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GROWING EPAZOTE 14 5 3 StumbleUpon2 11 | In The Garden Epazote is a piece of living history.

Native to Central and South America, this herb was prized by the Aztec culture for culinary and medicinal uses. oday epazote has naturalized in the !nited States along roadsides "fre#uently called a weed$ and is %nown to grow in New &or%'s Central (ar%. Some call epazote a weed, while others en)oy it as a culinary companion to coo%ed beans. *f you're the latter, try growing epazote plants in your garden. Epazote adds a distinct flavor to +e,ican dishes and is a staple ingredient in bean dishes, both for its taste and its anti-flatulent properties. .i%e cilantro, epazote has a fragrance and flavor that fol%s either love or hate. .eaves have an aroma that seems to smell differently to different people. *t's been described as having tones of lemon, petroleum, savory, gasoline, mint, turpentine, and even putty. /espite the sometimes odd fragrance, the uni#ue flavor ma%es epazote an ingredient that can't be duplicated or replaced in recipes. (regnant or nursing women should not consume epazote in any form. No one should ingest the seeds or oil, which are poisonous. *t's also wise to avoid consuming the flowering tips of stems. In This Article Soil, (lanting, and Care roubleshooting 0arvest and Storage 1A2s Soil, (lanting, And Care Epazote is native to tropical climes. *n North America, plants are annual in 3ones 4 to 5 and perennial in warmer zones, typically growing 4 to 6 feet tall. *n all regions, you can grow epazote in a container, bringing it indoors for winter in coldest climes. (lant epazote outdoors in spring after all danger of frost has passed and when night temperatures are consistently above 78 degrees 1. Site plants in full sun in average, well-drained soil. /rainage is important9 don't place where roots will sit in water. 1ull sun develops the best flavor in leaves. *n early spring, fertilize epazote with :onnie 0erb ; <egetable (lant 1ood. his organically based fertilizer is low in salt and won't cause ugly brown leaf tips.

Troubleshooting Epazote doesn't have pest problems9 the aromatic leaves tend to repel insects. Some gardeners report that crushing and scattering leaves acts as ant repellent. *n the garden, epazote sets an abundance of seeds and definitely has the potential to be invasive. Clip and destroy seedheads to limit self-sowing. Harvest And Storage 0arvest leaves at any point after plants are established. (ic% leaves in the morning, after dew dries. Air dry leaves on screens or gather stems in bunches and hang upside down. Uses !se epazote leaves fresh or dried. he flavor is strong9 use sparingly to season dishes until you %now the taste your family li%es. =lder leaves have the strongest flavor9 younger leaves are more mild. Store harvested epazote for fresh use by slipping stems into a glass of water or refrigerating them wrapped in damp paper towels and tuc%ed into a loose "unsealed$ plastic bag. +any recipes call for adding a few sprigs of epazote during the last minutes of coo%ing. >hen using dried epazote, leaves will soften with longer coo%ing time. =ften recipes will re#uire ?one stem of epazote.@ hat's roughly e#uivalent to A teaspoon of dried, chopped herb. 1oods where epazote can play a supporting role include refried beans, s#uash dishes, chili, split pea soup, #uesadillas, and egg dishes. he flavor complements cilantro and green chile peppers, as well as por%, corn, shellfish, and fish. o preserve epazote, dry whole leaves and store in sealed containers in a dar% place. o release flavor, crumble leaves finely )ust before using. &ou can also freeze epazote, whole or chopped, in ice cube trays filled with water. Some fol%s harvest epazote stems and dry them for a wreath base in dried floral creations. !se caution when handling dried epazote9 the resin in leaves can cause dermatitis or other allergic reactions in some individuals. Epazote seeds and oil should never be consumed; both are poisonous. >omen who are pregnant or nursing should not ingest epazote in any form. 4 Thoughts On Growing Epazote 1. Mrs. B On July 2 ! 2"#2 $t %&'( )m *aid& +ow poisonous is this plant and is true that this herb should not be eaten by children,

Mary Beth On July -#! 2"#2 $t -&-. )m *aid&

+i Mrs. B! /ou may have read about larges dosages o0 the oil. Most recipes call 0or 1ust a sprig or two o0 the 0resh leaves. Only in really large doses is it considered unsa0e.$nother resource advises against consumption by pregnant women. 20 you are interested in learning more about coo3ing with a 0ew 0resh leaves! this site sources a 0ew great Me4ican recipes and lin3s. O0 course! i0 you 5uestion the sa0ety o0 any item in your landscape! please contact your local poison control center. 6or instance! lantana 0lowers are very popular in summer plantings! but the seeds are considered unsa0e and indigestible7poisonous. But it doesn8t rule out popularity or proper use o0 plants. Be smart and be sa0e9 +appy gardening. :Mary Beth! Bonnie )lants 2. ;ynn Bein3e On July (! 2"#2 $t '&## $m *aid& 2 bought one o0 your epazote plants. 2t went right to seed and never became a usable plant. <ill the seeds start new plants. 2s there a perennial, $ 0riend in Me4ico had a plant about 0eet tall with many leaves. =elly *mith >rimble On July %! 2"#2 $t 2&"' )m *aid& +i ;ynn! /es! epazote goes to seed 5uic3ly and will reseed and grow new plants in your garden i0 you let it. Epazote is a perennial in zones ?@#". <hen you do get to harvest leaves 0rom your epazote plants! be sure to try our recipe 0or )into Beans with Epazote. En1oy9 Family: Chenopodiaceae Genus: Chenopodium Species: ambrosioides Synonyms: Ambrina ambrosioides, A. parvula, A. spathulata, Atriple ambrosioides, !litum ambrosioides, Chenopodium anthelminticum, C. integri"olium, C. spathulatum, C. su""ruticosum Common #ames: $pa%ote, erva&de&santa maria, 'ormseed, apasote, chenopode, "euilles a vers, herbe a vers, me(si(a cayi, paico, pa%ote, semen contra, semin contra, simon contegras, me ican tea, american 'ormseed, )esuit*s tea, payco, pai(u, paico, amush, camatai, cashua, amasamas, anserina, mastruco, mastru%, sie&sie, )erusalem tea, spanish tea, ambroisie

du me i+ue, 'urmsamen, hierba hormiguera ,arts Used: -ea", 'hole plant, seed From The Healing Power of Rainforest Herbs EPAZOTE !ER"A# PROPERTIE$ AN% A&TION$ 'ain Actions Other Actions $tandard %osage increases -eaves e pels 'orms perspiration %ecoction ./0 cup once (ills parasites increases urination daily increases breast (ills amebas mil( promotes mildly la ative menstruation stimulates (ills bacteria digestion prevents ulcers calms nerves repels insects mildly sedative heals 'ounds (ills cancer cells Epazote is an annual herb that grows to about 1 m in height. It has multi-branched, reddish stems covered with small, sharply toothed leaves. Epazote bears numerous small yellow flowers in clusters along its stems. Following the flowers, it produces thousands of tiny blac seeds in small fruit clusters. It is easily spread and re-grown from the numerous seeds it produces which is why some consider it an invasive weed. !he whole plant gives off a strong and distinctive odor. Epazote is native to "e#ico and the tropical regions of $entral and %outh &merica where it is commonly used as a culinary herb as well as a medicinal plant. It has been widely naturalized throughout the world and can be found growing in parts of the southern 'nited %tates. In (razil the plant)s name is erva-de-santamaria or mastruo* in +eru its calledpaico. It is nown throughout "e#ico and ,atin &merica as epazote. !he %iona name of this plant means worm remedy and here in &merica it is referred to as wormseed - both referring to it long history of use against intestinal worms. TRIBAL AND HERBAL MEDICINE USES In the -ucatan, indigenous Indian groups have long used epazote for intestinal

parasites, asthma, e#cessive mucus, chorea .a type of rheumatic fever that affects the brain/ and other nervous afflictions. !he !i una Indians in the &mazon use it to e#pel intestinal worms and as a mild la#ative. !he %iona-%ecoya and 0of1n Indian tribes in %outh &merica also use epazote for intestinal worms .usually by ta ing one cup of a leaf decoction each morning before eating for three consecutive days/. !he 0of1n Indians also use the plant as a perfume-tying it to their arm for an )aromatic) bracelet. .2owever, most &mericans consider the smell of the plant 3uite strong and ob4ectionable - calling it s un -weed5/ $reoles use it as a worm remedy for children and a cold medicine for adults while the 6ay7pi use the plant decoction for stomach upsets and internal hemorrhages caused by falls. In +iura a leaf decoction is used to e#pel intestinal gas, as a mild la#ative, as an insecticide, and as a natural remedy for cramps, gout, hemorrhoids, intestinal worms and parasites and nervous disorders. %ome indigenous tribes bathe in a decoction of epazote to reduce fever and will also throw a couple of freshly uprooted green plants onto their fires to drive mos3uitoes and flies away. In herbal medicine systems throughout ,atin &merica epazote is a popular household remedy used to rid children and adults of intestinal parasites, worms and amebas. !he plant is also used in coo ing - it is said to prevent intestinal gas if the leaves are coo ed and8or eaten with beans and other common gas-forming foods. !he leaves and seeds of epazote have long been used in $entral and %outh &merican medicine as a vermifuge .to e#pel intestinal worms/. In (razilian herbal medicine, it is considered an important remedy for worms .especially hoo worms, round worms and tape worms/ and is also used for coughs, asthma, bronchitis and other upper respiratory complaints* for angina, to relieve intestinal gas, to promote sweating and as a general digestive aid. It is used for similar conditions in +eruvian herbal medicine today. ,ocal people in the &mazon region in +eru also soa the plant in water for several days and use it as a topical arthritis remedy. In other %outh &merican herbal medicine systems the plant is used for asthma, bronchitis, diarrhea, dysentery, and menstrual disorders. E#ternally it has been used as a wash for hemorrhoids, bruises, wounds, contusions and fractures. !he plant)s ability to e#pel intestinal worms has been attributed to the essential oil of the seed and )9il of $henopodium) has been used for several centuries worldwide as a worm remedy. !he oil was once in the U.S. Pharmacopoeia as a drug used against amebas, roundworms and hoo worms. !he therapeutic dose of the essential oil however does have other to#ic effects, therefore it fell from favor as an internal remedy many years ago. Inta e of 1: mg of the oil has been nown to cause cardiac disturbances, convulsions, respiratory disturbances, sleepiness, vomiting and wea ness and even death. PLANT CHEMICALS Epazote is rich in chemicals called monoterpenes. !he seed and fruit contain a large amount of essential oil which has a main active chemical in it called ascaridole. !his chemical was first isolated in 1;<= by a >erman pharmacist living in (razil and it has been attributed with most of the vermifuge .worm-e#pelling/ actions of the plant.

&scaridole has been also documented with sedative and pain-relieving properties as well as antifungal effects. &pplication of the oil topically was reported to effectively treat ringworm within ?-12 days in a clinical study with guinea pigs. In other in vitro clinical studies, ascaridole was documented with activity against a tropical parasite called Trypanosoma cruzi as well as strong anti-malarial and insecticidal actions. !he main chemicals found in epazote include alpha-pinene, aritasone, ascaridole, butyric-acid, d-camphor, essential oils, ferulic-acid, geraniol, l-pinocarvone, limonene, malic-acid, menthadiene, menthadiene hydropero#ides, methyl-salicylate, myrcene, p-cymene, p-cymol, safrole, saponins, spinasterol, tartaric-acid, terpinene, terpinyl-acetate, terpinyl-salicylate, triacontyl-alcohol, trimethylamine, urease, and vanillic-acid. BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES AND CLINICAL RESEARCH & decoction and infusion of the plant was analyzed in vitro to determine if they had to#ic effects. &t various concentrations the e#tracts caused cellular aberrations in the test tube, indicating possible to#ic effects. 2owever, in the 1<?:)s the 6orld 2ealth 9rganization reported that a decoction of 2: g of leaves rapidly e#pelled parasites without any apparent side effects in humans. In 1<<@ e#tracts from the leaves of epazote were given to ?2 children and adults with intestinal parasitic infections. & stool analysis was performed before and eight days after treatment. 9n average, an antiparasitic efficacy was seen in =@A of cases. 6ith respect to the tested parasites, epazote leaf e#tract was 1::A effective against the common intestinal parasites, Ancilostomaand Trichuris, and, =:A effective against Ascaris. In a study in 2::1, thirty children .ages B-1C years/ with intestinal roundworms were treated with epazote. Doses given were 1 ml of e#tract per g of body weight for younger children .weighing less than 2= pounds/, and 2 ml of e#tract per g of body weight in older children. 9ne dose was given daily on an empty stomach for three days. %tool e#aminations were conducted before and 1= days after treatment. Disappearance of the ascaris eggs occurred in ;@.?A, while the parasitic burden decreased in =<.=A. In addition, this study also reported that epazote was 1::A effective in eliminating the common human tapeworm .Hymenolepsis nana/. In other research epazote has been documented with to#ic effects against snails. and was shown to have an in vitro to#ic action against drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In 2::2, a '.%. patent was filed on a $hinese herbal combination containing epazote for the treatment of peptic ulcers. !his combination .containing $henopodium essential oil/ was reported to inhibit stress-induced, as well as various chemical and bacteria-induced ulcer formation. !he most recent research has documented the anticancerous and antitumorous properties of epazote. In one study an e#tract of the entire plant of epazote showed the ability to ill human liver cancer cells in the test tube. &nother study reported that the essential oil of epazote .as well as its main chemical, ascaridole/ showed strong antitumorous actions against numerous different cancerous tumor cells .including several multi-drug resistant tumor cell lines/ in the test tube.

CURRENT PRACTICAL USES Due to the to#icity of the essential oil .usually distilled from the seeds/, the oil of this plant is no longer recommended for internal use. !he leaves of the plant .containing smaller amounts of essential oil/ is the preferred natural treatment for intestinal parasites in herbal medicine systems today throughout the world. It is best to find a source for only epazote leaves, as products sold as )whole herb) can contain a significant amount of seeds .and resulting essential oil/ depending on when it was harvested. For intestinal worms and parasites, most herbalists and practitioners recommend E cup of a standard leaf decoction ta en in the morning on an empty stomach for three days in a row. 9n the fourth day, a mild la#ative is given to evacuate the bowel .and the dead and dying parasites and worms/. !his is repeated two wee s later to address any worm eggs that may have survived and hatched. EPAZOTE P#ANT $(''AR) Main Preparation Method: infusion or capsules Main Action !in order": antiparasitic, vermifuge .e#pels worms/, insecticidal, digestive stimulant, hepatoprotective .liver protector/ Main U e : 1. for intestinal worms and parasites 2. for s in parasites, lice, and ringworm B. to tone, balance, and strengthen the liver .and for liver flu es and parasites/ C. to tone, balance, and strengthen the stomach and bowel . and for acid reflu#, intestinal gas, cramping, chronic constipation, hemorrhoids, etc/ =. for coughs, asthma, bronchitis, and other upper respiratory problems Propertie #Action Doc$%ented &' Re earch: amebicide, antibacterial, anticancerous, antimalarial, antiparasitic, antitumorous, ascaricide . ills &scaris parasitic worms/, insecticidal, molluscicidal . ills snails/, vermifuge .e#pels worms/ Other Propertie #Action Doc$%ented &' Traditiona( U e: analgesic .pain-reliever/, antacid, anti-inflammatory, antihepatoto#ic .liver deto#ifier/, antimicrobial, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antiulcer, carminative, contraceptive,

diaphoretic .promotes sweating/, digestive stimulant, diuretic, gastrototonic .tones, balances, strengthens/, hepatoprotective .liver protector/, la#ative, lactagogue .promotes mil flow/, menstrual stimulant, nervine .balances8calms nerves/, sedative, tonic .tones, balances, strengthens overall body functions/, wound healer Ca$tion : It should not be used during pregnancy or while breast-feeding. Don)t use essential oil internally.

Traditiona( Preparation:F For intestinal parasitesF one-half cup of a leaf decoction once daily on an empty stomach for three days. & decoction of the leaves is employed .in E cup dosages/ for menstrual, respiratory, and digestive problems on an as-needed basis. Contraindication : !he plant and essential oil should not be used during pregnancy and lactation. Got only does the plant have to#ic activity, it has also been traditionally used to induce abortions. 6hile epazote has been used by indigenous tribes as a contraceptive, this use is not verified by clinical research .nor should it be relied on for such/. 2owever, the use of the plant is probably contraindicated for couples trying to get pregnant. !he oil of epazote is considered e#tremely to#ic and should not be ta en internally. Dr$) Interaction : Gone nown.

WOR#%WI%E ET!NO'E%I&A# ($E$ "eli*e "or digestive problems, hangovers, intestinal gas, intestinal parasites, and as a sedative "or abortions, angina, bacterial in"ections, bronchitis, bruises, circulation problems, colds, coughs, contusions, digestive sluggishness, dyspepsia, "alls, "lu, "ractures, gastric disorders, hemorrhoids, hemorrhages, increasing perspiration, insomnia, intestinal gas, intestinal parasites, laryngitis, menstrual di""iculties, palpitations, sinusitis, s(in parasites, s(in in"lammation, s(in ulceration, spasms, throat in"lammation, tuberculosis, 'orms, 'ounds, and as an insect repellent and sedative

"ra*il

Ecuado "or indigestion, intestinal gas, intestinal 'orms, slo' r digestion !aiti 'e+ico "or parasites, s(in sores, stomachache, 'orms, and as an antiseptic "or colic, increasing perspiration, menstrual disorders, nerves, parasites, toothache, tumors, 'ater retention, 'orms "or abscesses, arthritis, birth control, blood cleansing, cholera, colic, contusions, cough, cramps, diabetes, diarrhea, digestive problems, dysentery, edema, e cessive mucous, "ractures, gastritis, gout, hemorrhoids, hysteria, increasing perspiration, intestinal gas, liver support, lung problems, memory, menstrual disorders, nervousness, numbness, pain, paralysis, parasites, pleurisy, rheumatism, s(in disorders, spasms, stomach pain, tumors, urinary tract in"lammation, urinary in"ections, vaginal discharge, vomiting, 'ater retention, 'orms, 'ounds, and as an antacid and antiseptic, insect repellent, and sedative "or amebic in"ections, asthma, childbirth, dysentery, dyspepsia, "atigue, "ungal in"ections, lung problems, palpitations, sores, 'orms "or asthma, digestive problems, menstrual di""iculties, nervous disorders, 'orms "or childbirth, increasing mil( "lo', menstrual disorders, nerves, pain, parasites, 'orms

Panama "or asthma, dysentery, 'orms

Peru

Trinida d Tur,e(nited $tates

.ene*u "or aiding digestion, 'orms ela "or abortions, amebic in"ections, anemia, appendicitis, arthritis, asthma, breathing di""iculty, bug bites, childbirth, cholera, colds, colic, con)unctivitis, coughs, cramps, dyspepsia, dysentery, "atigue, "ever, "ungal in"ections, hoo('orms, increase perspiration, intestinal parasites, Else/h intestinal gas, intestinal ulceration, lactation aid, malaria, ere measles, menstrual irregularities, nervousness, neurosis, pains, palpitations, paralysis, rheumatism, round'orms, sna(ebite, stomach problems, spasms, tonic, tumor, 'ater retention, 'orms, and as an antiseptic, insecticide, and sedative

Maybe you have heard about it, maybe you have wondered about it but epazote is still working on its reputation !ind out all about this unusual "atin #meri$an herb and soon you will be adding authenti$ity to some o% your %avorite dishes &ry it %irst in this re$ipe %or a $olor%ul 'orn and (la$k (ean Salad with &ortilla Strip 'routons &he $ookbook is now available %or pur$hase) &o %ind out more about it as well as take advantage o% spe$ial website pri$ing *+, o%%--use dis$ount $ode U./012434 visit the Spi$ed 5ight e-storeat 'reateSpa$e We got a glowing review! Check it out at the Chef Talk website.

All About Epazote by Sandra (owens #s you learn about epazote the age-old 6uestion, 78hat9s in a name:7 may o$$ur to you 8hile epazote sounds somewhat e;oti$, the other names %or this Me;i$an herb are less appealing 'onsider skunkweed, pig weed, wormseed or goose%oot #nd then there is the %a$t that the word epazote $omes %rom the #zte$ words 9epatl9 and 9tzotl9 meaning smelly animal Me;i$an tea is a ni$er name as is the botani$al Chenopodium ambrosioides "et9s <ust sti$k with

epazote *say eh-pa-zo-tay4 %or this dis$ussion =ative to 'entral #meri$a, espe$ially Me;i$o and 0uatemala, epazote is $ommon to those $uisines >t is most o%ten used %resh in these regions to %lavor beans, $orn and %ish &he strongly s$ented herb is said to help avoid the gastri$ dis$om%ort that sometimes o$$urs a%ter eating beans #n$ient #zte$s used epazote both medi$inally and as a $ulinary herb &he taste is strong as well, slightly bitter with hints o% lemon >t is o%ten $ompared to $ilantro as both are a$6uired tastes ?pazote has no $omparable substitute but we have %ound using Me;i$an oregano in its pla$e provides pleasing results Simply omitting it %rom a re$ipe is another option 1ou might %ind %resh epazote %or sale at Me;i$an gro$ery stores Me;i$an %ood guru 5i$k (ayless notes in his book Mexico: One Plate at a Time that although the %resh herb may appear wilted, it is still okay %or $ooking @e also re$ommends storing the %resh stems in a glass o% water, like a bou6uet o% %lowers, or re%rigerated wrapped in damp paper towels Aried epazote is available $hopped or as whole stems 5e$ipes will o$$asionally $all %or a stem o% epazote--roughly e6ual to a teaspoon o% the dried $hopped produ$t

>t is easy to grow your own epazote i% you like it enough to want a steady supply &he shrubby plant is an annual that grows about three or %our %eet high "eaves are large and pointed with serrated edges while the %lowers are tiny $lusters o% green balls &he $rushed leaves are said to send ants s$attering i% pla$ed in their path >% you buy dried epazote %or your own kit$hen you may noti$e that

some pie$es seem rather woody 1ou $an pi$k these tough stems out or try pulverizing it %urther with a mortar and pestle &he dried herb does so%ten plenty with e;tended $ooking &ry epazote in soups, with shell%ish and eggs or as an ingredient in 6uesadillas >t is espe$ially popular %or %lavoring beans o% any kind ?pazote $ombines well with other Me;i$an seasonings like oregano, $umin and $hiles 1ou should be aware that this pungent herb is poisonous in large 6uantities but don9t let that stop you %rom e;perimenting with a pin$h or two Corn and Black Bean Salad with Tortilla Strip Croutons For maximum fla or! make this salad the da" before# Store in the refri$erator and brin$ to room temperature before ser in$# This salad also works as a salsa# 2 $ups %rozen $orn kernels, $ooked a$$ording to pa$kage dire$tions and drained 1 $an *15 oun$es4 bla$k beans, rinsed and drained 1 $an *4 5 oun$es4 di$ed green $hiles 1 large $love garli$, min$ed 1 medium tomato, $ored and di$ed 1 teaspoon ground $oriander 3 &ablespoons olive oil 1 &ablespoon plus 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar 1 1B2 teaspoons %inely $hopped dried epazote 1B2 teaspoon /osher salt 1B, teaspoon ground bla$k pepper &ortilla strip $routons, re$ipe %ollows Cla$e the $orn, bla$k beans, green $hiles, garli$ and tomato into a large salad bowl Sprinkle with the $oriander and toss well 8hisk together the oil, vinegar, epazote, salt and pepperD pour over the $orn and bean mi;ture &oss well >% time allows, $over and pla$e in re%rigerator overnight (ring to room temperature be%ore serving &o serve, mound on a salad plate and s$atter the tortilla $routons over the top

1ieldE si; 1B2 $up servings Tortilla Strip Croutons F si;-in$h $orn tortillas Gegetable oil %or %rying 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground $umin 'ut the tortillas in hal%, sta$k and sli$e into hal%-in$h strips @eat 1B2 in$h o% the oil in a deep, heavy sau$epan over medium-high heat Hil is ready when a test tortilla strip dipped into it sizzles heartily 'are%ully drop about one-third o% the strips into the hot oilD keep them moving with a slotted spoon and %ry until $risp, about 4 minutes Using the slotted spoon, $are%ully trans%er to drain on layers o% paper towels 5epeat two more times with remaining tortilla strips Mi; together the salt and ground $umin Sprinkle this mi;ture over the warm tortilla strips and toss lightly to $oat

Maybe you have heard about it, maybe you have wondered about it but epazote is still working on its reputation !ind out all about this unusual "atin #meri$an herb and soon you will be adding authenti$ity to some o% your %avorite dishes &ry it %irst in this re$ipe %or a $olor%ul 'orn and (la$k (ean Salad with &ortilla Strip 'routons

&he $ookbook is now available %or pur$hase) &o %ind out more about it as well as take advantage o% spe$ial website pri$ing *+, o%%--use dis$ount $ode U./012434 visit the Spi$ed 5ight e-storeat 'reateSpa$e We got a glowing review! Check it out at the Chef Talk website.

All About Epazote by Sandra (owens #s you learn about epazote the age-old 6uestion, 78hat9s in a name:7 may o$$ur to you 8hile epazote sounds somewhat e;oti$, the other names %or this Me;i$an herb are less appealing 'onsider skunkweed, pig weed, wormseed or goose%oot #nd then there is the %a$t that the word epazote $omes %rom the #zte$ words 9epatl9 and 9tzotl9 meaning smelly animal Me;i$an tea is a ni$er name as is the botani$al Chenopodium ambrosioides "et9s <ust sti$k with epazote *say eh-pa-zo-tay4 %or this dis$ussion =ative to 'entral #meri$a, espe$ially Me;i$o and 0uatemala, epazote is $ommon to those $uisines >t is most o%ten used %resh in these regions to %lavor beans, $orn and %ish &he strongly s$ented herb is said to help avoid the gastri$ dis$om%ort that sometimes o$$urs a%ter eating beans #n$ient #zte$s used epazote both medi$inally and as a $ulinary herb &he taste is strong as well, slightly bitter with hints o% lemon >t is o%ten $ompared to $ilantro as both are a$6uired tastes ?pazote has no $omparable substitute but we have %ound using Me;i$an oregano in its pla$e provides pleasing results Simply omitting it %rom a re$ipe is another option

1ou might %ind %resh epazote %or sale at Me;i$an gro$ery stores Me;i$an %ood guru 5i$k (ayless notes in his book Mexico: One Plate at a Time that although the %resh herb may appear wilted, it is still okay %or $ooking @e also re$ommends storing the %resh stems in a glass o% water, like a bou6uet o% %lowers, or re%rigerated wrapped in damp paper towels Aried epazote is available $hopped or as whole stems 5e$ipes will o$$asionally $all %or a stem o% epazote--roughly e6ual to a teaspoon o% the dried $hopped produ$t

>t is easy to grow your own epazote i% you like it enough to want a steady supply &he shrubby plant is an annual that grows about three or %our %eet high "eaves are large and pointed with serrated edges while the %lowers are tiny $lusters o% green balls &he $rushed leaves are said to send ants s$attering i% pla$ed in their path >% you buy dried epazote %or your own kit$hen you may noti$e that some pie$es seem rather woody 1ou $an pi$k these tough stems out or try pulverizing it %urther with a mortar and pestle &he dried herb does so%ten plenty with e;tended $ooking &ry epazote in soups, with shell%ish and eggs or as an ingredient in 6uesadillas >t is espe$ially popular %or %lavoring beans o% any kind ?pazote $ombines well with other Me;i$an seasonings like oregano, $umin and $hiles 1ou should be aware that this pungent herb is poisonous in large 6uantities but don9t let that stop you %rom e;perimenting with a pin$h or two

Corn and Black Bean Salad with Tortilla Strip Croutons For maximum fla or! make this salad the da" before# Store in the refri$erator and brin$ to room temperature before ser in$# This salad also works as a salsa# 2 $ups %rozen $orn kernels, $ooked a$$ording to pa$kage dire$tions and drained 1 $an *15 oun$es4 bla$k beans, rinsed and drained 1 $an *4 5 oun$es4 di$ed green $hiles 1 large $love garli$, min$ed 1 medium tomato, $ored and di$ed 1 teaspoon ground $oriander 3 &ablespoons olive oil 1 &ablespoon plus 2 teaspoons red wine vinegar 1 1B2 teaspoons %inely $hopped dried epazote 1B2 teaspoon /osher salt 1B, teaspoon ground bla$k pepper &ortilla strip $routons, re$ipe %ollows Cla$e the $orn, bla$k beans, green $hiles, garli$ and tomato into a large salad bowl Sprinkle with the $oriander and toss well 8hisk together the oil, vinegar, epazote, salt and pepperD pour over the $orn and bean mi;ture &oss well >% time allows, $over and pla$e in re%rigerator overnight (ring to room temperature be%ore serving &o serve, mound on a salad plate and s$atter the tortilla $routons over the top 1ieldE si; 1B2 $up servings Tortilla Strip Croutons F si;-in$h $orn tortillas Gegetable oil %or %rying 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground $umin 'ut the tortillas in hal%, sta$k and sli$e into hal%-in$h strips @eat 1B2 in$h o% the oil in a deep, heavy sau$epan over medium-high heat Hil is ready when a test tortilla strip dipped into it sizzles

heartily 'are%ully drop about one-third o% the strips into the hot oilD keep them moving with a slotted spoon and %ry until $risp, about 4 minutes Using the slotted spoon, $are%ully trans%er to drain on layers o% paper towels 5epeat two more times with remaining tortilla strips Mi; together the salt and ground $umin Sprinkle this mi;ture over the warm tortilla strips and toss lightly to $oat

EpazoteF !he Flavor of "e#ico $omes Gorth

Epazote can be grown in "aine and by Jason Moore added to "e#ican dishes. +hoto courtesy of +ete Gutile, +hotographer, HohnnyIs %elected %eeds. Local farmers markets are an excellent source

of traditional organic produce, such as sweet corn, peas and tomatoes, but also of regional and ethnic favorites, such as fresh fiddleheads, chicory, okra or chayote. As regional demographics change and new immigrant communities appear, farmers markets reflect these changes, and previously unknown Mexican American foods and spices are now common in farmers stalls from !pringfield, Massachusetts, to "llsworth, Maine. A lesser known plant seasoning that is used throughout Latin America but is only beginning to be found in #ew "ngland markets is epa$ote %&henopodium ambrosioides, syn. 'ysphania ambrosioides(. )ronounced eh paw *+" tey, this plant has a wonderfully diverse number of uses but is especially effective in traditional Mexican dishes. Although we often think of soft corn flour tacos with beans and cheese as typical Mexican fare, the Mexican food that is served today in local or chain fast food restaurants is a pale imitation of a cuisine with over ,--- years of history and marked by regional variety and difference. .o understand the uni/ue flavors and tastes common in the Mexican cocina, one must start in ancient Mexico where the A$tecs founded a city sate in what would become Mexico &ity, and the Maya thrived in what is now the 0ucatan and 1uatemala. A$tec agriculture in central Mexico before the arrival and con/uest of the !panish was based on several domesticated plants but was dominated by s/uash, beans, chili peppers, tomatoes and, primarily, corn. As A$tec civili$ation developed, expanded and eventually urbani$ed with the legendary city of .enochtitlan, the diet eventually included peanuts, sweet potatoes, yucca, guavas, amaranth, lima beans and green tomatoes, with dogs and turkeys as sources of animal protein. .o the south of the A$tecs, the Mayans were also successful agronomists propagating corn, chili peppers and black beans, while simultaneously using bees to pollinate orchards that produced an abundance of pineapples, papaya, mamey sapote and sapodilla %Manikara $apota(, a fruit that looks similar to a potato but tastes like a mix !he flower and seed stal s of epazote between root beer and molasses. As with are ornamental J although the plant may the A$tecs, corn dominated the Mayan diet, become weedy .li e its relative, but the Mayans were fortunate and could lambs3uarters/ if it goes to seed* and an often supplant their primary grain with such essential oil from the plant can be to#ic,
which is why the plant shown here was growing in the +oisonous +lants section of the "ontreal (otanical >arden. English photo.

Mexican Black Beans with Epazote Recipe From: Field Guide to Herbs & Spices , by Aliza Green 1
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$A.E TO PROFI#E 01 234 WRITE A RE.IEW Epazote is native to "e#ico and the tropical regions of $entral and %outh &merica, where it is commonly found wild. It is also widely naturalized throughout the world and the 'nited %tates, especially $alifornia. In "e#ican coo ing, epazote is always added to the pot when coo ing blac beans for its natural carminative .gas-preventing/ properties and because its potent aroma cuts the heaviness of the beans. What to buy: Epazote is available fresh in supermarkets in Texas and others parts of the southwestern United States, but its more often found dried in Mexican markets. INGREDIENTS 1 pound dried black beans 3 cups chicken stock 3 cups water 2 large sprigs fresh epazote (or 2 tablespoons dried) 1/2 pound chopped fresh chorizo sausage 1 diced onion 2 diced carrots 2 diced celery stalks 1 tablespoon chopped garlic 1 tablespoon ancho or New Mexico chile powder 1 tablespoon ground cumin INSTRUCTIONS 1. Soak black beans overnight in cold water to cover. Drain and rinse. 2. Preheat the oven to 300F. Place the beans, chicken stock and water, and epazote in a Dutch oven. Bring to a boil on the stove top, skim off foam, then cover and bake for 1 1/2 hours. 3. In a large, heavy skillet, brown chorizo sausage. Remove the chorizo, leaving the fat in the pan. Add onion, carrots, celery stalks, and garlic to the pan and cook over medium heat until the vegetables become soft. 4. Remove the pot of beans from the oven and stir in the vegetables and chorizo, along with ancho or New Mexico chile powder, ground cumin, and salt to taste.

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5. Cover and bake for 1 hour, or until the beans are soft.

"pa$ote2 .he !imple !ecret to &ooking )erfect 3eans )osted by Laura Frisk at 4256 AM 7 )ermalink 7 &omments %,( &ooking with dried beans can be intimidating, but dont worry2 8ts easy9 !ure, opening a can may seem easier, but trust me, its not much more difficult to do it the old fashioned way:and its much cheaper. 8 think the hardest part is remembering to soak the beans. And freshly cooked beans have a taste that ;ust cant compare to canned beans. .hey are almost sweet. As a native of !outhern &alifornia, 8 have the advantage of being exposed to Mexican foods that almost always involve beans. Mexican cooks have long known that cooking beans with the herb epa$ote adds an unusual and delicious flavor and aids in their digestion %reducing the gas they often cause(. 8 buy fresh epa$ote in my local Mexican market, then dry the leaves in my dehydrator. 0ou can easily find dried epa$ote in many herb shops online. <eres an easy recipe for cooking beans. "asy 'ried 3eans 5 cups dried beans = .bsp. dried epa$ote %optional( = .bsp. dried oregano %optional( = > cloves garlic, sliced, chopped, or minced %optional( #ote2 'o not add salt to the beans while cooking. 8t makes the beans tough. ?inse beans. )lace in a large glass or ceramic bowl. &over with fresh, cold water by about 5 inches. Let soak at least eight hours or overnight. )our out soaking li/uid and rinse beans. )lace in a large cooking pot and add herbs and garlic if youre using them. &over with about 5 inches of fresh, cold water and bring to a boil. .urn down to a simmer and cover and cook for about = hour, stirring occasionally. 8f the beans dont taste done, cook another 5- to >- minutes or more until the beans are tender. Add more water if needed. @hen done, serve immediately or let the beans sit in the pot in their cooking li/uid to cool for later use. Letting them cool in their cooking li/uid keeps the beans from drying out. 3efore storage, drain some, but not all, of the cooking

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li/uid. Makes 4 A servings My personal favorite time to cook beans is !aturday morning while 8 am having my coffee and making my grocery list. 3y the time they are done, 8 am ready to go shopping, so 8 let them cool on the stove, in their cooking li/uid, until 8 get home with the groceries. +nce home, 8 pop the covered pot right into the fridge and let the flavors blend. .hat evening, 8 pull out the pot of beans and reheat for dinner. Awesome9 @e eat a lot of beans at my house. 8 like to cook up a big batch, keep half for one or two nights of dinners, and free$e the rest in small containers so that 8 can pull them out when 8 need them. 3eans free$e really well. Just make sure that they are cooled and drained of their cooking li/uids first. .ry your beans in black bean soup or epa$ote black bean chili. .here are a lot of great bean recipes at Beg&ooking.com. 8 also love to eat beans plain. .here is nothing as delicious as a bowl of freshly cooked beans, with maybe a side of brown rice and a big green salad. <ave some toppings handy, such as fresh chopped parsley, finishing salt or tamari, chopped black olives, capers, diced tomatoes, or anything that you think might compliment the type of bean you are serving. 8 would love to read about some of your fresh cooked bean recipes and ideas9

?ecipe for !plit )ea !oup with <am, 3ay Leaves, "pa$ote and ?ed 3ell )epper %or &arrots(

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2Today5s pic( "or the month o" %ail- Phase One Reci2es 2as 'ell as Phase One Frida-s4 is this "avorite $2lit Pea $ou2 /ith !am3 "a- #ea4es3 E2a*ote3 and Red "ell Pe22er that5s one o" the soups 65ve been thin(ing about trying in the ne' electric pressure coo(er 6 got "or Christmas. 7ou can see all the recipes "rom the month by clic(ing %ail- Phase One Reci2es. Chec( a"ter the recipe "or Phase One Flash5ac,s "rom this day in 08.0 and 08.9.4

65ve been a long&time "an o" split pea soup, but 6 al'ays made it 'ith carrots until 6 tried this e periment o" replacing the carrots 'ith s'eet red bell peppers, "or a split pea soup that5s not only delicious and color"ul but also a ,hase :ne recipe "or the South !each ;iet. Score< 6 used a "airly generous amount o" ham and red bell peppers in proportion to the split peas, so you can have this "or ,hase :ne, even though split peas and lentils are a limited "ood. :" course i" you5re )ust craving split pea soup and don5t care about ,hase :ne, go ahead and ma(e it 'ith carrots i" you pre"er. 65m guessing some o" you have never heard o" $pa%ote, a uni+ue =e ican herb 6 add to my split pea and bean soups. $pa%ote 2pronounced ep&ah&so& teh4 adds an interesting subtle "lavor to bean dishes 2especially re"ried beans4, but it5s also used to reduce the intestinal gas that can be produced by beans. 6t gro's 'ild in the U.S. and =e ico and has a slightly s'eet "lavor. 2Some $pa%ote comes 'ith a lot o" 'oody stems, so 'hen 6 "irst get a ne' batch, 6 put it into my "ood processor 'ith the steel blade and process it to a "ine po'der.4 6" you don5t have $pa%ote, you can get it atThe Spice House or ,en%eys, but you can certainly ma(e this 'ithout it too.

Saute chopped onions in olive oil "or a "e' minutes, )ust until they are starting

to so"ten. 26 'as ma(ing hal" the recipe to test the addition o" red bell peppers, so all these photos sho' hal" as much as the recipe ma(es.4

Then add the split peas, chic(en or ham stoc(, bay leaves, and $pa%ote. 6" you have ham rinds, add them as 'ell. 26" you don5t have rinds, you might 'ant to add some ham "lavor base, especially i" you5re not using ham stoc(.4 -et this simmer "or about an hour, or until the peas are +uite so"t. 7ou may need to add 'ater a "e' times 'hile it5s coo(ing.

>hen all the peas are so"tened and many are dissolved into the li+uid, it 'ill loo( li(e this. ?emove the bay leaves and ham rinds 2i" using.4 7ou can blend it 'ith an immersion blender at this point i" you 'ant, but 6 didn5t.

Then add the chopped ham and red bell peppers 2or carrots4 and let the soup simmer another 98&18 minutes, adding 'ater i" needed.

Here5s ho' mine loo(ed a"ter it had simmered 18 minutes more 2not especially photogenic, but very "lavor"ul.4

At this point 6 decided to use my immersion blender and give this )ust a "e' bu%%es to slightly brea( up the red

peppers and ham. 6" you decide to do that, don5t overdo it< Taste "or seasoning and i" you5re li(e me, season 'ith lots o" "resh ground blac( pepper.

$2lit Pea $ou2 /ith !am3 "a- #ea4es3 E2a*ote3 and Red "ell Pe22er 6or &arrots7 2=a(es about @&A servings, but this "ree%es very 'ell so you may 'ant to double the recipe4 Ingredients . large onion, diced . T olive oil @ cups chic(en stoc(, ham stoc(, or 'ater 'ith chic(en soup base . lb. green split peas 2)ust over 0 cups4 0 "resh bay leaves or . dried bay lea" ./0 & . tsp. dried $pa%ote 2optional4 .&0 diced red bell peppers 2or .&0 cups diced carrots4 0 cups or more diced ham 2save the rind, use ham 'ith less than .8B "at "or

South !each ;iet4 optional: Ham "lavor base 26 use Goya, !etter than !ouillon, or ,en%ey5s brand4 salt/pepper to taste Instructions Heat oil in large heavy soup pot, then add diced onion and saute about 9&1 minutes, )ust until onion is starting to so"ten. Add chic(en stoc(, ham stoc(, or 'ater 'ith chic(en base, bay leaves, split peas, and $pa%ote i" using. 26" ham rind is available, put it in 'ith these ingredients. 6" not, you may 'ish to add .& 0 T ham "lavor base.4

Coo( at a lo' simmer, stirring occasionally, "or about . hour or until most peas are losing their shape and combining 'ith the li+uid. 2The length o" coo(ing time 'ill depend partly on the "reshness o" the dried split peas.4 7ou may need to add 'ater once or t'ice 'hile this coo(s. ?emove ham rind and bay leaves. Add red bell pepper 2or carrots4 and ham and coo( 98&18 minutes more, 2until red bell pepper or carrots are so"t and "lavors are 'ell blended.4 Season to taste 'ith salt and "resh ground blac( pepper. 26 didn5t add salt, but 6 added a lot o" pepper.4 Serve hot. 6" you5re not a South !each dieter, diced potatoes are good in this too. They should be added 'ith the ham and red bell pepper or a"ter the carrots have coo(ed about .8 minutes, i" using carrots. Cri;oles negros D black beans with epa$ote, whole and refried A Classic Mexican Recipe Easy Recipe for Frijoles Refritos Negros Refried Black Beans Seasoned with Epazote

For such a basic, simple food, a bowl of black beans, known to some as turtle beans, can be so satisfying, warming the tummy and the soul. A simmering pot of beans means home and hearth to me. Left-over beans can later reappear as refried beans, refritos. Mexicans love beans with every meal, from breakfast to dinner.FrijolesRefritos are often served with a plate of Huevos Rancheros or Huevos Mexicanos. For dinner, beans are a course unto themselves, served in small earthenware dishes in their broth before dessert makes its appearance. The variety of beans available here is awesome. Peruano, flor de may, bayo, negro. Flor de junio, ayacote ypinto. The litany is starting to sound like a line from a song. It could be set to music, no pun intended. The weather has been cloudy and cool lately, really wonderful. The unexpected coolness helps us temporarily forget the sear of summer. Northerners would laugh to hear me call todays weather cool at all, but everything is relative, right? A pot of beans bubbling on the stove helps me hold to the illusion that this is really winter. Simple Black Beans 1 lb. (1/2 kilo) black beans 2 quarts (2 liters) hot water 1/4 onion, sliced or chopped 2 teaspoons sea salt 2 sprigs of fresh epazote, if available Prepare the beans by first picking through them to remove any bits of dirt, plant matter or little stones. Using a colander, rinse under running water. When clean and rinsed, put the beans in a large pan or dish to soak in very warm water for 18 hours. This removes much of the phytic acid* which interferes with the absorption of calcium and other minerals. Cook the beans until almost tender, about two hours or so. Just before the beans are done, add about two teaspoons of salt or to taste, and fresh epazote if you are fortunate enough to find this herb. Continue cooking until beans are tender. Eat as is with the bean broth, or mash intorefritos.

Epazote, also known in English as wormseed or Mexican tea, is mostly found in central and southern Mexico, and is used to season beans, quesadillas and soups. It can also be found in the eastern U.S., where it is considered a bothersome weed. I have read that it grows in Central Park in New York City. Years ago, while traveling across Mexico, we stopped at a large camp along a river to park our travel trailer for a weeks stay. Also staying there were a couple of manual laborers who worked for the parks owner. Every morning, they would cook a pot of beans. When the beans were tender, they would continue to cook them until the beans were almost completely dry. In this form, they stayed fresh until the workers returned in the afternoon. They would then add water to rehydrate the beans for their meal. Such is the ingenuity of people who live without refrigeration. Refritos or Refried Beans 4 cups cooked black beans, including broth 4-6 tablespoons lard or vegetable oil 1/3 cup finely chopped onion dry, crumbly cheese, such as cotija seco or ranchero seco 1. Heat oil in a skillet and cook onion until starting to turn golden brown. 2. Add cooked beans and mash beans with a potato masher while cooking over medium heat. Leave some pieces of bean for texture. B. When the beans begin to dry out along the edges and are heated thoroughly, turn out onto a plate and garnish with a dry, salty cheese, such as queso aejo or queso seco.

Frijoles refritos can be used as a filling for quesadillas or as a topping for tostadas. Refrito means very well fried, not fried again.

Notes: To soak the beans for 18 hours, I put them in a stainless steel bowl of hot water, covered it with a plate, wrapped the bowl in a towel, and set it in a cardboard box covered with another towel. This maintained the water temperature, with my rewarming the bowl of beans and water one time, before I went to bed. I use a rustic, low-fired earthenware bean pot, but you can use any heavy pot or a pressure cooker. Mexican cooks claim the beans taste much better when cooked in earthenware. I like to think that by using one, I add my name to a long roster of traditional cooks, plus, doesnt this pot look elegant? Fresh lard, prized by Mexican cooks for the flavor it imparts, is the fat of choice for making refritos. While we may blanch at this, being thoroughly indoctrinated against all things with animal fat, lard does add an incomparable taste. As I do not eat pork, I used olive oil for my refritos, and they were very good.

Mexican trout with epazote: Trucha al epazote by Karen Hursh Graber 2013pazote is a characteristic flavor of the central region of Mexico, and especially favored in the cuisines of Puebla and Tlaxcala. It distinguishes this recipe for Mexican trout with epazote. Ingredients

$mail ,rint

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1 small trout, cleaned, scaled and split hori%ontally, or use 1 to @ ounce trout "ilets Cuice o" . lime 1 tablespoons olive oil D medium onion, cut into thin crescents 2ElunitasE4 0 "resh )alapeFo chiles, cut into A strips length'ise A to .0 epa%ote leaves, according to taste Salt to taste 1 slices manchego or Chihuahua cheese Open the trout like a book and rub the flesh (or filets) with lime juice.
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Place each trout or filet on a piece of buttered aluminum foil. Drizzle the oil over the fish and divide the onion, jalapeo and epazote leaves evenly among the fish, placing them on the fleshy surfaces. Season with salt to taste. Fold foil to seal edges and bake in a preheated 350 F oven until fish flakes easily with a fork. Whole fish will take longer than filets. Makes 4 servings.

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Hongos al Epazote ourtesy o! "hole #oods Mar$et ulinary enter This works as a great topping for eggs, grilled steak, or vegetarian filling for tacos or enchiladas. Difficulty Category: Side Dishes Seasons: January , February , ar!h , "#ri$ , e%ber , &!tober , 'o(e%ber ,De!e%ber

ay , June , Ju$y , "ugust , Se#t

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Ingredients For 2 #eo#$e ) CREAM 2 tab$es#oon)s* !orn oi$ 1+2 ,hite onion, s%a$$ di!e 3 !$o(es o- gar$i!, %in!ed 12 oun!e)s* %ushroo%s, ,i#ed !$ean and s$i!ed 2 .a$a#e/os, !ho##ed 1 teas#oon)s* sea sa$t 1+2 teas#oon)s* -resh$y ground #e##er 3 teas#oon)s* e#a0ote, !ho##ed )!an substitute !i$antro* *

Hongos al Epazote Directions 11 Heat oi$ in a s2i$$et3 add onions and gar$i! and saut4 unti$ trans#arent1 "dd %ushroo%s, .a$a#e/os, sa$t and #e##er1 21 5edu!e heat to $o,, !o(er and !oo2 -or 678 %inutes, .ust enough so that the %ushroo%s re$ease their .ui!es and the -$a(ors !an %i91 31 :urn o-- heat and stir in the e#a0ote1 'iscovering the <erb "pa$ote ./0G/08.9 .:H8:99 ,= !y Christopher #yerges Tags: aromatic herb, Christopher #yerges "nyone ,ho uses beans as a signi-i!ant #art o- their diet shou$d 2no, about e#a0ote1 ; -irst $earned o- the re%ar2ab$e gasre$ie(ing e--e!ts o- e#a0ote in 1<86 ,hi$e studying e9i!an and Centra$ "%eri!an herba$is%1 &n!e %y instru!tor had introdu!ed %e to this herb, ; i%%ediate$y re!ogni0ed it as the !o%%on #$ant o- so %any o- the strea%s ;=d hi2ed a$ong in the hi$$s abo(e %y >asadena ho%e1 y Costa 5i!an instru!tor shared ,ith %e his -a%i$y se!rets: "dd a -e, $ea(es o- e#a0ote to a #ot o- beans -or a de$i!ious -$a(or and to render the beans gas-ree1 "s the years #rogressed, ; ,as astounded that (irtua$$y no "%eri!ans ;=d ta$2ed ,ith ,ere -a%i$iar ,ith this herb, $et a$one its anti-gas e--e!ts1 ?et, this !o%%on, in!ons#i!uous herb had been 2no,n and used in Southern e9i!o and Centra$ "%eri!a -or !enturies@ AD;C;'"B >5&>A5:;AS ;n the re!orded $iterature o- Auro#e and 'orth "%eri!an, e#a0ote )-or%er$y Cheno#odiu% a%brosiodes, no, !a$$ed Dys#hania a%brosiodes by botanists* is 2no,n -or it e--i!a!y in e9#e$$ing intestina$ ,or%s1 For dogs and !ats, add one teas#oon o- the seed )or herb* to their %ea$s Cti$ the ,or%s !$ear u#1 :he

herb is said to be $ess e--e!ti(e against ta#e,or%s1 :he 'at!he0 ;ndians used e#a0ote to e9#e$ ,or%s in !hi$dren1 :he Chinese used the herb as a dia#horeti! )#ro%otes s,eating*1 :he anthe$%inti!+(er%i-uge Dua$ities oe#a0ote are ,e$$ re!ogni0ed, and the herb is !u$ti(ated in #arts o- the So(iet Enion -or this use1 Herba$ists be$ie(e that e#a0ote ,as a$so used by the an!ient ayans both as a s#i!e and %edi!ine1 ;t is be$ie(ed that e#a0ote=s e--e!ti(eness in re%o(ing the FgassinessF o- beans is due to the #resen!e o- oi$ o- !heno#odiu%, ,hi!h is -ound in !on!entrations o- 10G in the seed, and one #er!ent in the $ea-1 5e%e%ber that e9!ess -$atu$en!e is a sy%#to%, and that e#a0ote on$y dea$s ,ith that sy%#to%1 :he gas #rob$e% ,i$$ !ontinue i- the !ause is not e$i%inated1 So%e %ethods to e$i%inate the !ause o- gas are eating s$o,$y, #ro#er -ood !o%bination, and others1 G5&H;'G A>"I&:A ; -irst began to !o$$e!t the s#i!y $ea(es o- e#a0ote during %y s#ring hi2es into %y $o!a$ -oothi$$s1 Jut $i2e %ost gardeners and herb-$o(ers, ; e(entua$$y ,anted to ha(e %y o,n #at!h o- e#a0ote gro,ing near %y 2it!hen door1 ;n $ate su%%er, ; !o$$e!t the ,i$d seed on the dried #$ants1 ; #$ant these seeds in %y yard, in an en(iron%ent ,hi!h so%e,hat re#$i!ates the #$ant=s idea$ ,i$d en(iron%ent1 A#a0ote #re-ers se%i-shaded ri(er beds ,here the soi$ is sandy and ,e$$-drained, and ,here it=s usua$$y %oist1 :hus, ; #$ant the seeds on the north side o- %y house ,here there=s the %ost shade, in ,e$$-drained soi$1 A#a0ote seeds %ay ta2e u# to a %onth to s#rout, a -a!t ,hi!h $eads %any gardeners to sus#e!t their !ro# -ai$ed1 :o he$#, the seeds shou$d be soa2ed in ,ater -or 2K hours and then #$anted1 "dditiona$$y, you !an so, the seeds in a #ot or garden bed ,here other #$ants are gro,ing1 :his ,ay, you ,on=t get -rustrated as you ,ater a bare s#ot o- soi$1 S#routed e#a0ote has a bright green a##earan!e, and e(en ,hen (ery young you !an dete!t the !hara!teristi! e#a0ote aro%a1 So%eti%es you=$$ see a -e, b$ot!hes o- red on the young s#routs1 Har(esting the %id-si0ed e#a0ote #$ants is easy1 Just #in!h o-- the to# ne, gro,th1 >in!h o-- .ust ,hat you need at the ti%e, or #in!h ba!2 a $ot i- you #$an to dry so%e o- the herb -or storage1 :he $ea- #rodu!tion o- ea!h e#a0ote #$ant is great$y in!reased by this #in!hing1 "$though e#a0ote is a #erennia$, the entire abo(e-ground #$ant ,i$$ die ba!2 ea!h year1 >ro(iding the soi$ hasn=t dried out, the roots ,i$$ !ontinue to #rodu!e year a-ter year1 "$so, the regu$ar #in!hing-ba!2 o- the $ea(es during the gro,ing season ,i$$ signi-i!ant$y e9tend the gro,ing season -or your #$ants1 A#a0ote $ea(es are best dried in the dar2 ); dry %ine in an atti!*1 ; s#read the $ea(es thin$y on ne,s#a#er or bro,n #a#er bags1 :he dried herb is best stored in an o#aDue .ar1 :he seeds )-or gro,ing* and #a!2ets o- the dried herb !an be #ur!hased -ro%

Sur(i(a$ Seeds, >1&1 Jo9 K1L3K, Bos "nge$es, C" <00K11 Seeds are M33 herb is MK160 a #a!2et1 :here is a$so a uniDue boo2$et entit$ed Hhat Causes GasN )MO*, ,hi!h des!ribes the %any dietary and non-dietary !auses o- gas, as ,e$$ as #ra!ti!a$ so$utions1 :his aro%ati! herb is a nati(e o- e9i!o, Centra$ and South "%eri!a1 ;t has no, natura$i0ed in %any #arts o- the ,or$d1 A#a0ote is -ound in %any #arts othe E1S1, #arti!u$ar$y in the southern states1 C&&K;'G H;:H A>"I&:A Coo2ing ,ith e#a0ote is easy@ "dd a##ro91 one tab$es#oon o- the herb -- both the !ho##ed ste%s and the $ea(es -- to a #ot o- beans1 ?ou !an use it -resh or dried1 :he e#a0ote herb !an a$so be added to sou#s, ste,s, and %ade into tea1 :he #o,dered $ea(es !an be added to sa$ads, su!h as #otato and bean sa$ads1 Here are so%e si%#$e re!i#es ;=(e de(e$o#ed -or using e#a0ote1 BA':;B S&E> 1 !u# dry $enti$s 1 bay $ea6-O !u#s ,ater 2 ts# dried e#a0ote 1 di!ed red onion 3 !$o(es o- gar$i! 2 di!ed !arrots Hash the $enti$s, and then si%%er -or an hour and a ha$-1 "dd the other ingredients ,hen the beans are near$y so-t1 Si%%er Cti$ the (egetab$es are so-t1 )"dd sa$t or 2e$# to taste, i- desired1* ;PAD JA"' S"B"D 1 !u# !oo2ed+s$i!ed green beans 1 !u# !oo2ed 2idney beans 1 !u# !oo2ed garban0os Dressing eDua$ #arts o$i(e oi$ and a##$e !ider (inegar 1 ts#1 dried+#o,dered e#a0ote 2 di!ed !$o(es o- gar$i! 1+2 ts# di$$ Sa$t and #e##er, to taste, i- desired arinate the beans in the dressing, #re-erab$y at $east eight hours, but no $ess than 30 %inutes1

"?" JB"CK JA"' S&E> 1 !u# dry b$a!2 beans sage, #in!h ,ater oregano, #in!h 3 onions e#a0ote, t,o ts# 3 s%a$$ #otatoes di!ed sa$t and #e##er, to taste Soa2 the beans -or an hour and then !oo2 unti$ tender1 "dd the onions and #otatoes and !oo2 unti$ the #otatoes are done1 "dd the seasonings1 Bet si%%er on $o, te%#erature -or 16 %inutes be-ore ser(ing1 'yerges is the author o- QGuide to Hi$d FoodsR and other boo2s on #$ants and se$--re$ian!e1 He has taught sin!e 1<8K, and !ondu!ts a ,ee2$y #od!ast on >re#aredness 5adio 'et,or21 He !an be rea!hed at ,,,1Christo#her'yerges1!o%1

.he Mexican )antry2 "pa$ote

E2a*oteorWh- /ould I e4er /ant to coo, /ith that8 by Iictoria Challancin

JHuele rico,K my assistant sighed as she inhaled the aroma o" the "resh epa%ote she 'as dropping into a bubbling pot o" sopa A%teca. As 6 )oined her in a 'hi"", 6 smiled, understanding that 6 have lived in =e ico so long that 6, too, relish the strange smell o" this uni+ue and mysterious herb, 'hich dra's you to it as the same time it repels you. Cagged&edged, 'ild&loo(ing, and ree(ing o" a creosote&li(e scent, epa%ote 2Teloxys orChenopodium ambrosioides inneo4 is one o" the most

distinctive herbs used in the =e ican (itchen today. This botanical annual or short&lived perennial plant gro's to a height o" about three "eet and "lourishes in poor soil. $ach "oot&long sprig is topped 'ith seven t'o& to three&inch pointed, serrated leaves that give o"" a startling aroma 'hich could li(ely cause any coo( to as(, J>hy 'ould 6 ever 'ant to use thatLK >hy indeedL >hen used sparingly, epa%ote imparts a mello', earthy dimension to many =e ican dishes, giving them a uni+ue "lavor that even the novice gourmand recogni%es as JauthenticK =e ican. $pa%ote*s volatile oils e ude a scent reminiscent o" turpentine or (eroseneM an aggressive assault on the senses 'hich e plains its common $nglish names o" Js(un('eed,K Jpig'eed,K and Jstin('eed.K >hether dressed up in so"ter terms li(e the bland J=e ican teaK or the medicinal moni(er J'ormseed,K epa%ote is deserving o" its harsher handles. The 'ord itsel" comes "rom the A%tec language, #ahuatl in 'hich the 'ords epatl and t%otl re"er to an animal 'ith a ran( odor some'hat li(e a s(un(. And stin(y it is< !ut once you ac+uire a taste "or it, you can*t live 'ithout it. Considered a 'eed in many parts o" the 'orld, epa%ote "inds a 'elcome home in both the medicinal and culinary pantries o" =e ico and Central America. >hile modern botanists list no "e'er than .3 medicinal properties attributed to this lo'ly herb/'eed, the indigenous peoples o" ancient =e ico understood its many uses 'ithout the bene"its o" such illustrious terms as anthelmintic, anti&microbial, diaphoretic, analgesic, pectoral, and vulnerary, to name but a "e'. The A%tecs (ne' that it e pels intestinal 'orms, promotes s'eating and cell regeneration, relieves pain and constipation, and eases ailments o" the chest and lungs even as they denigrated it 'ith its harsh but apt #ahuatl name. 6n .Ath&century =e ico a decoction o" dried epa%ote leaves 'as used to treat such diverse conditions as rheumatism, typhus, "ainting, and burns. $ven today epa%ote tea is given to ease the pain o"

childbirth, to "acilitate menstrual "lo', to e pel intestinal 'orms, to com"ort a "right, and to soothe the pain o" gastritis. ,oultices o" "resh leaves are also used to treat burns, athlete*s "oot, and insect bites. Ho'ever, because the "ruit o" the plant and the oil distilled "rom it are to ic, home use by the novice is discouraged, particularly "or pregnant 'omen, young children, and anyone 'ith (idney problems. $pa%ote is a common roadside 'eed throughout the United States, albeit a milder version o" its pungent southern cousin. Although it is relatively un(no'n in non&-atino (itchens today, early American colonists used it in molasses ca(es to battle intestinal 'orms. So vast 'ere the .Gth&century plantings o" 'ormseed crops in =aryland, that the essential oil "or 'hich it 'as cultivated 'as called J!altimore oil.K Cust as they did then, today*s herbalists and gardeners "avor it "or its insect& and 'orm&repelling properties. ,erhaps it is this very assertiveness that (ept it in the medicine chest and precluded its "ull adoption into the broader culinary 'orld north o" the border. Cudicious use in the (itchen reveals the brighter side o" this much&maligned herb. 6n central and southern =e ico no pot o" beans 'ould be complete 'ithout a "e' sprigs o" epa%ote to impart a subtle "lavor plus the bene"icial gas&reducing properties many people believe it to possess. Although botanists "ail to list it as a carminative, conventional 'isdom holds it to be true. ?egardless o" its ability to lessen "latulence, epa%ote does have an a""inity "or beans as 'ell as eggs, mushrooms, dairy products, tomato sauces, strong soups, and corn. That strange medicinal, (erosene&li(e aroma mello's 'hen added to'ard the end o" the coo(ing into a so"t, yet curious, lemony a"tertaste that de"initely spea(s o" an authenticity 'e 'ould miss i" it 'ere omitted. Although epa%ote is sold in both "resh and dried "orms, it is e tremely easy to

gro' "rom seeds. 6" using it in coo(ing, don*t shy a'ay "rom 'ilted leaves as they retain their pungency even i" they loo( a bit tired. ;on*t be a"raid to e periment 'ith this delight"ul, yet po'er"ul, herb. Use it sparingly at "irst. Add a "e' sprigs to any type o" coo(ed dried beans, sprin(le a tablespoon o" the chopped "resh leaves over scrambled eggs, in"use a little mystery into a bland cream sauce by the addition o" a sprig or t'o, and lay a dramatic lea" over the cheese o" a +uesadilla be"ore the melting begins. The "ollo'ing recipes illustrate classic uses o" epa%ote. 65m submitting this article to >ee(end Herb

!logging, 'hich 'as established by Nalyn5s Nitchen. This 'ee(5s host is Susan "romThe >ell&Seasoned Coo(. Sopa Azteca 2Chic(en Soup 'ith Fried Tortillas and Avocado4 ./0 cup 'ater . medium 'hite onion, roughly chopped 0 tomatoes, roughly chopped 0 small garlic cloves, peeled . dried ancho chile, stem and seeds removed . tablespoon vegetable oil @ cups homemade chic(en broth Salt, to taste . ./0 cups coo(ed chic(en 2optional4 . sprig "resh epa%ote @ corn tortillas, cut into ./0&inch strips and "ried crisp in a little vegetable oil 0 diced canned chipotle chiles en adoboO @ limes or (ey limes, cut into 'edges . cup =anchego or =onterrey Cac( cheese, grated

. avocado, diced ,urPe the "irst "ive ingredients in a blender. Heat oil in a medium saucepan until very hot. ,our the contents o" the blender into the hot oil, being very care"ul to avoid the splatter. Stir and coo( "or about A minutes. Add the chic(en broth and the chic(enQ heat thoroughly. Add salt, i" necessary. -adle into bo'ls and pass the tortilla strips, chipotle chiles, limes, cheese, and avocado separately. Serves @. Oavailable in Hispanic mar(ets or the =e ican "ood section o" most grocery stores Rajas de Chile Poblano con Queso Manchego 2?oasted Chile Strips 'ith =elted Cheese4 9 tablespoons vegetable oil or olive oil ./0 cup 'hole epa%ote leaves . garlic clove, "inely minced G poblano chiles, roasted, peeled, seeded, and cut into ./1&inch strips 0 plum tomatoes, "inely chopped Salt to taste . ./0 cups mil( .0 ounces roughly grated =anchego cheese Heat the oil in a heavy s(illet until almost smo(ing. Add the epa%ote leaves and sautP until limp, stirring constantly "or appro imately 0 minutes. Add the garlic, chile strips, tomatoes, and saltQ "ry until so"t but not bro'n, about H minutes. ?educe the heat to lo' and add the mil(. Add the cheese and coo(, stirring, until the cheese melts. Serve hot 'ith 'arm corn tortillas. Serves @. Iariation: Substitute roasted red bell pepper strips "or a milder "lavor and use some heavy cream "or part o" the mil( "or an unctuous te ture and richness.

Hongos al Ajillo 2,an&"ried =ushrooms 'ith Chiles and Garlic4 9 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil 0 dried gua)illo chiles, seeded, and cut cross'ise into thin rings . small 'hite onion, "inely chopped 1 garlic cloves, minced or pressed . ./0 pounds oyster mushrooms cut into ./0&inch pieces or 'hite mushrooms cut into ./1&inch slices Salt to taste 9 tablespoons epa%ote leaves, chopped

Heat the oil in a large s(illet over medium&high heat and add the sliced chiles. Coo( . minute, stirring, until crisp but not burned. ?emove the chile pieces 'ith a slotted spoon and drain on paper to'els. 6n the same oil add the onionQ coo(, stirring until translucent and so"t, about H minutes. Add hal" the garlic and coo(, stirring, until the garlic begins to color slightly, about . minute. Add the mushrooms, salt, and remaining garlic. Coo( H&3 minutes or until mushrooms have released their li+uid. Add the epa%ote and coo( "or 08 minutes or until the mushrooms are so"t and thoroughly coo(ed. Ad)ust the seasoning. Toss 'ith the "ried chile rings. Serve 'ith 'arm corn tortillas. Serves 1. *ucchini and Mushrooms with "pa$ote !erves2 E .otal &alories2 5>=.446 )rep time2 nFa &ook time2 nFa

Ingredients > teaspoons olive oil E medium $ucchini , cut crosswise into = inch pieces =F5 teaspoon salt , or to taste =F5 pound small white mushrooms , /uartered 5 cloves garlic %medium(, minced = tablespoon , slivered fresh epa$ote, leaves = small fresh red ;alapeGo pepper or Cresno chile, seeded, veins removed, and very finely chopped Directions: =. 8n a large nonstick skillet, heat 5 teaspoons of the oil over medium high heat. Add the $ucchini and cook, stirring, until crisp tender and the edges turn bright green. !eason with =FE teaspoon of the salt and transfer to a bowl. 5. 8n the same skillet, add the remaining teaspoon of oil. Add the mushrooms, garlic, and epa$ote. &over and cook, stirring fre/uently, until the mushrooms release their ;uices and are tender, > to E minutes. ?eturn the $ucchini to the pan. Add the chile. &ook, stirring, until completely heated through, = to 5 minutes. !erve hot. Crom H=,--- Mexican ?ecipes.H &opyright 5--= by Marge )oore. Ised with permission of the publisher, @iley )ublishing, 8nc. All ?ights ?eserved. 'utritiona$ Fa!ts: !erves2 E .otal &alories2 5>=.446 &alories from Cat2 =5= *ucchini and Mushrooms with "pa$ote !erves2 E .otal &alories2 5>=.446 )rep time2 nFa &ook time2 nFa Ingredients > teaspoons olive oil

E medium $ucchini , cut crosswise into = inch pieces =F5 teaspoon salt , or to taste =F5 pound small white mushrooms , /uartered 5 cloves garlic %medium(, minced = tablespoon , slivered fresh epa$ote, leaves = small fresh red ;alapeGo pepper or Cresno chile, seeded, veins removed, and very finely chopped Directions: =. 8n a large nonstick skillet, heat 5 teaspoons of the oil over medium high heat. Add the $ucchini and cook, stirring, until crisp tender and the edges turn bright green. !eason with =FE teaspoon of the salt and transfer to a bowl. 5. 8n the same skillet, add the remaining teaspoon of oil. Add the mushrooms, garlic, and epa$ote. &over and cook, stirring fre/uently, until the mushrooms release their ;uices and are tender, > to E minutes. ?eturn the $ucchini to the pan. Add the chile. &ook, stirring, until completely heated through, = to 5 minutes. !erve hot. Crom H=,--- Mexican ?ecipes.H &opyright 5--= by Marge )oore. Ised with permission of the publisher, @iley )ublishing, 8nc. All ?ights ?eserved. 'utritiona$ Fa!ts: !erves2 E .otal &alories2 5>=.446 &alories from Cat2 =5= *ucchini and Mushrooms with "pa$ote !erves2 E .otal &alories2 5>=.446 )rep time2 nFa &ook time2 nFa Ingredients > teaspoons olive oil E medium $ucchini , cut crosswise into = inch pieces =F5 teaspoon salt , or to taste =F5 pound small white mushrooms , /uartered

5 cloves garlic %medium(, minced = tablespoon , slivered fresh epa$ote, leaves = small fresh red ;alapeGo pepper or Cresno chile, seeded, veins removed, and very finely chopped Directions: =. 8n a large nonstick skillet, heat 5 teaspoons of the oil over medium high heat. Add the $ucchini and cook, stirring, until crisp tender and the edges turn bright green. !eason with =FE teaspoon of the salt and transfer to a bowl. 5. 8n the same skillet, add the remaining teaspoon of oil. Add the mushrooms, garlic, and epa$ote. &over and cook, stirring fre/uently, until the mushrooms release their ;uices and are tender, > to E minutes. ?eturn the $ucchini to the pan. Add the chile. &ook, stirring, until completely heated through, = to 5 minutes. !erve hot. Crom H=,--- Mexican ?ecipes.H &opyright 5--= by Marge )oore. Ised with permission of the publisher, @iley )ublishing, 8nc. All ?ights ?eserved. 'utritiona$ Fa!ts: !erves2 E .otal &alories2 5>=.446 &alories from Cat2 =5= BecipeC Setas con epazote "oyster mushrooms with garlic and epazote$ $ugust ##! 2"#2
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Duisado setas con epazote "oyster mushrooms with garlic and

epazote$. "Eir% +cEoy F .os AngelesG$ Total time: 20 %inutes *ervings& his ma%es about H cups mushrooms Aote& Epazote, an herb, is generally available at +e,ican and .atin mar%ets. 4 tablespoons vegetable oil A heaping cup chopped white onion 4 cloves garlic A pound oyster mushrooms, shredded into strips 4 stal%s epazote, or about AI leaves, chopped Salt ortillas, for serving #. 2n a large! deep s3illet! heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion and coo%, stirring fre#uently, until soft and translucent, H to 7 minutes. Add the garlic and #uic%ly combine until aromatic, A7 to H8 seconds. 2. >oss in the oyster mushrooms and stir to coat in the oniongarlic mi,ture. Coo% until the mushrooms have softened but still retain some te,ture, H to 7 minutes. Stir in the epazote and season to taste with salt. Serve with tortillas. Each o0 % servings Bwithout tortillasC& 57 calories9 H grams protein9 5 grams carbohydrates9 4 grams fiber9 7 grams fat9 8 saturated fat9 8 cholesterol9 4 grams sugar9 A6 mg sodium.