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Stats 2B03 Test #2 (Version 1

)
November 19th, 2013
Name:___________________________________________
(Last Name)
(First Name)
Student Number:_____________________
Day Class
Duration: 75 Minutes
Maximum Mark: 20

Instructor: Childs

This test paper consists of 19 multiple choice questions worth 1 mark each, and one question
worth 1 mark on proper computer card filling. Marks will NOT be deducted for wrong answers
(i.e., there is no penalty for guessing). QUESTIONS MUST BE ANSWERED ON THE
COMPUTER CARD with an HB PENCIL. Answer all questions. You are responsible for
ensuring that your copy of this paper is complete. Bring any discrepancy to the attention of your
invigilator. Only the McMaster standard Calculator Casio fx-991 is allowed.
1. Researchers wished to know if they could conclude that two populations of infants differ
with respect to mean age at which they walked alone. The following data (ages in months)
were collected and are summarized in Minitab output #1 below:
Sample from Population A:
Sample from Population B:

9.5, 10.5, 10.4, 9.75, 10.0, 13.0, 10.3,10.0
10.0, 13.5, 10.0, 11.1, 10.0, 9.75, 11.1,11.6
12.5, 9.5, 13.5, 13.75, 8.75, 13.75
12.5, 9.5, 12.0, 9.8, 12.0, 12.0,14.25

Test the hypothesis that the population variances are equal using α œ Þ"! (i.e., test the
hypothesis L! À 5"# œ 5## vs LE À 5"# Á 5## .
Minitab Output #1
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Descriptive Statistics: A, B
Variable
A
B

N
16
13

N*
0
0

Mean
10.656
11.831

SE Mean
0.290
0.516

StDev
1.161
1.859

Minimum
9.500
8.750

Q1
10.000
9.650

Median
10.150
12.000

Q3
11.100
13.625

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------(a) Do not reject L! since .39  2.48
(b) Do not reject L! since 1.6  2.48
(c) Do not reject L! since .39  2.62
(d) Reject L! since 2.56  2.48
(e) Do not Reject L! since 2.56  2.62

1

0 œ no high school degree.% vs LE À . $ œ divorced) has an effect on exercise level (0 = none.3 (e) 4. (a) .21 (d) 21.51 2 . 1 = light.3174 (b) .$ œ . 1 œ high school graduate.70 (b) 14.# œ . For the ed-level variable. What method could be used? (a) F-test for variances (b) Contingency table (Chi-Square test) (c) > test for comparing two means (d) one-sample D-test for a proportion (e) Analysis of variance 4.2.5 hours.4 for at least one pair Ð3ß 4Ñ (a) 8. with standard deviation 3 hours. A sample of 36 hospital patients were administered a certain anesthetic.2. 2 œ college graduate. 2 = moderate. Find the value of the J -statistic for testing the hypothesis L! À ." œ .1587 (e) . 3 = heavy). and the total sum of squares is WWX œ 1627.5 (c) 10. A researcher is interested in testing whether there is a difference in mean IQ level among people with varying levels of education (ed-level).8413 3. # œ never married. and these patients slept an average of 9. 0 101 96 103 1 2 3 105 118 115 106 115 129 111 108 131 99 126 For this data set the sum of squares for treatments is equal to WWX < œ "$#$.4325 (d) .1667 (c) . Suppose that we were interested in testing whether marital status (" œ married. Suppose that the following data is collected.3 Á . 3 œ graduate degree. Find the :-vaue for the hypothesis test that the average time slept following the administration of this anasthetic is different than 9 hours for the sampled population.

find the critical value for testing the hypothesis that the mean walking time for Population A is less than for Population B.11.100 13.650 Median 10.5.75.5. 9. The following data (ages in months) were collected and are summarized in the Minitab outputbelow: Sample from Population A: Sample from Population B: 9. 13. using α œ Þ!&Þ Minitab Output ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Descriptive Statistics: A.5. 11.0 10. 11.0. 10. 13.859 Minimum 9.4.25 Assuming that 5"# Á 5## .5.5.516 StDev 1. 10.1. 13.0. 10. 13.14.8. 9.000 9. 10.0.0.831 SE Mean 0.1.5.5.3.6 12.656 11.0. 12. 8. Researchers wished to know if they could conclude that two populations of infants differ with respect to mean age at which they walked alone.000 Q3 11. 12.625 ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Þ!)%#>"#ßÞ*&  Þ#'&)>"&ßÞ*& Þ!(#'>"&ßÞ*&  Þ"%$>"#ßÞ*& (a)  (b)  Þ!)%#  Þ#'&) Þ!(#'  Þ"%$ (c)  Þ!(#'>"&ßÞ*(&  Þ"%$>"#ßÞ*(& Þ!(#'  Þ"%$ (e)  Þ!)%#>"&ßÞ*(&  Þ#'&)>"#ßÞ*(& Þ!)%#  Þ#'&) (d)  Þ!)%#>"&ßÞ*&  Þ#'&)>"#ßÞ*& Þ!)%#  Þ#'&) 3 .0.150 12.0. 9.75.0. 9.5. B Variable A B N 16 13 N* 0 0 Mean 10. 12. 13.750 Q1 10. 9.10.75.161 1.75.500 8. 10.75 12.290 0. 10.5.

6. For the ed-level variable. 3 œ graduate degree. 2 œ college graduate. A researcher is interested in testing whether there is a difference in mean IQ level among people with varying levels of education (ed-level). 0 œ no high school degree. 0 101 98 103 1 2 3 105 118 115 106 115 129 111 108 131 99 126 Which of the following is a correct normal probability plot of the residuals? Normal Probability Plot of the Residuals Normal Probability Plot of the Residuals (a) (b) (response is C1) 99 95 95 90 90 80 80 70 70 Percent Percent (response is C1) 99 60 50 40 30 60 50 40 30 20 20 10 10 5 5 1 -20 -10 0 Residual 10 1 20 -10 Normal Probability Plot of the Residuals 90 80 80 70 70 Percent Percent 95 90 60 50 40 30 20 10 5 5 0 Residual 10 20 (response is C1) 99 95 90 80 Percent 30 10 Normal Probability Plot of the Residuals (e) 60 50 40 20 -10 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 5 1 -30 -20 -10 0 Residual 10 99 95 -20 5 (response is C1) (d) 99 1 0 Residual Normal Probability Plot of the Residuals (response is C1) (c) -5 10 20 30 4 1 -20 -10 0 Residual 10 20 . Suppose that the following data is collected. 1 œ high school graduate.

The following data is obtained Group 1 Sample Size: 10 Mean: 20 Standard Deviation: 2 Group 2 Sample Size: 8 Mean: 10 Standard Deviation: 3 Group 3 Sample Size: 9 Mean: 30 Standard Deviation: 4 If you were to use one-way ANOVA to analyse the above data.412 Total 9 8.1 0.158 8. what would be the value of the sum of squares error WWI ? (a) 71 (b) 41 (c) 8 (d) 137 (e) 227 5 . A.9°F.0°F to 100.760 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Use Tukey's HSD* test at the 5% significance level to test the hypothesis L! À .3 0. Suppose we wish to test the relative effects of three drugs.937 7.0 2." Á .# (where .0 0.5 1.3  1.021 Error 7 2.3  2.94 (e) Do not reject L! since 1.2 1." œ .873 2.887 0.4 Some Minitab output for this data is given below.6 1. and the reduction in fever after four hours is noted as follows: Drug A Drug B Drug C 2.442 (c) Reject L! since 3.7.3  2.# is the corresponding average for Drug B).3  1.3  1." is the average reduction in fever for the population taking Drug A. C. on the reduction of fever.442 (d) Reject L! since 3. A researcher wishes to test the levels of calcium deficiency for three groups of women by taking lumbar spine bone-density measurements for a sample of women from each of the three groups. and . B.1 1.2 0. (a) Do not reject L! since 1.12 0.# vs LE À .94 (b) Do not reject L! since 1. The drugs are prescribed to children aged 5-14 with a fever of 100. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Source DF SS MS F P C2 2 5.

991 (e) No.8617  $Þ)%" 6 .00 Q3 216. because . T ÐredÑ œ "% . pink. G. so T ÐwhiteÑ œ "% . because 1. $ œ divorced) has an effect on weight (measured in pounds).384  3. What method could be used? (a) > test for comparing two means (b) Analysis of variance (c) D-test for proportions (d) F-test for variances (e) Contingency table (Chi-Square test) 10. T ÐpinkÑ œ "# . because 1. using α œ Þ!".77 Minimum 174. these four are equally likely. Under Mendel's theory. and red flowers respectively.384  5.991 (b) No. one of Mendel's followers.00 Q1 197. The serum cholesterol levels of a group of 9 people aged 20-39 who eat a primarily macrobiotic diet were measured (in mg/dL) and summarized in the Minitab output below: --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Descriptive Statistics: cholesterol Variable N cholesterol 9 Variable cholesterol N* 0 Mean SE Mean 205. An experiment carried out by Correns. Johannsen. (a) No.00 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------The mean cholesterol level in the general population in this age group is 230. Crossing these hybrids can lead to any one of four possible gene pairs.00 Maximum 223.9. Cross fertilizing a pure strain of red flowers with a pure strain of white flowers produces pink hybrids that have one gene of each type.28  7.841 (c) No.00 Median 207.92 StDev 14.) Do these observations appear to contradict the probabilities suggested by Mendel's theory? Use the 5% significance level.22 4. # œ never married. Elements of the Precise Theory of Heredity. (a) Reject L! since &Þ!$$  $Þ$&&% (b) Reject L! since &Þ!$$  #Þ)*' (c) Do not reject L! since &Þ!$$  $Þ$&&% (d) Reject L! since "*Þ$%  #Þ)*' (e) Reject L! since "*Þ$%  $Þ$&&% 11. Fischer. Suppose that we were interested in testing whether marital status (" œ married. because 3.8617  5. 291. and 132 for white. (Source: W. 1909. because . Jena.378 (d) No. Test the hypothesis that the average cholesterol level for people in this age group who eat a primarily macrobiotic diet is different than for the general population. resulted in the frequencies 141.

(d) All other factors affecting the IQ variable must be kept constant. (c) The populations must follow a normal distribution. A researcher is interested in testing whether there is a difference in mean IQ level among people with varying levels of education (ed-level). For the ed-level variable. 2 = moderate.% is the average for the population corresponding to 3 = heavy).# is the average for the population corresponding to 1 = light. 1 = light. (a) (i) Reject L! (ii) Reject L! (iii) Do not reject L! (b) (i) Do not reject L! (ii) Reject L! (iii) Reject L! (c) (i) Reject L! (ii) Reject L! (iii) Reject L! (d) (i) Do not reject L! (ii) Do not reject L! (iii) Do not reject L! (e) (i) Do not reject L! (ii) Do not reject L! (iii) Reject L! 7 .12.# (ii) L! À . 3 œ graduate degree. (i) L! À . 0 œ no high school degree. 2 œ college graduate. 13. (b) The population variances must be known." œ .$ (iii) L! À . A researcher wishes to test whether excercise level (0 = none. So the researcher collects some data and produces Minitab Output #1 which is given with the green sheets of tables and formulas. and . . . Suppose that the following data is collected." is the average for the population corresponding to 0 = none. 3 = heavy) has an effect on systolic blood pressure." œ . 0 101 98 103 1 2 3 105 118 115 106 115 129 111 108 131 99 126 Which of the following is NOT an assumption required for the analysis? (a) The population variances must all be equal. 1 œ high school graduate. (e) The samples are independent." œ .$ is the average for the population corresponding to 2 = moderate.% (where . Test the following hypotheses using Tukey's method with α œ Þ!&.

218 (b) .2 (c) 32.123639 ? ? ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------(a) .034 (c) .220000 0. Consider the data in the following contingency table.1 (d) 173.891 (e) .3 95% Lower Sample X N Sample p Bound Z-Value P-Value 1 11 50 0.7 8 .3 vs p < 0. The data obtained is shown in the table below.1 8 53 Asia 58.3 42 Find the :-value (a) .0002 (d) .0548 (e) . A sociologist wants to determine if the life expectancy of people in Africa is different than the life expectancy of people in Asia.2) of the expected table? (a) 25.109 15.14.3 = 8. Parental Handedness (father ‚ mother) Right ‚ Right Right ‚ Left Left ‚ Right Biological Offspring Right-Handed Left-Handed $!$ #* "' $( * ' If you were to do a chi-square analysis on the above data.026 (b) .068 (d) .6 (b) 44. Africa B 55. Consider the data set that is summarized in the Minitab output below.2 9.013 16.2 (e) 39. Find the missing :value.1096 (c) <. what would be the value in cell (1. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Test and CI for One Proportion Test of p = 0.

11 5 6.268.271. what would be the degrees of freedom for the chi-square test statistic? (a) 2 (b) 3 (c) 4 (d) 5 (e) 6 18.260 --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------(a) L! : smoking status and education level are independent. what is the null hypothesis that is being tested in the output.00 Cell Contents: Count Expected count Pearson Chi-Square = 1. P-Value = 0.89 8 6. A researcher wants to test whether there is a relationship between education level and smoking status.00 13 13. do not reject L! (e) L! : smoking status and education level are independent. do not reject L! (d) L! : the population variances are equal. So the researcher collects some data and produces the following Minitab output.17. reject L! (c) L! : smoking status and education level are dependent. and what is the conclusion? --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Tabulated statistics: smokingstatus2. edlevel2 Rows: smokingstatus2 Columns: edlevel2 H N All D 39 40.11 47 47.00 S 48 46.260 Likelihood Ratio Chi-Square = 1.00 All 87 87. do not reject L! 9 .89 53 53. Using α œ Þ!&. P-Value = 0. reject L! (b) L! : smoking status and education level are dependent.00 100 100. DF = 1. DF = 1. Consider the data in the following contingency table Parental Handedness (father ‚ mother) Right ‚ Right Right ‚ Left Left ‚ Right Biological Offspring Right-Handed Left-Handed $!$ #* "' $( * ' If you were to do a chi-square analysis on the above data.

Correctly fill out the bubbles corresponding to your student number and the version number of your test in the correct places on the computer card. The researcher takes a sample 200 women who are taking erythromycin and does not reject the null hypothesis. Suppose that the rate of nausea for all pregnant women in the population taking erythromycin is actually 40%. Hint: 10 . Which of the following is true? (a) The null hypothesis is L! À :   Þ$! (b) The probability of Type II error is Þ!& (c) A Type I error has occurred (d) The population must follow a normal distribution (e) A Type II error has occurred 20.19. A researcher wishes to test the hypothesis that the rate of nausea for pregnant women taking the drug Erythromycin is less than 30%.

22 +---------+---------+---------+--------(-----*-----) (--------*-------) (--------*--------) +---------+---------+---------+---------24 -12 0 12 EXERCISE = 1 subtracted from: EXERCISE 2 3 Lower -14.18 Center -4.19 -7.14 Upper 9.11 Level 0 1 2 3 N 38 38 13 11 DF 3 96 99 SS 2001 14084 16085 MS 667 147 R-Sq = 12.17 -3.92 Center -5.25 -2.01 -20.71% Individual 95% CIs For Mean Based on Pooled StDev ------+---------+---------+---------+--(----*-----) (-----*----) (---------*--------) (---------*----------) ------+---------+---------+---------+--119.74 -9.09 F 4.53 0.0 133.37 -18.97% EXERCISE = 0 subtracted from: EXERCISE 1 2 3 Lower -13.71 11.0 140.005 R-Sq(adj) = 9.44% Mean ? ? ? ? StDev 13.11 -23.93 -13.89 +---------+---------+---------+--------(---------*----------) +---------+---------+---------+---------24 -12 0 12 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 11 .Minitab Output #1 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Source EXERCISE Error Total S = 12.0 126.07 Upper 1.55 P 0.11 Tukey 95% Simultaneous Confidence Intervals All Pairwise Comparisons among Levels of EXERCISE Individual confidence level = 98.33 Upper 5.12 9.99 3.04 12.52 +---------+---------+---------+--------(--------*-------) (--------*--------) +---------+---------+---------+---------24 -12 0 12 EXERCISE = 2 subtracted from: EXERCISE 3 Lower Center -16.0 Pooled StDev = 12.

1788 2.51 3.60 15 .08 4.8946 2.1604 2.40 2.28 3.90 2.07 13 3.7074 7 1.69 2.43 5.34 3.04 3.53 4.36 13.95 3.02 4.650 3.37 3.43 3.20 3.89 4.59 2.77 5.15 3.54 9. >Þ*& >Þ*(& >Þ** >Þ**& 6 1.54 2.84 15 3.18 10 49.65 12 2.39 15 2.60 2.26 3.46 6.896 3.53 2.70 2.68 4. 1 2 3 ã 7 8 9 10 2 17.03 8.29 3.46 14 2.39 3.61 5.9432 2.0545 13 1.97 6.33 5.60 2.33 More Percentiles of the J Distribution Denominator JÞ*75 Degrees of Numerator Degrees of Freedom Freedom 8 9 10 12 15 20 11 3.3554 ã 12 1.59 5.80 6.67 2.30 6.77 2.0123 Percentiles of the Chi-Square Distribution # d.50 3 26.48 8 45.998 3.85 2.06 4.65 5.04 7 43.50 6 40.05 2.65 2.17 5.3060 2.143 3.15 3.41 4.#Þ*(& .76 Percentage Points of the Studentized Range for 2 Through 10 Treatments Upper 5% Points Error d.46 2.41 11.80 2.98 8.44 3.62 2.18 3.4469 3.40 13.53 2.15 4.Þ** " #Þ(!' $Þ)%" &Þ!#% 'Þ'$& # %Þ'!& &Þ**" (Þ$() *Þ#"! $ 'Þ#&" (Þ)"& *Þ$%) ""Þ$%& Percentiles of the J Distribution Denominator JÞ*5 Degrees of Numerator Degrees of Freedom Freedom 8 9 10 12 15 20 11 2.681 3.12 12.82 5 37.07 13.72 2.92 5.f.3646 2.82 5. .66 3.33 3.76 4.95 2.74 5.85 2.95 2.88 4.7709 2.7823 2.64 2.25 3.60 5.82 9.96 2.24 5.#Þ*& .75 2.8595 2.86 2.48 2.12 3.08 10.Some Partial Tables Percentiles of the > Distribution df.85 9 47.05 2.33 5.46 3.44 8.f.12 5.59 3.88 7.74 8.53 3.20 3.99 9.23 12 3.06 2.31 3.91 4 32.79 2.71 2.#Þ*! .91 5.40 5.21 3.16 4.36 5.16 5.00 5.54 13 2.95 14 3.4995 8 1.

e 14. b 10. d 2. b 4. b 5.Answers (Version 1): 1. a 3. d 6. b 8. e 19. a 18. b 17. b 13. a 16 . d 12. b 7. a 11. b 16. e 15. e 9.