You are on page 1of 36

Hello,

Oscar!

GAME

UBISOFT’S JADE RAYMOND PITCHES THE POWER OF VIDEO GAMES TO SXSW AND HOLLYWOOD. BY GARETT SLOANE

FACE

GREENSTEIN: RAINER HOSCH; BACK: WILLIAM LOVELACE/EXPRESS/GETTY IMAGES; ILLUSTRATION: CARLOS MONTEIRO; TEIGEN: THEO WARGO/FILMMA GIC; COVER: ANYA CHIBIS

SXSW

Preview

TECHNOLOGY 20

Game Changer

Ubisoft’s Jade Raymond heads to her first SXSW, but it’s Hollywood that’s on her mind.

ADWEEK

|

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

Contents

February 24

2014

Reebok shop p. 16

Front

THE WEEK 7 Facebook bags WhatsApp; CBS promotes Nina Tassler; Translation adds new leaders

Back

FIRST MOVER 10 Meredith’s Chip Schenck says despite the rise of programmatic, the role of people remains key.

THE SPOT 12 Wieden + Kennedy goes inside

Dateline:

the new Honda.

Oscar p. 29

TRENDING TOPICS 14 Brands go trolling for fans; All You goes outside Walmart; little hope for looser media- ownership rules.

ACCOUNTS IN REVIEW 16 Reebok hires Venables Bell & Partners for global creative.

DATA POINTS 18 Men are the new chief purchasing officers.

PORTRAIT 30

Hub Strategy

Specializing in early-stage marketing helped win this shop work from Microsoft and Google.

PERSPECTIVE 32

Satisfying Stuff

Snickers toys with a tagline.

INFODIET 34

Chrissy Teigen

The SI Swimsuit Issue cover model makes time for trashy reality shows when she’s not on Twitter.

Movieman

p. 24

MARKETING 24

Moving Pictures

In the run-up to the Academy Awards, a Q&A with Paramount Pictures CMO Josh Greenstein. Plus, an in-depth look at where the movie studios spend their money, and what they get for it.

What

guys buy

iTunes

addict

VOICE 19 How a little humanity can save marketing.

Subscriptions adweek.com/subscribe U.S. (877) 496-5246; Outside U.S. (845) 267-3007

3

Tony Case

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Stevan Keane

DIRECTOR OF VIDEO

James Cooper

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Lisa Granatstein

MANAGING EDITOR

Nick Mrozowski

EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Christopher Heine

DIGITAL EDITOR

SENIOR EDITORS

Katy Bachman (Washington Bureau Chief) • Michael Bürgi (Features) • Anthony Crupi (Television) Melissa Hoffmann (Web) • Andrew McMains (Agencies) • Lucia Moses (Publishing, Data) • Tim Nudd (Creative)

STAFF WRITERS

Emma Bazilian, Robert Klara, Noreen O’Leary, Garett Sloane, Sam Thielman

DIGITAL GENERAL MANAGER Jeff Rudolf • PROJECT MANAGER RJ Cabral • ONLINE PRODUCER John Tejada

COPY DESK SENIOR DESK EDITOR Mike Yuhas • SENIOR COPY EDITOR Dan Ouellette

ART MANAGING DESIGN DIRECTOR Ron Goodman • DESIGN DIRECTOR Carol R. Wells • DESIGN DIRECTOR Carrie Gee PHOTO EDITOR Margo Didia • DIGITAL DESIGN DIRECTOR Alfred Maskeroni • DIGITAL DESIGNER Rachel Cutler

CONTRIBUTORS

Gabriel Beltrone, Rebecca Cullers, David Gianatasio, David Griner, David Kiefaber, Danielle Marshall, Carlos Monteiro, T.L. Stanley, Janet Stilson, Joan Voight

Robert Eisenhardt

BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

(212) 493-4288 rob.eisenhardt@adweek.com

Adam Remson

INTEGRATED ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

(212) 493-4409 adam.remson@adweek.com

SALES

BROADCAST/CABLE DIRECTOR Robert Dahill (212) 493-4282 bob.dahill@adweek.com NEW YORK: Rory McAlister (212) 493-4101 rory.mcalister@adweek.com • Daniel McNamee (212) 493-4157 daniel.mcnamee@adweek.com NORTHERN CALIFORNIA/PACIFIC NORTHWEST KPA Media, Kim Abramson (415) 705-6772 kabramson@kpamedia.com SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA KPA Media, Theresa Le (310) 234-9809 tle@kpamedia.com SENIOR INTEGRATED SALES PLANNER Biz Mulu (212) 493-4206 biz.mulu@adweek.com • DIGITAL AD OPERATIONS MANAGER Ariel Perallon (212) 493-4414 ariel.perallon@adweek.com EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Dane Jerabek (212) 493-4124 dane.jerabek@adweek.com • SALES ASSISTANT Kenneth Moshensky (212) 493-4068 kenneth.moshensky@adweek.com

MARKETING/EVENTS

VICE PRESIDENT, MARKETING Liza Kirsh (212) 493-4411 liza.kirsh@adweek.com INSIGHTS AND ANALYTICS DIRECTOR Sheron O’Brien (212) 493-4438 sheron.o’brien@adweek.com DESIGN DIRECTOR Emily Chang (212) 493-4192 emily.chang@adweek.com CUSTOM PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Stuart Feil (212) 493-4171 stuart.feil@adweek.com DIGITAL CONTENT STRATEGIST Kolby Yarnell (212) 493-4046 kolby.yarnell@adweek.com

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT, EVENTS Nicole Purcell (212) 493-4434 nicole.purcell@adweek.com EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, AUDIENCE MARKETING Brooke Barasch 212-493-4036 brooke@clioawards.com EVENT MARKETING DIRECTOR Kym Blanchard (212) 493-4187 kym.blanchard@adweek.com EVENT OPERATIONS MANAGER Christina Alibrandi (212) 493-4168 christina.alibrandi@prometheusgm.com

CIRCULATION

ASSOCIATE CIRCULATION MANAGER Meredith Kahn (212) 493-4370 meredith.kahn@prometheusgm.com • REPRINTS Wright’s Media (877) 652-5295 pgm@wrightsmedia.com

PRODUCTION

GROUP PRODUCTION DIRECTOR John Sartoris (212) 493-4231 john.sartoris@adweek.com PRODUCTION MANAGER Cindee Weiss (212) 493-4233 cindee.weiss@adweek.com • ASSOCIATE PRODUCTION MANAGER Eileen Cotto (212) 493-4228 eileen.cotto@adweek.com

OPERATIONS GROUP FINANCE DIRECTOR Akira Sugihara • BUSINESS COORDINATOR Timo Wilson

SUBSCRIPTIONS

(877) 496-5246 (U.S.); (845) 267-3007 (Outside U.S.) • adweek.com/subscribe • Back issues available at Shop.adweek.com

J. Christopher Roe

Jeffrey Wilbur

PRESIDENT, ADWEEK /CLIO AWARDS/FILM E XPO GROUP

Rob Schoorl

PROMETHEUS GLOBAL MEDIA

Michele Singer

Alexandra Aguilar

Meghan Milkowski

Sarah Studley

CHIEF TECHNOLOGY

VP, HUMAN

GENERAL

HUMAN RESOURCES

VP, PRODUCTION

CONTROLLER

OFFICER

RESOURCES

COUNSEL

DIRECTOR

AND CIRCULATION

Adweek, The Hollywood Reporter, Billboard, Backstage, Film Journal International, CineAsia, CineEurope, ShowEast, The Clios

4

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

WRESTLING: COURTESY OF WWE; FALLON: KEVIN MAZUR/GETTY IMAGES FOR SIRIUSXM; NETFLIX: VICTOR J. BLUE/BLOOMBERG VIA GETTY IMAGES; COKE: RODGER MACUCH

UP/DOWN

The Simpsons To get Lego makeover for May 4 episode

NBCU Fails to strike new deal with WWE

Jimmy Fallon Tonight Show debut scores 11.3m viewers

Faux gaffes

p. 14

Viewers Verizon, Netflix feud slows streaming

Samsung Galaxy ad mercilessly mocks Apple again

Coca-Cola Q4 profits slide as U.S. soda sales fall

Headlines From the Week in Media

Neil Patrick Harris hams it up in a goofy music video for nutritional supplement Neuro Sleep.

ADWEEK

|

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

You are

getting

sleeeepy!

Amazon reportedly

preparing to launch Web TV box in March

► Apple founder

Steve Jobs to appear on postage stamp in 2015

YouTube redesigns

site to match mobile

Time Inc. launches

digital sports video programming network 120 Sports

Spark scores ConAgra media business

► Yahoo unveils

Yahoo Gemini, which pairs mobile search with native advertising

► AMI’s Muscle &

Fitness gets revamp by editor David Zinczenko

7

ZUCKERBERG: MARKHAM JOHNSON; TASSLER: BECK STARR/FILMMAGIC; TRUMP: ALO CEBALLOS/FILMMAGIC; RIVERS: CINDY ORD/GETTY IMAGES; THE T O N I G H T S H O W : C O U R T E S Y O F N B C

Shes

baaaack!

Heineken targets

U.S. soccer fans with Foursquare integration

FCC plans to roll out

new net neutrality rules

► CBS vet Nina Tassler

promoted to chairman of CBS Entertainment

► Google, Magna Global strike $100 million upfront deal

Translation hires

Toms’ Nils Peyron as president, TBWA\C\D’s John Norman as CCO

Bravo green-lights

Girlfriends’ Guide to Divorce as first scripted series

Univision launches

original Web video unit La Fabrica

Google buys Israeli security startup SlickLogin

Candy Crush files

$500 million IPO

► Trulia selects

Draftfcb San Francisco for first campaign

Meredith partners

with Kiip for branded in-app rewards

► Comcast, TWC deal

puts Netflix set-top box plans on hold

LinkedIn opens

Influencer publishing platform to all members

8

“Facebook pays $16bn (£9.6bn) for what Mark Zuckerberg calls ‘incredibly valuable’ WhatsApp massaging service.”

BBC News tweet gives the Internet a laugh with its “massaging” typo.

“They made such a monumental error in their approach to feminism … It felt gross.”

Lena Dunham on Jezebel publishing unretouched Vogue photos of the Girls creator/star. (Grantland)

“Sam, you’re fired!”

Donald Trump delivers his classic line to political consultant Sam Nunberg after BuzzFeed’s scathing profile of the real estate mogul. (NYP)

“It’s about time. I’ve been sitting in a taxi outside NBC with the meter running since 1987.”

Joan Rivers on her return to the Tonight show after longtime ban by johnny carson and jay leno. (THR)

—Lisa Granatstein

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

PHOTO: ALFRED MASKERONI

Front

First Mover Chip Schenck

Meredith’s programmatic chief says there will always be a need for human sellers.

There’s still a learning curve around programmatic. Do you have an analogy you use to explain it? The

Sotheby’s and Christie’s one is my favorite. Their job is to solicit as many buyers as they can. Then the piece comes up for bid. Instead of the paddles going up consecutively, all the paddles go up simultaneously in an RTB auction.

If you don’t get enough bidders, you’re

going to have an unsuccessful auction. Your ability to add phone and Web means you add more bidders to the auction.

So what does a programmatic sales head do? I think everyone is defining it a

bit differently. Before, I would have said it’s a form of automation, where buying

is assisted with an algorithmic decision

engine. Yesterday, I went to a lunch and came out with a simpler definition: It’s anything that allows you to execute in

a more operationally efficient matter

and creates ease of use. The technology

is changing, so more things are being

grouped in the programmatic bucket.

‘The only thing I don’t like about our industry is, people don’t listen as much.’

Why does Meredith need someone dedicated to this? As more marketers are asking how to use it for finding audiences at scale, publishers needed to respond. We’ve got fantastic data, and it can be used in a variety of different ways.

What’s a specific example of how it’ll work for Meredith, which specializes in reaching women? Programmatic has been used to clear remnant

inventory. We think it needs to do more.

If you’re looking for left-handed moms

from Indiana, you need a lot of access to scale. We can already do that today; it’s more about the packaging. You can do three campaigns where the client

10

Specs

Age 43 New gig Vp, programmatic sales and strategy, Meredith Old gig Vp, publisher, development, PubMatic

is identifying them, we’re identifying them, or we’re merging both sets of data or bringing in third-party data.

Salespeople have been wary of programmatic for fear it will erode ad rates and undermine their direct business. How do you resolve that tension? It seems kind of B.S. to say there is no tension, but I haven’t seen any because of the way Meredith has gone about it. When it warrants, we should have people in the same room together. That makes them feel much more comfortable.

How do you motivate them to sell programmatic when it’s not as lucrative as direct sales? We’re working on it. We want to incentivize our sellers to be as much of the conversation as they have to be.

Some think all buying will become automated some day. Do you agree? We’re in a big pendulum swing, and I think that’ll continue until the margins cap out. That will be our new Maginot Line. Then, programmatic will find its place. There will always be a need for sellers. At the end of the day, there are still rules that need to be put in place by a person, and that takes conversation.

Your father was on the publishing side. Do you have any nostalgia for the old days of advertising? In my dad’s day, it was the three-martini lunch. Maybe the new three-martini lunch is Google and Rubicon throwing these outrageous parties at trade shows. Maybe people will look back and say, I miss those concerts. The only thing I don’t like about our industry is, people don’t listen as much. The agency side is completely overworked, plans are spit out of a box, a lot of conversations with buyers go straight to price.

Isn’t that what programmatic is all about? That’s what it started as. But if there can be conversation about client goals, that’s where I think it gets exciting. I see it as morphing into more than just a price-sensitive opportunity. —Lucia Moses

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

Front

The Spot Honda, Inside Out

By Tim Nudd Wieden + Kennedy slices through everyday objects, and the Civic Tourer, in a brilliantly constructed commercial.

Idea You hear it often—it’s what’s inside that counts. That’s especially true for an automaker touting a roomy vehicle, like Honda has with its new Civic Tourer wagon in Europe. To advertise it, Wieden + Kennedy focused on all kinds of interiors in an amazing 60-second spot called “Inner Beauty.” The quirky, charming,

exquisitely crafted ad takes the viewer,

in a first-person view, zooming across

a desert and through all sorts of

objects—from a golf ball to a suitcase to the Civic Tourer itself—revealing their curious innards. The brief to W+K was, “There is an estate hidden inside”—i.e., the Civic Tourer has as much room as an estate vehicle (a big van/station wagon in the U.K.). “We decided it was interesting to focus on the human curiosity of looking inside things,” said W+K creative director Scott Dungate, “plus the joy you experience when you’re surprised and pleased by what you see.”

Copywriting The ad opens with the viewer speeding across a desert floor as Garrison Keillor, the brand’s longtime voice in Europe, says: “For those who love the inside as much as the outside, this is for you.” Quickly, the camera travels up to and through

Showing off a car’s roomy interior, in a playful way.

A different

view

Surprising

insides

Packing

it in

a golf ball, camera, wrapped gift (with

a robot inside), amplifier, suitcase

(containing clothes and a snow globe of San Francisco) and chest of drawers (with mostly socks). At the end, it explores the Civic Tourer’s interior, then pulls back to show all

the previous items flying into its trunk. “There,” says Keillor. “Aren’t you glad you looked?” There was a lot of debate over which objects to include. “I still wish we’d cut through a rock revealing

a fossil and ‘crystal cave,’ but that

12

Specs

Client Honda Agency Wieden + Kennedy, London Directors Smith & Foulkes, Nexus Editor Paul Hardcastle, Trim Effects Time Based Arts (See the spot and full credits at Adweek.com and on our iPad edition.)

was a casualty of the process,” said Dungate. The spot ends with the vehicle name on-screen, followed by the Honda name, “The power of dreams” tagline, honda.co.uk URL and #CivicTourer hashtag.

Art direction/filming The visuals are a mix of live action, stop motion and CGI. “We ended up taking things more surreal, but didn’t want to feel the CGI too much,” said Dungate. “While the final aesthetic is ‘hyper- real,’ I think it feels quite fresh as it uses a lot of real textures.” Oscar- nominated Nexus directors Smith & Foulkes, whose Honda work goes back to 2004’s Grand Prix-winning “Grrr,” filmed the live action in Teruel, Spain, and the stop motion in a studio. They wove in the CGI with help from Time Based Arts. “Quirky was important,” said Dungate. “It needed to be playful, human and warm—which can be difficult with inanimate objects and a ‘slicing technique.’”

Talent Keillor, 71, brings a warm

folksiness. “He adds humility, which is

a point of difference in a category full

of overclaim,” Dungate said. “Perhaps even more useful is, it’s good for when you’re writing. If you can’t imagine him saying it, it’s probably not right.” The driver of the car is almost invisible. “I didn’t want him in there at all,” said Dungate. “But someone had to drive, so I lost that argument.”

Sound There’s no music—it’s all sound design, rich and complex. “Sound played a big role in bringing humanity to the objects,” Dungate said. “It also plays a massive role

in storytelling, setting up what the

objects are and the lifestyle story relevant to the audience. Take, for example, the little kid laughing in the camera. Or the sound of the jet going into the suitcase. These all help you get the story of each object really quick, which is important as we move through things quite fast.”

Media The spot broke first in Germany, then in other European markets. It’s running for a month in the U.K.

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

WHEELER: MARK WILSON/GETTY IMAGES

Front

Trending Topics

The latest news from the worlds of tech, print, advertising, marketing and television.

Is 2014 the Year Of the Troll?

By David Griner Brands are having fun messing with consumers. Is it a smart strategy or marketing gone wrong?

Is JCPenney drunk tweeting the Super Bowl? Is Sports Illustrated putting Barbie on the cover of its Swimsuit Issue? Does Groupon really think Alexander Hamilton was president? When each of these questions ared up recently, the answer was always the same: no, not really. Welcome to the supposedly funny, largely frustrating new trend of marketers trolling consumers and journalists with what could best be described as “intentional fouls.” Brands are feigning questionable judgment, only to reveal soon after that it was all just a joke or (in the case of Barbie) much smaller in scope than people were led to believe. Is this the new real-time marketing? Each brand saw a spike in online conversation and media coverage that PR pros dream of. But the volume of reaction was mixed, and it’s also likely that many consumers who saw the original stunt never saw the later “reveal.” Case in point: JCPenney’s supposedly drunk tweets (“Who kkmew theis was ghiong tob e a baweball ghamle”) got about 40,000 retweets and widespread media coverage, but the follow-up #tweetingwithmittens hashtag

14

Brand Stunts

ONLINE REACTION, SENTIMENT WERE MIXED

10,428

Sports Illustrated + Barbie Topsy sentiment: 39% positive

7,911

JCPenney + #tweetingwithmittens Topsy sentiment: 67% positive

Groupon +

Alexander

Hamilton

Topsy

sentiment:

67% positive

President

Hamilton?

3,456

Coming to a retailer near you

only got used 7,911 times. A few weeks later, Mattel and Sports Illustrated put Barbie on the cover of SI’s Swimsuit Issue with the hashtag #Unapologetic. The stunt got more than 10,000 tweets before many realized the “cover” was an advertising wrap on a mere 1,000 issues, meaning few people would see the actual image on newsstands. And Groupon’s Presidents’ Day announcement that it was “honoring Alexander Hamilton” with a $10 discount (Hamilton, of course, was never president, despite being on the $10 bill) yielded just 3,500 tweets. The tenor of the online response to the stunts also has been mixed. Topsy, which measures the sentiment of social media activity, said the tweets about JCPenney’s mittens and Groupon’s President Hamilton were both 67 percent positive. The discussion of Barbie as swimsuit model was 39 percent positive, though, as many wondered if Mattel was baiting feminists. So is the “intentional foul” a smart marketing move? “Brands need to take a long, hard look at themselves before engaging in this kind of approach,” said Edelman Digital svp Dave Fleet. “For those with a playful

identity and whose audiences are used to this kind of tone, the risk is lower, and this approach can break through the clutter.” For less playful brands, the risk of reputation damage increases, Fleet warned. “Trust in a brand is critical, and

a perception of betraying that trust can do long-lasting damage to a company’s relationship with its customers,” he said. “That doesn’t mean ‘don’t do it,’ but it does mean companies should think twice about point-in-time stunts

if they don’t fit with their brand.”

MAGAZINES

In Lean Times, All You Looks Beyond Walmart

Bargains aren’t just for Walmart shoppers anymore. Starting in April, Time Inc.’s All You, the magazine for budget- conscious women, will be sold at stores outside the retail giant—the title’s sole newsstand distributor since launching 10 years ago. The exclusive deal with the world’s largest retailer let All You reach its target audience at scale with limited marketing costs, while circulation soared to more than 1 million in five years. But as the soft economy has made budget shoppers out of everyone, the title seemed to be missing out on potential sales and audience by limiting its distribution. Surprisingly, All You’s readers have a median household income of $68,000—$11,000 higher than Condé Nast’s luxury ad-driven Vogue at just $57,000. Technology has led to opportunity for the magazine, as two-thirds of smartphone owners have used their mobile devices to research products or compare prices, according to Leo J. Shapiro & Associates. “The economy has spurred the smart-shopping movement, but technology has accelerated it,” said All You publisher Suzanne Quint. “So more people are more interested in smart shopping because it’s easy to shop smart today.” The 1.5-million circ All You has raised its rate base by 50,000 copies in anticipation of the nationwide rollout to stores including Kroger,

Barnes & Noble and Target. The expansion comes as All You, along with the rest of the magazine business, has suffered declines in single-copy sales. From 2008 to 2013, All You newsstand sales fell 12 percent. But after testing distribution outside Walmart last year, sales

recovered. –Lucia Moses

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

When Newspapers Die

What happens when newspapers die? A new study published in Political Communication examined 2008-09 census data to assess the change in civic engagement (participating in civic groups, boycotting products or services, contacting public officials) in America’s biggest metro areas. Civic engagement dropped significantly more in Denver and Seattle, where the Rocky Mountain News and Seattle Post- Intelligencer closed in 2009, than in peer cities, suggesting that eliminating the papers was the cause.

SOURCE: DEAD NEWSPAPERS AND CITIZENS’ CIVIC ENGAGEMENT, POLITICAL COMMUNICATION, LEE SHAKER, PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY

Trending Topics

Relative change in civic engagement, 2008-09

-30%

Denver

-9%

Seattle

-3%

Portland

+6%

San Fran.

WASHINGTON

Little Hope For Looser Media Rules

The FCC could be close to a long overdue review of media ownership rules come March, and there’s bad news for media owners:

Early indications are that the new chairman Tom Wheeler is likely to propose tightening them. Backed by his fellow Democrats, Wheeler isn’t expected to loosen the rules but rather firm them up even more, which will no doubt bring strong opposition from TV broadcasters and newspapers, and

will split any vote along party lines. First, Wheeler is expected to bend to public interest groups and make joint sales agreements between TV stations count as owned under current ownership rules. Stations that find themselves over the ownership limits would have 18 months to two years to unwind these agreements. There are JSAs in more than 100 mostly smaller markets. Broadcasters, who have all but given up trying to convince the FCC to loosen the long-standing limits on how many stations can be owned in

a single market, are likely to appeal

the JSA change, especially since the FCC has allowed them for 20 years.

Newspapers also shouldn’t expect relief. They were hoping for cross-ownership rules to be loosened to allow TV or radio stations to purchase them. Wheeler has already signaled he wasn’t a big fan of his predecessor Julius Genachowski’s proposal to

loosen that part of media ownership. And if past is prologue, the rules could once again end up

in court—as they have

for the past decade.

–Katy Bachman

Wheeler’s not a dealer.

Leaving Los Angeles

By Noreen O’Leary Why have network agencies reduced their presence in Southern California while entrepreneurial shops have thrived?

Earlier this month, Ogilvy & Mather Los Angeles cut 33 jobs, all but eliminating its ad agency presence (already drastically down from its 350 level in 2000). In December, DDB L.A. parted with longtime client Wells Fargo and relocated 30 agency employees to San Francisco. Some 20 years ago, network agency offices were the dominant players in Southern California. They’d land a local anchor client— usually a car, entertainment or technology account—and try to build from there, despite the dearth of big marketers out West. But even as technology—driven from the West Coast—transforms the industry, many remaining

L.A. network agencies still have

more of an outpost mentality than an entrepreneurial reflex born of such change. One reason is that West Coast network offices often conform to their headquarters’ more traditional operating model, relegating them to service entities. “If the West was a different country, these agencies would be developed within that culture and have a clearer business role within the network,” said Robert LePlae, former North

American head of TBWA\Chiat\ Day and McCann Erickson. Not surprisingly, then, L.A.’s industry dynamism comes from hot independent shops like 72andSunny and

to trim overhead, the need for a network office is less critical. “With business consolidation and the recession, clients are migrating to larger markets, and it’s harder to sustain smaller offices,” said Mark O’Brien, president, DDB North America. “L.A. boutiques have an advantage in that it is their primary office.” Jay Chiat’s onetime boutique redefined L.A.’s ad industry in the ’80s. Network agencies with local roots, like TBWA\C\D, have done better by retaining their local identity. Deutsch’s L.A. office, founded before its acquisition by IPG, still has original partner and chief Mike Sheldon. Draftfcb has the advantage of Foote, Cone & Belding’s strong West Coast legacy born of Don Belding’s L.A. base. “It’s the kiss of death if clients think you are a satellite office,”

content creation upstarts. “To thrive in this market, you have to thrive at the intersection of marketing, technology and entertainment,” said John Boiler, founder, CEO, 72andSunny. John Seifert, chairman, O&M North America, said Ogilvy L.A. will now focus on technological and social media PR work there. “We believe a strong presence is

Reasons why agencies

Mark O’Brien,

are pulling back:

president, DDB

Exit of HTC, among other clients

North America

Loss of 18-year client Wells Fargo

John Seifert,

chairman, O&M

North America

essential, but we don’t think anyone has nailed the model of how to take advantage of it yet,” Seifert said. Aside from the vulnerability inherent in being dependent on a couple of clients, big-agency L.A. offices face other challenges. Prospective new clients can conflict with other existing ones in the network. Agencies don’t cultivate talent like they used to and may have fewer high-profile accounts to keep creatives happy. With technological advances and corporate pressure

said Carter Murray, CEO at Draftfcb Worldwide. “The West Coast used to be all about S.F. Now that power base is shifting to L.A.” Deutsch’s Sheldon says a certain amount of independence is necessary to succeed in that transformational L.A. “It comes down to thinking like an entrepreneur,” he said. “This city has always been a combination of relentlessness and effortlessness. People work really hard, but it’s difficult to be negative on a sunny day—and it’s always sunny.”

ILLUSTRATION: SHAW NIELSEN

Front

93m

people who play Candy Crush each day, according to the parent’s IPO filing. King Digital Entertainment is seeking $500 million in financing.

Data Science Comes to Web Ads, Slowly

By Garett Sloane The online ad business sees itself becoming more like Wall Street. If only clients moved that fast.

A restaurant chain’s marketing

objective is to move more customers from in-store to online ordering. A retailer wants to measure

ads according to real-world visits as opposed to clicks. Naturally, the right data in the hands of such advertisers can provide an edge over the competition—and many believe

it is headed toward a reality

in the online ad business where, not unlike Wall Street, the instantaneous analysis

of performance and behavior

drives results.

Call it the Bloombergization

of online advertising.

“It’s hard not to make that leap from where we are today to the

image of financial transactions looking for that millisecond of an advantage,” said Bob Ivins, head

of data at Mindshare. “Near real-

time data is forcing marketers— who historically had to plan buy cycles a month, six months, a year ahead—to collapse that and move

closer to real time.” In the U.K., information such as search trends is already informing clients’ television- buying decisions. For example, for Kimberly-Clark’s Kleenex

16

brand, a Mindshare client, media planners targeted commercials to postal codes that were identified by Google as most interested in flu-related keywords. But for all the data scientists now working on Madison Avenue, data-driven marketing

remains limited, according to the experts. Challenges include a move away from cookies. Measuring the success of campaigns is a difficult business, and even with the abundance of data at the ready, brands’ budgets and creative still move slowly, said Brian Gleason, managing director at Xaxis, WPP’s digital media buying platform. “A lot of companies aren’t set up to react in real time,” he pointed out. And yet the ability to mine data is crucial, he added. “If you could understand that a certain type of creative will have a larger impact with a certain demographic who will be more likely to make a purchase based on a certain time of day—and more insights like that—that puts you in a position to maximize ad dollars,” said Gleason. Several startups are working to move the field forward. One company, iSpot.tv, catalogs every national TV commercial via a YouTube-like interface, displaying such stats as how many times a spot airs and how much it costs. That allows brands to monitor their rivals or pair TV data with sales metrics. Information like that doesn’t come cheaply, however— an annual subscription can go for more than $100,000. Other players scrape every digital display ad. One company, xAd, is developing new ways to measure online ads based on store visits. It counts Pinkberry and The Home Depot among its clients. Measuring cost-per-visit ads is still an inexact process, according to xAd’s CEO Dipanshu Sharma. “It will make ad results more tangible,” Sharma said. “There are people who click on ads that never go to a store and those who don’t click and go. So what’s more important?”

Accounts

In Review

A weekly roundup of the major

accounts up for grabs and who’s chasing them. By Andrew McMains

Media Spend

$1b

global creative, media

Incumbent twofifteenmccann, Wunderman, Razorfish, MediaVest, UM and others

To be determined

Contenders

Microsoft

Consultant Joanne Davis Consulting

Completion

April

Media Spend

$325m

Burger King

global creative

Incumbent Mother, CHI & Partners and others

Contenders

Completion

To be determined April

Media Spend

$275m

Infiniti

Incumbent

Contenders

Completion

global creative TBWA Incumbent, others to be determined April

Still up for grabs $130m Wells Fargo creative $120m Papa John’s creative $115m CVS creative

Awarded

Reebok

global creative

Reebok has shifted its

global creative business yet again, this time

to Venables Bell

& Partners

after a review. Annual global media spending is estimated at $50-60 million. Sources identified the other finalists as Mother and Goodby, Silverstein & Partners. The new lead agency succeeds DDB, which had replaced mcgarrybowen just 13 months ago.

Note: All assignments for U.S. unless otherwise noted. Media spending reflects last full year, according to Nielsen.

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

INFOGRAPHIC: CARLOS MONTEIRO

Front

Data Points Man of the House

By Lucia Moses As gender boundaries erode, men are increasingly taking on the role of chief purchasing officer.

A survey of 2,000 men 18-49 by Defy Media, the product of the merger between Alloy Digital and Break Media, looked at men’s attitudes toward shopping and how they make purchasing decisions across a variety of categories.

They use digital devices in the shopping process, especially younger men.

27%

Use their mobiles to get product information while in the store.

$

67% say they actually enjoy shopping for the household.

65% of men hold primary responsibility for several household product categories.

54% of married men say they shop for groceries and household supplies more than their spouses.

63% are open to choosing new brands.

45%

Turn to friends or family for guidance on purchases.

32%

Ask store employees.

They’re not too proud to seek advice, contrary to stereotypes.

While advertising is a big factor behind a purchase, men care about products that appeal to their values.

50%

bought a product because they liked the story behind it.

60%

bought a product because it was made locally.

57%

said they’d stop buying from a company that did something offensive or illegal.

 

They’re

open to

Use online

reviews in

NEW

their research

41%

18-34

18

21%

35-49

BRANDS.

63%

Rely on

brands that

are tried

and true

35%

Friends and family are the primary way men learn about new products, but social media and YouTube are growing sources.

Social

media YouTube

28%

24%

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

ILLUSTR ATION: VAHR AM MUR ADYAN; HEADSHOT: GLUEKIT

Voice

The Era of Kinship

Front

By Abbie Walker In a fragmented landscape full of products and information, only real, purposed-based humanity can save marketing.

K inship is everywhere. It’s em- pathy in action: a hug, a com- forting word, the backbone of a friendship. Kinship is funda- mentally selfless, intrinsically rewarding, a vital and extreme-

ly human part of being, well, a human being. Kinship requires work, and while people inherently are driven by it, brands are not individuals and often do a poor job evoking similar feelings. Consumers have been skeptical of today’s brands’ intentions for some time now, and so is it any wonder they have such a hard time earning trust? Martin Weigel, planning director at Wieden + Kennedy Amsterdam, rightly said we have become prisoners of a metaphor, and as we’ve suspended reality for our metaphors, our brands ask consumers for what a person expects from his or her friends—loyalty, trust, attention, love, time— without putting in the reciprocally requisite work. In other words, brands need to reconsider their motivations and behaviors because no one is buying the be-our-friend act any longer. One problem is the mistaken notion that advertising shapes culture. Rather, advertising has always been a mirror that reflects changes in culture, politics and industry. In the Era of Logic—the ’50s and ’60s—there was a scarcity of information, so products earned markets based on clearly stated attributes. Winning brands made whites whiter, fed families more easily and vacuumed hard-to-reach places. Market saturation and mass media shifted us to the Era of Emotion. Prompted by booms of products and prosperity, conspicuous consumption kicked into high gear, and logic wasn’t enough. Your product had to make a prospective buyer feel something. A car was freedom on four wheels, jeans made you rebellious. This ego-driven style persists today, but it’s worn thin—its promises turned to platitudes, its emotion drowned in a sea of indistinguishable metaphors. Let’s consider the world in front of us: massive amounts of products and information a mere finger’s touch away. This could be a truly exhilarating landscape for brands and marketers. The bad news, however, is that brands are still working with

ADWEEK

|

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

Our success doesn’t lie in becoming more interesting or disruptive. What we need is purpose.

the dated tools from the Era of Emotion. Most brands are looking at behavior but don’t question whether people’s internal motivations have changed. Spoiler: They have. Fragmentation of media and the power to the public collective, for example, are behavioral outcomes of deeper truths. Find those truths, and you transcend the “like us on Facebook” noise. So what’s motivating people? What thoughts are keeping people up at night? Our access to endless information and socialization has given new life to age-old questions. Why am I here? What impact do I want to have on the people around me?” Our success doesn’t lie in becoming more interesting or disruptive. What we need is purpose and to help people realize their purpose. To know your purpose as a brand is to know who you, as the brand, aspire to be. This defines your subsequent behavior inside the company, in your products, and ultimately how you impact the world. It’s the “why” your brand exists. Consider a few well-known, proven examples. Pampers helps parents care for their babies and helps toddlers’ development. Amazon enables freedom of choice, exploration and discovery. Red Bull energizes the world. Notice the commonality: Purpose transcends business and product (the what) and delivers on human principles (the why). The “why” gives businesses and brands focus, a valued role to play in modern life and a depth that resonates with people. If you commit to a purpose that will truly benefit the world in some way, you are on your way to defining your brand’s role in people’s lives, and the way you communicate with them. It is within this dialogue between brand and consumer that we can find solutions, innovate and challenge the status quo. Ultimately, we can inspire others—our kin—to find their purpose. Let’s shed the chains of our metaphors in this new Era of Kinship. It’s not people who need to do the heavy lifting—it’s our brands and us. Like a good friend, we have to help others find purpose and to give selflessly, empathetically and meaningfully.

Abbie Walker is vp, strategy at brand experience agency Momentum Worldwide.

19

PHOTO: ANYA CHIBIS

SXSW

WHERE T H E G E E K S

20

RULE

VANTAGE

M E E T

POINT

T

H E

W O M A N

B

E H I N D

A

S S A S S I N ’ S

C

R E E D

As she heads to her first SXSW, Ubisoft exec Jade Raymond is cutting Hollywood deals as she prepares to launch a new franchise. By Garett Sloane

J ade Raymond thinks it would be cool to live in a world in which traffic lights change on her com- mand, one in which she has all the keys to all the locked doors. Nothing would be off limits.

That’s kind of how Ubisoft’s star video game producer views the future of the industry— putting gamers in charge. And fittingly, this ability to control the world is the theme of her company’s next likely blockbuster game. Watch Dogs is the future-set thriller about the surveillance society. The player controls the open world’s transit, communication and security systems. The game will be among the first to take advantage of the graphics and power boost provided by next-gen consoles Xbox One and PlayStation 4, and it’s one of the most anticipated titles of the year. It’s also one of Raymond’s creations in a portfolio of games that includes Assassin’s Creed. Raymond says she has embraced a phi- losophy of gaming that empowers the gamer. “Players—and people really—want to express themselves, and when I think about it, we’re kind of in an age of self-expression,” she says. “People want to play their way, they want to create their own stories, and they want to share those stories.” A native of Montreal who studied comput- er science at McGill University (and whose fa- vorite video game character is Donkey Kong), the 38-year-old manager of Ubisoft’s Toronto office is headed to her first SXSW, and her timing is impeccable. The festival is pushing deeper into gaming, an industry whose ten- drils reach into SXSW’s other cores: technol-

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

Raymond, in Ubisoft’s Toronto office, which she oversees.

SXSW

PREVIEW

Watch Dogs plays off the surveillance society we live in.

ogy, film and music. This year is the first that SXSW has a gaming awards ceremony. Raymond will take part in the interac- tive tech portion of SXSW, but these days she could fit into the film community almost as neatly, given that she’s been cutting a num- ber of Hollywood deals lately. New Regency and Ubisoft are planning to make Assassin’s Creed starring Michael Fassbender, Splinter Cell starring Tom Hardy and a Watch Dogs movie. (“We’re selecting partners and deter- mining brand values,” Raymond says of her recent business in Los Angeles.) The history of video games is littered with failed movie spinoffs, but the entertainment industry is changing and so is the type of con- tent that appeals to viewers. Online channels Twitch and eSports generate big audiences by streaming video game play, creating virtual spectator sports—a development few would have predicted in the early days of gaming. Surely in this environment, video game- based movies and shows stand a better chance than the 1993 Super Mario Bros. flop. Raymond says she understands the challeng- es when she’s reminded of how often movies based on video games fail. “I agree, that’s why we’re doing it different,” she says. “The prob- lem with a lot of what you’ve seen in the movie adaptation of video game franchises is that often people think that when they’re experts in one type of media, they think they’re ex- perts in everything else.” Ubisoft isn’t the only game studio with big- screen ambitions. Rovio is looking to trans- late Angry Birds into a full-length feature by 2016. Ubisoft has its own animated franchise called the Rabbids—cutely deranged rabbits—

22

‘ I F

T H E

S T O R Y

H A S

N

O W H E R E

T O

G O ,

T H E N

Y

O U

E N D

U P

W I T H

T H E

V

I D E O

G A M E

E Q U I V A L E N T

O

F

T H E

M A T R I X

2 . ’

 

Jade Raymond, Ubisoft

who currently star in a Nickelodeon cartoon and soon will get the movie treatment. Perhaps no Ubisoft franchise has the cin- ematic potential of Assassin’s Creed. With Fassbender signed on, they have a rising Hol- lywood star (X-Men First Class, Prometheus). In Assassin’s Creed, they have an immedi- ate fan base. The game is one of the highest- selling entertainment properties of the past decade, moving 73 million units, with new installments released yearly—a level of regu- larity that is hard to match in the industry. Grand Theft Auto released two sequels in the same time it took to make four Assassin’s games, and the fifth AC is in the works. “What they do with Assassin’s Creed on an annual basis—7 million to 10 million units— that’s pretty impressive,” says analyst Mi- chael Pachter with Wedbush Securities. “And with Watch Dogs, look for something of that magnitude.” There’s a compelling story propelling As- sassin’s Creed, as well, one that came from Raymond’s fascination with conspiracy theo- ries developed from reading books about the Illuminati in her early teens. Assassin’s Creed

G A M I N G

@

S X S W

A quick scan of goings-on in Austin:

• March 7, 5 p.m.: Electronic Arts CEO

Andrew Wilson interviewed at the Long

Center for the Performing Arts, Dell Hall

• March 8, 7 p.m.: SXSW Gaming Awards at

the Long Center

• March 9, 2 p.m.: Raymond interviewed by gamer personality Geoff Keighley at the Long Center

borrows heavily from that genre, featuring

a secret society of warriors who travel back

in time (not by time travel because “that’s cheesy,” she offers) using genetic memory (“this idea that the memories of people’s an- cestors are encoded in their genes”). Assassin’s Creed has explored the Cru-

sades, the Renaissance, American Revolution and most recently pirates. The fifth install- ment will feature her favorite historical era, Raymond says, but she can’t even give a hint of what that is because it would ruin the sur- prise. She did dispel the rumor that it is set at the end of the samurai age in Japan. That said, she thinks that would be a cool idea. “When we’re building a franchise, we’re thinking of a whole universe and how we’re developing a meta-story that could live on for many years in games and TV,” explains Ray- mond. “If the story has nowhere to go, then you end up with the video game equivalent of The Matrix 2 or something where it’s never going to be quite as genius.” Watch Dogs is the next potential block- buster, but it’s faced delays. Ubisoft is taking its time rather than risk disaster with the first big crack at creating a fresh franchise on the new consoles. The game is now expected in the spring, Raymond says, but she gets to play Watch Dogs now—one of the perks of working

in video games.

At SXSW, Raymond is set to discuss how the video game industry has become an entertain- ment force on a massive scale. The festival has been getting more into gaming, a tough indus- try to master for the Austin event that special- izes in technology, film and music. One of the challenges is bad timing—SXSW comes at the same time as the Game Developers Confer-

ence, one of gaming’s biggest events. The video game industry has typically been represented at SXSW by indie devel- opers and app makers, but it’s hard to do a technology and entertainment festival that doesn’t embrace the mainstream video game world. “The gaming aspect has been a little more difficult, but it has really grown,” says Hugh Forrest, SXSW’s interactive director. “One of the things we do very well is this con- cept of convergence—and gaming fits right into that.” —garett.sloane@adweek.com; Twitter: @garettsloane.

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

ILLUSTRATION: MATTHEW BILLINGTON

A

MARKETER’S

GUIDE

TO

SXSW

B

R A N D S

T R Y

T

O

K E E P

A U S T I N

W I R E D

( A N D

W E I R D )

The cacophony and crowds that define the annual geekfest force tech firms and advertisers alike to turn their activations up to ‘11.’ By Christopher Heine

F or 20 years, South by Southwest Interactive—which started, humbly enough, as SXSW Film & Multimedia—has evolved into a massive marketing extravaganza, last year playing host to 31,000 tech practitioners and enthusiasts, up from 11,000

in 2009. How can a brand hope to break through all that clutter? While it has become old hat for the Twitterati to snipe about the idea of traveling to Texas every year for such a big, noisy event, everybody

still shows up. And once they hit town, they’ll be sure to weigh in on activations by AT&T, Samsung, HBO, Subway, American Express and scores of other brands, vendors and agencies. Heading into this year’s festival, Adweek previews five activations vying for attention amid the controlled chaos of Austin.

ADWEEK

|

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

When Pigs Fly Focusing on what it does best, Gogo is bringing technology to consumers’ fingertips at 30,000 feet. On March 7 and 8, the in-flight WiFi provider will invite folks to a one-hour ride in the nine-seat plane it regularly uses as a test lab. But here’s the real draw: The cabin will be outfitted as a food truck, serving local favorite Keith’s BBQ during the flights. “We’re going to feed them some of the best barbecue in the country and give them the chance to experience our new products,” says Ash ElDifrawi, Gogo’s chief commercial officer. The private plane is typically employed by the Itasca, Ill.-based firm to tweak its in-flight WiFi service. And to ElDifrawi’s point, it’s where Gogo developed a Web- based text-and-talk service that’s being launched at SXSW, so jet-setting participants will get a sneak peek into how they can soon communicate with land-bound friends. Hey, how often can you say you had cloud-based ribs and brisket?

Wearables for Road Warriors Undertone has been readying an RV dubbed Future Proof Labs at West Coast Customs (of MTV’s Pimp My Ride fame) in Corona, Calif., featuring wearable devices and other digital technology. Next week, the firm plans to wow SXSW attendees with near field communication-enabled watches, rings and bracelets. Several interactive stations around and inside the motor home (located on the corner of 5th and Colorado) will demonstrate how wearables can impact consumers’ digital lives. “There’s never really been an ad tech company that’s been the talk of the show,” says Eric Franchi, Undertone’s co-founder. “We’ve sent people in the past, but this is a drastically different level of investment. We’re going to help people experience mobile and wearables and hopefully make a big splash.”

Bread Co. Seeks Mainland Dough King’s Hawaiian, which has been making bread since the ’50s, will work the festival’s interactive and film programs as a springboard for its emergence as a national advertising player, via TV spots from Energy BBDO. For Austin, the brand built its first food truck, featuring a huge HD screen reporting all the SXSW social buzz. Nearby photo booths let attendees share pics in their social streams along with King’s tagline #GoPupule (Hawaiian for “go crazy”). The company is buying Promoted Tweets around relevant keywords for the festival to promote the hashtag. And talk about meta: King’s truck

will be stationed outside the March 7 premiere of Chef, an indie film about

a food truck starring Dustin Hoffman,

Scarlett Johansson and Robert Downey Jr., for which King’s Hawaiian bought a product placement. “We want the South-by experience to be as interactive as possible while kick- starting the larger campaign, which launches around Easter,” explains Erick Dickens, marketing vp.

A Cure for Hospitality Headaches Razorfish is reprising last year’s much-buzzed-about #UseMeLeaveMe effort, equipping 20 bicycles with GPS and allowing attendees to take

a spin around the festival while their

wheels auto-tweet weather details and random hellos, comment on whether the rider is acting like a fool and other fun messages. The digital shop has expanded the initiative this time around, however, with a push it has dubbed “Buds for Beds,” offering South-by attendees the chance to lodge during the packed event for free. Attendees can register at UseMeLeaveMe.com, then encourage their friends to vote for them. The winner, along with four pals, will get the use of a house on a huge lot along West 4th Street. Recruiting sessions, hackathons and music performances will take place there over the course of SXSW. “With Buds for Beds, we want to help solve the housing problem that is endemic to the South- by experience,” explains Chris Bowler, Razorfish’s social media lead.

Where the Weird Things Live Tech vendors Umbel, AdColony and Vox Media are co-sponsoring an event March 7 in one of the Texas capital’s most-famous music venues, Moody Theater, home to PBS’ acclaimed Austin City Limits. It’s going to be strange. Indie “psych-folk” band Local Natives will take the stage, while street teams dressed as astronauts work the front of the venue and Mexican wrestler “El Umbel” takes selfies with guests. “It’s hard to be weird here, but we are going to give

it our best shot,” declares PR rep

Lana McGilvray. Inside the Moody, large screens will showcase Umbel’s data services as branded welcome messages are zapped to attendees’ smartphones. “The mascot unlocks conversation after conversation,” says Umbel CEO H.O. Maycotte. “It’s fun to have a little something playful in the business-to-business space.” For those braving the South-by crowds, be prepared for a little something weird. That’s just part of the deal, friendo. —christopher.heine@adweek.com; Twitter: @chris_heine.

23

PHOTO: RAINER HOSCH

The Oscars

24

‘To us, it was a movie about our times— [Scorsese] wasn’t just making a movie about the overreaching greed of the’80s. Everything in this film is applicable to what’s going on today.’

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

Q A

JOSH GREENSTEIN

Selling Marty, Leo and The Wolf of Wall Street

M arketing a movie is always work—especially when it’s about a wholly dishonorable Wall Street operator in the go-go ’80s. Josh Greenstein was up to the challenge.

Since 2011, he has served as CMO of Para- mount Pictures, which distributed Martin Scorsese’s The Wolf of Wall Street, starring Leonardo DiCaprio, in North America and Japan. Adweek caught up with Greenstein to learn how the studio turned a hard-charging portrayal of excess, full of graphic sex, drugs and general immorality, into a blockbuster, and nominee for the Academy Award for Best

Picture. —Gabriel Beltrone

adweek: First, the nuts and bolts. What was the target audience for Wolf? greenstein: Adults 18-49, entertainment consumers, moviegoers. Marty has a huge fan base. Leo DiCaprio has a huge fan base. We opened wide, so it was a national campaign. What about the popular sentiment about Wall Street? Did you pay particular attention to that as you approached marketing the film? Well, we did pay attention to what was go- ing on, but we really tried to broaden out the messaging for the film. To us, it was a movie about our times—Marty wasn’t just making a movie about the overreaching greed of the ’80s. Everything in this film is still applicable to what’s going on today, where people are in life and how they’re feeling about the world. How deeply involved in the marketing of the film was Scorsese? On a campaign, it’s always lockstep with

ADWEEK

|

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

him. He’s a true partner in the marketing, in every aspect of the campaign, because he’s such a visionary. We want to be able to take advantage of that mind in our campaign. For instance, we worked on [the teaser trailer] to- gether. He instantly loved the Kanye [West] song [“Black Skinhead”] that we used in it. That was a pretty bold song to put in the first piece for a movie that was set in a different pe- riod, and Marty embraced that. How did you use social and digital? One thing that got passed around a lot was the GIFs of Leo break dancing from the trail- er. We started with an uncompromising take in terms of our advertising, and I think that got people excited that Martin Scorsese was bringing his vision to life on the big screen be- cause I think people expect that from Marty. They expect him not to pull We didn’t try to paint the movie in a dif- ferent light. We embraced [the lead] Jordan’s character, we embraced the controversy. We didn’t try to paint him as a super-likable guy. We tried to stay as true to the film as we could [laughs] … under advertising limits. According to Nielsen, trailers tend to play better with moviegoing audiences than shorter TV spots, yet TV is still a huge part of any big campaign. Where’s your focus lie? To me, it’s a matter of sequencing. I think trailers, whether they’re in-theater or online, are a great opportunity to give people a more long-form version of what a movie is about, getting them excited to see the film. And tele- vision is incredibly important, and it really helps us close very hard and very targeted to our audiences. So they’re both important.

Which social stats do you look at most? In the first week, we want to be, you know, over 5 million or 6 million views. We want to feel like it’s consumed, that it feels very hot out in the world. And then we monitor the conversation and see what the reactions [are] … one, are people even talking about it? We want people to be passing it around. How did your marketing strategy shift when you clinched five Oscar nominations? Well, at that point, the movie had been out for a lot longer, and we didn’t have to be as lin- ear in the storytelling. We had a lot of great publicity, with Leo and Marty doing Q&As, going on Saturday Night Live. During the Academy push of the cam- paign, we show a little different side of the film, a little more serious, talk about all of the accolades, a very review-heavy, very re- view-centric campaign. The campaign kind of evolves, and you get to highlight the great performances from the cast. You get to high- light Marty’s direction, you get to highlight Thelma [Schoonmaker]’s editing; there’s just more freedom to kind of explore the different angles and areas of the filmmaking. We have

a piece of outdoor right now with the slogan

“Because it’s awesome.” That’s all it says. You couldn’t do that before the movie—people wouldn’t know what you were talking about. How is marketing The Wolf of Wall Street different from marketing something like [Best Picture nominee] Nebraska? Nebraska was a filmmaker-driven, criti- cally lauded, black-and-white film by Alex- ander Payne. Alexander’s had tremendous success with his other films—he himself has become a brand. The film is a big part of mar- keting Nebraska. We did an early screening program; we got it to as many people’s hands as we could because we knew when people saw that film, they would fall in love with it. What about World War Z? With a movie like World War Z, it was hold- ing back—we wanted to tease and hold back the film for as long as possible. Not only the film but the materials, to get people excited,

to give people hints, to create a mystery in the campaign and in the sell. So there was, when you went to the theater, it was a real sense of discovery, you were finding things out. And we sold it very aggressively. You know, it was

a giant summer tent pole with a giant interna-

tional star, obviously, in Brad Pitt. What’s on the agenda for 2014? Well, we’ve got a tremendous slate of films. We’ve got Darren Aronofsky’s Noah, Michael Bay’s Transformers: Age of Extinction, Brett Ratner’s Hercules, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Christopher Nolan’s Interstellar. We have tremendous, tremendous films com- ing up. I couldn’t be more excited to work on them, and we have very high hopes for all of them. —gabriel.beltrone@gmail.com; Twitter: @gbeltrone.

25

U P

R E P O R T E R ,

O F F I C E

A D D

N O T

B O X

H O L LY W O O D

M AY

I N T E L ,

P E R C E N TA G E S

B A S E L I N E

T H E

D I G E S T,

C A N A D A . S O U R C E S :

S C R E E N

A N D

O N LY.

M E D I A ,

U . S .

P I C T U R E S

I N C L U D E S

P Q

N I E L S E N ,

M O T I O N

G R O S S

M E D I A ,

O F

D O M E S T I C

M A R K E T I N G

K A N TA R

AVA I L A B L E .

I N T E R A C T I V E ,

T H E

T O

P E R I O D R E L AT E S

H A R R I S S O U R C E S .

R E C E N T S P E N D

G O O G L E ,

A D W E E K

M O S T M E D I A

F O R

R O U N D I N G .

I N S I D E R , S T U D I O S ,

A R E

D ATA

B U S I N E S S

M E D I A ,

T O

A L L D U E

O J O , N R U LY

O T E S :

1 0 0

O

T
M

N

U

MOVING

PICTURES

Hollywood’s marketing machine, by the numbers. By Gabriel Beltrone

THE STUDIOS

TV $2.8B

$3.2B

Total motion picture industry ad spend in 2012. Television had by far the biggest share, with 86.5%. The remainder went to: newspapers (6%), outdoor (3%), Internet (2%), and radio, magazines and b-to-b (<1% each).

The Wolf of Wall Street trailer won the 2013 Grand Key Art Award from The Hollywood Reporter and Clio.

$40M-50M

Average cost to market a feature film distributed by a major Hollywood studio

WARNER

WALT DISNEY

UNIVERSAL

20TH

BROS. PICTURES

PICTURES

STUDIOS

CENTURY FOX

2013 Worldwide Gross

$1.89B

DOMESTIC

Annual Media Spend

$3.15B

INTERNATIONAL

$582M

$5.04B

Social Scorecard 1.28M Twitter followers 663,000 Facebook likes

Marketing Chief Sue Kroll, president of worldwide marketing and distribution

Media Agency WB@OMG, a Warner Bros.-dedicated unit at Omnicom (U.S.)

Box Office Highlights The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug ($860M worldwide gross); Gravity ($701M worldwide); Man of Steel ($668M worldwide)

Oscar Nominations

21, including Best Picture for Gravity and Her

2013 Worldwide Gross

$1.72B

DOMESTIC

Annual Media Spend

$3.01B

INTERNATIONAL

$600M

$4.73B

Social Scorecard 1.84M Twitter followers 12M Facebook likes

Marketing Chief Ricky Strauss, president of marketing

Media Agency OMD’s 4D (U.S.); Carat (global)

Box Office Highlights Iron Man 3 ($1.22B worldwide gross); Frozen ($958M worldwide); Monsters University ($744M)

Oscar Nominations

8, including Best Animated Feature for Frozen and The Wind Rises

Tom Hanks is America’s favorite actor, followed by Denzel Washington and Jennifer Lawrence.

2013 Worldwide Gross

$1.42B

DOMESTIC

Annual Media Spend

$2.25B

INTERNATIONAL

$485M

$3.67B

Social Scorecard 118,000 Twitter followers 2.7M Facebook likes

Marketing Brass Josh Goldstine, president, marketing; Michael Moses, co-president

Media Agency Maxus (North America); MediaCom, London (global)

Box Office Highlights Despicable Me 2 ($971M worldwide gross); Fast & Furious 6 ($789M)

Oscar Nominations

10, including Best Picture for Dallas Buyers Club and Best Actor for lead Matthew McConaughey; Despicable Me 2 for Best Animated Feature

The Wolf of Wall Street has surged in popularity online since Oscar nominations were announced last month, doubling its social fan base to 872,112 (Facebook and Twitter combined). That's more than double the No. 2 Best Picture nominee, Warner Bros.’s Gravity. —ListenFirst Media, via The Hollywood Reporter

26

2013 Worldwide Gross

$1.18B

$2.33B

$3.51B

DOMESTIC INTERNATIONAL

Annual Media Spend

$303M

Social Scorecard 645,000 Twitter followers 873,000 Facebook likes

Marketing Brass Paul Hanneman and Tomas Jegeus, co-presidents of worldwide theatrical marketing; U.S. lead, Marc Weinstock

Media Agency ZenithOptimedia (U.S., global); Vizeum (global)

Box Office Highlights The Croods ($587M worldwide gross); The Wolverine ($415M)

Oscar Nominations

11, including Best Picture for 12 Years a Slave (Fox Searchlight) and its lead Chiwetel Ejiofor for Best Actor, and Best Animated Feature for The Croods

Action/adventure movies are America’s most loved genre, favored by 61%.

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

I M A G E S ;

STRAUSS: DAVID LIVINGSTON/WIREIMAGE; BLAKE: KEVIN WINTER/GETTY IMAGES FOR AFI

B R O W N / G E T T Y

M .

F R E D E R I C K

K R O L L :

M A C H I N E ;

K A U L / W O N D E R F U L

J

K A R L

M O C E A N :

44%

of consumers 12- 74 say they trust trailers "a lot" when deciding whether to see a movie.

Three of the 10 most-shared Super Bowl ads of all time were movie trailers—for the fifth and sixth installments of Universal’s Fast & Furious franchise and Paramount’s Star Trek Into Darkness.

44%

TRAILERS

40%

F R I E N D S AND FAMILY

32%

TV ADS

22%

C R I T I C S ’ REVIEWS

14%

S

M

P

F

STRANGERS

O C I A L E D I A O S T S R O M

THE TRAILER MAKERS While studios tend not to hire big ad agencies to market their films, there is an economy of shops in Los Angeles helping to create trailers, teasers, television spots, posters and other promotional materials. They include Trailer Park, mOcean, Buddha Jones, Skip Film, AV Squad, MobScene, BLT, Ant Farm, Industry Creative, Ignition Creative, Motive Creative, Mark Woollen & Associates, Workshop Creative, Flyer Entertainment, Wild Card and Vibe Creative.

SONY

PARAMOUNT

LIONSGATE

A WORD ABOUT PRODUCT

PICTURES

PICTURES

PLACEMENT

2013 Worldwide Gross

$1.14B

DOMESTIC

$1.91B

INTERNATIONAL

$3.05B

2013 Worldwide Gross

$1.02B

DOMESTIC

$1.36B

INTERNATIONAL

$2.38B

2013 Worldwide Gross

$1.07B

DOMESTIC

$1.25B

INTERNATIONAL

$2.32B

$1.8b

Total global spending on product placement in movies in 2013

Annual Media Spend

Annual Media Spend

Annual Media Spend

$472M

$310M

$329M

Social Scorecard 768,000 Twitter followers 583,000 Facebook likes

Social Scorecard 1M Twitter followers 2.5M Facebook likes

Social Scorecard 340,000 Twitter followers 531,000 Facebook likes

Marketing Chief Jeff Blake, chairman, worldwide marketing and distribution

Marketing Chief Josh Greenstein, CMO

Marketing Brass Tim Palen, CMO, Lionsgate; Nancy Kirkpatrick, president, worldwide marketing,

Media Agency

Media Agency UM (U.S., Latin America, Asia-Pacific)

Media Agency MEC (U.S., global)

Summit Entertainment

Box Office Highlights

($467M)

Mindshare (U.S.)

Box Office Highlights The Smurfs 2 ($348M worldwide gross); Cloudy With a Chance of

World War Z ($540M worldwide gross); Star Trek Into Darkness

Box Office Highlights The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

Meatballs 2 ($267M)

Oscar Nominations

($863M worldwide gross); Now You See Me ($352M)

Oscar Nominations

of Wall Street and Nebraska, both of which scored Best Actor nods for respective leads Leonardo DiCaprio and Bruce Dern and Best Director for Martin Scorsese and Alexander Payne

13,

including Best Picture for The Wolf

Oscar Nominations

1, Sound Editing for All Is Lost

21, including Best Picture for Captain Phillips and American Hustle, which also earned nods for Best Director (David O. Russell), Best Actor (Christian Bale) and Best Actress (Amy Adams)

94%

of teenagers see at least one movie a year.

The number of people who viewed movie trailers on YouTube doubled in 2013.

American adults see an average of fi ve movies every year .

ADWEEK

|

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

100

Warner Bros.’ Man of Steel picked up more than 100 product partners, earning the studio some $173 million.

EXPERT OPINION "The objective [of product placement] is being part of a story, having a relevant role in the story or having the values of the film match that of the brand," says Ruben Igielko-Herrlich, founding partner of Propaganda GEM, the marketing shop that tied Nokia to Man of Steel and whose clients also include BMW and Lacoste. China will become the No. 1 market for Hollywood, he adds, as it boasts more moviegoers than anywhere else on Earth. "There are Chinese brands that we will bring into Hollywood productions, which then are shown in China, and it demonstrates to their own consumers that these Chinese brands are global brands, on par with the aspirational Western brands."

27

THE NEW BILLBOARD MUSIC STORE

MORE MUSIC. MORE CONTENT. MORE ENGAGEMENT.

Over 12MM Tracks Artist Bio Information Customized URLs & Playlist Picks English & Spanish Stores Available • • Download Directly to iTunes, MP3 Players, MACs and PCs

CONTACT US FOR A FREE MUSIC DOWNLOAD AND GET THE PERFORMANCE YOU NEED

Diane Driscoll • 212.493.4110 • diane.driscoll@billboard.com • www.BillboardMusicStore.com

MUSIC PROMOTIONS

PORTRAIT PAGE 30 | PERSPECTIVE 32 | INFORMATION DIET 34

PHOTO: WILLIAM LOVELACE/EXPRESS/GETTY IMAGES

Back

Reporters file from the April 1962 Academy Awards ceremony. That year’s Oscar for Best Picture went to West Side Story.

ADWEEK

|

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

29

PHOTO: WINNI WINTERMEYER

Back

Portrait Hub Strategy

Specs

Who Peter Judd (l.), creative director, director of design; D.J. O’Neil, CEO, creative director What Advertising, design and production shop Where Presidio Bowling Center, near the agency’s San Francisco office

Helping clients in the early stages of marketing challenges has won this freelancer shop business from blue-chip brands Microsoft and Smart USA.

Twelve years ago, D.J. O’Neil assembled a network of freelancers that became Hub Strategy, to deliver the specialist executions smaller agencies don’t have in-house. (He’s since gathered some 120 creatives, designers and strategists within Hub’s Presidio-area office.) Though other agencies have since jumped on that bandwagon, O’Neil seeks to differentiate Hub by getting involved at the earliest stages of a marketer’s communications planning. Clients have included Slingbox, the Oakland A’s, Microsoft, Google and Blue Shield of California. One of the shop’s latest projects is for Smart USA: Last month, Hub launched an app that uses GPS tracking and social media to aggregate local parking location tips for the micro cars. —Noreen O’Leary

30

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

Your next ‘smart pill’ may be a tablet

THE ADWEEK IPAD ® EDITION

Medalist — Best Weekly App, Society of Publication Designers

Our award winning iPad ® App includes all of the print edition plus:

Enhanced format for iPad ® viewing

 

Custom

interactive

features

Unique content offerings such as Top 10 Ads of the Week

 

Enhanced bonus content such as videos, audio and photo galleries

Available FREE to current Adweek subscribers. www.adweek.com/ipad

Download the Adweek iPad ®

edition today.

iPad, iPhone, and iPod touch are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store is a service mark of Apple Inc.

Back

Perspective Hunger Games

By Robert Klara How Snickers fired a quarterback, hired a zebra and tweaked one of the most famous taglines in advertising history.

Much like songwriters, brand marketers play variations on a theme. Coca-Cola’s famous tagline “It’s the real thing” from 1970 became “Can’t beat the real thing” 20

years later. KFC’s unforgettable “It’s finger-lickin’ good” slogan of the 1960s and ‘70s morphed into the more compact “So good” in 2011. And L’Oréal’s successful “Because I’m worth it” slogan has modulated twice, first into “Because you are worth it” and then “Because we’re worth it.” Most of these evolutions have to do with the usual things: changing consumer tastes and shorter attention spans. But in the case of Snickers, the condensing of “Packed with peanuts, Snickers really satisfies” to just “Snickers satisfies” has its own particular story, as the ads here suggest. Steve Stallman, president of Stallman Marketing, points out that these 1986 and 2014 ads (along with their respective taglines) are indeed variations on

a familiar theme. “The core message that Snickers

satisfies is at the end of the new ad, so it’s a logical extension of the identical message,” he said. But while the message might be identical, its execution is anything but.

Ever since 1930, when Mars first struck on the idea of combining the usual candy bar ingredients like chocolate and nougat with whole peanuts, Snickers has acted more like a meal than a snack. And the bar’s stomach-filling properties made it a runaway hit after Ted Bates Worldwide coined the “Snickers really satisfies” tag in 1979.

But traveling that rough-and-rugged marketing path landed Snickers in a rut that’s on full display in this 1986 ad. Sure, it’s great that Snickers has mom’s blessing, but the target consumer is clearly jock boy here, complete with his muddy track pants and his football. Another Snickers ad from this period featured John Siman of the U.S. Olympic water polo team. “After

a workout, you really build up a big hunger,” said big

John with his big muscles. It took a few years (and lost market share) before Snickers realized that a delicate operation was in order, one that would retain the brand’s central attribute even as it tweaked both content and tagline. The result from BBDO isn’t just a funnier image, it’s a more accessible (read: gender-neutral) one. After all, as Stallman asks, who can’t relate to hunger? “This is a big segment,” he said. “Now, Snickers is talking to the factory worker, the office worker, the college student.” Snickers is also doing it with a new slogan. “You’re not you when you’re hungry” holds true for anybody. But check out the 2014 ad’s lower right corner. Snickers has retained all the brand familiarity it won with years of the old slogan by retaining its most powerful word:

satisfies. Which goes to show: You can fire a jock and replace him with a zebra, but a good tagline can live forever.

32

Even as Snickers used our strapping quarterback friend here to represent its core demo, it was making a separate marketing appeal—to mom. “A big thing with working mothers is guilt that they couldn’t have a warm meal on the table at 5 o’clock,” Stallman said, “so this ad is giving permission.” Or trying to. Substituting a candy bar for a meal seems a little dubious, but in the 1980s—the era of the energy bar—it was common.

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

|

ADWEEK

‘Satisfies is at the end of the new ad, so it’s a logical extension of the identical message.’

Steve Stallman, president, Stallman Marketing

Stallman observes that reversal of a familiar metaphor (rarely do we see a lion as prey) is a visual manifestation of the new tagline. A zebra doing the hunting “is not normal,” he said. “Great ads can be done with few words—and this one does it.”

Stallman wonders why more brands don’t “take advantage of showing the food” as Snickers does very well here. Mars no longer has to say that Snickers is “packed with peanuts”— we can tell.

ADWEEK

|

FEBRUARY 24, 2014

Back

The sole surviving word from the old tagline sits down here by itself. But “satisfies” is still doing a critical job, reminding consumers of a familiar slogan and reinforcing the message that “Snickers is still about filling you up,” Stallman said.

33

TEIGEN: THEO WARGO/FILMMAGIC; VANDERPUMP RULES: TOMMY GARCIA/BRAVO; THE REAL HOUSEWIVES: VIVIAN ZINK/BRAVO

Back

Information Diet Chrissy Teigen

The new Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue cover star has also reached the pinnacle of social media fame thanks to her very own meme.

What’s the first information you consume in the morning? MSNBC is usually already on—Morning Joe, specifically— because my husband [John

Legend] wakes up a little before

I do. I listen to that as I scroll through Twitter and look at what’s trending.

You’ve become a big star on social media. How did you get started with that? I have always been a bit of an Internet addict. Young Chrissy loved her AOL chat rooms, message boards, forums,

everything!

You’re pretty active with your followers, too. Why is that important? Fan interaction is everything these days, for me at least. It’s nice to show people that you don’t just take pictures, you have a voice.

You also have your own food blog, So Delushious!. What blogs do you read for inspiration? I actually don’t read too many food blogs. Foodbeast comes to mind and Immaculate Infatuation. But most of my food inspiration comes from food magazines. I usually have four or five with me on any plane ride.

What’s your favorite app? My

Talking Pet is hysterical. It makes any photo of anything talk. Pets, Barack Obama, a donut, whatever you want. I have had nights where

I have cried laughing for hours on end doing this.

What about TV shows? Any guilty pleasures? I love trashy reality shows. Love. And I feel absolutely no guilt about it. Vanderpump Rules and all of the Real Housewives have my heart.

How do you wind down before bed? Red wine and Bravo!

Vanderpump Rules

What’s on your reading list right now? I’m currently reading The Genius of Dogs: How Dogs Are Smarter Than You Think, by Brian Hare.

Did you read the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue before you became a model? Of course! Getting to meet so many of the women I looked up to is just so crazy to me. It never gets old.

Do you think it’s as much of a must-read for some women as it is for men? Yes! I have so many female friends in the fashion industry who use our photos for shoot inspiration. I love it.

The Real Housewives

You are now the subject of your very own Internet meme, #ChrissyHoldingThings. Is that pretty much the social media equivalent of landing the Swimsuit Issue cover? I’m not sure if anything is nearly as good as this feeling I have right now with the cover. But I cannot believe that the meme happened.

And I cannot believe that so many people know how to use Photoshop. —Emma Bazilian

Specs

Age 28 Accomplishments 2014 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue cover model; founder/writer of So Delushious! cooking blog Base New York

This foodie has her own blog.

Adweek (USPS 458870, ISSN 1549-9553) is published weekly, except biweekly in July and August, and three issues in December. Publisher is Prometheus Global Media, LLC, 770 Broadway, New York, NY 10003, (212) 493-4100; 5700 Wilshire Blvd, 5th floor Los Angeles, CA 90036, (323) 525-2000. Subscriptions are $249 for one year, $449 for two years. Canadian subscriptions are $299 per year. All other foreign subscriptions are $349 (using air mail). Subscription inquiries: (877) 496-5246; outside the U.S.: (845) 267-3007. Registered as newspaper at the British Post Office. Canadian Publication Mail Agreement No. 41450540. Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to: MSI, PO BOX 2600, Mississauga, On L4T OA8. Periodicals postage is paid in New York, NY, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send all UAA to CFS. Non-Postal and Military Facilities send address changes to ADWEEK, PO Box 15, Congers, NY 10920-0015; Subscriptions@Adweek.com. Copyright 2014 Prometheus Global Media, LLC. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in any retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior written permission of the publisher. For reprints, please call Wright’s Media, (877) 652-5295, email pgm@wrightsmedia.com.

FIRST

EVER

CELEBRATING

INVENTIONS

IN MEDIA,TECHNOLOGY,

MARKETING & ADVERTISING

MEET THE JURY

JURY CHAIR

LORI SENECAL

Chairman & CEO, kbs+

DIGITAL

WINSTON BINCH

Partner & Chief Digital Officer, Deutsch LA

SUNG CHANG

Group Creative

Director, AKQA

DARREN MCCOLL

Global Chief Strategy Officer, SapientNitro

ERIKA NARDINI

Chief Marketing Officer, Aol Advertising

MARKETING &

ADVERTISING

CINDY GALLOP

Founder & CEO, IfWeRanTheWorld/ MakeLoveNotPorn

MATT JARVIS

Partner & Chief Strategy Officer, 72andSunny

KATHY LEAKE

Co-Founder & CEO, LocalResponse

CLARK SCHEFFY

Associate Partner, IDEO

MEDIA

ALAN COHEN

Co-Founder,

Giant Spoon

ANDREW ESSEX

Co-Founder & Vice Chairman, Droga5

ARI LEWINE

Co-Founder & Chief Strategy Officer, TripleLift

KEVIN SLAVIN

Assistant Professor of Media Arts & Sciences, MIT Media Lab

DONNA SPECIALE

President, Turner Entertainment & Young Adults Ad Sales

BEST PRACTICES

GAIL HEIMANN

President, Weber

Shandwick

SCOTT HESS

SVP, Human Intelligence, Spark SMG

MARLA E.

KAPLOWITZ

CEO, North America, MEC Global

LAURA NELSON

SVP, Global Watch Marketing & Communications, Nielsen

STUDENT

THE ISAAC+ AWARD IN PARTNERSHIP WITH KBS+

JONAH BLOOM

Chief Strategy Officer, kbs+; Co-Founder, kbs+ Content Labs

ED BROJERDI

President & Co-Chief Creative Officer, kbs+

JOSHUA ENGROFF

Chief Digital Media Officer, The Media Kitchen; Managing Partner, kbs+ Ventures

MATT POWELL

Chief Information

Officer, kbs+

ENTRIES

NOW

OPEN

ISAACAWARDS.COM