camry. America’s best-selling sedan, famed for its bland driving
characteristics, bland interiors and bland styling, has finally been
given something of a shake-up. Coasting for years on rock-solid
reliability and dependable usability, Toyota’s sales aren’t quite
as strong as they used to be, which has clearly inspired the com-
pany to make this welcome change.
With a sharply styled front end, an attractive rear, stiffened
chassis, retuned suspension, tweaks to the power steering and
better braking, the Camry should drive as well as it now looks.
It’s not going to set pulses racing, but anything is better than its
predecessor. Inside, there’s a new interior, with better sound
insulation, a revised center stack, redesigned instrument cluster
and even wireless charging for devices that support it. A new,
sportier trim, XSE, adds specially tuned shocks, springs, bush-
ings and 18-inch wheels to further improve the new model’s
driving characteristics.
Touché, Toyota. You may finally deserve to top those sales
charts.
LAND ROVER DISCOVERY VISION CONCEPT — This was it, the high-
light of the New York Auto Show. Land Rover swooped in and
stole everyone’s thunder with its Discovery Vision Concept.
With a glitzy, confident launch atop the USS Intrepid, it offers
two things in one: a strong hint at the design direction of the
Land Rover brand and the return of the Discovery nameplate to
the United States.
The Land Rover Discovery entered the U.S. market in 1994,
a mid-size SUV offering seven seats and Land Rover’s go-any-
where versatility. When it was redesigned in 2004, the Discover
nameplate was dropped in North America, becoming the LR3
and, later, the LR4 for the 2009 refresh. With Land Rover’s
Range Rover badge becoming a family of vehicles, its lagging
LR2 — known as the Freelander outside North America — and
LR4 needed their own design direction. Thus, the Discovery
brand. It is intended to become its own family of vehicles, much
like Range Rover has become three luxury-focused models, here
focusing on leisure. Land Rover intends to “redefine its territory
in the leisure category”.
The seven-seat Discovery Vision Concept aims to exemplify
future Discovery vehicles, which will borrow heavily from its
design language. It’s a working concept, too, which showcases
some impressive technologies. Land Rover, whose pioneering
Terrain Response off-road system has been liberally copied by
Jeep (Selec-Terrain) and Ford (Terrain Management) for their
SUVs, debuted several new ideas designed to make driving and
off-roading much easier. Smart Glass can be used to display
information on the windscreen, sunroof and side windows, but
is otherwise transparent. Transparent Bonnet uses cameras and
Smart Glass to let drivers “see” through the hood of the car,
overlaying an image of the terrain in front onto the windscreen
— which should help visibility when negotiating obstacles or
parking. Laser Terrain Scanning does exactly what it says on the
tin, letting the car better anticipate the terrain ahead and notify-
ing the driver of upcoming obstacles.
On top of all that, the Discovery Vision Concept is itself a very
handsome car. There’s no word when the production Discov-
ery will hit the road, but the smaller Discovery Sport model is
expected to launch in 2015, replacing the LR2 in North America.
Land Rover may have “won” the New York Auto Show, but it’s
consumers who will be taking home the glory if the production
models match the style of the Vision Concept. l
46 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Caption
Cortana Nirvana
With Cortana and Windows Phone 8.1,
Microsoft’s smartphones finally reach parity
with their Android and iPhone rivals
W
INDOWS PHONE IS NOW THE UNDISPUT-
ed third place smartphone OS. It’s grown suf-
ficiently that is has recently overtaken Black-
berry in terms of market share and even bests
the iPhone in some countries around the world. Microsoft’s
mobile software is making all the right moves.
Until very recently, however, it felt as though it didn’t deserve
to move beyond third place. Windows Phone lacked a lot of the
features users of Apple and Google’s software have become
accustomed to, making switching to Microsoft’s ecosystem a
tough sell. It could be particularly bad for those who were forced
to adopt Windows Phone through work schemes where “bring
your own device” isn’t allowed. It was a solid, smooth, beautiful
OS, but nobody could successfully argue that it matched Android
or even iOS for functionality.
Note the past tense. Microsoft recently announced Windows
Phone 8.1, a big update that sought to iron out a lot of complaints
and include many of the functions and features present on com-
petitor devices. Earlier this month, it was released in an exclu-
sive developer preview to let app builders get to grips with the
OS before being unleashed on the general public this summer.
Unusually, Microsoft has sneakily made it possible for anyone to
enter the developer program – which normally costs $20 – for
free, simply by registering their email address with Microsoft
and downloading an app. Windows Phone 8.1 can then be down-
loaded to the user’s handset at will.
With a Nokia Lumia 1520 in hand, I went through the simple
steps, hit “refresh” on phone update in my settings app and
waited. After 15 minutes and a couple restarts, I had Microsoft’s
latest and greatest smartphone OS in my hand – and boy, is it
good. After a day of tapping, swiping, exploring and Binging (it
just doesn’t sound right, does it?), I can safely say that Windows
Phone 8.1 is now much more worthy of standing shoulder-to-
shoulder with iOS and Android. Third place has never looked
this good.
CORTANA - This is the big one, the flagship inclusion for the 8.1
update. Microsoft’s Siri and Google Now rival is a dedicated
personal assistant who draws her inspiration and voice from an
AI character in its Halo video game series on Xbox. Accessed
with a tap of the Search button, a friendly greeting from Cortana
welcomes you. “Hi, Rhuaridh!” or “Anything else I can help you
with, Rhuaridh?” were common messages as Cortana animated
tech
by RHUARIDH MARR
47 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
on-screen. She’s represented by a glowing circle, which flips and
pulses as she listens intently to your every word, trying to deci-
pher what you want her to do. Microsoft bills her as a personal
assistant, and to that extent they’ve succeeded. I’ve never found
a computer that could speak my name, but Microsoft allows you
to teach Cortana the correct pronunciation, something neither
Google nor Apple offer.
Once she’s grasped how to reference you, Cortana will
encourage you to fill out her Notebook. This is where she’ll
really get to know you. Grant her access to your Facebook and
email and she’ll start to learn about you – she’ll look for track-
ing information in emails, such as flights, and use Facebook to
personalize your search results. Interests is where you can cus-
tomize what Cortana displays on her main screen: “Daily glance”
will show top news stories, information about your commute,
the weather forecast and information on any upcoming trips. If
it sounds like Google Now, that’s because it is incredibly similar.
Google’s system is still more natural and currently a lot more
useful – it detects your interests based on searches and displays a
lot more information – but Cortana offers deeper customization
as to what is actually displayed.
Next up is “remind me,” which is used to set, shockingly,
reminders. What’s unique here is geolocation. Tell Cortana
you need to get milk next time you go to the grocery and she’ll
wait until your phone’s location reaches your local store before
pinging you. Want to raise a topic next time your friend calls?
Tell Cortana, and when the phone starts ringing, she’ll show
the reminder among the call information. “Quiet hours” mimics
Apple’s Do Not Disturb, shutting off notifications for a set period
of time, though you can establish an “inner circle” of trusted
people who can get through should they need to urgently tell you
something. Similarly, if the same person calls multiple times in
an emergency, Cortana can let them through to you if allowed.
On top of that, she’ll also detect music, linking the track to the
Xbox music store for streaming or purchasing.
Natural language searches can be hit or miss. Occasionally
Cortana will nail it and offer a verbal response and appropri-
ate information card. Other times she’ll just offer basic search
results. Either way, the job gets done, but it’s always nice to have
her respond to you. Of course, she’s still in beta, so this will likely
get better over time. What Cortana does nail are a vast array of
responses to the usual questions asked of voice assistants. Jen
Taylor, who voiced Cortana in the Halo games, provided the
voice for Cortana on Windows Phone, and she really shines in
these witty, referential responses. Ask her who her father is and
she’ll say, with perfect inflection, “Technically speaking, that’d be
Bill Gates. No big deal.” Ask her what she thinks of iOS and she’ll
tell answer, “May the best OS win. Y’know, job security.” Ask
“What are you wearing?” and she’ll tell you “Just a little some-
thing I picked up in engineering.” For Halo fans, the references
are numerous. Ask her where the game’s protagonist Master
Chief is and she’ll say “Probably off saving the galaxy somewhere.
He’s good like that.” There are many more, and I won’t spoil
them. What’s great here is that Microsoft has recorded hundreds
of natural language phrases. Inquire as to whether you’ll need an
umbrella tomorrow, and Cortana could say “Not likely” or “You
shouldn’t have to bring one” before offering a weather synopsis.
The natural, personality-rich phrases, free from robotic bland-
ness, offer a human touch to this digital assistant.
She’s not perfect, but she’s certainly got all the hallmarks of a
great entry into the voice-assistant club. Google Now is still the
most functional, but Microsoft’s focus on personality could well
see it taking the lead should it iron out any hiccups and inject
more features before Cortana leaves beta. Either way, she’s a
mascot for Windows Phone, one it sorely needs right now.
READY FOR ACTION (CENTER) - Yup. Windows phone just got a noti-
fication center, dubbed the “action center.” Android pioneered
it, Apple deftly stole it for iOS, now Microsoft is jumping on the
bandwagon. Swipe down from the top of the screen and a list of
notifications are presented, which can be selected or cleared at
whim. Apps can intelligently leave notifications there for users
to find, removing them if they’re time-sensitive and no longer
necessary, for instance. Along the top, the quick settings toggles
– again, pioneered in Android and liberally borrowed by Apple
and now Microsoft – live, which can be changed to suit each user
and offer fast toggle access to WiFi, brightness, GPS, Bluetooth
and other functions.
There’s nothing new here, but that’s not what users will care
about. What matters is that it just works. It offers exactly what
people wanted – though it doesn’t sit as well with the rest of OS.
It’s functional, but not as stark, minimalist and well designed
as the other parts of Windows Phone. Again, it could change in
future, but right now, notifications are no longer restricted to
Live Tiles. That’s reason enough to rejoice.
APP-SOLUTELY WONDERFUL - Windows Phone 8 has made great
strides to catch up with iOS and Android. There are still some
apps missing from the two main platforms, but those that matter
are here. Vine, Instagram, Pocket, Netflix, Scruff, Snapchat and
many more. What matters for gay people is Grindr. For years, it
was missing, as Grindr ignored users who cried out for an official
app. Grindr still has its fingers in its ears, acting as if Windows
Phone doesn’t exist, but a third-party app maker has stepped
up to fill the gap. Meet’m – yes, it really is called that – offers
full access to Grindr. For gay men, that could be all they need to
finally jump ship, as shallow as it sounds.
What’s more, the store now makes it easier to find the
apps you want. It also updates your apps automatically, while
downloaded apps can be stored on SD cards to free up space on
your phone. These may sound like minor additions – and that’s
because they are. They should have been here long ago, but hey,
they’re welcome changes all the same.
ENTERPRISING - This is the big one for those who rely on a Win-
dows Phone for work. The main headline is VPN support – it’s
not built in at the OS level, and can be auto-triggered for when-
ever you reach the office. Also on board is S/MIME to encrypt
emails, certificate management to enroll, update and revoke cer-
tificates for user authentication, the ability for admins to change
passwords and remotely lock devices and support for password-
protected Office documents. Speaking of Office, Microsoft’s bril-
liant Office Lens app is here. It can scan documents, blackboards,
receipts and a number of other surfaces, importing the informa-
tion into OneNote and allowing search of recognized text. Need
to keep track of expenses? Fire up the Lens app and receipts are
automatically captured, stored and organized for you. Enterprise
WiFi is also here, with support for EAP-TLS and enhanced MDM
policies to secure functionality for more enterprise control, on
top of greater app management. They’re not the sexiest features,
but there will be companies and individuals all over America
rejoicing at them.
SENSE-ATIONAL - There are three new features in Windows
Phone 8.1, bundled under the heading of “Sense” apps. Battery
Sense comprises Battery Saver and Battery Power Sense. The
48 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
former can be toggled to activate when
the phone’s battery drops to a certain
level, restricting the functions of back-
ground apps, turning off notifications and
otherwise turning everything down from
11 to help eke out the last few drops of
juice from the battery. The latter is an
extension of this, showing which apps are
draining what amount of battery, letting
users uninstall problem apps or restrict
what functions they can perform when
the device is locked or the app is running
in the background. Both should help Win-
dows Phone’s already impressive stamina
get even better.
Data Sense has been seen previously
on some Windows Phone devices, but
was limited to certain handsets or car-
riers. It now comes bundled with the
OS and keeps track of how much data is
being consumed by the phone. Set your
data limit, and Data Sense will do its
best to help you make the most of every
megabyte, crunching down data-heavy
Web pages when accessed over mobile
networks and shutting off your data con-
nection when you’ve reached your limit
– though this can be turned off for those
happy to keep spending.
WiFi Sense is the most impressive
function here. It can detect trustworthy,
open networks – such as airport or Star-
bucks WiFi – and automatically accept
the T’s & C’s and connect you. WiFi can
also activate based on location – stray
from your home router and it’ll automati-
cally switch off WiFi to save battery life.
A really cool feature is network shar-
ing. If a friend comes over and wants to
access your WiFi, you no longer need to
give them your password. Simply check
a box in WiFi settings and, if the friend
is in your Skype, Facebook or Hotmail
contacts list, they’ll be automatically con-
nected. No more hunting for that pass-
word card next to your router.
NIP/TUCK - The whole OS has undergone
something of a beauty treatment. Fonts
and app spacing have been adjusted to
make better use of the space on larger and
denser screens as Windows Phone gains
more 1080p displays. The calendar finally
displays a week view, as well as the stan-
dard day and month (seriously, it’s ridicu-
lous it took this long to get here). Google
calendar is back aboard after Google
yanked support for the system Windows
Phone originally used. The camera app
has been given a Nokia-esque makeover
with greater manual control over images
and a refreshed UI. The browser has been
updated to Internet Explorer 11, which
should make it faster, slicker and more
compatible with websites – tabs will now
show up as windows in the multi-task
view, which should make it easier to jump
to a specific website from another app.
Speaking of multitasking, pressing back
in an app will no longer close it; it will
merely suspend it to speed up resuming
times. To close an app, swipe the appro-
priate window away in the multitasking
view – yes, just like iOS, which borrowed
the idea from Android (seeing a pattern
here?), which in turn borrowed the idea
from webOS.
There’s a new keyboard addition, with
the much-loved “swipe” functionality
popular on Android present here, letting
users trace over words rather than tapping
individual letters. There are now separate
volumes for ringtones and music/media
when the volume button is pressed. (Yes,
this has just been added, four years after
WP7 launched.) Low-energy Bluetooth
is here, which should be perfect for all of
the fitness bands and smartwatches that
use low-energy Bluetooth to sync with
devices. It’s just a shame very few actually
support Windows Phone.
Finally, there’s a nifty parallax effect
available for the Start screen. Instead of
picking a themed color for live tiles, you
can now pick a photo, which will appear
as if underneath the tiles. Scrolling up or
down will move the tiles over the top of
the photo. It’s a nifty effect, and breathes
additional life into the live-tile format
that so many Windows Phone users have
fallen in love with.
Ultimately, Windows Phone 8.1 is a
big step in the right direction. For Micro-
soft, there are two key battles. First, it
must convince developers that Windows
Phone is finally ready to step into the
limelight and receive apps at the same
time as iOS and Android. Second, it needs
to convince consumers that swapping to
Windows Phone no longer means losing
the usability and apps they enjoy on other
devices in order to sample Microsoft’s
beautifully stark OS.
With new devices coming from Nokia
and Samsung this month, and hopefully
more from other manufacturers this sum-
mer, it will be interesting to see if the
folks in Redmond, Wash., can leverage
the press buzz surrounding 8.1 into actual
sales. For current Windows Phone own-
ers, who’ll receive 8.1 this summer, the
onus is also on them to get the word out
about the changes. Windows Phone is
finally something for which I can say,
“Yeah, try it. It’s great.” l
49 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
Flying high at Zoom Room
Training Day
Patience, dedication and guidance
can help you build a beautiful
bond with your pet
I
F PUPPIES AND KITTENS WEREN’T SO CUTE, MOST
new owners wouldn’t make it through the first month. Your
little furball comes with a lifetime of delightful commit-
ments, but few will give greater returns on your time and
patience then proper training. Though it may seem daunting to
turn that manic pee-monster into a four-legged Boy Scout, a few
local resources and a little common sense can get the job done.
Zoom Room, the Rockville branch of a national dog-training
franchise, operates like Discovery Zone for dogs. Their facility
is dedicated to dog education, offering services like obedience,
agility and puppy training and various other enrichment classes.
Zoom Room operates on the theory that a dog will learn better
while playing than through static commands, so don’t be sur-
prised if your Bowser learns her P’s and Q’s on a Westminster-
worthy indoor agility course.
“It’s hard for a dog to learn to stay for 30 seconds, but if
you’re doing agility work, and doing a reward system that is fun
and engaging, it will build the confidence of the dog and the
owner much faster,” says Steve Mulder, Zoom Room’s owner
and head trainer. “Confidence is a huge part of dog training. The
most important thing that separates us is that our dog training
is about building confidence between owner and dog, and in the
dog itself.”
Adages about dogs and tricks do not apply here – Zoom Room
accepts puppies of all ages to its classes. Groups are organized
by levels of training, which means owners can work at their own
pets
by ZACK ROSEN
photography by TODD FRANSON
50 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
pace and keep their dog at an appropriate level, regardless of age,
until both are ready for advancement. An animal’s capabilities
and behaviors change rapidly as they grow up, so it is important
to remember that true training is a lifetime commitment.
That said, it is never too early to get a puppy ready for the
world. The central tenet of dog training is positive reinforce-
ment, teaching positive commands — “Lie down on the floor”
— instead of negative ones — “Don’t jump on my grandmother”
— that a dog finds more confusing.
Socialization is also key. Bringing the puppy out into the
world after eight weeks and exposing it, safely and comfortably,
to a broad range of life’s experiences will greatly aid adjustment.
“A classic phobia dogs have is children,” says Mulder.
“Children are jerky, loud, energetic. Dogs not exposed can
have a lifelong phobia. So don’t take your dog to playground
and have kids jump on him, but walk around the playground
and get him used to their noises and commotions while
they’re still young.”
While Zoom Room is strictly for the canines, be aware that
“cat training” is not a mutually exclusive clause. Felines have not
been domesticated for as long as dogs have and, as such, retain
more of their wild characteristics. This, combined with a cat’s
solitary wiring — as compared to a dogs “please the leader” pack
mentality — means that good old-fashioned bribery is usually
your best place to start.
“With reward-based training methods, most cats can learn
simple tricks and behaviors,” says Veronica Sanchez, trainer and
behavior consultant for Vienna, Va.-based behavior-consulting
outfit Cooperative Paws. “It’s important to find out what moti-
vates your cat. Food treats are an easy reward to use for training
because you can deliver them quickly and do several repetitions.
I’ve used soft cat treats and canned cat food on a spoon.”
Sanchez is a specialist in both cat and dog behavior. She has
19 years experience and more degrees than Dupont Circle has
Starbucks. Though much of her focus is on canines, Sanchez is
quick to offer the more uncommon insights into feline workings
as well.
“Cats, just like other animals, vary in their temperament and
behavior,” she says. “Some cats are more independent and less
needy. Other cats are just as people-oriented as many dogs are.
Some people may incorrectly perceive cats being less loving
than some other domestic animals. The truth is they are just
different.”
One of those most pronounced differences is in leash train-
ing. While a leash is a dog’s necessary interface with the greater
world, your cat will more likely be scared by the unfamiliar
environments and frightening street stimuli. Some of the more
confident cats out there can eventually, through treats and
patience, be your urban walking companion. Famous for their
individualism, though, cats are best served by respecting their
own unique temperaments.
“I think it’s important for all pet owners to understand and
appreciate the pet that they have rather than try to change their
pet. Learning and appreciating what their cat really wants,
enjoys and needs can help owners develop the best relationship
possible with their pet.”
For more information about Zoom Room, 11771 Rockville Pike,
Rockville, call 301-825-9113 or visit zoomroomonline.com. For
more about Cooperative Paws, visit cooperativepaws.com. l
51 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014 51 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
Sawyer
“Sawyer is my best bud, always by my side and wanting to be out and about in the
mix of Dupont Circle. We take plenty of walks around the neighborhood and often
look for alternate routes. (Well, I look for alternate routes, but Sawyer always tries to
insist we walk by way of the doggie store for a treat.)
He loves running around large parks, up and down the hills of Rock Creek
and going berserk when he plays in the water. His favorite activity: destroying any
stuffed animal he can, especially those with voice boxes. He’s a charming killer of
plush stuff.”
Michael Bigley’s 6-year-old Border Collie/Pit mix
P
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53 METROWEEKLY.COM
t
THURS., 04.24.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
EAGLE-N-EXILE
Special Capital Fringe
Pop Up • Highwaymen
TNT Hot Jock Contest •
6pm-2am • No Cover •
607 New York Ave. NW
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
LISTINGS
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half-price burgers and
fries
FRI., 04.25.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Friday Night
Videos with resident
DJ Shea Van Horn • VJ
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
EAGLE-N-EXILE
Special Capital Fringe
Pop Up • Gear Night •
6pm-2am • No Cover •
607 New York Ave. NW
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Banaka •
Doors open at 10pm • For
those 21 and over, $5 from
10-11pm and $10 after
11pm • For those 18-20,
$10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers
• Ladies of Illusion with
host Kristina Kelly, 9pm •
Cover 21+
SAT., 04.26.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • $5 Absolut &
Tito’s, $3 Miller Lite after
9pm • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-7pm
• Karaoke and/or live
entertainment, 9pm
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
Guest DJs • Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer,
House Rail Drinks and
Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm •
Buckets of Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Doors 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover

PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge •
Charity Bingo with Cash
Prizes 3rd Sat. of Every
Month
TOWN
Special Early Cabaret:
Miss Richfeld 1981 •
Doors 7:30pm, Show
8:30pm • $20 VIP, $10
General • Drag Show
starts at 10:30pm •
Laganja Estranja from
RuPaul’s Drag Race •
DJ Wess • Hosted by
Lena Lett and featuring
Tatianna, Shi-Queeta-
Lee, Jessica Spaulding
Deverreoux and Banaka •
$8 from 10-11pm and $12
after 11pm • 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All nude male dancers,
9pm • Ladies of Illusion
with host Ella Fitzgerald,
9pm • DJ Steve
Henderson in Secrets • DJ
Spyke in Ziegfelds • Doors
8pm • Cover • 21+
SUN., 04.27.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
cover
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch
Buffet, 10am-3pm •
Crazy Hour, 4-8pm •
Drag Show hosted by
Destiny B. Childs featuring
performances by a rotating
cast, 9pm • No cover •
Karaoke follows show
JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all favors), all
day and night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
55
t
METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
scene
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
JR.’s Easter Bonnet Contest
Sunday, April 20
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • Doors
8pm • Cover 21+
MON., 04.28.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Poker Texas Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Buzztime Trivia
competition • 75 cents off
bottles and drafts
TUES., 04.29.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/
Alt/Brit Rock), 9pm-close
• DJ Wes Della Volla •
2-for-1, all day and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Karaoke
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
56 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
75 cents off bottles and
drafts • Movie Night
WED., 04.30.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • Multiple TVs
showing movies, shows,
sports • Expanded craft
beer selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
GREEN LANTERN
Happy Hour Prices,
4pm-Close
JR.’S
Trivia with MC Jay
Ray, 8pm • The Queen,
10-11pm • $2 JR’s Drafts
& $4 Vodka ($2 with
College I.D./JR’s Team
Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Half-Price Burger Night
• Buckets of Beer $15 •
SmartAss Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Free Pool • 75 cents off
Bottles and Drafts
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesday DJ
Don T • 9pm • Cover 21+
THURS., 05.01.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour,
4pm-7pm • $4 Small
Plates, $4 Stella Artois,
$4 House Wines, $4
Stolichnaya Cocktails, $4
Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
GREEN LANTERN
Shirtless Men Drink Free,
10-11pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs,
$2 JR.’s drafts, 8pm to
close • Top Pop Night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy
Hour — $2 (5-6pm), $3
(6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15 •
Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim E in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+ l
57 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014
58 SEE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
JR.’s Easter Bonnet Contest / Sunday, April 20 / PHOTOGRAPHY BY WARD MORRISON
59 PURCHASE YOUR PHOTO AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE/
scene
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with your
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Freddie’s Beach Bar
Sunday, April 20
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
JR.’s Easter Bonnet Contest / Sunday, April 20 / PHOTOGRAPHY BY WARD MORRISON
60 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
scene
Nellie’s Sports Bar
Saturday, April 12
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
CHRISTOPHER CUNETTO
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
61 METROWEEKLY.COM APRIL 24, 2014

That wisdom which the likes of Churchill had, where is it?
You can’t see it in people now with gay habits
– shame on them.

— Zimbabwean President ROBERT MUGABE discussing what he saw as the declining importance of Britain on the world stage,
before claiming it had “gone to the dogs.” He added that he pitied “the one lady I admire, the queen, that she is in these
circumstances.” Mugabe has ruled Zimbabwe since its independence from the United Kingdom in 1984.
(BBC)

While
I disagree with perhaps what other states have done in
regards to gay marriage,
it’s a reality in other states. And those married couples will move to Wyoming.

— Wyoming Gov. MATT MEAD, speaking with reporters. Mead clarified that he believes marriage is between one man and one
woman, but that same-sex couples legally married out of state should have access to the state’s legal system as spouses, stating,
“We need to make sure in Wyoming that those married gay couples know they have access to the courts.”
(Casper Star-Tribune)

It is only when they hear what I have to say and see me in person that
they can get past the fact that I am a transgender.”
— BHARATHI KANNAMMA, regarding her run for a seat in India’s Parliament. Kannamma, who will run as an anti-corruption
independent, is the first out trans woman to run for Parliament in India. After coming out as trans, she established
a foundation dedicated to helping transgender individuals living below the poverty line.
(AFP)

When I was a kid
I was definitely what you would call a fag hag
because that’s how I learned to dress and be extrovert and walk into a room.

— COURTNEY LOVE in an interview, explaining that her development as a rock star occurred during college, adding “Freshman year
of learning how to be a rock star was just hanging around drag queens.” Love has consistently recognized her gay friends and fans
for the impact they’ve had on her career, previously telling Vanity Fair, “My homos — they stick by me through thick and thin.”
(Gay Times)

I don’t know why people are trying to surround my career with that. I agree with you man. No issues here.
If you love me I love you back. I’ve got love for everybody.”
— TRACY MORGAN, speaking in a Reddit AMA, responding to a question asking if he had any issues with gay people. Morgan came
under fire for telling an audience at a 2011 comedy show that if his son came out to him he would “pull out a knife and stab
that little [N-word] to death.” Morgan later apologized at a GLAAD press conference.
(Reddit)
62 APRIL 24, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM

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